Huntington Connects

ADHD Blog

Join ADHD Blog Author Dr. Mary Rooney and Huntington Learning Center in discussing important information and tips for parents of children with ADHD.
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ADHD and Sugar Cravings

Research shows that low levels of dopamine, the chemical in the brain thought to be at least partially responsible for ADHD symptoms, is also related to cravings for sugar and other carbohydrates. Since kids with ADHD have chronically low levels of dopamine, they are more likely than other kids to crave and eat sugary or carbohydrate-heavy foods.

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The Importance of Follow-up Care for Kids Taking Medication for ADHD

As a parent, what type of follow-up care should you expect for your child after they start an ADHD medication? 

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Why You Shouldn’t “Wait and See” When it Comes to Kids with ADHD

When parents have concerns about their child’s behavior or academic performance, they are often told by friends, family, teachers, and doctors that they should “wait and see” if things improve before seeking professional help. When there are persistent behavior challenges at home or at school, like difficulty following basic rules, difficulty getting along with classmates or teachers, oppositional behavior, or difficulties with focus or completing schoolwork, then a wait-and-see approach is not helpful and could even be harmful to kids who may have ADHD

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Teaching Parents Strategies to Help Their Anxious Child

As a parent, it’s very hard to know how much to accommodate and comfort your child and how much to pull back and allow your child to experience their anxiety symptoms. This is where parent coaching comes in.

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What Is the Connection Between ADHD Medications and Sleep Problems?

Studies have shown that kids with ADHD have higher rates of sleep disorders, like sleep-disordered breathing or restless leg syndrome, and experience more daytime sleepiness than kids without ADHD.

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Does Your Child Have Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Kids with ADHD are often labeled as having “behavior challenges,” which usually means that their behavior is more difficult for teachers, parents, and peers to cope with than it is for kids without ADHD. They may also have Oppositional Defiant Disorder (or ODD). In fact, up to 40% of kids with ADHD also meet diagnostic criteria for ODD.

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