Huntington Connects Connecting you to the latest news, tips and academic resources Fri, 28 Jul 2017 10:54:39 -0400 Zend_Feed_Writer 1.12.17dev (http://framework.zend.com) https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog rss@huntingtonhelps.com (Huntington Learning Center) Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Offers Advice for Effective SAT/ACT Prep It’s that time of year when many college-bound students are taking or re-taking the SAT and ACT. Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that the best way for students to prepare for college entrance exams is through plenty of practice. “It is true that keeping up with school work inherently helps students acquire the knowledge that they need to perform on college entrance exams, but there is no substitute for regular, thorough studying of the types of questions they will see on these tests,” says Huntington.

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Tue, 11 Jul 2017 10:32:02 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/advice-for-effective-sat-act-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/advice-for-effective-sat-act-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s that time of year when many college-bound students are taking or re-taking the SAT and ACT. Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that the best way for students to prepare for college entrance exams is through plenty of practice. “It is true that keeping up with school work inherently helps students acquire the knowledge that they need to perform on college entrance exams, but there is no substitute for regular, thorough studying of the types of questions they will see on these tests,” says Huntington.

She suggests that parents think about the following as they and their teens develop a summer study schedule that will yield positive results:

Learn the ins and outs of each exam. Teens should get to know the format and details of the exam they decide to take. It’s essential to understand what is expected on the test, the time limit for each section, the number of questions, and other basic information. This can help steer teens toward one exam over the other. Some of the major distinctions that could also impact a test-taker’s decision between the exams:

  • The ACT has a Science Test that tests critical thinking skills (while the SAT does not).
  • The SAT has one more reading passage than the ACT.
  • The SAT has some math questions that must be answered without the use of a calculator (the ACT allows the use of a calculator for all math questions).

Take a diagnostic evaluation. A teen’s very first step to devising an effective SAT/ACT prep plan should be taking an initial test to determine his or her strengths and weaknesses. Study sessions will be far more effective when teens know exactly what to study and where they need to improve. A full-length diagnostic test gives a baseline so that teens can identify areas to focus on (and measure their progress).

Create a schedule. Teens will be more effective in their study approach if they create a schedule with milestones. The schedule should dedicate the appropriate amount of time to each subject and specific section of the exam, targeting weaker areas and considering teens’ strengths. Certainly, a teen’s specific test score goals (possibly driven by his or her target college or university) and the gap between the diagnostic test score and “goal” test score will impact the amount of study time needed.

Cover all the elements. Yes, the SAT and ACT require subject-matter knowledge—this should be the foremost area of focus in a teen’s study plan. However, the best study plan should cover several other areas as well:

  • Practice exams – Teens should take at least two full-length, timed practice tests that simulate the actual test environment.
  • Speed work – There are a lot of questions on the SAT and ACT to answer in a short timeframe. It’s important to work on improving one’s speed without sacrificing accuracy.
  • Stress management – There’s no getting around the fact that the SAT and ACT can cause teens anxiety because of the impact that the exams can have on their future. It’s important that teens learn how to manage any stress and are able to employ relaxation techniques as needed.

Plan ahead for a retake. Many teens take the SAT or ACT a few times to attain their best score. Summer before junior year is a good time to prepare for the SAT or ACT.  In doing so, keep in mind that many colleges have application deadlines as early as January 1.   The SAT is offered seven times per year and includes a summer test in August, and ACT is offered six times per year, with the first test of the school year occurring in September. It’s wise to put the best foot forward by adhering to a study plan and schedule because planning ahead for specific test dates is key.

Huntington invites parents and teens who are unsure where to begin to call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. “We understand that few parents and teens know the best way to study for the SAT or ACT, or how close together those study sessions should be—and those sorts of details,” Huntington says. “We’re adept at assessing students’ abilities, developing targeted programs to help them achieve their goals, and helping students do well on these tests.”

Learn more about Huntington’s premier, 32-hour and 14-hour SAT and ACT prep programs and the Huntington test prep approach at www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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7 Note-Taking Strategies for High School Students A lot changes when students transition into high school and one skill that becomes more important than ever is that of note-taking. “In high school, students are expected to become proficient note-takers, and those notes will become essential study tools that they use to review material for quizzes and tests,” says Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Note-taking should augment student learning and help students recall difficult concepts more easily and remember what teachers teach. Our goal when working with students is to share some of the basics that will help them retain what they learn and study smarter.”

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Tue, 11 Jul 2017 10:05:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/note-taking-strategies-for-high-school-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/note-taking-strategies-for-high-school-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center A lot changes when students transition into high school and one skill that becomes more important than ever is that of note-taking. “In high school, students are expected to become proficient note-takers, and those notes will become essential study tools that they use to review material for quizzes and tests,” says Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Note-taking should augment student learning and help students recall difficult concepts more easily and remember what teachers teach. Our goal when working with students is to share some of the basics that will help them retain what they learn and study smarter.”

Huntington shares these seven strategies for effective note-taking with parents and their teens:

  1. Record meaningful facts. The goal of note-taking should be to summarize the most important parts of what a teacher shares during a lecture: dates, names, places, formulas or anything else that is emphasized. It’s good to write lots of notes, but teens should focus on recording points that seem important, recurring themes or other details that are critical to their overall understanding.
  2. Group ideas. Lots of “raw” notes may not make studying any easier for a student. It’s a good idea to leave space on the left- or right-hand side of the notebook for condensing and recapping concepts. During class or afterward, teens can write down any main ideas on the side of their notes, or at a minimum, subtitles of what was discussed.
  3. Think quality over quantity. New high school students tend to think good note-taking means recording everything the teacher says. It’s a common challenge for students: focusing so intently on taking notes that they forget to listen and process information enough to be thoughtful about what they record in their notebooks. Big picture: notes should concentrate on what the teacher wants the class to know. That may very well mean teens’ pencils aren’t moving the entire class period, and that’s perfectly fine.
  4. Follow along in the book if appropriate. When the teacher focuses on a particular chapter or topic, it can be helpful later on to have page numbers to refer to for clarification or more information. Teens should ask at the beginning of the period if the teacher is referencing textbook material.
  5. Date and title notes. It’s a minor thing that can make a huge difference: labeling notes will prove helpful when it comes time to study for a test. Teens should always put the date, class name and topic(s) discussed at the top of their notes.
  6. Highlight the clues. Teachers usually point out information that students need to know and it is a smart idea to call out these cues in notes. Teens should listen for phrases like the most important part, for example, in summary, as a review and the only exception to this is. These should trigger careful note-taking and teens should notate these important points with an asterisk or other symbol.
  7. Say it another way. One of the most important parts of note-taking is not the note-taking itself—it’s the reflection process. Teens should write down complex points in their own words so they are easier to understand later. This helps information “click” and reinforces long-term retention.

Huntington reminds parents that taking notes is not a natural skill—it must be taught and practiced. “Organized students tend to take cleaner notes, of course, but note-taking is meant to solidify knowledge and make studying easier and more effective, and that doesn’t come easily to many students,” she says. Huntington helps students develop their study skills, including their note-taking abilities. For more information, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Things Your Graduating Senior Needs To Know About College High school is drawing to a close and your teen is probably feeling excited, nervous and everything in between. College is on the horizon—everything he or she has worked toward. It is indeed a special time of life, but there is so much coming that your teen may not even realize. Yes, your teen likely knows that college is harder and different than high school. Certainly, he or she knows the impact that college can have on his or her future. But what are some of the things your teen might not realize are coming? 

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 17:18:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-things-your-graduating-senior-needs-to-know-about-college https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-things-your-graduating-senior-needs-to-know-about-college Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington High school is drawing to a close and your teen is probably feeling excited, nervous and everything in between. College is on the horizon—everything he or she has worked toward. It is indeed a special time of life, but there is so much coming that your teen may not even realize. Yes, your teen likely knows that college is harder and different than high school. Certainly, he or she knows the impact that college can have on his or her future. But what are some of the things your teen might not realize are coming? Here are five things for your teen to expect next year when beginning the college journey:

  1. It’s all on them! One of the key differences between high school and college is the expectation that students—nobody else—are responsible for themselves. Professors expect students to listen in class, speak up with questions if they don’t understand something, and keep up with reading and homework. Students are given a lot of freedom, which means they are responsible for keeping on top of it all and reaching out for help if they need it. The consequences include academic probation for grades that fall below a certain GPA and forced withdrawal if students don’t raise those grades quickly enough.
  2. Class sizes vary. Until they are on campus and in a classroom, most students might not fully grasp that the number of students in a college classroom can vary widely. A lot depends on whether a student goes to a large university or smaller college, but even at smaller schools, introductory, general education classes might have upwards of 100 students (and the number could approach 300-400 at a big university). Especially as freshmen, it’s important that students go to class ready to learn and take thorough notes. It’s also a good idea to visit professors during office hours if they need extra help.
  3. Critical thinking skills are essential. The whole goal of college is to help students prepare for successful careers—and nurturing the development of critical thinking skills is a big part of that. Professors in college want students to analyze information as they learn it, make their own inferences, and make connections about what they learn. They also want students to be self-aware about what they understand well and what they are still learning or struggling with.
  4. Now is the time for time management. College offers so many opportunities to socialize, get involved on campus and explore new interests. It’s easy for students to become overwhelmed by the volume of homework and studying in addition to everything else. Time management is critical for college success. Students should plan out their weeks to ensure they have time to meet all of their academic commitments, using some sort of system, whether that’s a planner, smartphone calendar, homework app or some combination of these tools. Good time managers also embrace a solid organizational system (to minimize wasted time and procrastination) and incorporate sufficient sleep and down time into their schedules.
  5. The major matters sooner than later. Teens who go into college without a major declared do have a little time to decide, but many fields of study start steering students toward a certain curriculum as early as sophomore year. Although students shouldn’t feel pressured to “just pick something,” they should take the initiative to discover career interests that would fit their skills and personality. The college career center is a useful resource that every student should visit early and often. They’ll help undecided students explore different fields and majors and get them on the right path sooner than later.

Dr. Raymond Huntington encourages parents to keep the lines of communication open with their college-bound teens in the months leading up to college. “The transition from high school to college is a big one and it’s understandable that teens want to kick back and relax over summer before they leave home and begin their new adventure,” he says. “We always tell parents that this summer is a good opportunity to have those important conversations with their teens about the exciting and vastly different experience that is upon them. Teens who understand that change is coming but eagerly embrace a positive, motivated attitude will experience great success.”

To learn more about how to prepare teens for college-level academics, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates 40th Anniversary with Mayoral Proclamation, Oradell NJ  Oradell, NJ; June 19, 2017 – Huntington Learning Center was honored by Oradell, NJ, Mayor Dianne Didio during an official proclamation at the company’s corporate headquarters on Friday, June 16, 2017. Mayor Didio congratulated Huntington on its 40th anniversary and recognized Huntington’s commitment to children’s educational success through its four-step approach, which includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individualized tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The

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Wed, 21 Jun 2017 12:53:45 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-celebrates-40th-anniversary-with-mayoral-proclamation-oradell-nj https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-celebrates-40th-anniversary-with-mayoral-proclamation-oradell-nj Anne Huntington Anne Huntington Oradell, NJ; June 19, 2017 – Huntington Learning Center was honored by Oradell, NJ, Mayor Dianne Didio during an official proclamation at the company’s corporate headquarters on Friday, June 16, 2017. Mayor Didio congratulated Huntington on its 40th anniversary and recognized Huntington’s commitment to children’s educational success through its four-step approach, which includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individualized tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The mayoral staff was joined by Huntington’s co-founders, Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington, Anne Huntington who is the second generation Huntington continuing the company as a family business, along with franchisees, corporate employees and members of the local media.

"Huntington Learning Center is an Oradell-born company that employs more than 100 people here in the Oradell area and nearly 1500 more across the country," says Mayor Didio. "Huntington has a positive economic and social impact on our citizens through its work to help children succeed in school. I congratulate Huntington for 40 incredible years in business and wish the company the very best in the future."

In the 1970s, Eileen Huntington worked as a junior and senior high school teacher and Raymond Huntington, who earned a doctorate in statistics in 1974 from Rutgers University, was a business analyst for AT&T. Eileen recognized a problem in the schools where she worked with too many of her students lacking basic reading and study skills, which caused them problems in all academic areas. The Huntingtons saw a need and created their first learning center in rented office space in the building adjacent to where the Huntington Learning Center’s main offices are today, a building owned by Huntington Learning Centers and called, The Huntington Professional Building.

Since then, the company has helped millions of students from kindergarten to 12th grade, and at all academic levels, learn the skills, confidence and motivation to succeed in and out of the classroom. Huntington now operates nearly 300 centers in 40 states from coast to coast. The company began franchising in 1985. Both the Huntingtons and their daughter, Anne, are actively involved in the business operations.

"We founded this company because of our desire to help children and nothing gives me more joy than the fact that 40 years later, we are continuing to fulfill that promise to the families we serve," says Dr. Ray Huntington, who serves as the company’s Chairman of the Board. "We are honored to celebrate this significant milestone in our company’s history with Mayor Didio and the city of Oradell," says Mrs. Eileen Huntington, who serves as the company’s Chief Executive Officer. "We look forward to building on the foundation of these 40 years to pave way for the next 40 years and beyond helping students achieve results and helping our franchisees achieve success by carrying out our mission to give every student the best education," says Ms. Anne Huntington, who serves as the company’s Vice President.

Learn more about Huntington and its planned 40th-anniversary celebrations throughout 2017 at www.HuntingtonHelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the nation’s tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in phonics, reading, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.HuntingtonHelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.HuntingtonFranchise.com.

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Summertime: An Ideal Time for Test Prep If your teen is preparing to take the SAT or ACT this fall, there is no better time for him or her to register for a customized test prep program. Summer break is the perfect opportunity for students to focus on studying for the SAT or ACT because their schedules are far less crowded with school and extracurricular activities. Your teen can work from a targeted schedule to put himself or herself in the best position for the August or September exam.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:08:42 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-an-ideal-time-for-test-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-an-ideal-time-for-test-prep Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Summertime: An Ideal Time for Test Prep

If your teen is preparing to take the SAT or ACT this fall, there is no better time for him or her to register for a customized test prep program. Summer break is the perfect opportunity for students to focus on studying for the SAT or ACT because their schedules are far less crowded with school and extracurricular activities. Your teen can work from a targeted schedule to put himself or herself in the best position for the August or September exam.

To get the most out of his or her efforts, here are a few tips for your teen as he or she engages in summertime test prep:

Register. The registration deadlines for upcoming tests in 2017 are as follows:

Exam              Test date                                 Registration deadline

  • SAT                 August 26                               July 28
  • ACT                September 9                            August 4
  • SAT                 October 7                                September 8
  • ACT                October 28                              September 22
  • SAT                 November 4                            October 5

Encourage your teen to register now so that he or she has a committed date on the books—and a goal to work toward. That date will be the starting point when developing a study schedule.

Know the test. For the most effective prep, your teen must be familiar with the test he or she plans to take (and the differences between the ACT and the SAT). It is worthwhile to investigate the preferred test at his or her colleges of choice. Most important, your teen should understand the structure and sections of the test he or she is taking in order to study efficiently and effectively.

Make a plan and stick to it. Your teen will be far more successful if he or she has a schedule and a detailed plan to follow at each study session. Every session’s work plan should be divided into test sections and should take into account the student’s strengths and weaknesses so he or she does not waste valuable time on areas where he or she is stronger and gloss over areas where he or she is weak. The best way to assess those strengths and weaknesses is by taking an initial practice test.

Don’t underestimate the practice test. No study plan is complete if it does not incorporate practice tests. Your student will get a much better feel for the SAT or ACT’s structure and different question types (and how to answer them) when he or she takes an actual, full-length, timed practice test.  

Work on speed. Both the SAT and ACT are timed tests with no “fluff” time. Subject-matter knowledge is critical, but your teen must also be able to manage his or her time effectively to earn the best score. That means he or she will need to become comfortable reading and understanding the questions, narrowing down the choices and recognizing wrong answers—all very quickly.

Understandably, it can be overwhelming for teens to know where to begin with SAT or ACT test prep. If your teen needs help, call Huntington. We help thousands of students every summer prepare for the SAT and ACT, and we know both tests very well. Our highly trained teachers will work with your teen to understand his or her strengths and weaknesses and develop an individualized prep program to master the skills needed to raise his or her scores.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Effective Summer Learning Strategies Your child has worked hard all school year—the last thing you want is for him or her to lose ground over summer. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center advises parents to keep their children learning over summer break to minimize regression and the loss of essential skills for next school year. “Children deserve a break over summer, but there are many simple things parents can do to minimize learning loss and keep their children’s minds sharp while school is out,” says Huntington. She offers several summer learning strategies:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:31:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-summer-learning-strategies https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-summer-learning-strategies Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Your child has worked hard all school year—the last thing you want is for him or her to lose ground over summer. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center advises parents to keep their children learning over summer break to minimize regression and the loss of essential skills for next school year. “Children deserve a break over summer, but there are many simple things parents can do to minimize learning loss and keep their children’s minds sharp while school is out,” says Huntington. She offers several summer learning strategies:

Blend enrichment with recreation. Few children want to sit at a desk all summer with the books open. Summer should be about relaxation and exploration, so try to find ways to combine learning and fun. Field trips and outings to library events and activities are two easy options, but get creative. Pick educational themes for each week of summer and read articles, plan activities and play games within that theme. Take a road trip somewhere historic and do some advance reading and research as a family.

Do a little each day. Even as little as 15-20 minutes of daily academic practice can help children retain what they know in between school years. Check out workbooks that are designed to bridge learning between grades.  Ask your child’s teacher for recommendations for math and reading. Or enroll your child in a flexible, individualized tutoring program at Huntington.

Work on projects. Project-based learning is an excellent way to apply knowledge and skills and keep the mind active over summer. There are many advantages of this student-centered method of learning: students learn to solve problems, explore topics thoroughly and find answers to questions through research. At home, you could pick a theme or topic and have your child come up with a list of things to investigate about that topic. Throughout the summer, encourage him or her to share what he or she learns. Let your child drive the work, but facilitate along the way.

Read for fun. Summer is the perfect time for children to explore books they don’t have the time to enjoy during the school year. Give your child the freedom to read whatever he or she likes this summer, and remember that magazines, blogs, comic books and child-appropriate websites are all fair game. Study after study shows that a daily summer reading habit prevents children from taking a step backward. As long as your child is reading, do not be too picky about the format or subject.

Huntington says that summer is a great time for children to continue learning in a more relaxed, self-directed way. “It’s important for children to recharge their batteries over summer break, but parents should nudge them off the couch and encourage them to explore their imaginations and engage in projects and learning opportunities with peers and siblings. A little structured work each day can make a tremendous difference in preventing brain drain too, and will make the start of next school that much easier.”

Huntington offers summer tutoring programs for all types of students—whether a child has fallen behind in one or more subjects or simply wants to stay up on his or her skills during the school break. Call the City Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com to learn more.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

 

 

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Six Questions to Ask Teens Choosing a College Major The college decision is one of the most exciting and overwhelming that a teen will ever make.  Add to that the selection of a college major and it is no wonder many teens struggle to decide. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center tells parents of high school students that sometime during sophomore year is a good time for teens to start thinking about possible majors. “If a teen’s college search process during the last two or three years of high school is largely focused on where to go but not what to study, he or she is overlooking a big aspect of the college experience,” says Huntington. She suggests that as parents and teens talk about college possibilities, they also talk about field of study possibilities.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:05:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-questions-to-ask-teens-choosing-a-college-major https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-questions-to-ask-teens-choosing-a-college-major Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The college decision is one of the most exciting and overwhelming that a teen will ever make.  Add to that the selection of a college major and it is no wonder many teens struggle to decide. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center tells parents of high school students that sometime during sophomore year is a good time for teens to start thinking about possible majors. “If a teen’s college search process during the last two or three years of high school is largely focused on where to go but not what to study, he or she is overlooking a big aspect of the college experience,” says Huntington. She suggests that as parents and teens talk about college possibilities, they also talk about field of study possibilities. If you need a little help starting the conversation, here are six questions to ask:

“Narrowing down the options” questions

  • What do you find interesting? Encourage your teen to reflect on past jobs, school projects, volunteer projects and classes and think about the most and least enjoyable aspects. Avoid the pressure to probe about passions—perhaps your teen is still in discovery mode. Instead, focus on things that capture his or her attention and fuel inquisitiveness.
  • What are you good at? It’s wise to talk about school subjects, but remember to explore other skills that your teen would consider strengths, such as working on teams, managing people, critical thinking, analyzing details or solving complex problems.
  • Have you researched any possible majors (and if so, what did you learn)? Have your teen do some preliminary research on the fields of study on his or her mind to understand the major and what classes are usually required in that major. The College Majors 101 website is a useful resource for students wanting to learn more about majors, possible careers, and universities’ options for majors. The high school guidance counselor is also a good resource.

Deeper research questions

  • What types of jobs are out there? It’s important to do some initial homework on college majors and the jobs that graduates of those majors often obtain, but once your teen begins focusing on a particular major, it’s good to also research statistics like employment rates and job growth. Check out information on the Center on Education and the Workforce, Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics, and O*NET Online websites for starters as well as the labor market organization websites in your state (find a list here).
  • What matters to you? Family? Travel? Helping people? Working with your hands? Encourage your teen to think about his or her core values and personality while exploring majors and careers and picturing life down the road. Of course, it’s best not to think too far ahead, but a social butterfly who thrives working with others might be unsatisfied working in a laboratory or other independent type job.
  • What type of education is required? As your teen researches careers, it’s important to consider educational requirements and whether he or she is comfortable committing to them. Does a job of interest require advanced education for employment? Does it require additional certifications? Teens who have their sights set on earning a bachelor’s degree for now should make sure that they will be employable with that degree after graduation.

“The more research and thought teens put into choosing college majors, the higher their return on investment,” says Huntington. “Our advice to parents is to talk early and often about careers and majors and incorporate this type of consideration into the college search process.” For more information about how to prepare teens for college-level academics or Huntington’s SAT and ACT prep programs, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Tips for Preventing Summer Slide Many parents have heard the scary-but-true statistic that children who do not read over summer break can lose up to two months of reading achievement. According to Reading Rockets’ review of 13 empirical studies on summer reading loss, over time, this can create a compounded achievement gap of 1.5 years before a child has even reached middle school.

The good news: it’s not hard to curb summer reading loss. With a little effort, you can help your child continue to strengthen that “reading muscle” and prevent the dreaded summer slide so that when the next school year begins, he or she is ready to hit the ground running. Here are five tips to build those literacy skills this summer:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:39:31 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-preventing-summer-slide https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-preventing-summer-slide Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington Many parents have heard the scary-but-true statistic that children who do not read over summer break can lose up to two months of reading achievement. According to Reading Rockets’ review of 13 empirical studies on summer reading loss, over time, this can create a compounded achievement gap of 1.5 years before a child has even reached middle school.

The good news: it’s not hard to curb summer reading loss. With a little effort, you can help your child continue to strengthen that “reading muscle” and prevent the dreaded summer slide so that when the next school year begins, he or she is ready to hit the ground running. Here are five tips to build those literacy skills this summer:

  1. Set a daily minutes goal. Goal-setting gives children ownership of their learning. So, incorporate reading into the summertime daily routine and have your child set a goal of minutes to read each day or week. Make it fun by combining reading time with cookies and milk, or making a pitcher of your child’s favorite summer beverage and reading “al fresco.” Maybe you can start a new family tradition to all read together in a comfortable spot in the house before bedtime. Whatever you do, make sure you send the message that reading is a relaxing, rewarding activity, not a chore that must be checked off a task list.
  2. Keep a “summer memories” journal. Writing and reading are essential, interconnected skills, so it’s valuable to encourage children to write over the summer too. If you have a tough time convincing your child to start penning novellas or essays about summer, a subtler way to hone those writing skills is a summer journal. Have your child jot down the events of each day, record the stops on your family road trip, or write real-time observations of daily life in your home over summer vacation. If your child gets really into it, consider letting him or her create a blog on a free or inexpensive platform like Squarespace or Wix.
  3. Focus on a subject of interest. For some children, a new hobby or interest sparks exploration. So, if your child isn’t eager to read novels, try digging into topics that do get him or her excited, exploring books, websites, blogs, and magazine and newspaper articles on those topics. Fueled by curiosity, your child will end up reading more than he or she would otherwise.
  4. Talk about it. You can enrich your child’s reading time by talking about the books he or she is reading as well as the characters, plot, plot twists, and what your child thinks will happen next. Express interest by asking thoughtful questions that help your child think critically, reflect and improve comprehension.
  5. Share with others. Your child might also want to share what he or she is reading with other kids, which is exactly what young readers do on Scholastic’s Share What You’re Reading Think of it as a book review and recommendations website for children. Your child can share his or her own reviews and check out other children’s reviews as well.

If your child wants to catch up or get ahead this summer, call Huntington. Now is a great time to fill in any gaps in skills so that your child has the reading and writing aptitude to succeed in all subjects. Call 1-800 CAN LEARN today for more information about our literacy skill-building programs and summer reading program, Reading Adventure.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Launches 2017 Summer Reading Adventure Program It’s summer break, which also means it is time for Huntington Learning Center’s annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Students select books from Huntington’s carefully formulated book lists that offer a range of choices by grade level and reading ability. They then record what they read in their “reading passport,” sharing their assessment and opinions about each book. The program is intended to introduce children to high-interest reading material and get them excited about reading.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:07:00 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2017 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s summer break, which also means it is time for Huntington Learning Center’s annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Students select books from Huntington’s carefully formulated book lists that offer a range of choices by grade level and reading ability. They then record what they read in their “reading passport,” sharing their assessment and opinions about each book. The program is intended to introduce children to high-interest reading material and get them excited about reading.

Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that reading is one of the easiest ways to minimize regression over the long summer break from school and help children discover the joy of reading. “Our Reading Adventure program fosters a love of learning by helping children discover how much fun reading can be,” she says. “We know from experience that children become stronger readers through regular practice. With its more relaxed pace, summer is a perfect opportunity for parents to help their children develop a daily reading habit. The more they read, the more they will enjoy it—and become better readers.”

Huntington’s Reading Adventure program runs throughout the summer. Huntington says that parents can pick up information and passports for their children at centers beginning as early as June. As parents gear up to make the most of the program this summer, she also offers several tips:

  • Make reading time family time. Spend 20-30 minutes each evening as a family reading in the same room—perhaps with some tasty summer treats and drinks to enjoy.
  • Set goals. Have your child aim to read a certain number of books this summer or make a list of books, topics or authors he or she wants to explore.
  • Hit the library once a week. Regular trips to the library are an effective way to fuel your child’s fire for reading. Don’t forget to check out any summer reading activities going on. Encourage your child to talk to the librarian about book suggestions as well.
  • Pick a book for the whole family to read. Why not make this the summer of the “family book club” and have your child pick a book that you can all read together?
  • Choose a vacation theme book. If you’re going on any trips this summer, explore books that might be an engaging read while on the trip—stories set in the location to where you’re headed, for example.

Learn more about the Reading Adventure program by contacting Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Is Featured On CentralJersey.com Huntington Learning Center is celebrating 40 years of helping students achieve their full potential, and was recently featured on CentralJersey.com. Reas the full article here.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:39:59 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-gets-featured-may2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-gets-featured-may2017 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is celebrating 40 years of helping students achieve their full potential, and was recently featured on CentralJersey.com. Reas the full article here.

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How Praise, Intrinsic Motivation, Effort and Student Achievement Go Hand in Hand Any parent who has set foot in a Huntington Learning Center before has likely heard our teachers stress the importance of recognizing children’s efforts, not their achievements. Our years of experience with thousands of children have taught us that it is far more effective to encourage children to work hard on homework and in school than it is to encourage them to strive for high grades and test scores. Our beliefs on this are rooted in research: the right kind of praise inspires motivation, and therefore, achievement. Also, studies show that one of the key dimensions of student motivation is control, a student’s belief that there is a direct link between his or her actions and successful outcomes.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:48:21 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-praise-intrinsic-motivation-effort-and-student-achievement-go-hand-in-hand https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-praise-intrinsic-motivation-effort-and-student-achievement-go-hand-in-hand Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington Any parent who has set foot in a Huntington Learning Center before has likely heard our teachers stress the importance of recognizing children’s efforts, not their achievements. Our years of experience with thousands of children have taught us that it is far more effective to encourage children to work hard on homework and in school than it is to encourage them to strive for high grades and test scores. Our beliefs on this are rooted in research: the right kind of praise inspires motivation, and therefore, achievement. Also, studies show that one of the key dimensions of student motivation is control, a student’s belief that there is a direct link between his or her actions and successful outcomes.

At Huntington, we strive to not only build students’ academic competence and ability, but also nurture the development of their intrinsic motivation: the desire to complete tasks for the self-satisfaction that results from doing so. We know that students who are intrinsically motivated are more likely to take ownership of their success in school and put forth the effort that it requires.

Without a doubt, many children are extrinsically motivated by rewards such as praise from teachers and parents, grades or other factors. This is natural, of course, as not all students find enjoyment in homework. However, there are many ways that you can foster intrinsic motivation, even if you cannot convince your child to love Algebra or writing papers. Here are a few effective strategies to motivate your child, an essential part of helping him or her become a stronger student:

Encourage the child to value hard work. Emphasize the importance of perseverance in all that your child does, and especially in school. Learning is a journey that requires goal setting and constant dedication, and your child needs to know that it isn’t always easy. Teach your child that the way to master a subject, improve in something or overcome challenges is to put in the effort. When it comes to learning, progress is success.

Nurture a child’s inner curiosity. Challenge your child to explore new topics, question assumptions and never take knowledge for granted. Doing so encourages learning for the sake of learning, and it also teaches your child to be more independent as a learner. Congratulate your child when you notice him or her coming up with new ideas and solutions to problems.

Point out the relevance. Continually point out how your child’s school work is relevant in daily life. Especially when he or she doesn’t necessarily enjoy a subject or topic, it’s helpful to share ways that the subject matter is used in the real world or why it is important.

Embrace a growth mindset. A growth mindset is the belief that intelligence isn’t a fixed trait, but rather, one that can be nurtured and developed. Children who have a growth mindset understand that effort is the way to become smarter and recognize that a challenge is an opportunity to learn, not a road block.

When parents hold high, but achievable expectations for children, praise their efforts, encourage them to learn from their mistakes and point out often that such a combination is what leads to learning and improvement, they fuel their children’s intrinsic motivation. Just as important, such actions send the message that learning is continuous and requires persistence. Take note when your child works hard and makes progress. In doing so, you’ll help shape his or her attitude about the effort and diligence that school requires and will foster his or her long-term academic success.  

