High School Equivalency Tests

Open Doors to Your Future Through Test Prep

TEST PREP HELP FOR THE High School Equivalency Tests

Huntington can help students who wish to receive a high school diploma prepare for a high school equivalency test in order to obtain high school credentials. These credentials can then be used for college admission.

We offer test prep tutoring to improve scores on the following High School Equivalency Tests

How Huntington Helps Prep Students for the GED and TASC

If you will soon be taking one of these tests, our individualized test prep program is the perfect way to prepare. Students are given an initial assessment to determine baseline scores and identify specific areas of strengths and weaknesses. Using this information, an individualized prep plan is established. Students receive instruction in a 1-1 student-teacher ratio and are reassessed throughout their program to monitor progress and further tailor instruction.

General Education Development Test (GED)

The General Educational Development Test (GED) is a computer-based exam consisting of four tests that correspond to the general framework of most high school curricula: Social Studies, Science, Language Arts, and Mathematics. Each test is developed by adult and secondary educators and subject matter specialists. The GED is used as a basis for issuing high school credentials, meaning it is widely accepted as an equivalent to a high school diploma. Over 98% of colleges and 96% of employers accept the GED as an equivalent to a high school diploma. The GED test is available in the United States, Canada, and U.S. and Canadian territories.

The GED is intended primarily for people who, for any number of reasons, have missed their opportunity to complete high school. The GED can be administered to those who:

  • Have not graduated from an accredited high school or received a high school equivalency certificate or diploma;
  • Are not currently enrolled in a regular high school;
  • Are at least 16 years of age and out of school (some states require special permission for testers under 18 years of age);
  • Reside in the state in which they wish to take the test. All GED candidates need to show proof of residency at the time of test registration.

All GED candidates must provide valid photo identification at the time of registration and again before being admitted to the testing room. Candidates who are not citizens of the United States must meet all of the above requirements, including age requirements and regulations regarding withdrawal from school.

Common questions About the GED

The GED test questions require the understanding of broad concepts and generalizations, rather than the ability to recall facts, details, or precise definitions. The GED uses practical and realistic settings in test questions, which adults will recognize and are relevant to adults' lives.

Individuals typically take the four test sections over two or three consecutive days or over two consecutive weekends. The total GED testing time is approximately 7 hours and 25 minutes.

Students must create an account and register online at www.GED.com or call 1-877-EXAM-GED.

Because the GED is taken on the computer, it is scored electronically.

  • Each content area test on the GED is reported on a scale of 100 to 200, with the passing score for each set at 150.
  • Students are required to achieve a passing score of at least 150 on each of the tests in the four content areas in order to receive high school equivalency.
  • Because the tests are scored electronically, complete score reports are available within 3 hours of completing each test.
  • Students who score 170 or higher in a subject area qualify for the GED Score with Honors, which is deemed reflective of college and career readiness.
  • If a student fails any one of the four content area tests, he or she may retake that test up to three times within a calendar year. If a passing score is still not achieved by the third attempt, the student must wait 60 days before attempting to take the test again.
  • GED Testing Services does not place restrictions on the timeframe for students to complete all four content area tests. However, some states or districts do have specific requirements. Check with the appropriate state for specifics on GED administration and requirements in your area. Information and websites can easily be found by conducting an Internet search for “GED and [state name].”

Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC)

The Test Assessing Secondary Completion, or TASC, is a test created by CTB/McGraw-Hill that measures adult skill levels in five areas of high school academics including Mathematics, Reading/Language Arts, Writing, Social Studies, and Science. The TASC is an alternative to the GED and is widely accepted as an equivalent to a high school diploma. The TASC is available in the United States, Canada, and U.S. and Canadian territories and may be taken on the computer or in paper-and-pencil format.

Who takes the TASC?

The TASC is intended primarily for people who have missed their opportunity to complete high school. The TASC can be administered to those who:

  • Have not graduated from an accredited high school or received a high school equivalency certificate or diploma;
  • Are not currently enrolled in a regular high school;
  • Are at least 16 years of age and out of school (some states require special permissions for testers under 18 years of age);
  • Reside in the state in which they wish to take the test. All TASC candidates need to show proof of residency at the time of test registration.

All TASC candidates must provide valid photo identification at the time of registration and again before being admitted to the testing room. Candidates who are not citizens of the United States must meet all of the above requirements, including age requirements and regulations regarding withdrawal from school.

Common Questions About the TASC

TASC test questions require the understanding of broad concepts and generalizations rather than the ability to recall facts, details, or precise definitions. The TASC uses practical and realistic settings in test questions, which adults will recognize and are relevant to adults' lives.

The total TASC testing time is approximately 7 hours and 25 minutes. Individuals typically take the four test sections over two or three consecutive days.

TASC is currently an approved high school equivalency option in the following states:

  • California
  • Indiana
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • West Virginia

Test takers should check with their state’s Department of Education regarding test center locations and registration options, including CTB’s online registration system.

  • The overall passing score for the TASC is 2500. Each of the five content area tests requires a passing score of 500.
  • The passing score for the writing prompt is a minimum of 2 out of 8 points.
  • If a student fails any of the five content area tests, he or she may retake that test up to two more times at no cost. If a passing score is still not achieved by the third attempt, the student may retake the test for an additional fee.

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