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Latest SAT Happenings When it comes to the SAT college entrance exam, the last several years have been largely focused on the College Board’s redesign of the test, but Huntington Learning Center is up on the latest news and information. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of the importance of staying up to date. “Last year brought a great deal of change to the SAT, but the College Board is still adjusting processes and other aspects of the SAT,” she says. Huntington shares a few recent announcements that might impact your college-bound student:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:57:55 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/latest-sat-happenings https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/latest-sat-happenings Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When it comes to the SAT college entrance exam, the last several years have been largely focused on the College Board’s redesign of the test, but Huntington Learning Center is up on the latest news and information. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of the importance of staying up to date. “Last year brought a great deal of change to the SAT, but the College Board is still adjusting processes and other aspects of the SAT,” she says. Huntington shares the latest SAT happenings that may impact your college-bound student:

  • Students can now take the SAT in late August. For the first time since the mid-1970s, the College Board is offering an August exam date, based on feedback from students, K-12 and higher education professionals, and test center staff. This date provides students about to begin their senior year with earlier opportunities to take the exam before submitting college applications. Other benefits of an August SAT date:
    • It will be it easier for students to dedicate themselves to an SAT prep program over summer break since school is not in session.
    • A summer date should help minimize problems caused by issues such as delays in score reporting and weather-related test cancellations in late winter.
    • Students heading into senior year will have two opportunities instead of one to take the SAT (August and October) before early admission application deadlines, which are usually in early November.
  • The January exam date has been eliminated. Beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, the January SAT date will no longer be offered. This means that the SAT continues to be offered seven times per year: in August, October, November, December, March, May and June.
  • The process for requesting test accommodations is much simpler. In December 2016, the College Board announced a much simpler request process for testing accommodations for students currently using them at their schools through Individualized Education Programs and 504 Plans.
  • Testing supports are available for English language learners (ELL), effective January 1, 2017. ELL students taking a state-funded SAT during the school day will now have access to testing instructions in several native languages and approved bilingual glossaries. The College Board’s overall goal is to level the playing field for all students.

Following the redesign of the SAT, the number of students taking the new exam in 2016 jumped to 1.36 million (compared to 1.18 million in 2015). This indicates a show of support among students and parents alike, says Huntington. “The College Board has greatly increased its efforts to make the SAT and all of its exams reflect what students are learning in class.” she says. “Huntington is apprised of the latest changes and incorporates any and all adjustments into our prep programs.” For more information about Huntington’s individualized SAT prep programs, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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The Latest News with the ACT If you’ve been paying attention to news coming out of the college entrance exam world in the last several years, you’ve probably noticed that the headlines have largely focused on the redesign of the SAT. So, what about the ACT? Here are some of the latest happenings regarding the ACT college admissions exam and what your teen needs to know:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:00:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/news-about-the-act-2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/news-about-the-act-2017 Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you’ve been paying attention to news coming out of the college entrance exam world in the last several years, you’ve probably noticed that the headlines have largely focused on the redesign of the SAT. So, what about the ACT? Here are some of the latest happenings regarding the ACT college admissions exam and what your teen needs to know:

New test date – Beginning in 2018, students can take the ACT test in the summer (starting with the July 2018 test date). This increases the number of national ACT test dates from six to seven. Because the ACT is offered primarily at local high schools across the country, which are closed during the summer months, the July ACT tests centers will likely be located on college and university campuses. For your teen, this change is significant for several reasons:

  • The July ACT offers an opportunity to use the early part of summer break (assuming students get out of school in June) to study for the July ACT instead of squeezing ACT prep into the school year.
  • The July date means that your test taker can easily take the ACT twice before early-admission college deadlines, which are often in early November.
  • The new date means a wider variety of testing opportunities for college-bound students.

Score report changes – In September 2016, the ACT made several enhancements to its test reports that students receive with their scores. Here’s a summary of what changed:

  • Redesigned paper reports that are more visually engaging and offer more meaningful insights about students’ test results.
  • Reporting categories only (for English, math, reading and science) but no more subject subscores (for algebra/coordinate geometry, for example).
  • Readiness ranges that enable students to see how their performance on reporting categories compares to students who have met college readiness benchmarks for specific subjects.
  • More reporting categories that share information like total number of points possible, total number of points achieved, and percentage of points correct.
  • Additional indicators to guide students toward potential college majors and careers based on information students include during the test registration process.

To stay up on the latest information regarding changes or improvements to the ACT, visit www.act.org. To learn more about how Huntington Learning Center helps students prepare for the ACT, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Forty Years of Helping Students Create Bright Futures As schools across the country struggle to keep up with the demands of an increasingly complex global economy, Huntington’s commitment to our children’s educational success has become more important than ever. A 2015 Program for International Student Assessment study showed that 15-year-old students in the U.S. ranked just 24th out of 72 educational systems in average reading literacy, and only 40th in math literacy. Additional studies show the U.S. lagging behind in other critical areas as well: 17th out of 40 in overall educational performance and 6th out of 49 in fourth grade reading.

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Fri, 24 Mar 2017 10:49:26 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-students-create-bright-futures https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-students-create-bright-futures Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is celebrating its 40th year of helping students unlock their academic potential. Since its founding in 1977 by Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington, the company has helped millions of students of all ages and abilities learn the skills they need to excel in school, improve their study habits and build self-confidence.

As schools across the country struggle to keep up with the demands of an increasingly complex global economy, Huntington’s commitment to our children’s educational success has become more important than ever. A 2015 Program for International Student Assessment study showed that 15-year-old students in the U.S. ranked just 24th out of 72 educational systems in average reading literacy, and only 40th in math literacy. Additional studies show the U.S. lagging behind in other critical areas as well: 17th out of 40 in overall educational performance and 6th out of 49 in fourth grade reading.

This academic gap has created a tremendous need for specialized skills-based tutoring and test prep. Huntington works exclusively with certified tutors to deliver individualized instruction across a wide range of academic areas to students from kindergarten through high school. To help ensure consistent results, the company has designed a proprietary 4-step approach that includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individual tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The results have been profound. On average, Huntington students increase two or more grade levels in reading and math over a three-month period. Average SAT scores increase 192 points after a two-and-a-half month program, while ACT scores increase an average of four points.

“When Eileen and I started this company four decades ago, our hope was to help children who were struggling to keep up in school and give them the one-to-one supplemental instruction they needed to boost their confidence and their grades,” says Dr. Huntington. “Today, we are simply astonished by the results we’ve seen.”

The company’s success is grounded in its mission, which is to give every student the best education possible. Huntington is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools as well as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and is one of the nation’s first approved supplemental education services providers under No Child Left Behind. Eileen Huntington, co-founder and CEO, adds, “While we’ve received numerous awards and accolades over the past 40 years, our greatest joy is knowing we have helped millions of students gain the skills, confidence and motivation they need to succeed.”

This commitment to their students has led to tremendous demand and expansion. In 1985, the company began franchising outside of New Jersey and Philadelphia, growing to 148 franchised centers by 2000. Today, it operates nearly 300 centers in 38 states from coast to coast.

“We have so much to celebrate,” says Dr. Huntington. “To have reached 40 years in business is something that makes us incredibly proud — knowing that we have changed so many students’ and parents’ lives.”

Despite this enormous growth, Huntington remains a family owned and operated company. Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington are proud to welcome the next generation into the business to continue the mission. “We look forward to the next forty-plus years of changing students' lives across America,” adds their daughter, Anne Huntington, who is actively involved in all aspects of the business as head of partnerships and development.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington Learning Center is the premier national tutoring and test prep provider for the K-12 market with locations in 38 states. It was founded in 1977 with the mission to give every student the best education possible, which is what still drives every business decision to this day. The company prides itself on personalized attention and proven results with individualized programs taught by certified teachers at accredited centers. Areas of instruction include phonics, reading, writing, vocabulary, math, science, study skills, executive functioning skills, ACT, SAT, PSAT, high school entrance exams, and state and other standardized exams.

To learn more about Huntington Learning Center and stay updated on scheduled events and activities for its 40th anniversary, visit huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities, visit huntingtonfranchise.com. 

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Tips to Develop a Child’s Leadership Skills No matter what children plan to do in their lives, learning to communicate, make decisions, and work with teams will benefit them tremendously. Huntington Learning Center says such leadership competencies help children build confidence and learn to advocate for themselves in all areas of their lives.

“Leadership skills are important at every age, but especially become valuable when children enter high school and college, where teachers expect that students are able to motivate themselves and others and work well with a wide range of people.”

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Thu, 16 Mar 2017 11:01:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5tipsforleadershipskills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5tipsforleadershipskills No matter what children plan to do in their lives, learning to communicate, make decisions, and work with teams will benefit them tremendously. Huntington Learning Center says such leadership competencies help children build confidence and learn to advocate for themselves in all areas of their lives.

“Leadership skills are important at every age, but especially become valuable when children enter high school and college, where teachers expect that students are able to motivate themselves and others and work well with a wide range of people.”

Huntington offers these five tips to parents to help develop valuable leadership aptitudes:

Embrace goal setting from a young age. All leaders will agree that success doesn’t come easy and generally requires advanced planning and a lot of hard work. Children who learn to set goals and work toward them will be better equipped later on to prioritize numerous tasks and more motivated overall. Teach your child to dream big but also lay out how he or she plans to achieve those dreams.

Encourage your child to go for the things he or she wants. Life sometimes requires taking risks, which can be scary. Talk to your child about the benefits of putting himself or herself out there and trying things, even when afraid or nervous. Although nobody wants to fail, teach your child that failure is an opportunity to grow and learn. 

Talk about the importance of respect. Great leaders are respectful toward others and believe that they will be more successful if they build up those around them. Establish the expectation that your child will always be respectful of family members, teachers, friends, teammates and others. Talk with your child about valuing others’ ideas and strengths and why it is essential to listen well.

Suggest activities that involve working in groups. Extracurricular activities have many benefits, including the lessons they teach about teamwork and collaboration. Get your child involved in activities that offer opportunities to build those skills. Talk about how to be a role model for younger members of any club or team.

Demand perseverance. By the time you send your child off to college, hopefully he or she will be equipped with solid problem-solving skills and an optimistic outlook. You can help by emphasizing the importance of perseverance. Teach your child that effort equals improvement, that progress is always the goal. Remind your child often that the best things in life require persistence and patience.

Remember that their goal shouldn’t just be to raise leaders, but to help strengthen their children as students and people. “Every child can benefit from a little leadership development. Great leaders are tough-minded, self-assured, hard-working and confident. Whether your child grows up to become a CEO or a teacher, nurturing those skills will benefit your child for life.

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Huntington Learning Center is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017 Huntington Learning Center  is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017, an annual event that recognizes the importance of mathematics and its applications and developments in specific areas.

Huntington joins schools, educators, colleges, universities, communities and others to celebrate mathematics as an integral part of everyday life. Math is the building block for many essential careers and plays a central role in some of the world’s greatest innovations.  In the past year alone, we’ve seen technological advancements that are changing the way we live—from smart robots to genetic engineering to artificial intelligence—all of which are examples of math in action. This month, we pay special attention to math’s many applications in solving real-world problems large and small.

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Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:48:08 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathawarenessmonth https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathawarenessmonth Huntington Learning Center  is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017, an annual event that recognizes the importance of mathematics and its applications and developments in specific areas.

Huntington joins schools, educators, colleges, universities, communities and others to celebrate mathematics as an integral part of everyday life. Math is the building block for many essential careers and plays a central role in some of the world’s greatest innovations.  In the past year alone, we’ve seen technological advancements that are changing the way we live—from smart robots to genetic engineering to artificial intelligence—all of which are examples of math in action. This month, we pay special attention to math’s many applications in solving real-world problems large and small.

Parents can join their efforts this month and year-round by helping their children recognize math’s important uses and put it into practice in their daily lives. Here are some  suggestions:

  1. Have your child estimate the grocery bill as you shop.
  2. Point out careers that require math skills, especially among people your child knows or admires.
  3. Plan a family trip, and have your child calculate drive time or mileage between destinations based on speed limits and distance as well as a trip budget that includes the cost of flights, hotels, gas, meals and other expenditures.
  4. Invite your child to cook with you and calculate all measurements for recipes.
  5. Take your child to the bank every time you go and talk about money—saving it, earning it and how interest compounds in an interest-bearing account.
  6. Take note of the use of statistics in everyday life: in the polls for the recent Presidential election, to deliver accurate weather forecasts, in stock market predictions and more.
  7. Talk about math’s role in some of the most significant discoveries in history: the landing on Mars and the invention of photography, for example.


Mathematics Awareness Month began in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation to establish National Mathematics Awareness Week. This annual celebration is a collaborative effort of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics. In 2017, the name of the holiday was changed to Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month.

To learn more about Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month, visit www.mathaware.org

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4 Tips for Helping Middle School Students Increase Academic Independence If you’re the parent of a new or soon-to-be middle schooler, brace yourself for some major changes. Middle school is more intense and has a heavier workload, with most middle school curriculums including five core subjects and two electives. Children are expected to do more, question more, and think more critically.

Above all, middle school demands that children function as independent students. But how can you encourage your child to engage in the activities that promote greater independence?

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:44:28 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-middle-school-students-increase-academic-independence https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-middle-school-students-increase-academic-independence Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you’re the parent of a new or soon-to-be middle schooler, brace yourself for some major changes. Middle school is more intense and has a heavier workload, with most middle school curriculums including five core subjects and two electives. Children are expected to do more, question more, and think more critically.

Above all, middle school demands that children function as independent students. But how can you encourage your child to engage in the activities that promote greater independence? Here are four tips that will encourage independent learning and significantly benefit your child:

  1. Establish a good routine. Middle school is a time when children must take ownership of their academic responsibilities, and there’s no better way to encourage this than to promote a solid nightly homework routine. At the beginning of middle school, parents should help children establish good habits: laying out a homework plan at the start of each study session, studying in a place that fosters their productivity, and embracing an organizational system that works for them. It’s fine to keep tabs on this to make sure children are staying on top of everything, but it’s essential that parents put their children in the driver’s seat.
  2. Promote goal-setting. Setting goals is a powerful exercise that encourages children to think about school more intentionally and narrow their focus on what they want to achieve (and how they will do so). Parents and their children should spend time setting goals at the start of each new semester and writing down the obstacles and to-dos to overcome them. It’s also helpful to get children thinking about what each goal really means to them personally by dividing them into short term and long term. For example, your child’s goals for math class might be to stay up to date on all homework assigned (short term), develop and follow a weekly study plan (short term), and improve his or her attitude about math in middle school (long term).
  3. Encourage self-monitoring. In simple terms, self-monitoring is a strategy that helps students check their own work for mistakes or areas that need improvement. As students become more independent, they should be able to uncover clues when reading for information or recognize when something—a series of steps in a math problem, for example—doesn’t make sense or seem right. Self-monitoring strategies can strengthen this ability. When children do homework for each of their classes, parents can encourage them to ask these types of questions along the way:
    1. Are all steps in the directions clear to me?
    2. Does this make sense so far? If not, what part is confusing me?
    3. Do I recognize this problem as a similar type of problem that I’ve done before?
    4. How confident do I feel about what I just read?
    5. I got that problem wrong the first time—what can I do to get it right next time?
    6. How would I restate what I just read in another way?
  4. Step up the planner usage. Many children start using planners in elementary school, but middle school is when this becomes essential. With seven or eight classes to keep track of, children must stay organized, and it’s hard to do without some sort of organizational system and a planner. Explore whether your child’s school has a class or program dedicated to helping students create a binder system for all classes and use planners effectively. At a minimum, make sure your child has a weekly planner and is keeping track of:
    1. Test and quiz dates
    2. Homework assignments each day (and upcoming deadlines)
    3. Other important dates for school (such as parent-teacher conferences)

Middle school is a major time of transition in large part due to the elevated expectations for students. Help your child be successful by nudging him or her toward increased independence—and follow the lead of his or her teachers, who have this goal top of mind as well. Lay the foundation now and by the time your child reaches high school, he or she will be ready to face any challenge with confidence.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Read Across America Day Calling all children, parents and others who love to read: March 2, 2017, is Read Across America Day. Huntington Learning Center joins millions of elementary and secondary teachers, administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, librarians, students and others in the education industry as well as members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate this annual literary event, now in its 20th year.

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Mon, 27 Feb 2017 12:18:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/readacrossamericamarch2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/readacrossamericamarch2017 Calling all children, parents and others who love to read: March 2, 2017, is Read Across America Day. Huntington Learning Center joins millions of elementary and secondary teachers, administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, librarians, students and others in the education industry as well as members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate this annual literary event, now in its 20th year.

Read Across America Day also marks the birthday of revered children’s author, Theodor Seuss Geisel: the beloved and prolific Dr. Seuss. The celebration’s goal is to inspire children and adults alike to read by offering reading resources and organizing fun events and activities. While March 2 is the official day of celebration, the NEA strives to build a nation of readers all year long—through events, partnerships and a range of reading resources that make reading more enjoyable and accessible for everyone.

Everyone at Huntington loves Read Across America Day because it is a day that we join our community members and celebrate reading for the entertaining and worthwhile escape that it is. A good book can inspire the mind and nurture the soul. We stand behind the NEA’s goal with this annual celebration of one of the world’s most influential authors to help more children discover new knowledge and adventure through books.

Here are several suggestions for parents to encourage their children to read:

  • Visit the library often. The library is free for everyone—take advantage of the books, e-books and other resources that it offers. Most libraries also host many activities for children of all ages. Make visiting the library a weekly tradition.
  • Download a free e-reader app. Open eBooks puts books in the hands of everyone. Learn more about President Obama’s ConnectED initiative to make books available to all children and how to download and use Open eBooks.
  • Have a happy reading hour. When everyone in your household gets into the habit of reading, your child will be more likely to associate it with fun family time. Spend time together at least a few nights a week with books, blankets and mugs of hot chocolate.
  • Engage with other readers. Part of the joy of reading is talking about the stories you’re reading. Websites like Goodreads are a wonderful way for children to engage with peers and share their thoughts about the books they’re enjoying and seek book recommendations. Ask your child’s teacher about book clubs or groups through school, too.
  • Try it all. Magazines, comic books, newspapers and blogs—these are all great ways to engage reluctant readers who are less enthusiastic about books for one reason or another. Remember that reading is reading. If your child isn’t excited about books, there are many other ways to get him or her reading, so keep trying.

To learn more about Read Across America or to get involved, visit www.nea.org/readacross. For more reading tips and ideas, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

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Evaluating Your Children's Mid-Year Report Card Huntington Learning Center offers tips to help children overcome issues with academic skills they have by evaluating their mid-year report card.

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Tue, 24 Jan 2017 11:24:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/evaluating-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/evaluating-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Evaluating Your Child’s Mid-Year Report Card

 Holiday break is behind us and it’s a brand new year—which also means those mid-year report cards are just around the corner. “Many students and parents dread report cards, but they shouldn’t,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “A child’s report card contains lots of useful information about his or her skill proficiency, academic development, and strengths and weaknesses. Using that knowledge, parents can help their child overcome school problems and be the best student possible.” Huntington offers parents a few tips to address different report card scenarios: 

Issue: My child’s report card says he needs to work on study skills.

If your child struggles to get focused at homework time (or during class), is overly disorganized or has trouble prioritizing and managing his or her time, talk with him or her about what might help. Try a planner or notebook to record and check off homework assignments and other obligations. Make organization a part of the homework routine—setting up, keeping the desk neat and filing away graded homework. Ask your child what study strategies seem to work for him or her best—a quiet room? Taking an after-school break before diving into homework?

Issue: My child’s grades do not reflect her efforts.

If your child spends a lot of time on homework but his or her grades are still suffering, there may be other issues at play. He or she may be missing basic skills or may not understand the concepts covered in class (and struggles to tackle them at home). Visit with your child’s teacher to get an approximate idea of how much time should be spent on homework each evening and how you can best support your child. 

Issue: My child’s grades were mostly fine, but he received a failing grade in one subject.

It is common for children to do better in certain subjects than others, but a failing grade in any subject is a red flag that your child may not be comprehending class material, completing assignments or putting forth the effort required. Schedule a meeting with the teacher to discuss the reasons behind the low mark and get ideas to help your child bring up the grade by the end of the year. 

Issue: My child’s report card is full of bad grades and she doesn’t seem to care.

Your child may care more than you think. Many children who struggle in school have low self-esteem and assume their parents are disappointed in them. They stop trying because they would rather get a low grade than experience continued frustration. Resist the urge to punish your child for failing and instead let him or her know that you want to help. Communicate openly about what your child thinks will help him or her improve. Involve your child in the plan of action to encourage him or her to take ownership and responsibility.

There’s a lot to be learned from your child’s report card, but Huntington reminds parents to keep it in perspective. “Report cards and the grades they contain certainly do not measure how smart your child is or the likelihood of his or her success in life, so don’t panic if your child’s report card indicates that he or she needs help,” says Huntington. “Investigate these issues with your child’s teacher and together, you can help your child raise his or her self-esteem, do better in school and be a happier person overall.”

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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How Your College-Bound Teen Can Make it a Productive Holiday Break College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year. For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come. 

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Tue, 20 Dec 2016 16:42:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/productive-holiday-break-for-your-college-bound-teen https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/productive-holiday-break-for-your-college-bound-teen College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year. For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come. 

Start working on the FAFSA. Seniors planning on enrolling in college for fall 2017 should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon after January 1 as possible. This application is your family’s avenue to receiving federal, state and college financial aid and the sooner you submit it, the better. Get started at www.studentaid.ed.gov.

Register for Advanced Placement exams. Before school lets out, your teen should talk to teachers or the school’s designated Advanced Placement (AP) coordinator about taking any AP exams in the spring. In 2017, AP exams are scheduled for early May, so holiday break is a good time to start thinking about which exams your teen wants to study for and take.

Register for the spring SAT or ACT. For juniors taking the exam for the first time, now is the time to develop a study schedule for the February 11 or May 6 SAT and March 11 or April 8 ACT. Contact Huntington over the break to learn more about our 14-hour, 32-hour and Premier SAT and ACT prep programs.

Work on college applications. Seniors should use holiday break as a time to get going on college applications, as many colleges have application deadlines as early as January 1. At the very least, your senior should spend time working on some of the time-consuming parts of the application package, such as the essay. It’s also a good idea to write succinct but professional letters to teachers from whom your teen would like letters of recommendation, making sure to include a resume and list of accomplishments in each teacher’s class. When school is back in session in January, your teen can deliver these letters personally.

Visit local colleges. Although colleges are also on break, this might be a good chance for you and your teen to visit any colleges in your area. Walk the campus, stop by the admissions offices, explore the classrooms and reach out ahead of time to see if any tours are offered.

Holiday break is a wonderful time for your teen to recharge his or her batteries after a busy fall semester, but it also presents a chance to get ahead on that college checklist. At Huntington, we advise students to take advantage of every break they have from school and use that downtime to ensure they’re on top of everything they need to be regarding college. During the spring, things pick up significantly when it comes to college—from applying for financial aid to selecting a college. Encourage your teen to use this time effectively, so that he or she will feel more organized and ready to continue moving forward when school resumes in January.”

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Huntington Learning Center Suggests Educational Activities for Holiday Break Students absolutely deserve a breather from school work and studying over the holidays, and there are many benefits to embracing this time as a chance to relax and recharge. However, Huntington reminds parents how easy it is to keep children engaged and having fun during break. There are so many great ways to keep the mind active while spending time together as a family. And best of all, including a few educational activities in your holiday break schedule can keep your child’s brain active, minimizing regression that can take place even during a short break from school.

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Tue, 20 Dec 2016 16:41:28 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaybreakeducational-activities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaybreakeducational-activities Students absolutely deserve a breather from school work and studying over the holidays, and there are many benefits to embracing this time as a chance to relax and recharge. However, Huntington reminds parents how easy it is to keep children engaged and having fun during break. There are so many great ways to keep the mind active while spending time together as a family. And best of all, including a few educational activities in your holiday break schedule can keep your child’s brain active, minimizing regression that can take place even during a short break from school. 

Library visits – An easy and highly beneficial educational outing for holiday break is a family trip to the library—and you can go as often as you like. Most libraries offer a range of activities during holiday breaks that might pique your child’s interest. At a minimum, however, you and your child can pick up some reading material to enjoy during the lazy days that school is out. Make reading a daily activity for the whole family.

Museum outings – If you have a favorite art, cultural, science or other museum or have wanted to visit one for the first time, holiday break is an ideal time to do so. Be sure to view the website ahead of time to see if there are any special exhibits or events. And take your child’s lead—perhaps he or she would enjoy art over science or a fireman’s museum over the baseball museum.

Documentary or film – If your child was fascinated during his or her class’s unit on Egypt or loves learning about nature and weather, check out the selection of films and documentaries at your library (or through Netflix if you’re a subscriber). An at-home movie afternoon is certainly fun, but you could also make it a day outing. Browse the showings at your local science museum—maybe you’ll discover an exciting option at a nearby IMAX theater or planetarium.

Musical performances or theater – This time of year generally means lots of cultural events and activities if your family is interested in music, theater or dance. If The Nutcracker doesn’t grab your child’s interest, check out the local high school or college for plays or other performances, nearby jazz or other music clubs, or even your local coffee shop to see what types of entertainment might be on the holiday calendar.

Holiday break is a great chance for your child to unwind and do the things he or she wants to do, but it is also a perfect time to enrich the mind and explore different topics. This is a rare opportunity free of school obligations when parents and their children can delve into some interests and enjoy learning something new together. Get out and expand your horizons. Offer your child ideas and then let his or her curiosities guide you.

 

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Engaging Your Child in the Learning Process If you’ve ever tried to motivate your child to study or do homework, you probably know that it’s much easier to be successful when you get your child’s input and buy-in. Research shows that students who are more engaged in the learning process, after all, are more attentive and focused, and generally more motivated to learn increasingly challenging topics. Although your child’s teacher plays a big role, there are many ways you can encourage your child to become more connected and interested in what he or she learns.

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Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:19:48 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/engage_learning_process https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/engage_learning_process If you’ve ever tried to motivate your child to study or do homework, you probably know that it’s much easier to be successful when you get your child’s input and buy-in. Research shows that students who are more engaged in the learning process, after all, are more attentive and focused, and generally more motivated to learn increasingly challenging topics. Although your child’s teacher plays a big role, there are many ways you can encourage your child to become more connected and interested in what he or she learns. Here are several tips on how to do just that:

Frequently start conversations about school topics. You can strengthen your child’s critical thinking, communication, and other related skills by asking thoughtful questions about school, your child’s opinion on an issue, the books your child reads and more. Skip the yes/no questions and instead focus on those that encourage inquisition and thinking from different perspectives. Asking about the “why” and not just the “how” will strengthen your child’s ability to formulate ideas and foster the active learning process. It will also send the message that learning for the sake of learning is worthwhile.

Talk about alternatives. Teachers usually encourage students to learn multiple methods to solving problems or answering questions and give them the freedom to choose the one they understand and like the best. You can reinforce your child’s understanding of a subject by talking through alternate viewpoints or ways of solving a problem. If your child is working on a multiplication problem, for example, ask about other ways to get to the same answer and why your child chose a certain approach. Explaining different strategies to you will strengthen your child’s understanding and build his or her confidence—activities that lead to enhanced engagement.

Take a supporting role. One of the simplest ways to increase your child’s level of engagement is to put him or her in the driver’s seat—always. Set ground rules at home that make it clear that you are available for guidance, not answers, and that school is your child’s job. That means attempting things before asking for help and being resourceful about finding answers to questions. Your child is responsible for school work and all associated duties. Make sure you send that message with your actions as well as your words.

Emphasize learning, not grades. Grades are important, but more important is the effort that your child puts into school. Take note of your child’s persistence and hard work more than achievements such as grades—and remind your child that learning isn’t always easy. Also, instill in your child the belief that the ultimate goal of school and homework is to acquire knowledge.

Children sometimes find school to be difficult, frustrating or even boring, but there are many ways to encourage them to take ownership of school. Embrace these strategies for strengthening your child’s academic engagement, and good things will happen. In the end, you’ll help your child take an active role as a learner—a trait that will serve him or her well in college and long after.

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Five Soft Skills Every Child Needs for Success Parents hear often that their children need a solid foundation of academic knowledge to flourish in college and beyond. However, there are many other attributes that help children lead successful, fulfilling lives. When it comes to life and career, most people can attest that technical skills only get one so far. “We tell parents regularly that while academic aptitude matters, there are a number of personal characteristics that will set their children apart and help them do well in life.”

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Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:27:54 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fivesoftskills_for_success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fivesoftskills_for_success Parents hear often that their children need a solid foundation of academic knowledge to flourish in college and beyond. However, there are many other attributes that help children lead successful, fulfilling lives. When it comes to life and career, most people can attest that technical skills only get one so far. “We tell parents regularly that while academic aptitude matters, there are a number of personal characteristics that will set their children apart and help them do well in life.”

Successful students and people possess these five “soft” skills and encourages parents to nurture them in their children whenever possible:

Communication skills – Verbal and nonverbal communication skills are frequently touted as the most important skills in any career. Parents should encourage their children to express their ideas and opinions clearly when writing or speaking, but it’s also crucial to build careful, attentive listening skills as well.

Empathy – Empathy is one component of emotional intelligence and something that helps people develop strong interpersonal connections—a key to success in life. Parents can help their children learn to recognize how their actions and words impact and influence others, both positively and negatively. The ability to understand others’ feelings is critical for building good relationships—with friends as well as teachers, classmates, coworkers and bosses.

Perseverance – Most parents have recited the age-old adage, “If at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again,” to their children before. Without question, life is full of challenges. One of the most important skills children can acquire is that of perseverance. Parents can facilitate the development of this trait by teaching their children to set goals and lay out smaller steps toward achieving those goals and by always talking about challenges as opportunities for learning and growth.

Teamwork – Students who are able to work effectively with all types of people have a leg up in college and the working world. Luckily for parents, today’s teachers often have their students collaborate on a variety of projects. At home, parents can offer their children opportunities to contribute and debate ideas and work with their siblings to complete tasks.

Problem-solvingChildren who take a proactive approach to solving problems and overcoming roadblocks have a big advantage. When facing problems large and small, children should try out different solutions. Parents can support this by encouraging their children to talk about what worked and didn’t work with each attempted solution and helping them think through alternatives.

Soft skills don’t come naturally to everyone, but with effort and practice, parents can foster their children’s development of these personal traits. Soft skills are important throughout school, but they become essential in one’s career .  Parents who consistently and patiently work with their children to help them become adaptable, hard-working problem-solvers with the critical thinking skills to navigate any issue are preparing them for life success.

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5 Tips for Studying Smarter 5 Tips for Studying Smarter

If you or your child have an impression that studying should be intense and time consuming to be effective, guess again. Studies show that the most successful students don’t necessarily study harder, but smarter. How can your child learn to embrace strong study habits? Here are a few tips to make the very most of study sessions:

 

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Tue, 25 Oct 2016 10:22:32 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5_tips_studyingsmarter- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5_tips_studyingsmarter- Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you or your child have an impression that studying should be intense and time consuming to be effective, guess again. Studies show that the most successful students don’t necessarily study harder, but smarter. How can your child learn to embrace strong study habits? Here are a few tips to make the very most of study sessions:

  1. Plan ahead. Cramming is the enemy of the strong student. Encourage your child to plan ahead so that study sessions are spaced over time. Repeated reviewing of material is more effective at helping students recall and remember information. Your child will be more successful if he or she studies once a day for seven days prior to a test as opposed to just one seven-hour study session the day before.
  2. Read the right way. Most classes involve reading, and some might require a lot. Your child can retain what he or she reads by practicing active reading, or reading with purpose. That means previewing a text for information, writing down any questions or ideas before diving in, identifying key terms or information while reading, recalling information and self-checking at natural stopping points along the way (such as the ends of sections or chapters), and reading summaries carefully at the end of each session. Reading in this way helps children absorb things and it also guides them toward improved comprehension and retention.
  3. Practice self-testing. Taking periodic quizzes and tests while studying new material helps students remember information, and particularly by continuing to test information after it has been learned. Children can jot down questions as they read their text or notes to assemble a self-test to take later. Encourage your child to always draw from information that the teacher has noted as important (rather than random or obscure passages in the textbook).
  4. Don’t waste time on futile practices. Certain popular study techniques have actually been found by researchers to be largely ineffective. Highlighting is a tool that many students rely upon to identify important information, but if a student highlights too much or too little or focuses on the wrong information, it can be counterproductive. The use of keyword mnemonics to memorize information is another study trick that has been proven to be unproductive, especially for the level of effort required. Bottom line: your child should embrace study practices that yield results and do away with those that do not.
  5. When in doubt, turn to the teacher. Memorizing notes or chapter summaries is not the best way to learn information and certainly not the best way to review it either. If the teacher doesn’t initiate such a conversation in class, your child should arrange a time to talk with the teacher about what is most important to focus on while preparing for a test.

Studying does not come naturally to every student, and while your child might have good intentions, these strategies will help him or her prepare for tests more efficiently and more effectively. As your child gets closer to high school, he or she will especially appreciate having reliable techniques for learning. If your child could use assistance improving those study skills, call Huntington. We can customize a program that will improve your child’s methods and approach—and result in academic success.

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Tips for Reviewing Your Child's First Report Card Your child has gotten back into the swing of the school routine, and now it's time for an academic check-up. "Think of the first report card as a great opportunity to communicate with your child about school," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. "It is the first true academic checkup of the year, and a good time to talk about how things are going."

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Tue, 25 Oct 2016 10:26:49 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-reviewing-your-childs-first-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-reviewing-your-childs-first-report-card Your child has gotten back into the swing of the school routine, and now it's time for an academic check-up. "Think of the first report card as a great opportunity to communicate with your child about school," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. "It is the first true academic checkup of the year, and a good time to talk about how things are going."

Huntington offers parents the following tips when assessing their child's first semester report card:

Jot down questions to ask the teacher. Go through the report card carefully and identify areas you'd like to discuss with the teacher. What concerns you most about your child's report card? What grades or comments surprise you? What does the teacher think you should work on at home? Be sure to ask the teacher about your child's attitude and behavior, too.

Take note of irregularities and patterns. If something on your child's report card is inconsistent with what you know about your child, it is probably worth investigating. For example, it might surprise you to see a poor grade in math if your child did well in math last year. There could be many factors at play, such as the pace of the class, basic skills missed that are now hindering your child's performance, or other issues.

Pay attention to study skills. Some smart students are hampered by disorganization and poor study skills. Does your child's report card indicate that he or she is struggling with things such as time management, focus or overall organization? If so, it may be time to intervene by helping him or her develop a homework routine and an organizational system to keep track of paperwork coming home. Talk with his or her teacher for ideas.

Go to the source. After you've taken time to review the report card, sit down with your child and get his or her perspective. What parts of school is he or she struggling with most? Let your child know that you want to help, and ask him or her how you can best do so.

Huntington advises parents not to let the first report card of the year cause stress - even if grades are lower than expected. "The report card gives you detailed information about your child's academic progress, and should be used to support your child's learning," Huntington says. "Use this invaluable tool to assess your child's first semester, identify any issues and make a plan to address them together. Don't wait to seek tutoring help if your child's skills aren't where they should be. Your child will benefit - and hopefully the next report card will reflect those efforts." For more information, please contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit http://huntingtonhelps.com.

 

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How Parents Can Support Their 21st Century Learners How Parents Can Support Their 21st Century Learners

This generation of learners is quite different than the one that came before them. Parents are aware that their children learn differently than they did in school, but they don't always know exactly why. What should you know about your child as a student? Below is some valuable insight into what 21st century learners are all about and how you can support your child at home:

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Tue, 18 Oct 2016 15:10:23 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/support_digital_learners https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/support_digital_learners Today's students are digital natives and members of the so-called Generation "Z." They have grown up with the internet and technology, and social media tools such as Instagram and Snapchat are a part of their daily lives. This generation of learners is quite different than the one that came before them. Parents are aware that their children learn differently than they did in school, but they don't always know exactly why. What should you know about your child as a student? Below is some valuable insight into what 21st century learners are all about and how you can support your child at home:

Technology is integrated into their lives. Children today spend a great deal of time online, whether that's at school or through smartphone devices. They are skilled multi-taskers who need to be engaged with a variety of teaching techniques in the classroom. You can expect that your child will become an efficient and adept researcher as he or she grows older too.

Problem solving is active. Children today have grown up in a dynamic, globalized world, and thus, are used to thinking on their toes. When it comes to school, this translates into creativity and deeper thinking. You can foster your child's learning by encouraging him or her to brainstorm solutions and think through potential ways to improve those solutions.

They are being taught essential 21st century skills. In today's information-based economy, education researchers have identified the skills that the future generation needs to achieve success in their careers. Those skills include problem-solving in the face of uncertainty, critical thinking and leadership. Your child is certainly media and technology savvy, but he or she is also entering a rapidly changing workforce that requires flexibility and creativity. Nurture those assets whenever possible.

They move quickly. The classroom today is largely a student-centered learning environment. Students prefer active learning and projects that engage them in material. They are often self-starters and very capable of managing ambiguity, yet they seek to understand the relevance of what they learn as well. As you guide your child, keep these tendencies in mind.

They are used to working in teams. Thanks to the social networks in which today's children frequently interact, students are highly collaborative and used to learning alongside their peers. Encourage your child to share what he or she learns with you and others. Doing so helps your child remember and retain, and reinforces the approach of his or her teacher.

Your job as a parent is to support your child's educational journey and guide him or her toward independence and success—a job that is much easier to do when you have a good understanding of what your child is learning at school and how he or she learns best. If you need help, call Huntington, we understand the unique traits of students today and have adapted our learning programs to fit their needs and help them flourish. Whether your child is struggling in school or wants to build skills or get ahead, Huntington can help. Call 1 800 CAN LEARN today to learn more.

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Partnering with your Child's Teacher for a Successful School Year Most teachers will tell any parent that parental participation is vital to their child's success in school. As your child starts a brand new school year, take time to get acquainted with the person (or persons) that will play a large part in your child's learning experience-your child's teacher.

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Thu, 15 Sep 2016 17:34:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/partnering-with-your-childs-teacher-for-a-successful-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/partnering-with-your-childs-teacher-for-a-successful-school-year How can you effectively collaborate with your child's teacher? By fostering positive and productive communication throughout the year. Just as it is important to talk with your child about school, communicating with his or her teacher is crucial as well. Read on for a few pointers on how to develop a positive parent-teacher relationship and make the most out of it all year long.

Go to parent-teacher conferences.
Take advantage of parent-teacher conferences, which offer regular opportunities for you to talk with your child's teacher face to face. To get the most out of these meetings, jot down any issues you'd like to discuss before you go. If your child is struggling with school or homework, ask his or her teacher lots of questions, such as:

  • Does my child seem focused during class?
  • Does my child come prepared for class
  • Does my child complete all homework and classroom assignments
  • Does my child get along with his or her peers?
  • What are my child's best subjects? What subjects does my child struggle with?
  • Does my child participate in class?
  • Does my child pay attention in class?
  • Has my child had absences from school that I may not be aware of?
  • What tests will my child take this school year? What do these tests measure?

Of course, your child's teacher may have a few questions for you as well. If your child is experiencing problems at home, with friends or in other areas of his or her life, be sure to share this with your child's teacher. Together, the two of you can brainstorm ways to lessen the impact of outside factors on your child's school performance.

Keep interactions positive and collaborative.
Not every parent-teacher relationship will be perfect. Topics such as homework, tests and learning environment may rouse disagreement between you and your child's teacher, particularly if your child is struggling to keep up or has difficulty completing assignments. However, it's best to approach your child's teacher with a cooperative attitude, avoiding assigning blame or criticizing. First, attempt to understand the situation. Remember that your child's teacher also has your child's best interests in mind.

Ask teachers what you can do to help your child at home.
Whether at parent-teacher conferences or in a separate meeting or discussion, be sure to ask your child's teacher for suggestions on how to help your child get the most out of homework and improve his or her study habits. Your child's teacher will likely have several helpful suggestions and be more than willing to help you devise an action plan to enhance your child's learning at home.

Be mindful of a teacher's schedule.
Keep in mind when calling your child's teacher or requesting meetings that he or she likely interacts with many other students' parents on a regular basis as well. Ask your child's teacher what is the best way for the two of you to communicate. Some teachers may suggest using email to stay in touch when quick questions arise, saving in-person meetings for bigger issues.

In the end, you and your child's teacher have the same goal: to provide your child the best education possible. Do your part to make it a great year by keeping the lines of communication open. Huntington is here to help every step of the way. If your child needs additional help, turn to us. We can address areas where your child may be struggling and tailor a program based on his or her learning needs.

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Helping Your Child Become Faster and More Efficient by Embracing Routine and Structure For a busy parents with limited time, it's frustrating when your child seems to have no sense of urgency and no motivation to get things done. If you're having a hard time getting your child to move faster—here are a few tips to help him or her become speedier and more organized in school and life.

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Tue, 20 Sep 2016 22:37:29 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-become-faster-and-more-efficient-by-embracing-routine-and-structure https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-become-faster-and-more-efficient-by-embracing-routine-and-structure Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Help your child be faster and more efficient this school year!

For a busy parents with limited time, it's frustrating when your child seems to have no sense of urgency and no motivation to get things done. If you're having a hard time getting your child to move faster—here are a few tips to help him or her become speedier and more organized in school and life.

Give your child checklists. Some children do much better when they have a visual to-do list that they can check off step by step. Create a checklist for any daily routine that seems to spark your child’s inner procrastinator. For a younger child, draw or write out the steps and laminate the checklist. For the morning checklist, for example, your child can check off each step with a dry erase marker—from getting dressed to making a lunch to checking that all homework and other items are in placed into his or her backpack before heading out the door. Older children might do well with smartphone reminders and alarms.  

Plan ahead—and get your child to do the same. Whenever possible, do things ahead of time. If your child has basketball practice shortly after school, have him or her get out the gym bag, clothes and gear the night before, so that all he or she needs to do after school is change clothes and grab a quick snack. If the morning routine is difficult for your child, have him or her lay out his or outfit and get his or her backpack ready to go at night rather than in the morning.

Set time limits for each and every task. Some children are relatively organized, but slower than they need to be. If this is your child, set small goals for each task. For example, if a homework worksheet should take your child 10 minutes to complete, set a timer for 15. If he or she dawdles or gets distracted while getting ready for school, set a goal of getting to the breakfast table by a specific time. Then, set another goal of having his or her shoes on and backpack ready 10 minutes before departure time.

Keep an organized house and have your child do the same. Good organization and efficiency go hand in hand. When your child is disorganized, it’s too easy for him or her to lose things and overlook important dates, obligations and homework assignments—and these problems are only exacerbated by his or her tendency to move and work slowly. Encourage your child to embrace a reliable organizational system at his or her desk, in his or her room and anywhere else. This leads to less wasted time and minimized stress.

Have a frank conversation. Sometimes, the logical approach can work wonders. Talk with your child about all of the things that need to be accomplished each day by your child and by you. Explain that it is difficult to finish those tasks when he or she wastes 25 minutes on something that should take two, and that you want his or her help in keeping the household chaos to a minimum. Let your child know that the more efficient he or she is with time, the more time he or she will have to do fun things like play games or hang out with friends.

Build in extra time. The reality is that some children may just do things slower—from eating dinner to showering to completing school work. Do your best to establish and stick to routines whenever possible, but also be realistic about your expectations. Your child may simply be hard wired to move more slowly than you would prefer. Build a little extra time into your daily routines to accommodate and avoid the stress of constant scolding and nagging.

With effort, patience and practice, you can help you child become responsible and efficient with his or her time. Remember: all children are different, so while he or she may not do things exactly as you like, you can help him or her become a self-starter and an organized student and person. Those skills will stay with your child—and benefit him or her—for the rest of his or her life. 

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Tips to Help Children Become Better Writers Writing is one of the most important skills a child will acquire as a student—and also one of the most difficult to master.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:15:56 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-children-become-better-writers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-children-become-better-writers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Writing is one of the most important skills a child will acquire as a student—and also one of the most difficult to master. Why? Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center explains that writing involves a combination of skills. “Good writers are also good readers and have strong critical thinking and analytical skills, not to mention reading comprehension skills,” Huntington says. “It is something that takes lots of practice, which can be a challenge when children struggle with any of the underlying building blocks.”

Luckily, Huntington says there are a number of ways students can build their writing skills from the ground up. Here are a few tips to help students develop and improve their writing skills:

Read more. Many teachers say that the best way to become a better writer is to read more and read widely. There are many reasons for this: reading helps children expand their vocabulary, understand the many different uses of language and methods of storytelling or informative writing, and see grammar rules in action. It helps them appreciate the concept of voice in fiction and develop an understanding of how to share information in a clear, coherent, succinct way in nonfiction.

Brainstorm first. Strong writers often invest as much into the preparation required to write as the writing itself. For an essay or other writing assignment, your child should become adept at the brainstorming process. If given a specific topic, your child’s job is easier, but if not, encourage him or her to think through an approach to the topic before writing. Your child should ask questions such as: What is most interesting about this subject? Who am I speaking to? What facts about this topic might people not already know?

Get organized before writing. When writing anything from a two-page book report to a 15-page research paper to an opinion essay, an outline is a must. This helps writers organize their ideas and present them in the most logical, compelling way. Encourage your child to refer back to their brainstorming notes and come up with the “big idea” of what they’re writing and main three or four points, then confirm that they are answering the questions being asked of them (in an assignment). Even a loose outline will help your child write more clearly and stay on topic when working from a writing prompt or assignment.

Become a better editor. Strong writers know that no article, essay or story comes out perfect the first time. Teach your child to think of writing as a process that involves writing, editing, improving (and repeating if needed). After your child writes a draft, he or she should set it aside, then read with fresh eyes no sooner than a few hours later. At this point, your child should mark up the written piece for grammar and spelling mistakes as well as any areas that are unclear, do not follow the outline, do not make sense or could make his or her points stronger. It can be helpful for you to read your child’s work as well.

Write for fun. For many children, the mechanics of writing make it a frustrating subject—not to mention the fact that so much of what they write is required for school. Encourage your child to keep a journal, or even make it something you do together each evening. A daily journaling habit has numerous benefits for a child’s emotional well-being and stress level, but it is also a great way to think critically through ideas and express opinions and feelings in writing. Writing letters to a friend, grandparent or other family member is another valuable and fun activity.

Like any subject, writing is one where practice makes better. The more your child writes, the more he or she will improve—and perhaps even enjoy it. “Writing well involves using vivid language, organizing one’s thoughts and using good grammar and spelling,” says Last Name. “These are all things students can improve by reading frequently and seeking guidance from their teachers—and of course through plenty of repetition.”

If your child needs help building the skills that writing requires or would simply like some guidance on how to become a better writer, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Regression: What it is and How to Avoid it This Summer Dr. Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center urges parents to engage their children in learning activities to avoid summer regression. Put simply, summer regression is the loss of academic knowledge gained throughout the school year. “Learning loss or the ‘summer slide’ among students over summer break is a very real problem that we see often,” says Huntington, adding that most students can lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math and reading achievement during this period. He offers several ways for parents to help minimize summer regression.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:50:39 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-regression-in-the-summer https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-regression-in-the-summer Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington It’s summer vacation, and your child is probably happy to spend his or her days lounging and recuperating from the hectic school year. A break is well deserved, but Dr. Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center urges parents to engage their children in learning activities to avoid summer regression. Put simply, summer regression is the loss of academic knowledge gained throughout the school year. “Learning loss or the ‘summer slide’ among students over summer break is a very real problem that we see often,” says Huntington, adding that most students can lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math and reading achievement during this period. He offers several ways for parents to help minimize summer regression:

Read daily. A daily reading habit is one of the easiest ways for children to keep their brains in shape over summer and deter any loss of reading ability. Incorporate reading into the summer routine. Check out book clubs or summer reading programs offered at your local library or book store. Visit the library every week. Start a series as a family and read a book together.

Write often. Writing frequently will help your child keep up important literacy skills such as self-expression and vocabulary acquisition. While you might have trouble convincing your child to write essays or book reports this summer, creative writing or journal writing still has many benefits. It encourages creativity, problem solving and experimentation with various types of storytelling, and also improves communication skills.

Plan educational visits. Don’t forget that visits to your local history, science, art and other museums are fun learning opportunities. If you’re taking any vacations, incorporate a family field trip to an interesting monument, historical site or museum in the area you’re visiting. Before you go, check out books from the library about the place or topic that you can read together. Use the plane or car ride home as a chance to reflect on the visit, what your child learned, and what he or she wants to learn more about.

Set aside daily learning time. If your child does best with a learning routine, consider purchasing grade-specific workbooks that your child can work on throughout the summer. The goal of these programs is to help students practice and maintain skills they acquired all year and prevent them from losing those concepts due to inactivity. Your school or teacher might have recommendations, but books such as Summer Bridge, ThinkStretch and Summer Fit are worth consideration. Just 15 minutes a day can make a huge difference.

Enroll in a summer learning program. Whether your child struggled this school year and needs to catch up or you want to help your child build new skills and confidence, an individualized summer tutoring program is a great solution. Huntington can help your child maintain skills, improve habits and prepare for a smooth transition into the next grade.

“Parents can help their child minimize regression this summer by investing a small amount of time into learning activities,” says Huntington. For ideas on how best to engage your child, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How to Make Reading Part of the Summer Routine Summer is an ideal time to incorporate reading into the daily schedule—and the perfect opportunity to get children to enjoy this ageless pastime. “The key to making reading a daily habit is to make it enjoyable, and there are so many ways to do that during summer,” says Huntington. “Make it fun. Let your child choose the books. Make reading a fun family tradition. When you do things like this, you’ll start to see your child choosing to read over other activities, and his or her reading skills will improve greatly as well.”

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:56:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-make-summer-reading-routine-for-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-make-summer-reading-routine-for-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Many children look forward to summer as a time to unwind, relax and enjoy—and reading for fun can definitely enhance the summer. “The school year is busy and most students read plenty, but not necessarily the books or materials of their choosing,” says Eileen Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center. “Summer reading can be so much fun because children can read whatever they choose, take their time and explore topics they find interesting.”

It’s easier than you think to make reading a part of your summer routine, says Huntington. Here of a few tips:

Do some research. Teachers and education professionals know well that you’ll have far better luck getting children to choose to read if they find books that interest them. So, do a little homework on books that might appeal to your child. What topic, sport or activity is your child into right now? If you need help, ask your librarian for recommendations. Websites like goodreads.com are also helpful for searching genres (even getting as specific as children’s classics, juvenile, young adult fiction, realistic young adult, teen and young adult contemporary, for example) and reading reviews.

Make it family time. Set aside 20 or 30 minutes each evening for the entire family to get out their books and read together. Make reading time a treat by setting out a tray of summer snacks and a pitcher of ice cold lemonade. If you have a shady spot in the backyard, transform it into your summer reading spot with a few lounge chairs or hammocks. The more you can treat reading like a fun, “want-to” activity, the more your child will embrace it and look forward to it.

Sign up for summer reading programs. Summer reading programs do a great job of rewarding readers for achieving milestones and building a sense of community among readers. Huntington Learning Center’s Reading Adventure Program runs all summer long and has children choose books from a pre-selected book list with many high-interest, popular books. Students record their reading in a reading “passport” and get recognized for meeting their goals. Don’t forget to check out summer reading programs at your local library and bookstores as well.

Visit the library. Librarians are the biggest proponents of summer reading and you’ll find lots of ideas to get your child inspired at your local library. Look into summer book clubs, summer reading programs, reading activities for teens and family reading programs. At a minimum, stopping by the library regularly is a great way to keep reading top of mind and set and meet goals. For every book that your child completes, why not reward him or her with a stop at the ice cream shop on the way home?

Summer is an ideal time to incorporate reading into the daily schedule—and the perfect opportunity to get children to enjoy this ageless pastime. “The key to making reading a daily habit is to make it enjoyable, and there are so many ways to do that during summer,” says Huntington. “Make it fun. Let your child choose the books. Make reading a fun family tradition. When you do things like this, you’ll start to see your child choosing to read over other activities, and his or her reading skills will improve greatly as well.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Establishing a Good After-School Routine Ray Huntington offers suggestions for parents who want to help their child establish a successful after-school routine.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:35:41 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/establishing-good-afterschool-routine https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/establishing-good-afterschool-routine Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When it comes to homework and studying, having a plan helps students maximize their time and get more done. After a long day at school, many children want nothing more than to come home and toss the backpack aside, but Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center says that parents should encourage children to embrace a routine to minimize stress. “Having a set schedule after school sounds rigid, but really, it prevents students from unknowingly wasting their time,” Huntington says. “With a reliable routine, students are more productive overall and they also learn to take ownership of their schedules.”

Huntington offers these suggestions for parents who want to help their child establish a successful after-school routine:

Have your child take the lead. One of the biggest benefits of creating a routine is that it empowers children to take responsibility for their daily to-dos. Sit down together to develop an after-school schedule that your child finds workable and in tune to his or her preferences (of when to study and when to enjoy downtime, for example).

Design with your child in mind. A routine will be more effective if it is created with your child’s input. Think about things like when your child is the most focused and what type of environment works best for your child to study (with siblings or alone? In his or her room or in the kitchen?). Pay attention to what works and stick to it.

Put the routine on display. Like the teacher does in the classroom, set expectations at home each day. Hang the after-school routine in a visible location—consider buying a white board for the kitchen or somewhere similar—and have your child look at it before leaving for school and as soon as he or she gets home. It should be detailed enough to keep your child on task, but flexible to incorporate free time. For example, a student in elementary school could follow a routine such as:

            Empty backpack, prep for homework                         3:30-3:45

            Wash hands, snack                                                      3:45-4:00

            Homework                                                                  4:00-4:30

            Practice piano                                                             4:30-4:45

            Basketball practice                                                      5:00-6:00

            Dinner, cleanup                                                          6:00-7:00

            Reading, any other studying                                        7:00-7:30

            Bedtime prep                                                               7:30-8:00

            Free time                                                                     8:00-8:30

            Lights out                                                                    8:30                                        

 Incorporate organization. At the end of each homework session, your child should take a few minutes to neaten his or her workspace, put away all supplies, check off any completed to-dos and mentally prepare for the next school day. Organization will help your child pick up where he or she left off at the next study session, minimizing ramp-up time and maximizing actual work time.

 As a parent, your job is to help your child acquire the study skills and independence to be an effective learner. “Routines at home teach children to be self-starters, take responsibility for what they have to accomplish and rely on themselves, not others, to make those things happen,” says Huntington. “By encouraging and upholding a routine and system of organization at home, you’re ingraining those essentials into your child, which will benefit him or her over the long term.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How to Help a Child with ADHD Improve Focus and Task Completion For students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), simple tasks such as getting ready for school and finishing a homework assignment can be a stressful battle. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center offers a few strategies for parents to keep ADHD students focused and on task.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:42:29 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-adhd-child-improve-focus-and-task-completion https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-adhd-child-improve-focus-and-task-completion Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center For students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), simple tasks such as getting ready for school and finishing a homework assignment can be a stressful battle. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of children with ADHD that approaching these issues with patience and consistency can make a tremendous difference. “Your primary goal is to help  your child be successful in spite of some of the challenges he or she faces with time management and attention,” says Huntington. She offers a few strategies for parents to keep ADHD students focused and on task:

Focus on the positive. Negative attention and threats can exacerbate a problematic situation with an ADHD child. Instead, point out the things that your child is doing right and reward effort and positive behavior rather than solely focus on your child’s failures.

Use checklists for daily tasks and routines. Relying on checklists for multistep tasks can make a big difference for ADHD children, who tend to lose focus even during simple daily routines. For example, an after school checklist might include steps like empty backpack folders, hand Mom and Dad important papers, bring homework folder and pencils to desk and grab snack. Put tasks in order or even assign lengths of time. Use checklists for other routines as well, such as homework sessions and chores.

Use timers. It’s common for ADHD children to lose track of time or take a long time to complete uncomplicated tasks. Give your child a timer to use along with his or her daily checklist. Break down big tasks into smaller ones and assign time limits for each. For example, if your child can comfortably complete homework in 45 minutes, break down each subject even further: 15 minutes for math, 10 minutes for writing and 20 minutes for reading.

Use focus-enhancing tools. Some settings and tools can promote concentration and keep children relaxed and focused. Does your child need a little background noise or music to concentrate? Does he or she prefer sitting on an exercise ball instead of a desk chair? Some ADHD students think best when fidgeting or playing with silly putty or another fidget/sensory toy or tool. Others are most successful when their workspace is clear and uncluttered. Pay attention to how your child works and talk about what could help.

Boost your child’s confidence. Children who struggle to get things done and stay focused often struggle with diminished confidence. Help your child recognize that which makes him or her special and always compliment his or her efforts and progress, no matter how small.

Students with an ADHD diagnosis have to work hard to stay on task and focused. If you need help supporting your child’s needs, call Huntington. Our ADHD instructional strategies and customized programs can help your child boost his or her skills and do better in school.

Call 1 800 CAN LEARN today.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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The Importance of Routine and Organization You’ve probably heard before that students who embrace regular routines are more successful, organized and effective. Studies prove this to be true as well. Here is what some of the research says about the positive impact that routines at home can have on children’s school performance—drawing on studies recently completed:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:13:42 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the_importance_of_routine_and_organization https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the_importance_of_routine_and_organization Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center You’ve probably heard before that students who embrace regular routines are more successful, organized and effective. Studies prove this to be true as well. Here is what some of the research says about the positive impact that routines at home can have on children’s school performance—drawing on studies recently completed:

  • Reading routines help students develop early literacy skills and set the stage for continued enjoyment of reading into the school years.
  • Family routines provide children with a model for structure.
  • Family routines during the early childhood years get students involved in activities that contribute to vocabulary development and social skills building as well as academic achievement later on.
  • A study showed that families with a stable, high level of commitment in rituals at home have children with higher scores on standard tests of academic achievement than children of families with a low level or decline in routine.
  • In a study of children with divorced parents, regular bedtime predicted academic performance two years after the initial assessment.
  • An early literacy study said that book-reading routines promote future academic success.

At Huntington Learning Center, our experience echoes these findings—we see every day that students are more organized and capable of achieving their goals when they know what to expect at home and in the classroom. Routines help children build independence, teaching them to set small goals and complete tasks. Through our work with thousands of children, we have found that:

  • Structure and routines teach children responsibility and inspire them to take pride in and ownership of their work.
  • Children who embrace routines and organization tend to do better in school.
  • Routines teach children about self-discipline and working toward goals.
  • Children who are empowered by parents and teachers to take primary responsibility for their daily tasks build the confidence to try new things without fear of failure.
  • Consistency in the daily and homework routine helps children make the most of their time, leaving more time for hobbies, activities and socializing.
  • Routines reduce anxiety about the unknown and help children feel safer in the classroom.
  • At home, routines reinforce what teachers do in the classroom and help children understand that being organized saves time, minimizes stress and reduces unnecessary chaos.
  • In the classroom, routines minimize disruptions and wasted time, making transitions from activity to activity smoother and easier.

Most parents know from experience that routines are a good thing, but the great news is that educational researchers and teachers alike agree. Continue to work on creating and upholding reliable routines for homework, study time and daily tasks and you’ll notice that your child is a more organized, efficient and happy student.

Huntington Learning Center drew from the article, “Family Routines and Rituals” in Infants & Young Children, Vol. 20, No. 4, for this article.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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How Does Your Child Learn Best? It doesn't take an education professional to know that when it comes to learning, each person is unique.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:46:48 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-does-your-child-learn-best https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-does-your-child-learn-best Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Does Your Child Learn Best?

It doesn’t take an education professional to know that when it comes to learning, each person is unique. As a parent, it’s not just helpful to know more about how your child learns—it’s essential. You’ve probably heard before about learning styles, which are often explained through different theories and models. Here are a few well-known types that suggest how students might approach learning tasks:

The VARK model – This commonly cited model examines learning style through the senses:

  • Visual learners learn best through the use of visual aids, diagrams, or other visual tools other than words.
  • Auditory learners process best through listening, reading aloud and talking about ideas.
  • Read/write learners prefer taking in information through the texts which they read.
  • Kinesthetic learners prefer using their hands or body to learn by “doing.”

The Experiential Learning Model – This model considers learning as a cycle that begins with a concrete experience, moves into reflective observation to understand the meaning of things from different viewpoints, abstract conceptualization to analyze a situation, and active experimentation to reinforce learning through action. In short, the cycles are feeling, watching, thinking and doing. 

You can work with your school’s guidance counseling office to arrange for your child to take one or more learning assessments to better understand his or her learning style. However, you can still get a good idea of how your child learns, the types of environments that suit him or her best, and more by asking the right questions and being observant. Start with these topics for discussion with your child:

When does your child seem to absorb information? While reading? While being read to? While talking things through?

How and where does your child prefer to do homework? Is your child most focused when listening to music? In a quiet space? When studying alone, or with siblings?

When does your child seem the most productive? In the morning or at night? Immediately after school or after dinner?

What seems to be the best way for your child to grasp new information? Through reading? Visual aids? By watching someone else do something first?

What are your child’s best subjects? What concepts are easiest and hardest for your child? What does the teacher think? Why does your child prefer certain subjects over others?

What environments get your child most excited about learning? Indoor or outdoor? Smaller classes or larger ones? Classes with frequent group discussions or those where students learn independently?

Getting to know your child as a student is valuable because it will help you work effectively with his or her teacher when issues arise. Just as important, you will be better equipped to nurture your child’s strengths and guide your child toward overcoming weaknesses. If you need help, contact Huntington. We can assess your child’s learning style and preferences and academic strengths and weaknesses and develop a program of instruction to help your child become the best student possible. Call us at 800-CAN-LEARN.   

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Coming March 2016: the Redesigned SAT The long-anticipated redesigned SAT is almost here, and if your high school student is planning to take this exam for the first time next spring, he or she will definitely be impacted.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:48:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/coming-march-2016-the-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/coming-march-2016-the-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Coming March 2016: the Redesigned SAT

The long-anticipated redesigned SAT is almost here, and if your high school student is planning to take this exam for the first time next spring, he or she will definitely be impacted. Huntington Learning Center is your resource for all things SAT. Here is a high-level view of what to expect from the redesigned SAT, to be debuted in March 2016:

Greater focus on the skills needed for college and workforce success – The redesigned SAT is focused on the skills, knowledge and understandings that predict student success in college and the workforce. The College Board says the most essential skills students need are the ability to:

  • Read, analyze, and use reasoning to comprehend challenging literary and informational texts, including texts on science and history/social studies topics, to expand their knowledge and understanding.
  • Revise and edit extended texts across a range of academic and career-related subjects demonstrating an understanding of grammar and punctuation conventions as well as proper development and organization for the most effective expression of ideas.
  • Show command of a focused, but powerful set of knowledge, skills, and understanding in math, and apply that ability to solve problems situated in science, social studies, and career-related contexts.
  • Make careful and considered use of evidence as students read and write.
  • Demonstrate reading, writing, and math skills in analyzing data, including data represented graphically in tables, charts, and other formats.
  • Reveal an understanding of relevant words in context and how word choice shapes meaning and tone.

Optional essay – The Essay Test on the SAT will now be optional. Students must engage in and demonstrate the deep critical thinking and analysis (and of course, writing skills) learned throughout high school.

New Reading Test, Writing and Language Test, and Essay Test – The College Board made six major changes to these tests, summarized as follows:

  1. Incorporated texts spanning a range of difficulty into the exams.
  2. Changed the tests to assess whether students are able to analyze source texts and use textual evidence effectively to support claims and points.
  3. Incorporated informational graphics, such as tables, graphs and charts.
  4. Shifted the focus away from obscure vocabulary, with more emphasis placed on word meanings and the impact of word choice.
  5. Focused the redesigned tests on language that is associated with clear and effective communication.
  6. Adjusted the test to incorporate texts in a range of subject areas (including U.S. and world literature, science, history/social studies, the humanities, and careers).

New Math Test – The College Board made these changes to the Math Test:

  1. Focused the exam on the math knowledge, skills, and understandings that are most strongly linked to readiness for and success in college.
  2. Emphasized problem solving and data analysis.
  3. Included both calculator and no-calculator sections.

For more specific details on the redesigned SAT, call Huntington. We can help you and your teen understand how the redesigned SAT will differ, how your teen needs to adjust his or her study approach, and much more.

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Start the School Year Off the Right Way With These Study Tips Utilizing the proper study tips can be the difference between average and extraordinary grades. Read the tips found here in order to reach your potential.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:59:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/start-the-school-year-off-the-right-way-with-these-study-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/start-the-school-year-off-the-right-way-with-these-study-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Start the School Year Off the Right Way With These Study Tips

The new school year is here! Start the year off right - develop a study schedule, organize your materials, and take a few moments to reflect on what you can do to make this year the best yet.  

Stay a step ahead Don’t wait until you are behind to adjust your study skills. Starting the school year off the right way will provide you the opportunity to maximize your learning and stay ahead of your studies.

Attend to your learning Good attendance is necessary for school success. Arrive at your classes early, make sure your materials are ready, and prepare for the day’s learning. Being ready before the school day and the individual class begins will help you acquire the most new knowledge.

Review your study habits Think about your previous years’ study habits and determine what worked best for you. Talk to your teachers about any concerns you may have and how this year’s courses will impact your individual study habits. If you have laboratory based courses, such as chemistry, biology, or physics, seek additional time in the lab to review your learning with course materials on hand.

Identify your strengths and weaknesses Understanding what your strongest academic areas are, and identifying the areas you struggle with the most, will help you plan your studying and maximize your learning. Huntington Learning Center can help. Each customized tutoring plan we create is based on the individual student’s strengths and weaknesses. Your tutoring plan will reflect your needs and is crafted based on your individual assessment data.

Find What You Need Each student is different and what works best for you is personal. Some students choose to study in large chunks of time and others prefer to spread their studying out over time. You may study best at home in your bedroom but your friend may do better in a secluded corner of the public library. Determining your ideal conditions for studying will aid your preparation.  

Choose the perfect spot It is important to determine the perfect spot for you to study. All of these study tips will be irrelevant if your study location is insufficient. Where are you most comfortable? Which study spot has the least amount of distractions? Where do you complete your best work?

Set a weekly schedule Take the time to create a master study schedule you can stick to each week. Be careful to schedule plenty of time around family, athletic, and extra-curricular activities. Consider building in extra time in case unforeseen circumstances or commitmen ts arise. 

Know when you need help If your school work is quickly becoming overwhelming and you are struggling to keep up it may be time to ask for help. The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers will administer assessments to determine your current strengths and weaknesses. Your progress will be carefully monitored to determine areas of continued need and the tutoring plan will be updated as you master new learning.

Stay in Touch It is important to stay on top of both coursework and your individual performance. Knowing when you need additional support, and asking for help, is best done as soon as difficulties arise. If you wait too long to seek assistance you will likely be wasting precious study time. 

Review expectations Don't just read the syllabus and stick it in a folder. Your course expectations should be reviewed often to ensure you haven't missed any important dates or information. Compare the expectations periodically with your master calendar to make sure you haven't overlooked anything.

Connect with others There may be other students in your class who are searching for a peer to connect with. Having another student in the class to study with, compare notes, and bounce ideas off of is a great way to stay connected with the academic work.

Communicate with teachers and tutors Do your part to communicate with your teachers and tutors. When you are feeling confused ask for help. When something seems frustrating or overwhelming let them know. Utilize your teacher's office hours or review sessions and spend time during tutoring sessions to share your concerns or problems. 

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Get Your Child Ready For School The start of the school year causes a mixed reaction among elementary school-aged children.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:50:50 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-school Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Get Your Child Ready for School

The start of the school year causes a mixed reaction among elementary school-aged children. Some are excited to see their friends and begin learning again. Others feel the summer went by in a blink and mourn the loss of the warm weather, playing outside all day and lack of homework. After a long summer of limited learning, students might need extra help preparing for the upcoming school year. 

How can you help your child get ready for school?

  • Slowly adjust your child back into the typical school schedule. In the last weeks before school begins, it is highly beneficial if parents simulate their child’s daily school routine. Practice the morning process of waking up earlier, getting dressed and eating breakfast within your “school schedule.” Therefore, when school begins your child will be well adjusted and able to focus on their day of learning.

     

    Set the time and place for homework. Whether it is the kitchen table or their own desk, creating a designated place, and a time, for homework makes it a habit. If possible, be available for your student while he or she is doing homework so you can help with any potential problems.
     
  • Talk with your child’s teachers. During elementary school, it is vital to check in with your child’s teachers. Understand the type of homework, tests and projects your student will be assigned so you can help and aren’t surprised by bigger projects that are on the horizon. Keep track of when your child’s assignments are due so that you can instill time management skills.
     
  • Find exceptional tutoring services. To ensure your child’s success, turn to tutoring services. Provide your student with professional help so he or she can succeed during the upcoming school year. With the help of a learning center, students will remain on track with what is being taught in their classrooms. Do not wait for your student to show signs of struggling with the subject matter. By introducing tutoring services early in your child’s life, you will instill the first of many valuable lessons – always ask for help when needed!
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Common Core and Critical Thinking: Helping Students Hone This Important Skill We help students hone the common core curriculum and the critical thinking behind science, math, and reading skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:48:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-core-and-critical-thinking-helping-students-hone-this-important-skill- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-core-and-critical-thinking-helping-students-hone-this-important-skill- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Common Core and Critical Thinking: Helping Students Hone This Important Skill

The Common Core State Standards are intended to help students prepare for college and the working world, wherein they must think critically and apply the skills they learn in the classroom to a variety of real-world scenarios. The “buzz” about the standards is that they go much deeper into all math and English-language arts areas and emphasize comprehension and building understanding more so than rote memorization. The standards are meant to strengthen students’ ability to think, analyze, comprehend, defend and support one’s ideas, and much more. According to the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, the Common Core State Standards weave such aptitudes throughout the standards. Here are a few examples:

Reading

Reading comprehension is top of mind at all levels. As students read a variety of texts—both literature and nonfiction—they will be expected to make logical inferences, express their insights, explore ideas, and think about topics from many different viewpoints, among other objectives.

Speaking and listening

Through speaking and listening (and through media), students must assess and offer complex information and ideas. The classroom will focus on smaller group discussions as well as one-on-one discussions as a way to encourage students to think critically, work together to develop ideas and answer questions, and more.

Writing

Students are expected to write thoughtful, logical arguments, express their opinions, reason, and conduct focused and in-depth research.

Media and Technology

A huge part of 21st-century learning is knowing how to use, critically analyze and produce media and technology. Technology and media are woven throughout the standards—from teaching students to present ideas and knowledge in various media formats to using technology to develop mathematical models that link classroom math to everyday decision making.

Mathematics

High school students will be expected to apply mathematical ways of thinking to real-world issues and challenges and think and reason their way through math problems. The elementary and middle school standards help prepare students for this type of thinking.

There are many things you can do to help your student build his or her critical thinking skills, thereby equipping him or her for the curricular changes resulting from Common Core. Here are a few simple ideas to help your student engage in critical thinking each and every day.

  • Ask your student questions that confirm his or her understanding of the texts that he or she reads.
  • Encourage your child to analyze what he reads—whether that’s newspaper or magazine articles or fiction stories and books. Ask questions about the main idea of the story such as what the author’s purpose is (to entertain or persuade, for example), whether a piece is opinion or fact and how he or she can tell, and what clues he or she can identify about a story’s plot, main message or takeaway.
  • Ask your child how he or she feels about texts and readings and why. Why does he or enjoy a story or not? Why does he or she think a certain event or point is the most important in a passage or story? Why does he or she like certain characters?
  • When using measurement in math homework, encourage your child to think about how and where measurements are used in life.
  • As your child completes math problems, have him or her explain how he or she reached an answer and why he or she thinks that approach makes sense.
  • When using graphs in homework, encourage your child to carefully interpret data, think about how graphs make it easier to represent data (versus communicating data in a different way), and consider how he or she might collect and show data in a different way.
  • In math word problems, have your child talk you through the information provided and explain how he or she will use such information to solve problems (as well as what information might be missing).
  • Encourage your child to notice patterns in the real world.
  • Have your child point out the use of fractions in everyday use.

Critical thinking is an important life skill that is now becoming a focal point in math and English-language arts curriculum. Talk with your child’s teacher about how you can support his or her development of such higher order thinking abilities. Also, throughout your child’s daily life, encourage him or her to think, reflect, make decisions and develop opinions.

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How to Prepare Your Student to Go Back to School If your child could use a little help getting back into the school swing of things, there are a number of simple things you can do to make the transition easier.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:13:07 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-prepare-your-student-to-go-back-to-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-prepare-your-student-to-go-back-to-school If your child could use a little help getting back into the school swing of things, there are a number of simple things you can do to make the transition easier. "Take steps these final few weeks of summer to help your student prepare mentally and otherwise for a new school year," advises Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers these tips to ready children for the first day and week of school:

Call up friends. If your child hasn't seen classmates from last year all summer, now is a great time to arrange a few activities with school friends. If you know students who will be in your child's class, encourage your child to reach out to them, too.

Make a school visit. Stop by the school at least once to let your child walk around and check out his or her new classroom, if possible. If your child has an opportunity to meet staff members and his or her new teacher (at back-to-school night or in another way), take advantage.

Go over the routine. If your summer routine has been relaxed, now is the time to remind your child how a typical school day will go. If needed, start enforcing a reasonable bedtime a few weeks before school starts. Hang a family schedule and/or calendar in a visible place.

Get the home organized. Keep hooks near the entry door to your home where your child can keep the backpack, jacket and other school gear. Have him or her organize his or her desk or homework area. Take your child shopping to restock school and organizational supplies for the home and the classroom. Don't forget to buy a new planner for him or her to use to stay on top of all obligations and assignments.

Do some refresher work. The final few weeks of summer, incorporate a little school work into your child's daily schedule, using workbooks or worksheets from last year to brush up on math, reading and other basics. To practice writing, have your child keep a daily journal on the things he or she did this summer. As you bump up bedtime, include reading in the nightly routine-letting your child choose books from the library.

Sit down to talk about goals. Goal setting can be a powerful tool. Talk with your child about the things that he or she would like to accomplish or change this school year-academic or otherwise. If your child had any difficulties last year, let him or her know that you are there to help and want to maintain open communication about school.

When it comes to preparing for back to school, a little can go a long way. "Back to school preparation is largely about getting in the right mindset," says Huntington. "Help your child prepare by talking positively about this coming school year and the good things to come. Remind your child of the best parts of school, and also let him or her know that you're always there to help problem solve when issues arise."



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Tips to Make it a Great School Year Oradell, N.J. If it seems that your student isn't ready to get back into the school routine, there are several ways to help him or her ease into school mode.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:17:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year If it seems that your student isn't ready to get back into the school routine, there are several ways to help him or her ease into school mode.

"It's natural for children to be anxious or sad about the end of summer break, but you can help smooth the transition back to school by being positive and reminding your child of the fun parts about a new school year," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers these tips to make it a great school year:

View this year as a new opportunity. If your child had any school issues or other problems last year, encourage him or her to think of this new school year as a chance to start anew. Remind your child of the best parts of the previous school year—a friendship made, a favorite extracurricular activity discovered or a goal achieved. An optimistic outlook can go a long way.

Don't wait to address problems. If academics were a problem last year, it is unlikely that the problem went away. Weak skills may still exist and should be addressed. Any change in your child's demeanor or problems arising with certain subjects, investigate immediately. By report card time your child may have fallen far behind, so arrange a time to speak to the teacher right away if you have concerns or see your child struggling with homework or suddenly displaying serious frustration and anger.

Establish open communication. Good communication and parental involvement are both key to student success. So, if you weren't as involved last year as you would have liked, make it a priority now. And remember that being involved isn't as complicated as it sounds. Talk with your child about school. Stay in touch with his or her teacher. Keep apprised of what your student is learning and do your part to make homework and studying a priority.

Get organized. This goes for you and your child. Set up a homework area. Prepare an organizational system for paperwork that comes home—both for you and for your child—and teach your child to use this system so as not to lose track of things. If your family works best on a schedule, sit down with your child to discuss a nightly routine that you can all stick to. The idea of going back to school may cause some stress for your student, but preparation and a positive attitude can help ease your child's woes. Remind your child that a new school year holds many exciting opportunities—and that together, you can overcome any challenges that arise.

 

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Creating Independent Students Afterschool tutoring promotes independent study skills and more so students quickly become self-reliant.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:49:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/creating-independent-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/creating-independent-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Creating Independent Students

Whether you teach elementary school or high school, one of your key goals is to help your students become independent, capable learners. In fact, nurturing independence in students is an underpinning of the Common Core State Standards, which state that students who are college and career ready are self-directed learners overall.

Just as it is essential for your students to comprehend the content that you teach, it is critical that they become more focused and able to think on their own as they mature as learners. Students need to learn how to develop their ideas, solve problems, seek out resources on their own, and much more.

How can you foster such academic independence? Here are a few exercises to incorporate into your lessons that will build essential self-starter competencies:

Encourage students to learn from their mistakes. Making mistakes is how students learn, but it is critical that you teach your students to not only recognize their mistakes, but also figure out  potential solutions. How? Walk students step by step through solutions to common mistakes, and invite their input so that they comprehend where they went wrong and how to fix it. Always encourage your students to ask questions. Most importantly, let your students know that mistakes are opportunities to confirm understanding of how a problem or process works.

Set goals. At the beginning of each year, have students set a number of short- and long-term goals—several that are related to your class and several broader life or academic goals. In class or as homework, have students write down the roadblocks standing in the way of their goals and the necessary steps to overcome them. Throughout the year, revisit goals and have students track their progress. The goal-setting process is rich with valuable lessons about working diligently toward the things one wants, taking ownership of one’s life and education, beating challenges and more.

Strive for intrinsic motivation. While it is tempting to motivate students with extrinsic rewards such as constant praise, prizes or bribes, students who are inspired to learn because they want to—intrinsically motivated—are far better off in the long run. So, what can you do to help? Challenge your students. Set the bar high and give them the tools and support to reach it. Urge students to ask questions and think through solutions, and congratulate them for their efforts and progress, not just their grades. The more you can do to encourage students to learn for learning’s sake, the more independent they will be.

Establish clear rules and procedures. Students of all ages flourish when they know what is expected of them throughout the school day. Equipped with a consistent routine upon which they can rely, your students can be more independent when completing tasks, working on bigger projects and transitioning between activities. This will translate to independence at home, too. Students who know how to function independently and successfully in the classroom are more likely to complete their homework without reminders from parents.

Focus on organizational skills. As students move into middle and high school, the art of organization is more critical than ever. Expect students to keep their desks and backpacks tidy and organized. They should have a designated place for everything, from papers to books, so it is quick and easy to get out materials and get to work when you ask them to. A related and equally important concept is time management. Teach your students to keep track of their homework and assignments in a planner or smartphone app. Consider incorporating into each class a few minutes of administration time (during which students can write down assignments and other information, organize their desks and notes, and more).

Students must learn to be self-starters and independent thinkers in order to succeed in college and beyond. You can build this aptitude by giving your students opportunities to think, make decisions and learn from their mistakes. Provide your students ample guidance and support and the result will be engaged students who are confident in themselves and their abilities.

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How to Use Technology to Keep Your Child Learning All Summer In today's digital world, technology tools are at our fingertips 'and our children's, too.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:14:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-use-technology-to-keep-your-child-learning-all-summer https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-use-technology-to-keep-your-child-learning-all-summer Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Use Technology to Keep Your Child Learning All Summer

In today’s digital world, technology tools are at our fingertips—and our children’s, too. If your family has a tablet, computer, smartphone or all of the above, your child has access to all kinds of great learning programs. This summer break, you can offer your child opportunities to learn on the go, while beating the heat inside, during a family road trip, or just about anywhere you can access the internet.

Here are a few great activities for your child to enjoy this summer from the comfort of his or her mobile device, tablet or computer:

Build a website. These days, building a website doesn’t require computer programming skills, but rather, creativity and a willingness to learn. There are lots of website builders out there that offer customizable templates. Your child’s summer learning project could be to create a website—the budding artist or photographer could showcase his or her work, or the foodie could create a recipe blog. What about a family blog to which each member of the family contributes posts a few times a week, sharing your summer’s adventures?

Download learning apps to practice skills. While reviewing homework and assignments from the prior year is an excellent way to keep your child fresh, if you didn’t save your child’s work, there are other great alternatives to deter summer learning loss. Check out Reading Rockets for some of the best apps for vocabulary, writing and spelling practice and reading comprehension. Common Sense Media (free) ranks all kinds of apps, including math apps with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, geometry and logic games and practice tools. Before the school year ends, also ask your child’s teacher for recommendations.

Learn to program. For imaginative and mathematically or technically inclined students, websites like Scratch (www.scratch.mit.edu) are excellent learning tools. Created for children ages 8 to 16 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Scratch is a “programming language and an online community where children can program and share interactive media such as stories, games and animation.” Other websites to check out include www.alice.org, a 3D programming environment that makes it easier for students to learn object-oriented programming, and Hackety.com which teaches students the Ruby programming language.  For beginners, check out apps such as Lightbot Jr. ($2.99) coding puzzle (and later, Lightbot) and Cato’s Hike ($4.99).

Download a podcast (or five). Whether your family is planning a few road trips this summer or your child enjoys audio learning, podcasts can be great fun for children of all ages. Your child can download and listen to podcasts on any mobile device or computer. What interests your child? Try searching the iTunes store for podcasts on various topics (www.apple.com/itunes/podcasts). Also, check out these great podcasts: Bookwink (which reviews books for kids ages 8 to 14/ Grades 3-8), Global Wonders (which introduces children to different world cultures), Reading Rockets Meet the Author (which interviews top children’s book authors and illustrators) and Brains On! (a science podcast).

Think about what your child is into. The great news about the world we live in today is that there are so many mobile technologies that if your child has an interest, there may very well be an app or other technology program to teach or fuel that interest. Is your child curious about learning a new language? Check out one of the many foreign language learning apps out there such as Little Pim. Is your child a hands-on learner who enjoys creating? Don’t miss DIY, an app that has children complete skill-based, hands-on challenges.

Technology has changed education forever—and has provided today’s students some incredible learning opportunities. This summer break, explore the many programs available to your child and incorporate a few such tools into your learning repertoire. Not only will you encourage your child to keep learning this summer, you will also be emulating 21st century classroom teaching.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

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7 Tips to Find the Best College Fit from Huntington Learning Center Tue, 15 Sep 2015 14:41:50 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Choosing a college can be difficult for many high school students. With so many factors to consider, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages teens to go about the process systematically. "Narrowing down colleges can be overwhelming, but by thinking through priorities and goals, teens can make the process easier and make a well-informed decision." Huntington offers seven tips for parents helping their teens choose their college carefully.

  1. Write down the five most important factors in a college. Some teens might have their hearts set on a small college, a big university or a college that's close to home. Other teens might already have specific majors in mind or be looking into certain academic programs, such as an honors or leadership program. Have your teen think about five (or more) things he or she is looking for in a college. This list may change over time, but the exercise is worthwhile.
     
  2. Talk about the future. Talk openly with your teen about his or her ideas for a major and career. Is your teen still figuring things out or clear on his or her path? Students who seem certain about their direction might want to consider colleges based on the availability of academic programs in their area of interest. Those who are still unsure might be wise to choose colleges with plenty of options and a great career center that can help them decide.
     
  3. Discuss cost and scholarships. Whether you have a college fund set aside for your teen or he or she will be funding some of the cost, it's important to discuss the cost of college and start exploring financial aid options. Keep in mind that the tuition and fees listed on a college's website aren't likely the net price you'll pay. Loans and financial aid are available to most students and parents, and depending on your financial situation, your teen may qualify for grants or work-study as well. Arrange a meeting with your teen's high school guidance counselor early in the search process to talk through scholarship options and your teen's chances of receiving some merit-based assistance. The earlier the better, so even if your teen is just starting high school, start familiarizing yourself now with financial aid options.
  4. Start searching for colleges. The in-state colleges and universities are obvious options, but encourage your teen to search far and wide. Tools such as Peterson's, the College Board's College Search, and College Navigator help you research schools based on just about any criteria you can think of: college type, size, fields of study, average percentage of financial need met, setting, sports and activities offered, and more.
     
  5. Go back to your teen's "five most important factors" list. Once your teen has spent time researching colleges online and with the help of the school guidance counselor, return to that list of important factors. What colleges do not meet most of those criteria? If your teen's list included small college, warmer climate, affordable/scholarship opportunities, strong engineering program and study abroad opportunities, peruse your teen's list of colleges to see if any can be ruled out. If your teen found the perfect private liberal arts college in Florida, but it doesn't offer engineering as a major, cross it off the list. If a school seems too expensive, perhaps you can keep it on the list while you explore financial aid and scholarship options that would lower the net cost to your family.
     
  6. Plan a visit. It can be immensely helpful to spend time on college campuses to get a feel for student life and the community. If possible, plan a trip when college is in session to a few schools that are high on your teen's list. Take a tour, check out the dorms, sit in on a class and even talk with a few students or faculty members.
     
  7. Ask around. It can be helpful to get the perspective of a few alumni or current students of a college to understand what it's like to be a student there, pros and cons, information about classes and more. If you know any family friends or relatives who have attended a college, perhaps they would be willing to share their insight and experience. If you're exploring a college where you don't have any contacts, the college's admissions office may be able to connect you with a student.
     

Huntington adds that choosing a college is a very personal decision. "Students should come up with their priority list, research their options and, most importantly, consider how their top few contenders each make them feel," Huntington says. "In the end, teens must choose a college that seems to be the best fit on paper and the place where they'll be the happiest."

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7 Tips to Find the Best College Fit from Huntington Learning Center Tue, 15 Sep 2015 14:41:50 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Choosing a college can be difficult for many high school students. With so many factors to consider, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages teens to go about the process systematically. "Narrowing down colleges can be overwhelming, but by thinking through priorities and goals, teens can make the process easier and make a well-informed decision." Huntington offers seven tips for parents helping their teens choose their college carefully.

  1. Write down the five most important factors in a college. Some teens might have their hearts set on a small college, a big university or a college that's close to home. Other teens might already have specific majors in mind or be looking into certain academic programs, such as an honors or leadership program. Have your teen think about five (or more) things he or she is looking for in a college. This list may change over time, but the exercise is worthwhile.
     
  2. Talk about the future. Talk openly with your teen about his or her ideas for a major and career. Is your teen still figuring things out or clear on his or her path? Students who seem certain about their direction might want to consider colleges based on the availability of academic programs in their area of interest. Those who are still unsure might be wise to choose colleges with plenty of options and a great career center that can help them decide.
     
  3. Discuss cost and scholarships. Whether you have a college fund set aside for your teen or he or she will be funding some of the cost, it's important to discuss the cost of college and start exploring financial aid options. Keep in mind that the tuition and fees listed on a college's website aren't likely the net price you'll pay. Loans and financial aid are available to most students and parents, and depending on your financial situation, your teen may qualify for grants or work-study as well. Arrange a meeting with your teen's high school guidance counselor early in the search process to talk through scholarship options and your teen's chances of receiving some merit-based assistance. The earlier the better, so even if your teen is just starting high school, start familiarizing yourself now with financial aid options.
  4. Start searching for colleges. The in-state colleges and universities are obvious options, but encourage your teen to search far and wide. Tools such as Peterson's, the College Board's College Search, and College Navigator help you research schools based on just about any criteria you can think of: college type, size, fields of study, average percentage of financial need met, setting, sports and activities offered, and more.
     
  5. Go back to your teen's "five most important factors" list. Once your teen has spent time researching colleges online and with the help of the school guidance counselor, return to that list of important factors. What colleges do not meet most of those criteria? If your teen's list included small college, warmer climate, affordable/scholarship opportunities, strong engineering program and study abroad opportunities, peruse your teen's list of colleges to see if any can be ruled out. If your teen found the perfect private liberal arts college in Florida, but it doesn't offer engineering as a major, cross it off the list. If a school seems too expensive, perhaps you can keep it on the list while you explore financial aid and scholarship options that would lower the net cost to your family.
     
  6. Plan a visit. It can be immensely helpful to spend time on college campuses to get a feel for student life and the community. If possible, plan a trip when college is in session to a few schools that are high on your teen's list. Take a tour, check out the dorms, sit in on a class and even talk with a few students or faculty members.
     
  7. Ask around. It can be helpful to get the perspective of a few alumni or current students of a college to understand what it's like to be a student there, pros and cons, information about classes and more. If you know any family friends or relatives who have attended a college, perhaps they would be willing to share their insight and experience. If you're exploring a college where you don't have any contacts, the college's admissions office may be able to connect you with a student.
     

Huntington adds that choosing a college is a very personal decision. "Students should come up with their priority list, research their options and, most importantly, consider how their top few contenders each make them feel," Huntington says. "In the end, teens must choose a college that seems to be the best fit on paper and the place where they'll be the happiest."

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Huntington Learning Center's 2016 Summer Reading Adventure Program Kicks Off Summer Reading Adventure Program Kicks Off

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Mon, 06 Jun 2016 19:44:34 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/reading-adventure2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/reading-adventure2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is gearing up to launch its annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Participating students choose books from Huntington’s carefully selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Students receive a reading "passport" in which they record each book they read and write a journal entry about it.

"Summer reading is so important, not only because it helps prevent regression that is common during summer vacation, but because it’s a great opportunity to get children excited about reading," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Our reading lists include highly appealing books that engage even struggling and non-readers. The goal is to encourage students to read for fun and continue reading in their free time simply for the enjoyment of it. The more they read, the better they will become at reading—and the more they’ll actually choose to read."

The Reading Adventure program runs throughout the summer. At the end of the summer, the Huntington Learning Center will host a party to celebrate each student’s reading achievements and acknowledge each student’s participation.

"Studies show that reading during summer break is one of the best ways for students to maintain their reading skills and be prepared for the coming school year," says Huntington. "Our Reading Adventure program is all about the joy, imagination and adventure of reading. Children get to immerse themselves in great stories and books and explore their interests."

To learn more about Huntington’s Reading Adventure program, visit a Huntington location near you.

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Five Great Online Summer Reading Programs One of the best and simplest ways to prevent your child's reading proficiency levels from declining this summer is to establish a daily reading habit.

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Mon, 06 Jun 2016 20:12:27 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-online-summer-reading-programs https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-online-summer-reading-programs Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Five Great Online Summer Reading Programs

One of the best and simplest ways to prevent your child’s reading proficiency levels from declining this summer is to establish a daily reading habit. And with the relaxed pace of summer, your child might be happy to hear that he or she is free to choose whatever books sound the most interesting—a welcome change from the school year, which is undoubtedly busy with required school reading.

Want to give your child a nudge in the right direction? Why not enroll him or her in a summer reading program? Summer reading programs offer a fun way for children to keep track of their reading and rewards for completing reading milestones. While your local library or bookstore may have a reading program, there are also a number of excellent online options as well—and even better, all are free.

Here are five online summer reading programs for you to explore:

Scholastic’s Summer Challenge

The Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge runs May 4 to September 4, 2015. Once you register your child, you will receive book lists, activities and tips and your child can earn weekly virtual badges and free book excerpts for meeting certain milestones. The program also features a sweepstakes with a range of prizes. www.scholastic.com/summer

Barnes & Noble Summer Reading

Barnes & Noble provides a reading journal in which your child records the books he or she reads and a little about the book. The program runs from May 19, 2015 to September 17, 2015. After finishing eight books, a child can bring the reading journal into a Barnes & Noble store and redeem it for a free book. www.barnesandnoble.com/summerreading

Pizza Hut Book It Summer Program

Pizza Hut’s summer reading program (called Spark Your Greatness) asks children to read books and record them on the program website. Participants are then entered into a sweepstakes for prizes. In addition, the program has activity calendars and games. Spark Your Greatness runs June 1, 2015 to August 15, 2015. www.bookitprogram.com/summer

TD BaNK Summer Reading Program

Everyone agrees that summer reading is important for kids – and we want to make it a bit more fun! Their Summer Reading Program encourages reading and also helps children learn about saving money. Kids can earn $10  TDBank.com/summerreading/

Education.com “Do-It-Yourself” Summer Reading Camp

In cooperation with PBS Kids, Education.com offers printable worksheets for a 10-week reading camp. Each week has a theme with all kinds of activities and crafts, and the website also offers summer reading worksheets and activities (customizable by your child’s grade). www.education.com/summer-reading

A summer reading program is a great way to incentivize your child to stick with reading all summer long. These five programs all strive to make reading enjoyable, reward progress and encourage children to commit to reading as a hobby of choice. The summer is upon us—get started now, and help your child start off on the right foot for a fun-filled summer of learning and exploration.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Helping Your Child Build a Greater Depth of Understanding in Math You may have heard education experts, researchers or media outlets refer to mathematics curriculum in the United States as being "a mile wide and an inch deep."

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:00:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-build-a-greater-depth-of-understanding-in-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-build-a-greater-depth-of-understanding-in-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Helping Your Child Build a Greater Depth of Understanding in Math

You may have heard education experts, researchers or media outlets refer to mathematics curriculum in the United States as being “a mile wide and an inch deep.” The problem with math education, according to many, is that U.S. math teachers have historically been asked to cover far too many topics in each grade, resulting in students who have only a vague understanding of a lot of areas rather than a deep understanding of fewer, more essential topics. Students are introduced to advanced concepts haphazardly and before they have had an opportunity to master certain basic skills.

Of course, the Common Core State Standards are changing all that. Researchers “have concluded that mathematics education in the United States must become substantially more focused and coherent in order to improve mathematics achievement in this country,” (corestandards.org). As a result, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics will embody these three key shifts:

  • Greater focus on fewer topics
  • Linking topics and thinking across grades
  • More rigorous overall (educators must help students gain a conceptual understanding of key math concepts, procedural skills and fluency, and application in situations that require mathematical knowledge)

How can you help your child learn to apply math and use it as a problem-solving tool? Here are a few tips for parents when helping their child with homework:

  • Have your child talk through math rules. As your child completes homework, periodically have him or her point out to you when a math rule is used and where that rule comes from.
  • Explain the thinking. Even in the simplest math, have your child explain how he or she draws conclusions and why. That cognitive process is becoming more important in math than ever.
  • Try different methods to solve problems. Children should practice using different approaches to solving the same problem and identify similarities among those different methods.
  • Encourage students to visualize math problems. Help your child draw out visual representations of figures or numbers. For example, your child should be able to show what something (a shape, for example) would look like when divided up into fractions.
  • Have your child talk about wrong answers. Just as students should know how to “construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others” (per the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice), it is helpful for children think through incorrect answers and share their conclusions on why a certain answer to a problem is right and another is wrong.
  • Use math in everyday life. Your child should practice writing down mathematical equations and assumptions when trying to solve real-world problems. He or she should use tools to aid understanding whenever it makes sense—tools such as graphs, equations and flowcharts.
  • Pay attention to detail. The new standards expect students to be precise when discussing math and working on math problems. Encourage your child to label his or her work, be neat and explain the symbols used in various mathematical equations. Precision and accuracy is important.

As the Standards for Mathematical Practice state, “students who lack understanding of a topic may rely on procedures too heavily.” Although you may not feel equipped to help your child through probability and statistics homework, you can nurture his or her acquisition of a conceptual understanding of math. Encourage your child to make connections between mathematical ideas and life, use reasoning when working on math, and think critically about how math plays a role in day-to-day life. To learn more about the Common Core State Standards for Math, visit www.corestandards.org.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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How to Respond to a Child's Negativity If any of these outbursts sound familiar, it's understandable that you might feel concern about what is causing your child such anger and frustration and what you can do to change it.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:13:37 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-respond-to-a-childs-negativity https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-respond-to-a-childs-negativity Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Respond to a Child’s Negativity

School is the worst! I hate learning! I’m stupid! I hate homework!

If any of these outbursts sound familiar, it’s understandable that you might feel concern about what is causing your child such anger and frustration and what you can do to change it. Unfortunately, there may come a time in your child’s school life that he or she feels upset or negative about school. If you are struggling with how to respond—or you share your child’s frustration—here are a few considerations on what might actually be going on and tips on how best to handle the situation. 

Your child has never felt the pride that comes with achievement. Children who acquire negative attitudes about school might never have experienced true school success. Gaps in their skills have made it difficult to understand homework and solve problems independently, always leaving them feeling inadequate and behind. If this sounds like your child, a conversation with the teacher is definitely in order. There is likely a mismatch in the type of work that is expected of your child and his or her abilities. An individualized tutoring program with Huntington can help your child gain the abilities to complete work successfully, thereby boosting the self-esteem and confidence.

Pinpointing the problem is essential. If your child seems generally exasperated by school, it may be difficult to have productive conversations about what subjects are the most stressful—and frankly, your child may simply not be able to offer you the insight you need. So, rather than grill your child for details on what is most difficult, have your child evaluated so that you can gain specific information about his areas of deficiency, study skills and more. Huntington can perform a diagnostic evaluation of your child’s strengths and weaknesses as well as a plan of instruction to help your child. With more accurate information about the problems your child is facing, you can develop a plan together to help your child overcome them.

Your understanding goes a long way. While your desire to smother your child’s cynicism with unbridled optimism is understandable, doing so might exacerbate your child even more. Instead, talk openly about how your child is feeling and the fact that school problems are not insurmountable. Empathize with your child’s fear and anger. Explain that you are committed to helping your child not just earn better grades, but feel better about him or herself. Most of all, remember that your child’s problems, however big they seem, can be addressed.

Problem solving is a tool every child needs. For many children who struggle in school and don’t know what to do about it, acting out, giving up and being negative are resultant behaviors. Certainly, it is expected that a child experiencing repeated difficulties with math homework feels great frustration. However, the child who can move past that frustration, to identify specific problems and lay out a plan to address them will successfully avoid the “negative bottleneck” that prevents so many students from achieving their goals.

 While academic knowledge and good study habits are certainly essential for school success, so are traits such as resilience, perseverance in the face of difficulty and a good attitude. Help your child learn to understand that negativity only makes problems feel worse. Identifying issues and creating manageable steps to tackle each one is a far more constructive approach that will help your child feel less overwhelmed.

Of course, if school is the culprit of your child’s pessimistic attitude, don’t wait to investigate. Huntington can help you understand what is at the root of the problem and develop a plan to turn things around. Call us at 1-800-CAN LEARN to discuss how to give your child a whole new outlook on school and life.

 

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Teaching Your Child to be a Strong, Effective Communicator Communication: it's one of the most valuable skills a person can have throughout life.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:07:12 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-your-child-to-be-a-strong-effective-communicator https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-your-child-to-be-a-strong-effective-communicator Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Teaching Your Child to be a Strong, Effective Communicator

Communication: it’s one of the most valuable skills a person can have throughout life. Effective communicators are better able to develop and maintain relationships with others, express what they know, ask questions in the classroom, at work and elsewhere, and advocate for themselves and others. And while you communicate each day with your child, are you teaching him or her to become a good communicator with others?

Keep in mind that communicating is much more than just listening and speaking. Here are a few of the most important abilities and traits that strong communicators have:

  • Actively engaged in learning
  • Attentive
  • Observant
  • Clear and concise messaging
  • Convincing when expressing an opinion
  • Thorough when explaining something detailed or specific

How can you help your child build good communication skills? Here are a few tips and suggested activities:

Ask why. Children are born curious, and as a parent, it’s your job to nurture that curiosity. One way to do so is to encourage your child to express his or her opinions and ideas. Whether your child is talking about the solution to a math problem or a favorite football team’s defensive lineup, encourage sharing thoughts and opinions. Don’t stop at what your child thinks and why; ask your child how he or she knows something. 

Encourage your child to keep a journal. Journaling is an excellent way for children to hone the art of expressing themselves. Many children have school journals in which their teachers have them record observations or reactions to certain writing prompts, but a personal journal is a great way for children to put their ideas and feelings in writing, think critically about why they feel the way they do about things, build writing skills and much more.

Get your child involved in extracurricular activities that build communication skills. Activities such as debate team (or similar programs for younger children) are great opportunities for students to form opinions, develop arguments to support those opinions and express them to others. Similarly, student council helps children build leadership and both oral and written communication skills.

Model good communication. The primary way that your child will learn how to communicate is by observing you. So, be present when your child speaks to you. When interacting with others while in your child’s presence, speak clearly and honestly, always saying what you mean in the most unambiguous manner possible. Talk frequently with your child about how to engage others in conversation, how to listen actively and how to get and keep someone’s attention (and how not to).

Work together on good listening. Listening well is a critical part of being an effective communicator. Your child needs to understand that listening involves more than just hearing someone speak; it means focusing on the person speaking while simultaneously processing information. It means watching for non-verbal cues as well as listening to words being spoken. It means confirming understanding after a speaker is finished speaking.

Encourage your child to think about others’ feelings and reactions. People who are self-aware and able to recognize how their actions and words impact others—in other words, those with high emotional intelligence—are generally well equipped to communicate effectively. Some of the building blocks for emotional intelligence include awareness of one’s own (and others’) strengths and weaknesses, perseverance, independence, and assertiveness when joining discussions or expressing ideas. Whenever possible, help your child practice these skills.

Remember: communication is not inherent, but rather, a skill that must be strengthened over time. Work with your child on developing strong communication skills and you will help him or her build skills for lifelong success. No matter what your child does in life, knowing how to communicate with all different types of people will serve him or her well.

 

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Five Tips to Create Your Children's Summer Learning Schedule Five Tips to Create Your Child's Summer Learning Schedule

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Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:19:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-summer-schedule https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-summer-schedule Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It's summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. 

"There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child's summer schedule," says Huntington. "Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning. 

Huntington offers parents five tips to developing a summer schedule that will guide their children all summer long: 

Tip #1:

First, take a break. Before you get out the calendar and schedule each week with educational activities, plan to take a week or two off completely. Enjoy some family time, head to the pool and allow your child to truly decompress from the school year. It's fine to talk about ideas for summer learning opportunities, but be sure to let your child enjoy some down time. 

Tip #2:

Set aside time for daily reading. Summer is a wonderful time for children to explore their curiosities through reading. Load up on books that interest your child. Be flexible about the type of materials your child chooses, but make it a summer rule that your child reads for 30 minutes a day. Incorporate a weekly library trip into your summer schedule. 

Tip #3:

Pick weekly themes. Engage your child in learning by choosing weekly themes. What kinds of themes? Anything! Africa, the seasons, the zoo, mystery, inventors or insects, to name a few. Weekly learning themes work best for younger children, but you can certainly adapt them for older, more independent students as well. Each week, plan a simple outing, a craft, a writing activity and a math assignment. 

Tip #4:

Review last year's work. Studies show that many students' math skills take a nose dive during summer break. One of the easiest ways to stay fresh on the math skills is to review some of the previous year's assignments or tests. If you haven't saved paperwork throughout the year, ask your child's teacher for copies of assignments covered throughout the year. If you purchased a math book, review sections each week together. 

Tip #5:

Set goals and milestones. Sit down at the beginning of summer and talk with your child about his or her goals. Perhaps your child just wants to learn to enjoy reading. Maybe your child could improve in math. Choose an area of focus (or several) and discuss where your child would like to be by summer's end. For reading, lean on the help of a summer reading program put on by your school, library or local bookstore.

Summertime is a perfect opportunity for your child to explore some interests while keeping the mind active. "You can make an enormous difference by developing a simple summer learning schedule with tasks and goals for each week," says Huntington. 

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SAT Spotlight- Current Vs. Redesigned SAT The College Board will roll out a totally redesigned SAT in spring 2016. What exactly is changing?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:53:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-spotlight-current-vs-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-spotlight-current-vs-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Spotlight

Current Vs. Redesigned SAT

The College Board will roll out a totally redesigned SAT in spring 2016. What exactly is changing? Here’s a side-by-side comparison:

 

Current SAT

Redesigned SAT

Total Testing Time

 

3 hours and 45 minutes

3 hours without essay

3 hours 50 minutes with essay (optional)

Components

  1. Critical Reading
  2. Writing
  3. Mathematics
  4. Essay (required)
  5. Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
  • Reading Test
  • Writing and Language Test
  1. Math (calculator and No calculator)
  2. Essay (optional)

Section Length

 

Reading

Writing

Essay

Math

 

Total

 

 

67 questions

49 questions

1 question

54 questions

 

171 questions

 

52 questions

44 questions

1 question

57 questions

 

154 questions with Essay

Important Features

Emphasis on general reasoning skills

Emphasis on vocabulary, often in limited contexts

Complex scoring (a point for a correct answer and a deduction for an incorrect answer; blank responses have no impact on scores)

Emphasis on reasoning. Clearer, stronger focus on the knowledge, skills and understandings most important for college and career readiness

Greater emphasis on the meaning of words in extended contexts and on how word choice shapes meaning, tone and impact

Rights-only scoring (a point for a correct answer but no deduction for an incorrect answer; blank responses have no impact on scores)

Essay

  • Required and given at the beginning of the SAT
  • 25 minutes
  • Tests writing skills; students take a position on a presented issue
  • Optional and given at the end of the SAT (colleges determine whether they will require the essay)
  • 50 minutes
  • Tests reading, analysis and writing skills; students produce a written analysis of a provided source text
 

Score Reporting

  • Scale range: 600 to 2400

200 to 800 for Critical Reading

200 to 800 for Mathematics

200 to 800 for Writing

  • Essay results scaled to multiple-choice Writing
  • Scale range: 400 to 1600

200 to 800 for Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

200 to 800 for Math

2 to 8 on each of three traits for Essay

  • Essay results reported separately

Subscore Reporting

None

Subscores for every test, providing insight for students, parents, admission officers, educators, and counselors

 

 

 

 

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Five Tips to Create Your Child’s Summer Learning Schedule It’s summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. “There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child’s summer schedule,” says Huntington. “Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:40:58 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-your-childs-summer-learning-schedule https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-your-childs-summer-learning-schedule Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington It’s summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Elieen Huntington, Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. “There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child’s summer schedule,” says Huntington. “Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning.

Huntington offers parents five tips to developing a summer schedule that will guide their children all summer long:

Tip #1: First, take a break. Before you get out the calendar and schedule each week with educational activities, plan to take a week or two off completely. Enjoy some family time, head to the pool and allow your child to truly decompress from the school year. It’s fine to talk about ideas for summer learning opportunities, but be sure to let your child enjoy some down time. 

Tip #2: Set aside time for daily reading. Summer is a wonderful time for children to explore their curiosities through reading. Load up on books that interest your child. Be flexible about the type of materials your child chooses, but make it a summer rule that your child reads for 30 minutes a day. Incorporate a weekly library trip into your summer schedule.

Tip #3: Pick weekly themes. Engage your child in learning by choosing weekly themes. What kinds of themes? Anything! Africa, the seasons, the zoo, mystery, inventors or insects, to name a few. Weekly learning themes work best for younger children, but you can certainly adapt them for older, more independent students as well. Each week, plan a simple outing, a craft, a writing activity and a math assignment.

Tip #4: Review last year’s work. Studies show that many students’ math skills take a nose dive during summer break. One of the easiest ways to stay fresh on the math skills is to review some of the previous year’s assignments or tests. If you haven’t saved paperwork throughout the year, ask your child’s teacher for copies of assignments covered throughout the year. If you purchased a math book, review sections each week together.

Tip #5: Set goals and milestones. Sit down at the beginning of summer and talk with your child about his or her goals. Perhaps your child just wants to learn to enjoy reading. Maybe your child could improve in math. Choose an area of focus (or several) and discuss where your child would like to be by summer’s end.  For reading, lean on the help of a summer reading program put on by your school, library or local bookstore.

Summertime is a perfect opportunity for your child to explore some interests while keeping the mind active. “You can make an enormous difference by developing a simple summer learning schedule with tasks and goals for each week,” says Huntington. For more information, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.   

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Test Taking Tips for High School Students If your teen struggles with test taking, he or she isn't alone.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:10:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tips-for-high-school-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tips-for-high-school-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Test Taking Tips for High School Students 

If your teen struggles with test taking, he or she isn’t alone. For many students, tests are highly stressful, causing fear for even those who study diligently in advance. Luckily, there are a number of test taking strategies and tips that will help your teen boost his or her chances for exam success, whether taking a standardized exam or a pop quiz in English class.

Adopt a positive and realistic outlook. Before your teen ever cracks a book to study, be sure you explain this: no test is a completely accurate measure of a student’s knowledge and no test is worth excessive anxiety. Remind your teen frequently—and especially before a test day—that all you and the teacher expect is sincere effort, not perfection. Putting things into perspective will help ease those worries and allow your teen to simply demonstrate his or her knowledge.

 Adopt a few go-to stress management techniques. Teens who experience test anxiety should arm themselves with a few trusted relaxation practices and stress busters. For many students, taking a few moments to close their eyes and think and visualize positive things works wonders. For others, stretching and deep breathing can slow down a racing heart and bring oxygen into the blood flow, creating a calming effect. Talk with your teen’s teacher about effective techniques to calm oneself and stay focused and optimistic during a test.

 Jot down the “can’t forgets” right away. When beginning a test, your teen should take a minute to write down (on a piece of scrap paper, if provided, or in the margin of the exam) any formulas, key facts or other important information that he or she might need to refer to during the test.

 Calculate a time budget. Encourage your teen at the start of the test to perform a quick calculation on how much time to spend on each question. If given 60 minutes to complete a test with 45 multiple choice questions, your teen should average around one minute 20 seconds per question. So, this means your teen must pace him or herself and check the clock a few times throughout the exam. Managing one’s time well is an essential part of being a good test taker.

 Save the hardest for last. Every exam will have a few brain busters that trip up your teen, and getting hung up on these mid-exam can cause unneeded anxiety. Instead of spinning the wheels on a challenging question for more than your teen’s budgeted time, encourage him or her to skip and circle such problems. Your teen can revisit those questions at the end of the exam—as long as he or she leaves sufficient time to work on them.

 Leave some review time.  Ideally, your teen will be able to go over the exam one final time before the test ends to review all answers and re-read any confusing questions where your teen wasn’t certain about the answer. At that time, your teen should also review the test for any glaring errors such as leaving their name off the test or any unanswered questions.

 Test taking isn’t easy for many students, but there are few signs to watch for that may indicate your teen has more than a case of pre-exam nerves:

 Consistently panics about exams and studying for them.

  • Studies for long periods of time, but exam scores don’t reflect the effort.
  • Consistently underperforms on exams for which the student studied or claims to have studied.

 Whether your teen struggles on tests occasionally or always, or would simply like help becoming a better test taker (and better at preparing for tests), Huntington can help. Our highly trained tutors can work with your teen to develop the confidence and test taking skills and strategies he or she needs to make high school—and college—a success.

 

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Where to Look for High School Internship Opportunities What's a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:28:21 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/where-to-look-for-high-school-internship-opportunities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/where-to-look-for-high-school-internship-opportunities Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Where to Look for High School Internship Opportunities

What’s a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility? An internship! Internships help students learn more about industries or fields of interest, meet professionals to whom they can turn as mentors in the future and most importantly, gain real world experience.

Here are five tips on where to start as you and your high school student look for internship opportunities:

Start at the guidance counselor’s office – The high school guidance counselor’s office is a great place to begin the search for internships, as it may have a current listing of opportunities and programs available in the area for students.

Check out organizations’ headquarters – Headquarters of large corporations often have summer internship programs for high school students. If you have relatives in a major metropolitan area with whom your teen could stay for a summer, consider exploring companies outside of your hometown. In Menlo Park, California, Facebook offers a summer high school internship program. In Washington, D.C., there are internship programs at organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the Library of Congress, to name a few. In San Francisco, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has a high school internship program for students interested in the field of transportation.

Explore companies and organizations in your area. What companies are in your town or city? Look at their websites to see if they list internships. If companies that interest your teen don’t seem to have anything formal in place, they still might consider hiring a hard working student who wants to learn their business. If your teen is interested in a particular field or type of company, encourage him or her to send out cover letters and resumes to a top 10 list of organizations. Many companies respond positively to students who take such initiative, and even if they don’t have a posted position, they might create one for an eager student who takes initiative.

Check out colleges. Community colleges and four-year colleges and universities are great places to look for internships. Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences has a number of different summer internship programs for high school students. Pennsylvania State University offers many different summer programs. The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio’s summer program exposes high school students interested in health careers to medical and biomedical research. Rutgers University’s New Jersey Medical School has a high school intern research exposure program. Explore the colleges in your state for programs for high school students.

Look for volunteer opportunities. If your teen strikes out in his or her search for internships, an alternate route could be to volunteer. Many organizations that don’t have the budget to pay interns might still be willing to take on an unpaid intern or volunteer for a few hours a week. A company may have your teen start out shadowing some of its employees, but the exposure to the industry and individuals’ roles within it will be valuable no matter what.

With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships can help high school students set themselves apart from their peers. Not only that, students can try out careers of interest, gain great experience and increase their professionalism. With some effort, your teen can find a great internship that will build their resume and help him or her gain new skills.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Five Places to Look for High School Internship Opportunities With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships are a great way for high school students to distinguish themselves from their peers.

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 12:42:49 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-places-to-look-for-internships https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-places-to-look-for-internships Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What's a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility? An internship! Internships help students learn more about industries or fields of interest, meet professionals to whom they can turn as mentors in the future and most importantly, gain real world experience. Here are five tips on where to start as you and your high school student look for internship opportunities:

1. Start at the guidance counselor's office – The high school guidance counselor's office is a great place to begin the search for internships, as it may have a current listing of opportunities and programs available in the area for students.

2. Check out organizations' headquarters – Headquarters of large corporations often have summer internship programs for high school students. If you have relatives in a major metropolitan area with whom your teen could stay for a summer, consider exploring companies outside of your hometown. In Menlo Park, California, Facebook offers a summer high school internship program. In Washington, D.C., there are internship programs at organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the Library of Congress, to name a few. In San Francisco, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has a high school internship program for students interested in the field of transportation.

3. Explore companies and organizations in your area. What companies are in your town or city? Look at their websites to see if they list internships. If companies that interest your teen don't seem to have anything formal in place, they still might consider hiring a hard working student who wants to learn their business. If your teen is interested in a particular field or type of company, encourage him or her to send out cover letters and resumes to a top 10 list of organizations. Many companies respond positively to students who take such initiative, and even if they don't have a posted position, they might create one for an eager student who takes initiative.

4. Check out colleges. Community colleges and four-year colleges and universities are great places to look for internships. Stanford's School of Earth Sciences has a number of different summer internship programs for high school students. Pennsylvania State University offers many different summer programs. The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio's summer program exposes high school students interested in health careers to medical and biomedical research. Rutgers University's New Jersey Medical School has a high school intern research exposure program. Explore the colleges in your state for programs for high school students.

5. Look for volunteer opportunities. If your teen strikes out in his or her search for internships, an alternate route could be to volunteer. Many organizations that don't have the budget to pay interns might still be willing to take on an unpaid intern or volunteer for a few hours a week. A company may have your teen start out shadowing some of its employees, but the exposure to the industry and individuals' roles within it will be valuable no matter what.

With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships can help high school students set themselves apart from their peers. Not only that, students can try out careers of interest, gain great experience and increase their professionalism. With some effort, your teen can find a great internship that will build their resume and help him or her gain new skills.

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Huntington Learning Center Honors Local Educators on National Teacher Day Wed, 17 Jun 2015 12:11:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/National-Teacher-Day-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/National-Teacher-Day-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center On May 5, 2015, Huntington Learning Center of is joining thousands of schools, students and communities to celebrate National Teacher Day, honoring educators and the important role they play in community.

Eileen Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center says there are many ways for schools and community members to celebrate their local teachers and show their appreciation, including the following (as suggested by the National Education Association [NEA], which sponsors the annual celebration):

  • Work with your local school to sponsor an essay contest on "A Teacher to Remember."
  • Hang congratulatory signs in your business or school recognizing teachers and their important work.
  • Invite a local newspaper reporter or TV news personality to spend a day as a classroom observer, and encourage him or her to publish or air his or her observations on a day in the life of a teacher.
  • Buy books portraying teachers as mentors and give them as gifts to the great teachers you know.
  • Host an event such as a luncheon or an ice cream social honoring teachers at your local schools.
  • Make National Teacher Day a community service day that can bring everyone together in your area to work on a single project.
  • Invite teachers to a before-school coffee and pastries celebration at a local business or in the school cafeteria.

"Every year on National Teacher Day, we honor the individuals who shape our children's futures and motivate them to achieve academic success and reach their potential," said Huntington. "It is a day near and dear to our hearts at Huntington, and we encourage everyone in our community to recognize the great teachers they know—today and always."

Huntington applauded the Huntington Learning Center teachers. "Our teachers are here because they're passionate about helping children do better in school—many of them working here in the evenings after their regular teaching or other jobs, said Huntington. "We are so grateful not only to our own teachers at Huntington, but to teachers everywhere who dedicate their lives to helping children learn."

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Huntington Awards Family $3,000 Prize When a family refers another student to Huntington Learning Centers, they receive a $50 gift card in addition to being entered to win a $3,000 prize!

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 13:32:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/awards-prize https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/awards-prize Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center, one of the leading tutoring centers in America, awarded a family $3,000 during its February referral sweepstakes. Huntington rolled out a new personal referral program called We Love Referrals. When a family refers another student to Huntington, that family is entered into a $3,000 prize drawing. Additionally, every family receives a $50 Visa Gift Card for the referral, and the student referred receives $100 off an Academic Evaluation. The referral sweepstakes took place during the month of February, and a winner was randomly selected on March 3, 2015.
 

The Cocco family, from Allamuchy, NJ, was chosen as the February referral sweepstakes winner. Sean Cocco attended the Ledgewood, NJ learning center. As a second grader, Sean was struggling in school, and his family chose Huntington to help him progress throughout the year. Now as a third grader, he is doing extremely well with his academics.

Heather Carroll, Center Director at the Ledgewood center, said the family was ecstatic to come into the center to receive the award. She also explained, "They know that coming to Huntington made a huge difference for Sean in school. He's currently doing really well and his homework has gotten much better." After seeing Sean's results at Huntington, and accepting the generous gift, the Cocco's are happy they chose Huntington Learning Center.


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Five Great Extracurricular Activities for the Analytical Child Parents know that extracurricular activities offer a wide range of benefits for children.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:58:10 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-extracurricular-activities-for-the-analytical-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-extracurricular-activities-for-the-analytical-child Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Five Great Extracurricular Activities for the Analytical Child

Parents know that extracurricular activities offer a wide range of benefits for children. They teach them to work with their peers, manage their time, set goals and work toward them, and so much more.

If your child is a “thinker” who enjoys activities that stretch the mind and develop those all-important critical thinking skills, you’re in luck. There are many extracurricular activities that will nurture your child’s intellect. Here are a few great activities for children who like to stretch their minds:

Chess:

It probably comes as no surprise to learn that chess is an excellent activity for students who enjoy mental stimulation. Chess strengthens one’s creative and critical thinking ability, memory, concentration, mental precision and academic endurance. Many studies report that chess helps strengthen certain areas of the brain as well. If your child appreciates logical thinking and strategy, chess is a wonderful lifelong activity.

Debate:

Is your child constantly negotiating fewer chores and developing convincing arguments for additional screen time? Is he or she the type to take nothing at face value? If so, your school’s debate team or club might be the perfect activity. In debate, students compete in formal contests of argumentation. Individual students develop arguments on specific topics and deliver those arguments in front of a panel of judges. Each team takes a position on the topic presented (pro or con) and then the teams present their statements and supporting points, either individually or as a team. Debate builds students’ public speaking abilities as well as their research skills, critical thinking and much more.

Model United Nations Club:

For students interested in government, law or even business, a Model United Nations (UN) Club might be a great fit. The United Nations Association describes Model UN as “a simulation of the UN General Assembly and other multilateral bodies.” Students play the role of ambassadors from UN member states and debate current issues by preparing speeches, drafting resolutions, and negotiating with allies and adversaries. Students compete at Model UN conferences, which are offered throughout the country and around the world.

Lego clubs:

Are an excellent opportunity for students interested in engineering as well as those who enjoy designing and building things and learning how things work. Lego programs provide tools that develop lateral and three dimensional thinking in a fun environment.  Not only do Legos improve literacy as kids work with instructions, it boosts motor development, and enhances communication and critical thinking. Many schools and libraries sponsor Lego based activities.  FIRST Lego League are competitions for children ages 9 to 14 years old and are geared to inspire interest and participation in science and technology using Lego based products.

 

Literature Club:

Does your student like to read and/or talk about what he or she reads? Check out the school book club or literary club. Some schools’ literary clubs focus on reading and discussing books, while others also invite budding writers to submit their works for reading and critiquing. For those who enjoy thoughtful discourse about the books that they read, literature clubs are a good way to improve communication, reading and writing skills and learn to develop and support opinions.

Many extracurricular activities teach your child valuable skills such as how to persevere in the face of challenges and think through problems with multiple possible solutions. Encourage your child to find activities that suit his or her interests and strengths and offer opportunities for growth. Your child will undoubtedly reap many academic and non-academic benefits.

About Huntington Learning Center:

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Mathematics Awareness Month To celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month, Huntington Learning Center has created fun ways parents can help their child practice math on a daily basis.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:41:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-awareness2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-awareness2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center joins schools, colleges, universities, student groups, and other related associations and interest groups to celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month this April. Mathematics Awareness Month began in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation for National Mathematics Awareness Week. The annual celebration is a collaboration of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics.

The theme of this year's Mathematics Awareness Month is "Math drives Careers." Innovation is an increasingly important factor in the growth of world economies. The advances in mathematical sciences have become drivers of innovation as new systems and methodologies have become more complex. As mathematics drives innovation, it also drives careers.

"Any career path you choose involves mathematics in some form," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "From the basic concepts to the most advanced theories, math is part of our daily lives at home and at our workplace. This year's theme for Mathematics Awareness Month increases an understanding of careers available to those who study mathematical sciences. We're proud to celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month and continue to promote all math skills that can prepare students for so many different careers."

Even at a young age, parents can help their children learn the importance of math in their daily lives and in their future careers. Huntington offers a few ideas for parents to help their child practice math on a daily basis and possibly towards a future career:

  1. Have your child help you make a recipe and put him or her in charge of all measuring. Ask questions along the way—is two 1/4 cups the same as a half cup? How can you tell?
  2. Measure each family member's height and/or weight on a monthly basis and calculate any change in percentages from month to month. Create a graph to track results.
  3. Ask your child to estimate the grocery bill while you shop.
  4. Let your child plan a family road trip, estimating how long it will take to drive to each destination based on the speed limits and distance. Have him or her calculate the trip cost based on the cost of hotels, meals and other expenditures.
  5. Teach your child how to save their money, and talk about the effect of compound interest.
  6. Play games that use math, such as Yahtzee, Monopoly, UNO and dice games.
  7. Play games that foster critical thinking and problem-solving skills, such as Sudoku and chess.

To learn more about Mathematics Awareness Month, visit www.mathaware.org.

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Huntington Learning Center Announces Educator of the Year Recipient Lita Gottesman won this year's "Educator of the Year" for superior tutoring services. Lita has been with Huntington Learning Center for over 12 years!

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 13:32:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/educator-of-the-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/educator-of-the-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ March 11, 2015 —Huntington Learning Center, one of the leading tutoring centers in America, awarded Lita Gottesman the 2014 Educator of the Year award last month. Huntington Learning Center announced the prestigious award at its annual Company Center Convention held at the Teaneck Marriott at Glen Pointe. The convention was a time to honor staff members and their dedicated work.


Lita is one of the most requested teachers at Huntington’s Eastchester, NY center. She believes it is important to follow the curriculum and help every student reach his or her fullest potential. For example, Lita has converted students from the special education classrooms into regular education classrooms. Her willingness to work and assist in any situation is what makes Lita such an inspiration to students.

Huntington has been fortunate enough to have Lita as a teacher for 12 years. One Huntington parent explained: “My son would not even pick up a book. He could barely read in the fourth grade! After working with Lita these past two months, he cannot put the books down!” With a Bachelors of Arts in education, along with a double major in political science and history, teaching has always been a huge part of her life. Lita has been in the education profession since 1958.

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Tips to Help Students Embrace Positive School Habits Wed, 01 Jul 2015 12:27:53 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Help-Students-Embrace-Positive-School-Habits- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Help-Students-Embrace-Positive-School-Habits- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What's the difference between a child who is a productive student and one who struggles to stay organized and get things done? Good habits, says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "It's simple but true: good school habits can make all the difference in a child's academic success," says Huntington. "If you teach your child from an early age to acquire positive habits, you will equip him or her with the tools to flourish."


Establish routines that work. Children benefit from structure and routine in many ways. A reliable routine helps children learn to be responsible, take ownership of their to-do lists and feel confident in approaching new and familiar tasks.


Top 3 tips for children:

  1. Plan ahead to avoid procrastination
  2. Break large tasks into smaller steps
  3. Create a homework chart or tracking system (and review each night).

     

Focus on study skills. There are obvious study pitfalls that your child should avoid to be an effective student, such as cramming and procrastinating. You can help your child make the most of study time by encouraging organization, time management and tried-and-true study techniques.


Top 3 tips for children:

  1. Set ground rules to improve concentration (i.e. sufficient sleep and food and no TV or electronics during study sessions)
  2. Develop a nightly plan to keep study sessions on track
  3. Develop long-term study schedules for concepts that require repeated review or multi-step projects
     

Take note of when your child is at his or her best. Finally, pay attention to what works for your child—keeping in mind that all children learn differently. Is your child most productive doing homework immediately after school or after activities and dinner? When studying, does your child do better independently or with a study partner? Does your child prefer a planner notebook or a planner app?

Top 3 tips for children:

  1. Try out different study approaches and organizational systems
  2. Ask teachers for suggestions for effective study strategies
  3. Stick to habits that yield positive results.
     

Helping your child develop and hone good habits in all aspects of his or her academic life will benefit your child in the long run. "Talk with your child about the habits that yield positive results and those that do not," says Huntington. "Then, establish effective habits that help your child achieve his or her best. In time, your child will be a more successful student."

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Huntington Learning Center to Launch Test Prep Program Designed Specifically for the Redesigned SAT With the upcoming redesigned SAT, Huntington has launched a test prep program specifically designed to help students prepare for this new exam.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:46:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center to Launch Test Prep Program Designed Specifically for the Redesigned SAT 

New Personalized Program Available This Summer to Help Students Get a Jumpstart on Exam Preparation

 Oradell, NJ (March 5, 2015) – The SAT, perhaps the most anxiety-producing rite of passage in a high school student’s life, is getting a major overhaul that will radically change how students prepare. In response, Huntington Learning Center, a tutoring and test prep company that places curricular knowledge at the center of test prep, has announced that it will launch a new test prep program devoted to the redesigned SAT® – a change the College Board announced a year ago today.

The redesigned test, which officially takes effect March 2016, will impact the nearly 2 million students who take the college entrance exam each year. The new test will place greater emphasis on college and career readiness and skills such as reasoning, data analysis and critical thinking. Its focus on evidence-based responses means that students will need to master root academic concepts and not merely employ a set of superficial strategies to “beat” the test. Helping students build core knowledge is critical to their success on the redesigned SAT and a strength of Huntington Learning Center.

“A college entrance exam is one of the most important tests that a person will take in his or her lifetime, because it impacts college admissions, scholarship dollars and future opportunities. We take that milestone very seriously,” said Dr. Raymond Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center, with his wife, Eileen Huntington. “We are a learning center first, which means that we are steeped in the knowledge of high school curricula, and we know what is being tested inside and out. We work with our students to ensure that on test day, they do too. Every student has the ability to learn, and we believe that learning is the most powerful form of test prep, making us ideally suited to help students adjust to the new format.”

Huntington undertook a multi-part process to develop its new SAT program, which will be available in its 260 centers beginning this summer. Its team of experts dissected and analyzed the new test’s blueprint to uncover key changes and has created a rigorous curriculum to address them. For example, the team has developed sets of practice math problems covering topics ranging from algebra to data analytics, as well as sample nonfiction reading passages with accompanying questions. Huntington is also creating proprietary instruction to support the SAT’s new specifications.

Students seeking test prep at Huntington receive an initial diagnostic assessment that pinpoints exactly which areas the student excels at or lags behind in – down to the skill level. For example, the assessment can reveal if a student struggles with multiplying fractions or reading critically. Each student receives a 13-page analysis, which informs how his personalized, 1:1 test prep program will be designed and delivered and which foundational knowledge needs strengthening. The student is re-assessed throughout his program to determine progress.

Huntington also offers supplementary digital programs – including a series of instructional videos, homework assignments and practice tests – that students can complete at home to reinforce their work in the Huntington center.

 “Many of the students who come to our centers tell us that they are anxious about the SAT and feel overwhelmed by test prep options, which is even more apparent with the redesign,” said Beverly Collins, Senior Vice President, Educational Support Services for Huntington Learning Center. “At Huntington, we give each student a personalized roadmap that spells out exactly what they need to do, how and when. We work with them hand in hand and show them that, if they work hard, they will deepen their knowledge, boost their confidence and improve their score.”

Huntington decided to launch its new SAT program this summer to provide ample support for the students planning to take the redesigned PSAT, a primer for the SAT, in October and the redesigned SAT next March. The PSAT, which is primarily taken by high school sophomores and juniors, is important for students wishing to compete for recognition and scholarships through the National Merit Scholarship Program.

For some students and their parents, the uncertainty of the new design may lead them to take an alternative to the SAT. Huntington also has deep expertise helping students with the ACT®, another college entrance exam that is widely accepted by colleges and universities across the nation and has actually outpaced the SAT in popularity. The ACT format will not be changing, and Huntington will continue to provide test prep programs for this exam as well.

Huntington Learning Center has provided SAT and ACT support to over 100,000 students since the company’s inception in 1977. On average, Huntington’s test prep students increase 192 points on the SAT and 4.2 points on the ACT in just over two months.  

For more information about the redesigned SAT, including key dates and considerations, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com/program/sat-redesigned and download a free copy of “Huntington’s Guide to the Understanding the Redesigned SAT.” 

About Huntington

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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How to Find Scholarship Money-Even for the Average Student Are scholarships only for outstanding students and stellar athletes? Definitely not!

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:53:54 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-find-scholarship-moneyeven-for-the-average-student https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-find-scholarship-moneyeven-for-the-average-student Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Find Scholarship Money—Even for the Average Student

Are scholarships only for outstanding students and stellar athletes? Definitely not!

If you have written off scholarships because your college-bound teen isn’t at the top of the class, think again. There are many scholarships for students with varying skillsets and different backgrounds, but not necessarily the highest GPAs and SAT/ACT test scores. According to sources such as Scholarship America and Scholarships.com, students can receive scholarship support from all kinds of sources—for their creativity, ability to overcome adversity, or efforts in extracurricular and volunteer activities, for example.

Where should your teen look? Here are a few tips and suggestions as you and your teen embark upon the scholarship search:

Start with the guidance counselor. A great place to begin the scholarship search is at the guidance counselor’s office. Many guidance/college counselors maintain a list of local and national scholarships and can quickly tell you what scholarships your teen may or may not be eligible for. In addition, the guidance counselor will have information about different types of scholarships at the colleges and universities in your state or region, as well as directions on how to apply. Keep in mind that guidance counselors may be your best source for information about local scholarships or foundations.  

Tip: Ask the guidance counselor how to stay up to date on new scholarships and deadlines. Many high schools maintain an online database of scholarships.

Look at your state’s Department of Education website. Obviously, all states offer financial aid, but many states offer scholarships or other types of stipends. While the colleges to which your teen applies often handle the application process for such aid, your state’s Department of Education website is a great source of information. For example, in Colorado, the College Opportunity Fund is a stipend available to all students going to college in the state. In Michigan, the Michigan Nursing Scholarship awards scholarships to residents who pursue nursing degrees. The state of New Jersey offers several types of scholarships for state residents pursuing different fields of study.

Tip: To find your state’s department of education website, visit www.ed.gov/about and click on “State Contacts”.   Then, search for scholarships. Colleges’ financial aid departments can also point you in the right direction to learn more about state funds and scholarships.

Ask organizations where you work or volunteer. Employers are an excellent resource for scholarships, especially bigger corporations. Some companies award scholarships to employees or dependents or employees, but many others do not require applicants to have any connection to the company. Check out some of the organizations in your area as well as larger national corporations that might offer scholarships. Examples include U.S. Bank, Microsoft and Walmart.

Tip: Your employer or your teen’s employer (if your teen has a part-time job) are a great place to start.

Consider scholarships for students of certain heritage or background. Many scholarships support specific individuals, such as women or students from underrepresented ethnic backgrounds. Nonprofit organizations such as the Hispanic Scholarship Fund and the United Negro College Fund award funds to thousands of students each year. 

Tip: A scholarship search engine can help you locate scholarships for which you might be eligible based on your personal characteristics.

Check out nontraditional sources of scholarship revenue offered in your state. Programs such as Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship program open doors for students without perfect GPAs. Students with a 3.0 GPA are eligible as well as students who come from home study programs, and they can receive funding toward college degrees and technical certifications or diplomas. Florida’s Bright Futures Scholarship program offers scholarships to students who have achieved at least a 3.0 GPA (for Florida Medallion Scholars, or a 3.5 GPA for Florida Academic Scholars) and completed a minimum number of service hours.

Tip: The scholarships mentioned above are both Lottery scholarship programs, which a number of states also have. Research whether your state offers a similar program that is funded by state lottery revenues or other funding sources, such as tobacco settlements or turnpike revenues.

Use scholarship search engines to aid your search. One of the best ways to round up a list of scholarships for which your teen is qualified is to use a scholarship search engine. These tools help students create a detailed student profile and narrow down a list of scholarships that fit that profile (eliminating any for which they do not meet the criteria).

Tip: Reputable search engines include scholarships.com, scholarshipexperts.com, fastweb.com, and the College Board’s Scholarship Search Tool.

Although there are thousands of scholarships out there, it can be discouraging to see scholarship after scholarship restricted for high achievers with exceptional grades and test scores. Never fear: there are many scholarships for students with other skills, traits and interests. Encourage your teen to put effort into the search and he or she may be surprised by the number of scholarship options available.

And of course, don’t forget to enter Huntington’s College Scholarship Sweepstakes. Huntington awards a $500 scholarship each quarter to a college-bound high school student. Simply submit your information via text message on behalf of your student. Learn more at www.huntingtonhelps.com/contest.

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Making Learning Easier There is no magic bullet to ensure that your child will be an excellent student who never experiences problems or challenges.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:36:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-learning-easier https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-learning-easier Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Making Learning Easier

5 Tips to Give Your Student an Advantage

There is no magic bullet to ensure that your child will be an excellent student who never experiences problems or challenges. However, there are a few things you can do to help your child stay focused and work more efficiently, thereby setting him or her up for success during homework time and in the classroom:

Establish routines and rules. Clear procedures create a home environment conducive to maximum learning, eliminating wasted time and encouraging children to work more efficiently. On the other hand, lack of structure can result in a child feeling unorganized and overwhelmed. Just as your child’s teacher does in the classroom, establish and maintain clear routines for study time at home. Once you have established and communicated those rules, hold your child to them. The less time spent on getting settled into homework, organizing or finding one’s things, the more time can be spent on learning.

Read, read, read. Simply put, a child who is a capable, confident reader will find school to be easier overall. Reading is essential in every subject, and teachers will increasingly expect your child to offer opinions on and insight into the things he or she reads. Make books, literature and reading a frequent family activity. Incorporate reading into your daily lives, and encourage your child to read for fun, both aloud and independently.

Work on basic skills.  If your child is struggling with basic concepts and this is causing problems in class and during homework, it may be time to investigate. Consider having your child assessed to get more details on what academic skills he or she may be lacking.

Encourage thinking. No matter what subject your child studies, critical thinking is an important skill that you can and should hone from an early age. Encourage your child to analyze, question and express opinions on books, articles, news and more. When reading stories, discuss the characters and main messages and have your child share his or her thoughts and ideas. Even with subjects like math and science, teach your child to think through problems and talk about the practical application of math and science concepts. The more your child develops such essential higher order thinking abilities, the more capable your child will be as a student.

Foster good study habits. Many children who are otherwise capable students are hampered by disorganization and poor study skills. Teach your child the basics, such as maintaining a neat workspace and backpack, embracing a system for tracking homework and projects (and their due dates), and making all study and homework sessions efficient. Ask for suggestions from your child’s teacher as well.

Finally, one of the most important things parents can do to benefit their children is talk about school. It sounds simple, and it is—but study after study proves the positive effects of parental involvement on students’ long-term educational outcomes. A small amount of effort today will help your child build a strong foundation for school and life success. 

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Parents' Guide for Middle School and High School Homework Huntington Learning Center has created a guide for parents to provide homework help for their child while enrolled in middle school and high school.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:56:54 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/homework-guide https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/homework-guide Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ February 16, 2015 —As your child progresses from middle school into high school and nears college, the expectations will become much greater. It can be challenging for parents to know exactly how to continue to support their child outside of the classroom. While the level of parental homework help in elementary school is much more tangible, your involvement as your child grows and matures into an independent student should evolve accordingly. For many parents, questions about how to assist older students during homework time abound. Should you be helping with homework? How much? What should that assistance look like? Huntington Learning Center addresses these questions and others: 

How much homework is typical for middle school students? High school students? 
Ask your child’s teachers what to expect when it comes to the amount of time that homework takes. A good ballpark is an hour of homework in sixth grade, 70 minutes in seventh grade, and 80 minutes in eighth grade. High school homework may vary widely from teacher to teacher, school to school. A recent survey by the University of Phoenix College of Education showed that teachers of high school students assign an average of 3.2 hours of homework per week (which equates 17.5 hours of homework per week for students with five teachers in different subjects).

What should your role be in middle school homework? 
Being on hand for support and facilitating good homework practices are important, but too much parental help with homework in middle school can actually be detrimental. The best way that you can help your middle school student during homework time is by monitoring his or her study habits and productivity and helping nurture effective habits. If your child struggles on a regular basis, reach out to the teacher to develop a plan of action and they may also need tutoring help.

What should your role be in high school homework?
In high school, it is critical that students learn to become their own advocates and recognize when they need help—and seek help out when needed. Although you should intervene if you see your teen struggling with homework, in high school, completing homework is your teen’s responsibility. You can offer suggestions for breaking down bigger projects into manageable steps. You can serve as a sounding board as your teen identifies homework where he or she needs clarification with the teacher. And you can help your teen learn strategies for maintaining an organized planner. Under no circumstances should you take the lead on homework or help your child with its completion. 

How about Advanced Placement homework? 
If your high school student is taking any Advanced Placement classes, the amount of class work and homework may differ from your teen’s other classes.  Advanced placement courses are on the college level and students can receive college credits for the courses at certain colleges if they receive good grades. Expect more homework in Advanced Placement classes. 

Why is homework so important? 

Homework offers many benefits as students move toward greater independence in school. It helps teachers reinforce what they teach in the classroom, extends student learning, builds students’ problem solving and time management skills as well as their sense of responsibility, and much more. 

Homework is an important part of your child’s life as a student. If you’re feeling uncertain about the best way to provide guidance for your child without overstepping your bounds, contact his or her teachers. They can help you understand your role at homework time and the most appropriate ways to support your child’s learning without being directly involved in homework completion. Together, you can help your child become a self-sufficient, independent and successful student. 

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates the National Education Association's Read Across America Day Our tutors strive to make learning fun for students. Huntington offers these tips for parents to help get children excited about reading.

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Tue, 21 Feb 2017 20:24:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ February 23, 2017 —On March 2, 2017, Huntington Learning Center will join millions of teachers and administrators, librarians, higher education faculty, education support professionals, students, and members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate Read Across America Day, which marks the 113th birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as beloved children's author, Dr. Seuss.

"Literacy is the foundation of learning and the most essential building block in a child's education," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Read Across America is one of our favorite national celebrations because not only does it bring attention to the importance of reading as an academic and life skill, it reminds us all that reading is fun. Dr. Seuss's books revolutionized storytelling and continue to show readers of all ages that reading is one of life's great pastimes."

How can parents encourage their children to get excited about reading? Huntington offers these tips:

  • Let your child choose books about subjects that interest him or her.
  • Continue trying new types of books to give your child opportunities to discover that favorite book or author.
  • Select books that your child can read successfully. Choosing books that he or she struggles to read will only prove discouraging.
  • Read aloud to your child, even if they are in middle school.  It is a great way for them to have 1:1 time with you and you can create excitement about the book.
  • Help your reluctant reader find books he or she likes. This may involve some trial and error, but talk with your librarian for ideas and look specifically for book series and lists designed for students who are below-grade-level or reluctant readers.
  • Reward reading. If your child needs a little encouragement, incentivize him or her for reading each day. The more your child reads, the more successful he or she will become—and the more likely he or she will want to read more.
  • Make reading a part of everyday life at home.
  • Have your child see you reading every day.  It shows reading is an important part of your life.
  • Make reading fun, and don't force it. Follow your child's lead when it comes to selecting books, even if it means letting him or her choose a comic book over a novel, or a book that's below his or her ability over one that challenges him or her.

 

For more information about Read Across America Day, visit www.nea.org/readacross

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Preparing your student for standardized testing Huntington has created a list of helpful ways parents can support there child before, during and after their child takes standardized exams.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 10:50:15 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-testing-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-testing-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ February 4, 2015 —Currently, in the United States, standardized testing plays a major role in public schools. Your child could take more than one standardized test during a school year and teachers may spend classroom time preparing students for upcoming tests. On a daily basis, parents can support their child before, during and after these tests in various ways that will help their child be more prepared on test day.

Before the test-As a parent you need to be prepared before the test. Most schools will send home information in advance of the test about testing schedules and preparation plans. That includes, what the test is, what it will measure, and how the results will be analyzed and used. Check with your school to see if standardized tests results are used for placement in classes for the following school year. Here are steps you can take to prepare your child:

  • Help your child with subjects that are difficult. Workbooks target test prep by offering practice exercises and questions similar to the ones on the test.
  • Put your child’s mind at ease if you think they might have any anxiety. Standardized testing is a reality that children are forced to deal with. Practice relaxation tips to use during the test.
  • Talk with your child’s teacher if you have concerns. Difficulty with standardized tests could be the symptom of a problem. Huntington Learning Centers offer academic evaluations that helps identify the areas causing a child trouble and can help to prepare for standardized tests.


On test day-
"It is imperative that your child gets a good night’s rest the night before and eats a healthy breakfast.  This ensures your child can work to their maximum potential," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center.  Huntington suggest the following test taking tactics. Here is a list of test taking strategies students can use to answer questions:

  • Read the question first. Read the entire question first to make sure you understand what it’s asking. With reading passage questions, read the questions first to guide reading.
  • Look for key words. Identify key words in the question, such as compare, except, and author’s intent, that will guide you towards choosing the correct answer.
  • Read every answer choice before choosing the correct answer. After reading the question, stop and think about the answer before reading all the possible answers. Then eliminate the unlikely answer choices and identify the correct answer.
  • Answer the easier questions first. Answer the questions you know, skip the challenging ones, and then they go back and answer the skipped questions.
  • Make smart guesses. When you don’t know the answer to a question, make an educated guess, unless there’s a penalty for guessing. Educated guesses are made by eliminating the incorrect choices; apply what you know on the particular topic, and then picking the best answer choice that remains. 
  • Stick with your first answer. Don’t second-guess yourself; the first answer is probably right. Unless you are certain that the first answer was wrong, don’t change any answers.
  • Pace yourself. Budget time wisely so you can finish the test.  Don’t spend too much time on any one question.
  • Check your work carefully. Check that you’ve answered every question.


After the test -
Assessments vary from test to test, but the test scores should include information that helps you interpret the results. Talk with your child's teacher if you have any questions about the test results. Usually, the results are made available to both parents and teachers. Remember that standardized tests cannot measure the sum total of your child’s progress. It is only one assessment tool designed to measure a certain set of skills.

Lower than expected test results on standardized tests might indicate your child is struggling. It’s better to get help sooner rather than later. Huntington’s highly trained tutors work with your child individually, at his or her own pace, to master each skill before moving on to more difficult tasks and more advanced learning.

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Teacher Tip: Four Great Common Core Resources for Teachers As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:06:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-great-common-core-resources-for-teachers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-great-common-core-resources-for-teachers As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

EduCore: www.educore.ascd.org - This collaboration between the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation offers resources, tools, professional development resources and more for teachers who are implementing Common Core.

Achieve the Core: www.achievethecore.org - Achieve the Core was developed by Student Achievement Partners, which is composed of authors of the Common Core State Standards. On their website, you can find free curricular tools, professional development materials, Common Core-aligned writing samples and lessons, and much more.

National Education Association (NEA) Common Core State Standards Toolkit: www.nea.org - This NEA publication offers all kinds of helpful curriculum and instruction resources, a list of resources by state, professional development modules and much more.

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Huntington Learning Center Gives Tips for Instilling the Importance of College into Your Child By creating an open dialogue about college early, parents can positively influence their child's study skills to better prepare for college.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:43:18 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-importance-college https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-importance-college Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Gives Tips for Instilling the Importance of College into Your Child

Oradell, NJ 1/9/15 – Parents hear often how important it is to start saving early for their child’s college education, but what about nurturing a lifelong college mindset? “Parents shouldn’t assume that just because their child attends school each day that he or she is thinking about and planning for college,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington suggests that parents start the college conversation early. Here are a few additional tips to positively influence your child’s feelings about the importance of college:

Set the expectation. Rather than making college sound like a possibility, talk about college as a definite plan. By doing so, you’ll ingrain in your child’s mind that it will happen—with your support. This is also a good opportunity to impress upon your child the importance of working hard in school in preparation for college-level academics.

Share the reasons that college is important. Starting as early as elementary school, talk candidly with your child about the fact that earning a college education will help him or her get a good job, make more money and have a better life overall. As your child grows older, discuss some of the other benefits of college, such as the ability to explore subjects, grow as a person, try new activities and much more. 

Go see colleges. If there is a college in your town, take your child there sometimes—even if just for picnics or walks on the weekends. Many colleges offer events for the community as well as camps and other programs for children of all ages. Seek out opportunities to expose your child to the college environment. Take your child to visit your alma mater if you have the chance. Point out the places where you lived and took classes and share some of the positive experiences from your time at college.

Talk about the future. Your nine-year-old might not yet have a firm career ambition, but you can still ponder the possibilities and discuss how a college education will help your child make them happen.  Ask your child what he or she wants to become. Give your child opportunities to explore careers through classes, camps, and later, internships and volunteer experiences.

Parents have a tremendous influence on their child’s college aspirations. “You are your child’s greatest influence, so everything you say and do shapes how your child feels about college and its value,” says Huntington. “Make college sound exciting, worthwhile and achievable. Promise that you’ll help your child realize his or her academic aspirations. Then, by the time your child reaches high school, the question won’t be whether or not to attend college, but where to apply.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Huntington Teamed up with Toys for Tots for 3rd Consecutive Year As the leading provider of tutoring and test prep, Huntington has teamed up with Toys For Tots to help give back to the community!

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:47:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/toys-tots-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/toys-tots-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Teamed up with Toys for Tots for 3rd Consecutive Year

Oradell, NJ -- January 2015-- Huntington employees participated in the 2014 Toys for Tots Holiday Campaign.  Huntington has a long standing tradition of giving back to the community and participation in the Toys for Tots program is an exciting way to get everyone involved.  Huntington collected boxes of unwrapped toys and books over the last few weeks of 2014 which were donated to the Toys for Tots organization.   

The mission at Huntington, a leading provider of tutoring and test prep services to students in kindergarten through twelfth grade, is to give every student the best education possible.  By teaming up with Toys for Tots, a program run by the US Marine Corps Reserve, Huntington’s is able to expand the mission and give back even more, by putting smiles on the faces of those in need during the holidays.  Through the generosity of Huntington employees, the holiday season was a little brighter for many children 

About Huntington

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Grade by Grade Parent Guide for Elementary Homework Huntington Learning Center has developed a homework help guide that parents can use as their child moves through elementary school.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 14:55:18 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/grade-by-grade https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/grade-by-grade Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Grade by Grade Parent Guide for Elementary Homework

Homework is an essential part of learning, helping reinforce what is taught in the classroom. However, many parents are unsure exactly what their role in homework should be and how much homework to expect in each grade. While there is no widespread rule that applies to students and parents everywhere, here is a general guide as your child moves through elementary and middle school.

Kindergarten – Homework in kindergarten is minimal and focused primarily on teaching students to follow directions, work independently and develop reading building blocks (such as letter sounds and combinations and sight words) and basic math skills.  Your role: Let your child take the lead on any homework assignments, but be on hand for help. Read with your child every night.

First Grade – Practice worksheets reinforce concepts taught in the classroom and may come home nightly or weekly so your child can complete at a comfortable pace. The National Parent Teacher Association recommends no more than 20 minutes of homework per night in first grade, but most elementary teachers encourage nightly reading of 15-30 minutes in addition to other homework. Your role: Have your child attempt homework independently, but be available for questions and help. Continue to read to your child and have your child read to you, practicing reading strategies taught in class.

Second Grade – By second grade, the goal is for your child to become a proficient reader. The teacher may provide a specific reading book for your child to read to you each night. Spelling will remain a focus, and you should continue to read together as well. Math worksheets will come home and may take 10-20 minutes to complete, focusing on explaining math concepts. Your role: Continue to help your child build independence as a reader and a student overall.

Third Grade – By third grade, your third-grader should be capable of maintaining the homework routine without reminders from you. Nightly math homework should take 15-25 minutes and moves into multiplication, division and early geometry (in addition to multi-digit addition and subtraction). Other homework, such as science or social studies projects, may take additional time. Your child should read for at least 20 minutes each night, both independently to him or herself and aloud. You may notice that reading expands into much more nonfiction and other texts. Reading to your child is still incredibly valuable. Your role: Continue to help your child build independence. Be supportive, but put your child in charge of completing homework.

Fourth Grade – In fourth grade, many teachers transition into communicating primarily with students about homework and assignments. Teachers elevate the focus on time management and organizational skills. Your child must keep track of homework each day. Nightly math homework becomes more complex (covering geometric figures, introduction to decimals, fractions and percentages, and more) and should take 20-30 minutes, and other homework and projects will take additional time. Your child should read for at least 20 minutes each night.  Your role: Continue to build independence and encourage your child’s responsibility in keeping track of homework assigned and upcoming projects. Be available for support.

Fifth Grade – Fifth grade homework is meant to prepare students for middle school. Students are expected to do math (decimals, fractions, percentages, ratios and much more), maintain a planner/organizational system, study for quizzes and read every night. Projects give fifth-grade students an opportunity to research, plan and complete bigger tasks that take several nights or weeks. Your role: Uphold a consistent homework routine, check your child’s planner to ensure its proper and effective use, and be available for homework questions.

Homework is a great way for you to stay apprised of what your child is learning in school, and it is also a big part of your child’s life as a student. If you are unsure about the extent of your role at homework time, talk to your child’s teacher. When homework is a family priority, your child benefits and becomes a more responsible, independent and successful student.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Catholic Schools Week America’s youth are shaped by their education, and Huntington is pleased to join Catholic schools in giving elementary and secondary students the best education possible

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:22:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/catholic-schools-week-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/catholic-schools-week-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Catholic Schools Week

Oradell, NJ, January 26, 2015 – Huntington Learning Center is proud to support Catholic Schools Week 2015 (Jan. 25 through Jan. 31), a celebration of Catholic schools in America as an important part of U.S. education due to their traditionally high academic standards and graduation rates. 2015 marks the 41st year of Catholic Schools Week, which became an annual event in 1974.

“America’s youth are shaped by their education, and Huntington is pleased to join Catholic schools in giving elementary and secondary students the best education possible,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “We applaud all schools that uphold high educational standards and integrate values-based teaching into their curricula.”

The 2015 theme of Catholic Schools Week is “Catholic Schools: Faith, Academics, Service,” which highlights the three distinctions of Catholic schools. “Huntington Learning Center is a part of many communities across our nation, and we recognize that Catholic schools play an important role in our educational system,” says Huntington. “We’re proud to partner with Catholic and other schools of excellence to help students reach their potential and give them the foundation to become good citizens.”

Huntington supports a variety of national events focused on education, including Read Across America, Math Awareness Month and American Education Week.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Classroom Management Strategies for Every Teacher Classroom management & homework help Strategies that every teacher can use to help boost their students' academic skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:47:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/classroom-management-strategies-for-every-teacher https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/classroom-management-strategies-for-every-teacher Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Classroom Management Strategies for Every Teacher

People become teachers because they care about children and their futures and because they are passionate about helping students achieve their potential. However, teaching is a not an easy job—and one of the most challenging aspects for many teachers is figuring out how to effectively manage the classroom.

If you ever have trouble keeping your students on task or have been thrown off course by troublesome students, you may need ideas to better manage your classroom and redirect the focus to student learning. Here are a number of battle-tested strategies that teachers can put to work in any classroom, as shared in David Adamson’s Classroom Management: 24 Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Know:

  • Use social cues – One of the best ways to communicate with students about appropriate behavior is to state a desired behavior that you want to see in class. Attribute the behavior to a specific student and affirm the behavior as a great example for the other students. What to say: “Thanks to table 3 for having their eyes on me.” “I see that John has started working on the assignment; thank you, John.”
  • Establish time limits – Plan out your day carefully, which will help you keep your students engaged. Share your expectations of time limits and schedule. What to say: “I’ll give you about five minutes for this task.” “Everyone needs to be in their seats in 30 seconds, please.”
  • Manage your transitions – Transitions from task to task can be challenging and time consuming, with students getting distracted or misbehaving. However, if you plan for transitions and explain carefully what you want students to do and how much time they have to do it, you can minimize that wandering or waiting time. What to do: Be prepared, get students’ attention, explain what you want students to do, confirm their understanding, give a signal to begin, give a time limit and start the next activity.
  • Show respect – The classroom environment cannot be productive without respect—between you and your students and among the students themselves. You cannot demand respect; however, you can exhibit respectful behavior toward students, thereby influencing how they respond to you. What to do: Be polite, avoid sarcasm, be on time and ready to teach and maintain a dignified student environment.
  • Keep a brisk pace – Students today are used to fast-paced interaction. You can minimize behavioral problems by picking up the pace of a lesson, introducing interesting activities and having extra activities on hand to fill gaps of time. What to do: Plan ahead, pose questions that invite critical thinking, and try different mediums for reinforcement of lessons.
  • Intervene in the moment – When needed, give simple reminders to bring unfocused or disruptive students back on task. What to do: Communicate nonverbally with a look or facial expression, change your tone of voice or move closer to the misbehaving student.

Teaching is an important and rewarding career with many wonderful aspects to it, but it certainly has its challenges as well. Managing classroom behavior and expectations is an essential part of the job that allows you to maintain control of your classroom and keep the focus on learning.

For many more strategies for classroom management that will help you improve student behavior and achievement, read Classroom Management: 24 Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Know.

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Tips for Building Your Students' Comprehension Thanks to the introduction of the Common Core State Standards, building students' comprehension in preparation for college and their careers has taken a front seat.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:15:51 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-building-your-students-comprehension https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-building-your-students-comprehension Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Tips for Building Your Students’ Comprehension

Thanks to the introduction of the Common Core State Standards, building students’ comprehension in preparation for college and their careers has taken a front seat. One of the key shifts called for by the Common Core is to practice with complex texts and their academic language, progressively developing students’ reading comprehension so that they can gain more from what they read. Students are asked to make logical inferences, analyze the structure of texts, evaluate texts’ arguments (and create their own), and much more.

As you know, however, it is challenging to “teach” comprehension. How can you ensure students extract meaning from that which they read? How can you inspire students to think critically as they read, speak and listen, and incorporate knowledge that they possess already into their understanding of new information?

Below are a few techniques to help your students more thoroughly engage with what they learn, derived from a number of tried-and-true comprehension strategies used by teachers across the nation:

The SQ3R method (Survey, Questions, Read, Recite and Review) guides students to ask questions, make predictions and confirm those predictions when reading and is used for successful studying habits.

  • Survey - Look over the headings, pictures, graphs, or tables. Read the introductory paragraph and summary paragraph. Glance over key words or questions that might be highlighted. Ask yourself; "What do I know about this lesson at this point?"
  • Question - Turn the first heading into a question. 
  • Read - Read to the end of the first section to answer the question you have asked.
  • Recite - After reading the first section, look away from the textbook and try to recite briefly the answer to your question. This is reciting from memory. Jot down brief phrases in outline form. Glance over the section again, if you cannot recite the correct information.

Repeat Question, Read, and Recite on each succeeding section heading.

  • Review - Look over your notes or main heading. Check your memory of the context by reciting the major sub-points under each heading.

 

Story Sequencing helps students learn to recall facts in a story in order, thereby helping them organize their ideas and the information that they read. One example of story sequencing is the use of story maps. Story maps are graphic aids that help students identify a story’s characters, plot, problem and solution as well as the story’s beginning, middle and end.

Paragraph Shrinking was developed as part of the Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies program that is used by many teachers to improve students’ reading proficiency (and was created at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development). As students read, have them summarize the main points of each section or paragraph (the who/what, most important thing about the who or what, and the overall main idea).

Paragraph shrinking empowers students to hone their comprehension by encouraging them to monitor their understanding of what they read as they read it. Students can work in small groups or you can work with the class as a whole.

Visualization, or the use of visual imagery, teaches students to think of images as they read, thereby engaging with the text and improving comprehension. You can encourage students to practice this by having them read passages and pause periodically (after coming across descriptive information) to develop a mental image. Students might relate a picture to a story’s plot or characters, or a passage’s main point.

When a student lacks reading skills, he or she suffers in all academic subjects. Students need reading skills to understand their history and science textbooks, test instructions, and literary stories.  Huntington's academic evaluation identifies a student's weak skills. Instructors develop an individualized program that builds these skills before progressing to the next skill level. Huntington Learning Center has been teaching reading comprehension since 1977. Visit www.huntingtonhelps.com for more information on our programs.

As you research ways to help your students improve their comprehension, keep in mind that it might be most effective to try out different strategies and give students the tools to hone the techniques that work best for them.  Just as students all learn differently, they learn to comprehend text in different manners as well.  As referenced above, there are various strategies for building comprehension that you can use with your students. To read up on the College and Career Readiness English Language Arts Standards, within the Common Core State Standards visit www.corestandards.org

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Teacher Tip: When to Refer Students for Tutoring Help When a student is having difficulty in school, intervening sooner than later can make a world of difference.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:06:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teacher-tip-when-to-refer-students-for-tutoring-help https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teacher-tip-when-to-refer-students-for-tutoring-help Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Teacher Tip: When to Refer Students for Tutoring Help

When a student is having difficulty in school, intervening sooner than later can make a world of difference. Here are a few signs that a student may need one-to-one, personalized tutoring:

The student is just getting by. Some struggling students fly under the radar because they’re not failing and they’re not overly troublesome, yet they frequently miss important concepts and have a hard time keeping up. Students like this are often slow to finish work and constantly seem overwhelmed.

The student has become despondent or angry. If the student is unusually moody or unhappy—on top of being disengaged in class—it may be time to investigate what’s going on. This is especially concerning if the student previously had an optimistic disposition.

The student is highly disorganized. No student is perfect when it comes to keeping things neat and orderly, but if you have a student whose disorganization interferes with learning on a regular basis, some targeted attention to study skills improvement could help. 

The student just doesn’t care. Often, students who are apathetic about school feel that they are past the point of help. Their self-esteem has taken a nose dive, and their school problems seem insurmountable. 

The student who fails despite lots of studying. If the student who seems to complete homework and participates during class performs poorly on tests and quizzes, it could be that the student is struggling to understand concepts independently.

The student who doesn’t complete assignments. Clearly, a student who stops doing homework or reading assignments altogether may have grown apathetic due to repeated struggles to understand what you are teaching.

If you have a student who is showing one or more of these signs, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN LEARN. We’ll share more with you about our supplemental education services and how best to help your student. 

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Preparing for the Redesigned SAT In March of 2014, College Board officials announced plans to significantly alter the format and content of the SAT, one of the most widely taken college entrance exams in the nation.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:44:27 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/preparing-for-the-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/preparing-for-the-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Preparing for the Redesigned SAT

In March of 2014, College Board officials announced plans to significantly alter the format and content of the SAT, one of the most widely taken college entrance exams in the nation. The reason? According to College Board, the Redesigned SAT will focus less on tricks and strategies and more on the work students see in high school. The changes will be a better assessment of the academic skills needed for college readiness.  

The Redesigned SAT will be administered for the first time in March 2016, so for students planning to take the SAT in 2016 or later, knowing about the changes to the test can help them to be better prepared.

A Few Key Changes to the Redesigned SAT

Time and Layout

The current SAT takes 3 hours and 45 minutes to complete, but the Redesigned SAT will be 3 hours in length. One reason for this time difference is that the Essay will no longer be required on the Redesigned SAT. Students who choose to take the optional essay will receive an additional 50 minutes, resulting in the overall test length of 3 hours and 50 minutes. Before deciding whether or not to complete the essay, it is in a student’s best interest to research admissions requirements for their college choices, since college requirements will vary.

The Redesigned SAT will have fewer sections than the current SAT. The current SAT has 10 sections (3 Critical Reading, 3 Math, 3 Writing, and 1 experimental). The Redesigned SAT will have only 4 sections (Reading, Writing and Language, Math (calculator allowed), and Math (no calculator allowed). Even though there will be fewer sections, this does not mean the test will be easier. This new format will challenge students to manage their time carefully to ensure they complete numerous questions within lengthy sections in the allotted time.

Scoring -Changing the rules

The rules of scoring are changing significantly on the Redesigned SAT, and these changes can strongly influence a student’s test-taking strategy. On the current SAT, students gain points for correct answers, but there is a penalty for incorrect answers (1/4 point lost for each wrong answer). Students neither gain nor lose points if an answer is left blank. The Redesigned SAT will offer a more straight-forward scoring approach, allowing students to gain points for correct answers, but not penalizing students for incorrect responses.  So how does this influence a student’s test-taking strategy? On the current SAT, students avoid lowering their score by omitting answers if they are less than certain their answer is right. With no fear of penalty on the Redesigned SAT, students should answer every question.

Scoring-Setting goals

The more questions that a student gets correct, the higher their score will be. 1600 is the new 2400, and by that we mean that the highest possible score on the Redesigned SAT will be a 1600 instead of the highest possible score on the current SAT which is a 2400. These changes are occurring as a result of the change in test format and sections. Students need to understand scoring potential on the test in order to set goals for themselves when testing.

Content and Area of Focus

The College Board created the Redesigned SAT to develop a more accurate assessment of the academic skills needed in our fast-paced, highly challenging educational system. The Redesigned SAT will more closely resemble the work encountered in the classroom. The Reading section will test the ability to develop a strong understanding of passages.  The Writing and Language section will challenge students to identify correct grammar and usage while determining if passages are developed properly. Math skills will be tested with a calculator and without a calculator, assessing skills in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and problem solving and data analysis questions.

Another change coming will be the addition of questions related to history/social studies and science. Students will find these types of questions in each section of the Redesigned SAT. A student’s performance on these types of questions can help high schools and colleges determine which courses the student is best suited for.

Preparation is Key

Understanding how the test is changing is a good place to start. To learn more about the Redesigned SAT, click here. The next step is to work with an SAT expert who can offer guidance and test-taking strategies specific to your needs. By working with an SAT expert, students can ensure they are fully prepared on test day.

At Huntington, whether you are preparing for the current SAT or the Redesigned SAT, we can help. To learn more about our prep programs, click here, or call us at 1 800 CAN LEARN to speak with an educational consultant.

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The 8 Key Changes to the SAT In spring 2016, the College Board will introduce a completely redesigned SAT, which will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need for college and career readiness.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:10:55 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-8-key-changes-to-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-8-key-changes-to-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The 8 Key Changes to the SAT

In spring 2016, the College Board will introduce a completely redesigned SAT, which will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need for college and career readiness. Here are the eight major changes your students can expect to see on the new SAT:

  1. Relevant words in context – Obscure vocabulary memorization will soon be a thing of the past. Although vocabulary is still an important part of the SAT, the redesigned SAT will focus on relevant vocabulary in context—words that students will use throughout college and their careers.
  2. Command of evidence – In the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Essay sections, students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to interpret, synthesize and use evidence found in many different sources.
  3. Essay analyzing a source – The optional Essay section will have students read a passage and explain how the author builds a persuasive argument. Students may analyze areas such as the author’s use of evidence, reasoning and stylistic elements.
  4. Focus on math that matters most – The Math section will focus on three essential types of math: problem solving and data analysis, the heart of algebra, and passport to advanced math.These areas of math are used in a wide range of majors and careers.
  5. Problems grounded in real-world contexts – The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math sections will require students to answer questions that are grounded in real-world issues directly related to college and career contexts.
  6. Analysis in science and in history/social studies – The redesigned SAT will have students apply their reading, writing, language and math skills to answer questions in science, history and social studies, both in the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section and the Math section.
  7. Founding documents and great global conversation – Students will encounter a passage from one of the U.S. founding documents (such as the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and the Federalist Papers) and must answer thought-provoking questions about such passages.
  8. No penalty for wrong answers – The redesigned SAT will move to a “rights-only” scoring system, removing any penalty for wrong answers.

Learn more about the specific changes to the SAT at www.collegeboard.org.

Questions? Huntington can help. We are in the forefront in preparing for the SAT and can help you and your student stay informed.

Students can take the ACT as an alternative to the SAT during this period of transition. The ACT is accepted by all 4 year colleges and universities in the United States.  More than 1.84 million 2014 graduates—a record 57 percent of the national graduating class—took the ACT.

Learn more about Huntington’s test prep services at www.huntingtonhelps.com.

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Kick off a Great New Year Happy New Year from Huntington Learning Center!

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:30:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/kick-off-a-great-new-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/kick-off-a-great-new-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Kick off a Great New Year

Happy New Year from Huntington Learning Center!

Looking to make 2015 the best year yet for your child? Here are a few suggestions to motivate and inspire your child to work hard, maintain a great attitude and finish the school year strong:

Set goals. Start the New Year off right by encouraging your child to ponder what he or she wants to accomplish this year. If this is an unfamiliar exercise, a simple way to start is to have your child make two lists: problems that your child is facing currently and things to change or achieve. As an example, your child’s first list might include the problem, I’m getting poor grades in math, while the second list might include, I want to tell interesting stories/become a stronger writer. Talk through each item and lay out next steps. For problems, discuss what your child must do to correct them and/or whether your child needs to seek help. For goals, talk about short-term and long-term objectives within each goal, obstacles to achieving those smaller milestones and steps to overcome each obstacle.

Revisit the routine. A consistent homework and school routine is the key to your student’s academic success. If yours could use some improvement, now is the time to make adjustments. Determine the best time of day for your child to do homework—for some, that’s right after school; for others, after dinner is best—and try to stick to it. During each study or homework session, be sure your child has a list of to-dos, prioritized by due date and required effort. Finally, talk with your child about good study habits. Is your child organized and making the most of every homework session?

Keep the lines of communication open. Whether the school year is going well so far or your child is struggling, the start of a new year presents a great opportunity to talk openly about how you can help your child when issues arise. If your child is having problems in one or more subjects, discuss a plan of action. Reiterate your role of support for this last half of the school year and in the 2015-16 school year. Strong communication between you and your child (and between you and the teacher) can make an enormous difference in your child’s school experience.

Look forward. What does the coming 12 months hold for your child? A major transition into middle or high school? The college search and application process, including prepping for the ACT or SAT? Is your child hoping to start a new activity this year that might impact his or her schedule? Whatever the case, urge your child to think ahead and picture where he or she wants to be one year from now. For many students, such visualization of the future is an effective motivator—and particularly useful with the goal-setting process.

As you ring in the New Year, take the time to talk about one of the most important parts of your child’s life: his or her education. Children can benefit immensely from the process of thinking through  ways to better themselves as students and people. Encourage your child to reflect on goals, strengths and areas of improvement, and ask how you can assist. Together, you can make this a positive and productive year.  

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How Tutoring Can Help Your Chemistry Student How can you help your student succeed in chemistry?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:16:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-tutoring-can-help-your-chemistry-student https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-tutoring-can-help-your-chemistry-student Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Tutoring Can Help Your Chemistry Student

If your student attends a high school with a required chemistry course, or if your student elected to take chemistry and finds himself or herself struggling to master concepts of nomenclature and stoichiometry, it’s time to take initiative with a plan to get your student the chemistry help he or she needs for success in the classroom and beyond.

But first, why is success in a high school chemistry class so important? The fundamentals of chemistry are required for many college majors, including health sciences, bioengineering, and biology, and basic level chemistry is highly suggested for an even larger number of majors. Many colleges see chemistry courses as integral to an education, based on chemistry’s role in our daily lives and its relevance to a wide variety of careers. Even if your student goes on to major in English or Theater, a basic understanding of chemistry will be relevant throughout his or her life. For example, did you know that chemistry fundamentals can be applied to anything from using laundry detergent to working as a hairdresser?

In addition, while a chemistry course will likely be required during a student’s freshman or sophomore year for applicable majors, the challenge of adjusting to the pace of university-level lectures, reading requirements and lab procedures can be made substantially easier with prior knowledge of basic chemistry, mastered in a high school course.

How can you help your student succeed in chemistry?

Seek out chemistry help through a professional tutoring service. In addition to discussing your student’s challenges in the course in an open, positive conversation and contacting their teacher for additional insight or supplementary resources, the Huntington Learning Center’s structured tutoring program, specifically designed for chemistry help, tackles every aspect of a student’s chemistry struggles with individual tutoring from highly-qualified instructors.

Most students perform poorly in chemistry for reasons a professional tutoring service can help address or redirect. According to studies, the most common reasons for failure in chemistry courses are procrastination in homework and test preparation, lack of comprehension of reading materials, inadequate math preparation (basic algebra is a must), relying on others to do assignments (or do the thinking for them), and simple fear of failure. At Huntington, our chemistry tutoring program addresses each of these barriers to success.

With a structured tutoring schedule, your student will now have allotted time to work on current assignments in a comfortable, yet focused environment. Our tutors will explain reading materials in further detail and provide a space for students to ask clarifying questions, which they may be reluctant to do in class. Further, we can help bring your student up to speed with the math essentials for the course, and at Huntington, your student will engage in his or her own critical thinking, without relying on lab partners or other classmates to help them understand the work.

 Finally, we pride ourselves on creating a positive atmosphere of support and encouragement. If fear of failure and anxiety are your student’s greatest concerns with chemistry, we can help your student become more confident and assured of his or her abilities in no time. What’s more, your student’s improved test scores and comprehension in class will be sure to improve his or her overall attitude towards the subject.

Let the Huntington Learning Center be your student’s solution for chemistry help this school year. Visit us online to learn more about our services for chemistry help, or call today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak with a friendly educational representative. 

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Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center, Profiled In Entrepreneur Magazine's January 2015 Franchise 500 Issue Huntington Learning Center is proud to announce that Entrepreneur Magazine has named Eileen Huntington as one of three "Women to Watch" in 2015.

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Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:15:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/entrepreneur-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/entrepreneur-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center, Profiled In Entrepreneur Magazine’s January 2015 Franchise 500 Issue

Oradell, New Jersey – December 29, 2014 – Huntington Learning Center announces its co-founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington, named by Entrepreneur magazine, as one of three “Women to Watch” in 2015.

The Entrepreneur profile documents Huntington Learning Center’s rise to the top of the tutoring and test prep industry, and delves into Eileen’s leadership style of “positivity and high expectations.” Under Eileen’s leadership, Huntington Learning Center has climbed ten spots on Entrepreneur’s annual Franchise 500 rankings due to the company’s financial strength and stability, growth rate, system size, years in business and low startup costs. This is the eighth year ranked as a Franchise 500 company.

 Eileen and Ray Huntington opened the first Huntington Learning Center in 1977 when, as Eileen tells Entrepreneur “at the time, there was no real tutoring industry … there was no model to follow … what do we have to lose?” That grit and entrepreneurial spirit are the reasons why she is franchising’s woman to watch.

Today, Eileen, Ray and the entire Huntington team lead the #1 producing tutoring franchise, producing 50% more in revenue than their closest competitor. Huntington’s financial results are a direct result of student performance. In just three months, on average, Huntington’s tutoring students increase 1.2 grade levels in reading and 1 grade level in math. On average, Huntington’s test prep students increase 192 points on the SAT and 4.2 points on the ACT in just 2 ½ months. 

Huntington began franchising in 1985 and now has over 260 locations across the United States. In 2013, the company changed its franchise model to lower its initial franchise fees. Now, individuals looking to take control of their lives and own their own business can become a franchisee for a total upfront investment of less than $100K. Huntington offers financing options, great flexibility, with part-time startup, and tremendous training and support. 

Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Eileen shares with Entrepreneur, “We’re working with children. When a child calls up and says, ‘I got on the honor roll for the first time,’ you are just over the moon for that.’” This sums up what Huntington does; it changes lives and helps students achieve their academic goals. 

Fittingly, Entrepreneur rated the “children’s businesses” category as the fourth largest sector in its rankings. According to the magazine, “From companies that offer preschoolers a head start to tutoring services that help high-schoolers boost SAT scores, franchises are earning high marks by supplementing the traditional education system.”

Huntington has been named a Top 20 Children’s Services and Education Franchise in Opportunity World magazine, an AllStar Franchise by AllBusiness, a Top 100 Franchise by the World Franchising Network and a Top 50 Franchise for Minorities by the National Minority Franchising Initiative. Huntington is nationally accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

Read the full 2015 Franchise 500 ranking at http://www.entrepreneur.com/franchise500/index.html.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

Press Contact
Laura Gehringer
Director of Marketing and Advertising Huntington Learning Centers,
Inc. 496 Kinderkamack Road Oradell, NJ 07649
Phone: 201 957 9431
Email: gehringerl@hlcmail.com

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Helping Your Young Reader Succeed with a Reading Tutor We know reading is important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:03:01 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-young-reader-succeed-with-a-reading-tutor https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-young-reader-succeed-with-a-reading-tutor Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Helping Your Young Reader Succeed with a Reading Tutor

We know reading is important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified? Don’t all students learn at their own pace? It’s true that every student has his or her academic strengths and weaknesses, and may pick up some skills more quickly than others; however, if your elementary student is reading below grade level or receiving report card marks that indicate under-performance, taking action is imperative.  Ignoring a reading deficiency can set the stage for struggles for the rest of the academic year and beyond.

When students struggle in reading, they become more inclined to avoid reading out of frustration and lack of confidence, and this will continue to limit their progress. A negative attitude toward reading can snowball into a lifelong aversion to reading, which can put your student at a significant disadvantage. Poor reading skills are likely to impede on an individual’s chances of scoring well on all areas of standardized tests.

In addition, reading skills aren’t confined to the elementary student’s reading lesson, nor will they be once your student enters middle school and high school. Mathematics, science, social studies and history all depend on reading skills like textual analysis and expository writing. The truth is that success in reading translates to greater success in all academic subjects.

So how can you provide your struggling reader with adequate help? Turn to a reading tutor. A reading tutor is the most effective way to successfully address a reader’s weakness in phonetics, fluency and comprehension. A reading tutor can conduct in-depth assessment of a reader’s abilities and provide individualized one-on-one instruction. Plus, at a well-respected tutoring service like The Huntington Learning Center, where our proven strategies have warranted success for over thirty-five years, parents are sure to see results quickly and students will gain new confidence in the classroom.

How do parents know when it’s time to seek the help of a reading tutor?

  • A reading tutor may be necessary if the reading instruction he or she does receive does not fully address their specific needs.
  • If your elementary student can read with fluency and accuracy, but does not comprehend what he or she is reading, your student is a struggling reader and could benefit from the help of a reading tutor.
  • A conversation with your child’s teacher is also an easy way to tell if your student is struggling with reading, as is your student’s sudden disinterest in reading, tendency to read aloud memorized words but skip over sight words, or inability to read fluently from diverse passages.
  • If you observe your student to be a strong reader at home with grade-level reading abilities but his or her grades don’t fully reflect this, the stress of the classroom environment may be hindering your student’s performance. A reading tutor can help build confidence for reading out loud.
  • Keep in mind that reading tutors are not just for students who are at risk for falling behind; if your elementary student is an advanced reader, a tutor could help him or her excel even further with one-on-one instruction delivered at the pace that works best.

These are just some of the many ways parents may be able to identify their student as a struggling reader. For more information or resources, or to arrange for a reading tutor for your young reader, contact the Huntington Learning Center today by visiting our website or calling 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

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Barrington Huntington Learning Center Announces Winner of Huntington's College Scholarship Sweepstakes Congratulations to Bella McCloskey for winning a $500 college tuition scholarship! Bella started with Huntington when she needed ACT test prep help.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 15:52:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-sweepstakes-3 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-sweepstakes-3 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Barrington, IL, 12/22/14 – The Barrington Huntington Learning Center announced the winner of its College Scholarship Sweepstakes. Bella McCloskey of Tower Lakes, IL, received a $500 scholarship toward future college tuition and fees. McCloskey is currently a junior at Barrington High School and loves physics and ceramics. Bella has been visiting colleges and universities west of Chicago as she prefers to attend a college in a state with warmer weather.

“She was excited to find out that she had won the scholarship.  She forgot that her entry was submitted when she signed up for the ACT prep program. Winning was a big surprise,” said McCloskey’s parents.

“Huntington is a proud supporter of high school students who strive to attend college, and we are excited to assist this student with her college tuition,” said Beth Meier of the Barrington Huntington Learning Center. In addition to the Barrington center, Huntington Learning Centers across the country participated in Huntington’s College Scholarship Sweepstakes.

High school students aged 14 and older were eligible to enter, as were parents, grandparents and friends of high school students attending college after graduation. Entries were submitted via text message.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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The Importance of Setting Math Goals Elementary and middle school grades are critical years for a student's math development, as it is during this time students learn the fundamentals so imperative for success in upper level math courses.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 14:37:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-importance-of-setting-math-goals https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-importance-of-setting-math-goals Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Importance of Setting Math Goals

 Elementary and middle school grades are critical years for a student’s math development, as it is during this time students learn the fundamentals so imperative for success in upper level math courses. The significance of these years explains why so many parents seek extra math help for their young students via a tutoring program, regarded as the most common and effective means of strengthening areas of weakness in math. But did you know? Effective math tutoring programs can achieve even greater results when defined by specific goals and strategies that are also recognized and implemented at home.

Why Do Math Goals Matter?

Research demonstrates that learning plans are most effective when students feel as if they have a stake in their own education, and understand where they’re going and how they will get there. Allowing a student to write out, discuss and follow through with his or her goal math goals is a great way to contribute a sense of personal ownership to the learning process. Goals will be an integral part of your student’s math tutoring experience, but can be integrated into home life as well. Here’s how parents can help:

Encourage your student to talk about their math goals and discuss ways they can continue to reach these goals after each tutoring session and throughout the week. Active discussion about goals in a relaxed, positive manner can help cultivate persistence and motivation. 

  • Display your student’s math goals in a frequently viewed space in the home, such as your child’s bedroom wall, in his or her planner or on the refrigerator. Communicate that this display isn’t to remind your child that his or her goals are “chores”, but rather that they serve as friendly, uplifting reminders that future accomplishments are on the horizon.
  • Talk with your student about his or her math goals in terms of specifics. As your child’s tutoring math goals will be tailored to strengthening specific skills, conversation about goals should involve more than general questions like, “Do you think you’re getting better?” or “Is math a little easier for you now?” Show you’re “truly in the know” when it comes to math goals by asking about the details. Specific questions typically yield more insightful answers. A parent’s demonstration of genuine interest in math goals can also help redirect focus from the pressure to simply earn an “A,” and instead communicate that attaining beneficial skills is what matters most.  
  • Continue to talk about the how aspect of your child’s math goals. Even if the how is simply attending his or her weekly tutoring session, it’s valuable to emphasize that goals can only be attained through a student’s course of action. Sometimes students aren’t sure what steps are needed to achieve a goal or how they are making gains from week to week, yet their full understanding and participation is critical.  
  • Plan a celebration. When a goal is met, celebrate! Math is a challenging subject, and any student that commits time and effort to reaching math goals deserves recognition. Promoting positive feedback also helps motivate students to continue to work towards their remaining math goals. 

Interested in math tutoring for your elementary or middle school student? At Huntington Learning Center, we can help. Visit us online or call today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Holiday Break Learning Tips Holiday breaks can be a nice disrupt from the daily routine of school - here are a few learning tips to keep your child's academic skills engaged.

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Thu, 08 Dec 2016 19:51:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaylearningtips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaylearningtips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center
Oradell, NJ December 19, 2016 —Holiday break is a wonderful time for children to enjoy a reprieve from the daily routine of school and homework, and spend time with family and relax. However, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that there are many ways to keep children learning and engaged over break—without forcing school work on them. "This break is a great opportunity to get into a few fun and educational activities as a family," says Huntington. Here are a few ideas to help your child keep learning these next few weeks:

Let your child plan a meal. This can combine time-management, and help with math, reading, writing, and art skills. Provide cookbooks or online cooking sites to help choose simple recipes for the meal. When cooking, put your child in charge of measuring. Ask questions, such as "Is two 1/4 cups the same as 1/2 cup? How can you tell?" Model how to create a shopping list. Try to estimate cooking times and prepare a schedule. Search the newspaper for coupons. Do math estimates while grocery shopping.

Break out the crafts. There's no better time than the holidays to create gifts. Check out your local craft center for classes on card-making, or spend time together at home working with your hands. Clay, paint, drawing materials and more are a great way to exercise those artistic, creative muscles. Take those projects a step further and check out how-to books from the library on new crafts or nonfiction books on different artists.

Hit the library. The library is a must-visit destination over holiday break. Your child can enjoy reading for the fun of it as opposed to reading for school, so let him or her choose a few books to enjoy over break on subjects that are of interest to him or her. Don't forget to check out the library's schedule of classes and events for children, teens and families over the holidays.

Books as holiday gifts. Good gifts over the holidays are books or a gift card from a book store. A gift card allows your child to pick out books they want to read so they are involved in the selection process and will be excited for what they will read.

Explore local museums. Call the local art, history, science or cultural museums to see if they have any special exhibits going on this holiday season. And even if they do not, these next couple of weeks are a great time to make a few family field trips to some of the attractions that your city has to offer. As a follow up to the outing have your child write about the activity.

With a little planning and imagination, you can make this holiday break enjoyable for your child—and help him or her learn a few new things, too. "Take time during the break to encourage your child to explore his or her interests and have fun in the process," says Huntington. "Free time is the best time to refresh one's memory that learning itself is a fun activity."

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Teaching Students to Write Well To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events. They learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and they begin to adapt the form and content of their writing to accomplish a particular task and purpose.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 11:59:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-students-to-write-well https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-students-to-write-well

Teaching Students to Write Well

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events. They learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and they begin to adapt the form and content of their writing to accomplish a particular task and purpose. They develop the capacity to build knowledge on a subject through research projects and to respond analytically to literary and informational sources. To meet these goals, students must devote significant time and effort to writing, producing numerous pieces over short and extended time frames throughout the year.

Common Core State Standards

One of the biggest changes put forth by the Common Core State Standards is an elevated focus on writing and overall literacy.  More than ever before, students are now expected to:

  • Write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning and relevant evidence.
  • Write arguments and opinion pieces from the earliest grades.
  • Conduct focused and in-depth research for written analyses and presentations.

Specifically, the standards state that students must build their writing abilities in three areas: argument/opinion writing, informative/explanatory writing, and narrative writing. Student Achievement Partners, a nonprofit organization founded by three lead writers of the Common Core State Standards, offers a variety of resources for teachers to get familiar with the Common Core State Standards and understand how to put them into action.

As you have your students work on more rigorous and in-depth writing assignments, here are a few key points to keep in mind about different types of writing, as derived from writing samples provided on Student Achievement Partners’ website, www.achievethecore.org:

Argument/opinion writing – Students are provided (and read) texts and a writing prompt that asks them to form an opinion or claim about a focusing question.

  • For students in the early elementary grades, opinion writing should offer a brief introduction, state the opinion, provide one or a few reasons for the opinion expressed, and provide a simple concluding statement.
  • As students progress through elementary school, their opinion essays should become more robust and should have an introduction, clear statement of an opinion, evidence from the text to support that opinion and explain the student’s thinking, several paragraphs and a conclusion.
  • Middle school students’ opinion writing should introduce a claim, acknowledge competing claims and rebut them with credible evidence and reasoning, organize reasoning and evidence logically, support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence, and provide a concluding section that supports the initial argument presented.
  • In early high school, students’ argument/opinion writing must introduce a precise claim with context and distinguish that claim from alternate claims, establish a formal style and objective tone, develop the claim with supporting evidence and reasoning, develop counterclaims fairly, and provide a concluding statement.

Informative/explanatory writing – Students are given a set of texts (or a video and a text, if younger) and a writing prompt that requests them to convey complex ideas and information.

  • For students early in elementary school, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, supply facts about it and end with a reflective concluding sentence.
  • As students approach the later elementary school years, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, provide a general observation and focus, use precise language to explain the topic, develop the topic with details, facts and examples, link ideas using words and phrases, and structure the essay to make it easy to follow.
  • In middle school, informative/explanatory writing must introduce the topic, name the work about which the student is writing (and the synopsis of the story), offer relevant facts and details, give examples from the text, clarify the relationship among the ideas presented, give examples, establish a formal style and use precise language.
  • In high school, students must give context to set the stage for an essay, use precise language to delve into the complexity of the topic, transition smoothly to clarify relationships among ideas and concepts, organize complex ideas and information to make connections, develop the topic with facts and details, establish a formal style and objective tone, and analyze ideas and information to make connections. 

Narrative writing – Students write from a writing prompt and stimulating idea to develop narrative about experiences or events.

  • In early elementary school, students must use temporal words or phrases (once, every week) to signal event order, recount sequenced events and include some details.
  • Later in elementary school, students write narratives by first orienting the reader and introducing a narrator, using a variety of transitional words to maintain sequence, use narrative techniques to develop events and show characters’ response, use concrete details to convey experiences and provide a conclusion.
  • In middle school, students engage and orient the reader by establishing context for narrative and introducing main characters, use dialogue to develop characters and events, use transitional clauses, use dialogue to develop character, use precise words and phrases and descriptive details, use description and reflection to build toward an outcome, and provide a conclusion. 
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Effective Ways to Improve Your Student's Study Skills A student's success in school isn't just based on how well he or she can understand material; rather, academic success also depends on the effectiveness of a student's study skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:56:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-ways-to-improve-your-students-study-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-ways-to-improve-your-students-study-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Effective Ways to Improve Your Student’s Study Skills 

A student’s success in school isn’t just based on how well he or she can understand material; rather, academic success also depends on the effectiveness of a student’s study skills.  These important skills include adequately preparing and reviewing material for tests, staying organized and exercising proper study habits. When these skills are weak or lacking in a student, that student is prevented from reaching his or her academic potential. While study skills are often seen as crucial for managing academics at the high school level, they can also foster or impede the success of elementary and middle school students, and developing proper study skills at a young age can pave the way for beneficial habits for the duration of a student’s academic career.

The good news is that improving a student’s study skills can be achieved relatively easily when parents are able to identify which skills their students are struggling with, and consistently implement the following strategies. 

Organizing Materials 


If your child struggles to keep track of his or her handouts and homework assignments, a binder can help contribute much needed organization to his or her daily routine. Together with your child, select a sturdy, sizeable binder (nothing too large) that will be divided into clearly labeled sections for notes, homework, handouts, tests and quizzes. For elementary students, a single binder will likely work well, while middle school students should have an individual binder dedicated to each subject area. Coordinating binders, folders and notebooks by color according to each class can also help middle school students more effectively organize their materials and lessen the chance of accidentally bringing home the wrong materials.

 

The Planner

Planners have long served as a tried-and-true approach to improving student study skills, and for good reason.  Planning is a foundational skill students need for success in both academics and the real world, and by actively writing down responsibilities on a daily basis, students also strengthen their time management skills. There are now so many planner layouts and formats geared toward all age levels that your student can easily find a planner that best suits his or her individual preferences. However, a planner should always have ample space for students to record all of their homework assignments and extra-curricular commitments on a daily basis. Keep in mind that the key to successful use of a planner is consistent use and active parent review.

An Optimal Study Environment

Students need quiet, private environments to efficiently complete homework or best prepare for upcoming tests, which is why parents should encourage their child to utilize a space in the home that is well-lit and free of distracting noises, passersbys or unnecessary technology. While your child may not have any qualms about working at the kitchen table or in front of the TV, the reality is that they’ll achieve far greater focus and comprehension when they have a space of their own.  Establishing a specific study time each week night for students can be another helpful strategy for improving study skills. For middle school students, limit access to cell phones or laptops during homework time, and for elementary students, it’s not a bad idea to check in often to note progress and offer assistance if needed.  

Study Skills Tutoring

Professional tutoring is another effective option for improving a student’s study skills that will complement strategies implemented at home and at school. Study skills tutoring programs, like those offered from the Huntington Learning Center, are available to elementary, middle school, and high school students. While study skills tutoring will always be individualized to meet a student’s specific needs, our program for elementary students often focuses on improving dictionary skills, outlining, general communication and referencing skills. For middle school students, our program frequently targets time management skills, test-taking strategies, note-taking tips and general study strategies. For high school students our program focuses on advanced study skills, such as self-quizzing, test anxiety management, and research paper writing.

Learn more about how you can help your student improve his or her study skills, or enroll in one of our proven-effective study skills programs by contacting the Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. 

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What to Expect from Exceptional Calculus Tutoring Calculus may well be one of the most challenging subjects a high school student will encounter.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:26:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-from-exceptional-calculus-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-from-exceptional-calculus-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What to Expect from Exceptional Calculus Tutoring

Calculus may well be one of the most challenging subjects a high school student will encounter. An extension of Algebra and Geometry, the subject of calculus expands into the complex mathematical concepts of things like parametric equations and applications of derivatives. We know that proficiency in calculus is critically important in a number of college majors and professions, which is why so many high school calculus students seek out calculus tutoring. But what should you expect from calculus tutoring designed to truly deliver improved academic performance? 

Individual Instruction

Calculus tutoring should be anything but a communal endeavor. Your needs are specific to you alone, which means you can expect a calculus tutoring experience to be one-on-one with a highly-qualified tutoring professional. Your tutoring will be tailored to your specific learning style, and will afford you the platform to freely ask questions as they arise.

Active Engagement

Calculus simply can’t be mastered with the passive absorption of knowledge; calculus depends on critical thinking, which is why you should expect your calculus tutoring experience to actively engage you in deep critical thinking that requires an explanation of reasoning. Dialogue can also help foster confidence and increase a student’s willingness to participate in class, which is also crucial for optimal learning.

Manageable Goals

Every great calculus tutor helps students set specific, measurable and timely goals. With exceptional calculus tutoring, you’ll always know where you’re going and how you’re getting there. A tutor’s job involves much more than simply securing a good grade at the end of the term, he or she is responsible for helping you master specific skills and concepts within a given time frame, and celebrating when those goals are achieved.

Preparation for Upcoming Exams

An effective calculus tutoring program should not be a wholly independent from the schedule of your high school calculus class. While the focus of calculus tutoring expands beyond daily management of homework, it should concentrate on upcoming quizzes and exams as needed. Though your tutoring program may primarily devote your efforts to specific calculus skills, when the time comes for an exam on transcendental functions, that should be top priority.

Let Huntington Learning Center provide exceptional calculus tutoring for you or your student! Schedule an appointment online, call us as 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit our subject tutoring page for more specific information about our services.

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Report Card Review: Turning the Year Around Though hard to believe, the school year is nearly halfway over. As the holiday season quickly approaches, your elementary student will soon receive his or her second report card, which serves as an even more revealing indication of academic performance than the first.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:49:00 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/report-card-review-turning-the-year-around https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/report-card-review-turning-the-year-around Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Report Card Review: Turning the Year Around

 Though hard to believe, the school year is nearly halfway over. As the holiday season quickly approaches, your elementary student will soon receive his or her second report card, which serves as an even more revealing indication of academic performance than the first. Why? Unlike the first report, which includes assessment of a substantial amount of review material, the second report card demonstrates how well a student is handling new, more challenging concepts.

 While a less-than-stellar midyear report card can be disheartening, with proper remediation a student’s next report card can show significant signs of improvement. So when that second report card arrives with grades that cause concern, turn to a tutoring program. Whether your child needs a math, spelling or reading tutor, a tutoring program with individualized instruction can make a world of difference.

While parents know that tutoring is a highly effective measure to boost academic success, many are often interested in ways they can complement a tutoring program and continue to help turn their student’s academic year around. There are many helpful measures parents can take; consider the following:

Foster Open Dialogue.

As you and your elementary student prepare for a tutoring program, ask your student how he or she feels about school. Open dialogue is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about why your child received a certain grade or what skills and concepts he or she struggles with the most.  A conversation with your child’s teacher can also provide helpful insight to all parties invested in a child’s academic success. Continue to invite input and reflection from your child after each tutoring session as well. 

Embrace Goals.

While learning goals will be established as part of your child’s tutoring program, it helps when parents continue to embrace and discuss these goals outside of a session. Talk with your child about the ways he or she is working to achieve a goal and why the goal is important. Perhaps write out goals to post on the refrigerator or in your child’s room, or make plans to celebrate after each goal is reached. Parents may even write out learning goals of their own to demonstrate that learning is an ongoing process.

Pursue Positivity.

As your student engages in a tutoring program, cultivate an atmosphere of positivity. Ensure your child understands that tutoring is not a punishment, nor should it carry any negative connotation. Explain that tutoring is simply an extra measure to help him or her advance even farther in school. To sustain a student’s confidence and self-esteem, be sure to praise other successes in both academics and beyond.  

Be Engaged at Home.

Ask your child’s reading tutor about ways you can continue to work on certain skills at home, or integrate math into daily conversation. Spell out signs you encounter while in the car or create fun games with math flashcards. Set aside time each day for reading, and ask questions about the stories your child reads. Efforts to keep your child positively engaged in academics at home can benefit both skill and motivation.

 

Visit Huntington Learning Center for more information about our proven tutoring solutions for elementary students struggling in various subjects.

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Parental Involvement Day Founded in 1995, National Parent Involvement Day honors and highlights the contributions that parents provide to support their child's success.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:56:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parental-involvement-day https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parental-involvement-day Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ — On November 20, 2014, the Huntington Learning Center will celebrate National Parental Involvement Day. Founded in 1995 by Project Appleseed, a nonprofit educational advocacy organization based in St. Louis, Missouri, National Parental Involvement Day honors and underscores the powerful contributions that parents and caregivers provide to support their students' success.

"Studies continue to show that parental involvement is one of the most consistent predictors of a child's academic achievement," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Huntington is pleased to celebrate National Parental Involvement Day and promote to parents and our greater community the importance of being involved in our children's education and holding high expectations for our students."

The Huntington Learning Center will host a number of activities that encourage parents to be a part of their children's school and academic experience. In addition, Huntington offers free workshops for parents throughout the year on topics such as homework help, summer learning, SAT/PSAT/ACT exam prep and preparing students for a successful school year.

Huntington also offers parents a number of ideas to get involved in their child's education:

  1. Read together every night for at least 20 minutes.
  2. Talk about school at home every day. Keep the lines of communication open about school issues.
  3. Get to know your child's teacher by attending parent-teacher conferences, volunteering in the classroom and through regular communication.
  4. Encourage your child to ask his or her teacher questions about class expectations and together set goals for your child to achieve those goals.
  5. Talk with your child's teacher about how you can best support your child at home.
  6. Help your child with homework each night by being on hand for questions and checking his or her work.
  7. Teach your child to develop a trusted organizational system for keeping track of assignments and homework.
  8. Attend school events as a family and get to know the teachers and other staff at your child's school.
  9. Visit your child's classroom as a guest speaker and share more on a subject about which you are knowledgeable. For example, for an upcoming science day, a parent who is an engineer could offer some real-world career information and insight.
  10. Create a family homework center, complete with a homework calendar. Spend time each evening discussing your child's to-dos and bigger projects on the horizon, and have him or her keep all important dates on the calendar so you can help keep things on track.

To learn more about National Parent Involvement Day, visit www.projectappleseed.org. For more information about Huntington Learning Center and its upcoming events, contact Laura Gehringer at Huntington Learning Center 201-975-9431, gehringerl@hlcmail.com or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

Lastly, Huntington reminds parents to make school a household priority. "Your role as a parent is to create and uphold a home environment that is conducive to learning and education," Huntington says. "Project Appleseed says that when parents are involved in children's learning in school and at home, schools work better and students flourish—and this is absolutely true. On National Parental Involvement Day and always, we encourage parents to seek ways to join their children's schools in giving students the best education possible."

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington's mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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The First Report Card: Solving Math Struggles Early It's report card season, which means by now your child has likely received or will soon receive his or her first report card of the year.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 14:35:58 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-first-report-card-solving-math-struggles-early https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-first-report-card-solving-math-struggles-early Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The First Report Card: Solving Math Struggles Early

It’s report card season, which means by now your child has likely received or will soon receive his or her first report card of the year. Though only an initial assessment of a student’s achievement in class, the first report card can serve as a crucial tool for parents, as they can help identify weaknesses in a student’s skills and abilities. When this is the case, it’s time to initiate a plan to provide your student the extra help he or she will need for a more successful school year.

When reviewing your child’s report card this fall, pay particular attention to his or her grades in math. Many students in the United States struggle with math; in fact, yearly polls reveal that math is the subject students say they find most challenging.  Yet, adequate math skills remain essential building blocks for math and science courses throughout high school and into college, and are even critical in daily life.  Because math is a sequential subject and depends upon the gradual accumulation of concepts and skills, when a student falls behind, it’s particularly difficult to catch up. There’s simply no way to progress to algebra without a strong foundation in multiplication and division. What’s more, this subject also depends on patience, practice and abstract thinking, and its concepts can be difficult for students to connect to the real world. It’s therefore easy to see why so many students face frustration, discouragement and the possibility of failure when they fall behind in math.

The key to success in math for the remainder of the school year and beyond lies in addressing issues the moment they arise, and taking appropriate action. Consider the following when determining if your student needs help in math:

  • Interpret their report card. While a grade gives a general idea of whether or not a student needs help in math, it’s important to interpret the grade in the context of how you know your student has performed in the past. Has your straight A student suddenly earned a B+ in Algebra II? A B+ is a good grade by any measure, but for your student, it could be the first sign that extra support is needed.
  • Assess changes in your student’s attitude towards math. If you sense your student is less excited about math than he or she was previously, or if it takes more encouragement than usual to get your student to complete homework assignments, your student may be struggling to stay afloat.
  • Consult your student’s math teacher. This can be particularly helpful if you’re having trouble determining if your student’s report card reflects the need for additional help. For example, for a student with a history of average performance, it may be difficult to know if that C in math on his or her first report card is a sign of future failure; discussion with a teacher can shed light on whether the cause of a grade is truly lack of comprehension or other factors, like a failure to regularly turn in assignments. 

Once you’ve determined your student needs help, create a plan that involves a math tutoring service. Structured, individualized tutoring that targets key skills can not only elevate a student’s grade, but improve his or her overall comprehension and confidence with the subject. Math tutoring is the best course of action for a student struggling in math because it offers the key components for success likely absent from an at-home study plan: clear objectives, accountability, a professional instructor, and structured lessons. There’s no question that with a subject as essential as math, your student deserves the benefit of personalized math tutoring.

The Huntington Learning Center offers math tutoring programs that focus on key math skills for elementary school, middle school and high school students. With our academic evaluation of your student’s skills and weaknesses, the Huntington Learning Center provides individualized, goal-oriented tutoring that can strengthen skills and raise grades. Learn more about our exceptional math tutoring services by calling 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak to an educational consultant or by visiting us online

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates American Education Week Huntington hosts activities throughout the year to support Education Week and promote education on topics such as homework help and exam prep.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:40:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/americaneducationweek https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/americaneducationweek Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center  

 
Oradell, NJ November 3, 2014 —During the week of November 17, 2014, the Huntington Learning Center will celebrate American Education Week, which recognizes public education and honors those who work to ensure every child in our country receives a quality education. The celebration kicks off on Monday, November 17, and is followed by daily events: 
  • Parents Day: Tuesday, November 18
  • Education Support Professionals Day: Wednesday, November 19
  • Educator for a Day: Thursday, November 20
  • Substitute Educators Day: Friday, November 21
American Education Week was founded in 1921 by the National Education Association and the American Legion as a national effort to raise public awareness of the importance of education.

“Education is one of the essentials for success, and we are thrilled to come together with peer organizations, teachers, students and others this week to celebrate its importance,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “We encourage everyone in our community to get involved in education and support our children as they pursue their educational goals.”

The Huntington Learning Center hosts activities throughout the year to promote education, including free workshops on topics such as homework help, summer learning, SAT/PSAT/ACT exam prep and preparing students for a successful school year. “Our message to families and others in our local community is that today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders, and it is absolutely essential that we equip them with the tools and confidence to succeed,” says Huntington. “Huntington salutes our nation’s teachers and education professionals for striving to do just that. We encourage everyone to recognize their good work during this important annual event.”

To learn more about American Education Week, visit www.nea.org. For more information about Huntington Learning Center and its upcoming events, contact Laura Gehringer at Huntington Learning Center -201-975-9431, gehringerl@hlcmail.com or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.
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PARENT'S GUIDE TO THE FIRST REPORT CARD OF THE YEAR Huntington Learning Center has created a list of tips that parents can use while assessing their child's first report card of the semester.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:53:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ October 28, 2015 — The first marking period of the year does not have to conjure up stress for many children and their parents. “The report card should be viewed as an opportunity to identify any potential trouble areas, address any issues and set goals with your child,” advises Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. As the first academic review of your child’s school performance this year, Huntington suggests that parents keep in mind the following when they receive their child’s fall report card:

The teacher can offer more in-depth information. Grades should be digested with the help of a teacher, who can provide more insight into and specifics about your child’s academic strengths and weaknesses, behavior in the classroom and more. Together, you can identify the areas where your child may need additional support and develop a plan to provide just that—at home and in the classroom.

Poor organization and study skills may hamper a student’s performance. Sometimes a child has the ability to learn and comprehend, but he or she is disorganized and unskilled at managing his or her time. If your child is getting bad grades, talk about his or her homework, study routine and approach. Perhaps a few small changes may help your child become a more effective and efficient student.

Last year was last year. It’s a whole new school year, with more demanding classes and concepts for your child to learn and different teachers who may approach subjects differently. This means that the challenges that confront your child may be completely different this year. Do not be surprised if your child brings home a lower-than-expected grade in a subject that did not cause trouble last year, and remind yourself that no matter what troubles present themselves, you and your child can overcome them together.

Some problems don’t go away on their own. Certain issues need correction sooner rather than later. If your child does not acquire certain “building block” skills in math or reading that are essential for him or her to grasp more difficult and in-depth concepts, for example, he or she will continue to struggle in those subjects. Your child’s teacher can advise whether your child would benefit from tutoring that will help him or her close those skill gaps as quickly as possible.

Huntington reminds parents that perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind when grades are declining is that the action taken is what really counts. “Inevitably, issues will arise throughout your child’s education,” says Huntington. “However, if you stay optimistic and calm and take steps early, you can overcome those issues before they grow into major problems.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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How to Deal with a Bad Report Card During your child's elementary school career you may be faced with a less-than-stellar report card.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:07:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-deal-with-a-bad-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-deal-with-a-bad-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Deal with a Bad Report Card

During your child’s elementary school career you may be faced with a less-than-stellar report card. Although bad grades are upsetting, as a parent, the best thing you can do is to remain calm and take the opportunity to demonstrate to your child how to overcome difficulties. Speak to your child about his or her grades, but try to do so while maintaining a positive attitude. Let your child know that when he or she falls, you will be there to catch him or her, and help him or her get back on track with his or her school work.

Here are some tips for parents dealing with a child’s disappointing report card:

  • Commend the positive. Find something on your child’s report card to praise. Your child is most likely aware he or she was not doing well. Your first comment should not be negative. Set the precedent that your child can come to you with problems and you will help your child address them, instead of berating your child for poor performance.
  • Discuss the bad grades rationally. Alert your child to the fact that your expectations were not met. Once you know that your student understands that he or she has underperformed, discuss potential reasons behind the grades. These causes could be forgetting to do or hand in homework, or lack of focus in the classroom. Pinpoint the problem areas so that you can form a game plan together.
  • Strategize how to do better next time. Set goals for the next report card and strategize how your child can achieve them. Brainstorm ways to help your child. Perhaps your child requires more homework help, or a quieter environment. Would changing seats in the classroom help? Sometimes small changes can produce the desired results.
  • Talk with your child’s teacher. Teachers are with your child during the school day, and should be able to provide more insight into your child’s academic difficulties.
  • Provide the necessary resources for your student to succeed. Whether you sit with your child while he or she completes homework assignments, or seek the help of a learning center, it is imperative to find a way to get your child back on the road to success. For example, a professional reading tutor specializes in teaching children who are struggling with comprehension or word recognition. By utilizing the skills of an expert in the subject with which your child is having problems, you may be able to accelerate progress and help get your student caught up and thriving again.

A bad report card does not have to be a catastrophe; it may just be a small road bump in your child’s education. Your child should understand that failure is not necessarily to be feared, and can be a learning experience. Remain calm and give your child the necessary resources to get back on track if they stumble at some point in their schooling. 

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Trigonometry Tutoring: Helping Your Student Navigate Mid-Fall Challenges Mid-fall is a critical time of the school year for high school students: they experience homework overload, are faced with demanding group projects, and must prepare for numerous quizzes and exams.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:18:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/trigonometry-tutoring-helping-your-student-navigate-midfall-challenges https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/trigonometry-tutoring-helping-your-student-navigate-midfall-challenges Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Trigonometry Tutoring: Helping Your Student Navigate Mid-Fall Challenges

Mid-fall is a critical time of the school year for high school students: they experience homework overload, are faced with demanding group projects, and must prepare for numerous quizzes and exams. Teens involved in extra-curricular activities such as student government or sports may also dedicate a significant amount of time after school to these endeavors, further cutting into homework and study time.

For junior and senior high school students, mid-fall can also bring with it the challenge of advanced coursework, which tends to accelerate as the year progresses. Trigonometry, is one such course that can prove problematic. Many students struggle to master the complex skills of this subject, such as inverse functions, trigonometric identities, polar equations, and graphing. As trigonometry is a building block in the field of mathematics and knowledge of the subject is often expected of incoming college freshmen, your student’s success in this course is about more than just a letter grade. 

The significance of trigonometry can also extend beyond college, as many career paths require mastery of this branch of mathematics. Fields demanding proficiency in trigonometry include architecture, navigation, engineering, digital imagery, astronomy, aircraft design, flight projection, and many more. In addition, an understanding of trigonometry is required before a student can take calculus, a mathematics course that is a pre-requisite for numerous college majors such as biology, environmental science, physics, marketing, and business administration, among others. With so many majors and careers requiring higher-level math skills, there’s a good chance your student’s trigonometry course will directly affect his or her future.

Furthermore, poor performance in a course like trigonometry can damage your teen’s confidence. Many high school students must work hard at trigonometry to be successful; don’t let your student feel as though he or she is alone in this struggle. Lack of confidence in one subject can develop into to a lack of confidence in others, as well as deter a student from pursuing a mathematics-heavy career path.

Trigonometry matters, so don’t wait until your student’s report card is issued to determine if he or she needs help with this critical subject. Addressing any issues early in the school year affords you time to get help for your student and improve his or her understanding and grade. Speak to your student about class progress, help with homework assignments when possible, and reach out to his or her teacher for more insight. In addition, determine if your student needs help focusing by assessing the impact of his or her extra-curricular commitments and study habits. Recognizing whether your student needs help understanding the material or is simply stretched too thin and requires more study time will help you determine how to get your child back on track.

The Huntington Learning Center offers effective one-to-one trigonometry tutoring to help your student tackle daily assignments, master necessary skills and concepts, prepare for quizzes, and improve his or her grades. For information on trigonometry tutoring and all of our services, contact The Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN, schedule a consultation online, or visit one of our centers.

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Being an Advocate for Your Child Huntington Learning Center provides children with tutoring in math, reading, writing, study skills, and related areas.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:43:45 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/being-an-advocate-for-your-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/being-an-advocate-for-your-child Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Being an Advocate for Your Child

One of the top recommendations you will receive as a parent from every teacher that your child has throughout his or her education is to stay involved. When your child is younger, staying involved means helping your child with homework, encouraging him or her to become more organized and a strong time manager, and generally keeping him or her on track. As your child becomes more independent, your duties will become less hands on. Your child will take the lead on his or her education while you step into a support role.

While your parent role will certainly evolve over time, there is one aspect that should always be important: you must always advocate for your child as a student. How can you best support your child? Here are several tips:

Make sure your child’s needs are being met. There may come times in your child’s educational career when he or she needs additional help or support. Your child might struggle in a subject and require one-on-one help outside the classroom. Perhaps your child will encounter anxiety problems that require the expertise of the school guidance counselor. Or maybe you’ll notice that your child might benefit from an instructional approach that is different than the one preferred by his or her teacher and will want to discuss how best to help your child flourish. Whatever the situation, if you ever sense that your child’s needs are not being met in the classroom, talk with his or her teacher. He or she will likely welcome your ideas and insight.

Establish a working relationship with the teacher. It goes without saying that your child’s teacher should be your first point of contact at school and you should reach out early in the school year to lay the foundation for a positive, cooperative, mutually respectful partnership. Let the teacher know that you are always available should he or she have questions about your child’s needs or school performance. Make clear your intentions of helpful collaboration for the benefit of your child.

Identify and nurture your child’s strengths. Help your child take notice of his or her strengths and build upon them. Reach out to his or her teacher and ask for suggestions on how to give your child opportunities to build on those strengths through academic enrichment opportunities or extracurricular activities. He or she may have suggestions as simple as giving your child additional fun projects that he or she may enjoy.

Educate yourself about your child. Get to know your child as a student and do your own homework on how he or she learns. Once you better understand your child’s learning preferences and styles, personality, strengths and weaknesses, you can do a little research on the most effective role for you as a parent. Your child’s teacher will certainly have insight as well. The better you understand your child as a student, the more you can help him or her flourish—and the better you can support him or her when challenges arise.

Let your child know that you are always there for support. Often, children fear that their parents will be upset about school problems, but it is important for your child to understand that part of your job as a parent is being available for support when he or she needs it. If he or she is struggling and doesn’t know how to turn things around, explain that you want him or her to come to you for guidance—no matter the circumstances. Together, you can come up with a plan to tackle big problems.

Ask questions. Many parents assume that their presence as a classroom volunteer or PTA parent is the best way to show their child that school is important. However, making school a priority at home and asking questions about your child’s school work and learning have an even greater impact on student educational outcomes.  Although it may seem like a subtle form of advocacy, your attitude toward your child’s education is highly influential. Ask your child about school and about his or her favorite subjects as well as those that cause him or her the most stress.

Being an advocate for your child is about supporting his or her learning, working effectively with his or her teachers and other school staff, and letting your child know that he or she is supported. Remember that one of the most important things you can do as your child’s advocate is to be a good influence—teach your child to advocate for him or herself, too. In doing so you will arm your child with the confidence to speak up when he or she needs help and communicate with teachers and peers to his or her benefit.

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Major Building Blocks for Early Readers If your child is an early elementary school student, you likely know how critical these first few years are in his or her reading development.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:34:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/major-building-blocks-for-early-readers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/major-building-blocks-for-early-readers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Major Building Blocks for Early Readers

How to Support Your Young Reader at Home

If your child is an early elementary school student, you likely know how critical these first few years are in his or her reading development. According to the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the International Reading Association, learning to read and write isn’t an automatic—parents and teachers must expose young children to books and experiences in drawing, pretend play and symbolic activities and guide their instruction in learning to recognize letters and sounds in order for them to become literate. Also, the spectrum of literacy development is wide. Some children may acquire skills at different times than others, and the best teachers try different approaches and techniques based on the knowledge that students have.

As your child navigates preschool through the early elementary grades, he or she will acquire a range of literacy skills that will help him or her become a capable reader. Here are a few of those building blocks and tips for how you can best support your reader’s learning (as researched in depth by the National Reading Panel, a collaborative jointly established by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development):

Phonemic awareness – Put simply, the smallest units (or sounds) of spoken language are called phonemes. As your child learns more about language, he or she must understand that words are composed of different sounds (/t/ /a/ /p/ in tap and /p/ /I/ in pie, for example), that some words make the same sounds (bag, band and bet all start with the /b/ sound) and often, sounds are formed from multiple letters. Songs and games are a great way to help children understand the various sounds that words make. Give your child a word (row) and have him or her add sounds to the beginning and end of the word to form new words (such as grow when /g/ is added to the beginning, or rows when /s/ is added to the end).

Phonics – Phonics instruction includes the teaching of letter sounds, the relationships between letters and sounds, and decoding words. One of the more effective approaches to helping students learn phonics is encouraging them to spell words out based on how they sound. Your child will learn different categories of phonics, such as consonant blends (bl, br, sl, scr), short vowels (cat, dot), long vowels (stay, road, tie) and consonant digraphs (sh, ph, gh). As your child begins to understand the sounds associated with these different letters and letter groups, he or she can use that knowledge to sound out new words.

Fluency – The goal for all students is to get them to read fluently—with accuracy, speed and good expression. Without a doubt, practice makes perfect. Read aloud with your child every day. Take turns being the reader and allowing your child to read aloud and offer constructive feedback when your child reads. 

Vocabulary – At a young age, children must learn high-frequency words that are common in written and oral language. Often, these sight words are not easy to decode, and therefore, it is important that newer readers can recognize them on sight. Over time, children must also learn words that are commonly used but unlikely to be known. Reading, writing and talking are the best ways to help children expand their vocabulary.

Reading comprehension – These days, there is great emphasis on the importance of reading comprehension—and it has long been known that reading comprehension is essential in the acquisition of literacy skills. A form of active thinking, comprehension involves inferring information that the author does not say explicitly, interpreting ideas and thinking through texts’ meaning. There are many reading comprehension strategies that you can try at home: summarizing passages while reading a story (and having your child do the same), asking questions about the story, thinking through the plot, structure, problem and setting of a story, and pausing to confirm understanding while reading challenging or intricate passages.       

It is easy to take for granted that a child will learn to read, but there are many pieces that must fall into place for it to happen. While you may not know exactly how to teach phonemic awareness or the best reading comprehension strategies for your child, your role as supporter is still critically important. As your child’s teacher sends home reading exercises and assignments, invest the time to work on them with your child, knowing that the end result will be your child becoming a proficient reader and a stronger student. 

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How to Help Your Student Face the ACT with Confidence By today's academic standards, a strong ACT score can be just as important as a high school diploma.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:12:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-student-face-the-act-with-confidence https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-student-face-the-act-with-confidence Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Help Your Student Face the ACT with Confidence

By today’s academic standards, a strong ACT score can be just as important as a high school diploma. This rigorous exam, traditionally completed by high school students in the spring of their junior year, can determine college acceptance and eligibility for merit-based scholarships. The ACT tests students’ knowledge of Math, Science, English and Reading, includes an optional writing portion, and is scored on a 36-point scale. Unfortunately, the Washington Post reports that ACT scores reached their lowest national average of the past five years in 2013, with a composite average of 20.9. Worse yet, only twenty-six percent of tested students met all four of the ACT’s subject benchmarks.

While the specific cause of low performance is purported to be the result of many varying factors, the competition for college acceptance remains stringent. Acceptance standards are high, and a noncompetitive ACT score could spell the difference between attending the college of a student’s dreams and attending another university. The only strategy proven to increase a student’s chances of scoring high on an ACT exam is proper preparation. But what does this look like, and how can it be achieved?

The Huntington Learning Center offers its top tips for successful ACT preparation.

Get Familiar with Key Strategies

Sometimes simply knowing how to take a test can be almost as helpful as knowing the material. For example, in the ACT reading section, your student will both save time and increase his or her chances of selecting the right answer if he or she reads questions before reading the corresponding passages. This strategy allows students to know exactly what they’re looking for while they read, a proven tactic to enhance comprehension. It’s also important to know that students should answer every question on the exam, as there is no penalty for guessing.  General test-taking strategies such as utilizing process of elimination for challenging multiple choice questions, memorizing the directions for each section beforehand, and always creating an outline for the writing portion of the exam, can also significantly improve your student’s chances for success.

Take Practice Tests

Encourage your student to take a full-length practice ACT exam, which can be found online, in test preparation books or from a tutoring service. Have your student take a diagnostic practice test before studying as a means to measure progress, and for an accurate score, always complete under similar test conditions (for instance, timing each section). Practice tests provide students an opportunity to determine pacing, identify potential weaknesses, and reduce test anxiety. Encourage your student to take as many practice exams as time allows. 

Use a Tutoring Service

Instruction from the classroom may simply not be enough when it comes to thoroughly preparing for the ACT exam. Students need extra reviews to strengthen skills in certain subjects, and even if your student does well in school, supplemental studying is still both necessary and worthwhile. This is where an ACT tutoring program can help. With an ACT tutoring program, your student will receive one-to-one instruction tailored to his or her learning style, gain valuable test-taking strategies, develop stronger time management skills, and acquire thorough preparation in every aspect of the exam. There are even opportunities for full-length, proctored exams. In today’s world of college admissions, in which a one-point increase in an ACT score can sometimes equal thousands in merit-based scholarships, there’s no denying the value of adequate preparation.

Help your student excel on the ACT exam this year with ACT tutoring from the Huntington Learning Center. The Huntington Learning Center offers three tutoring programs of varying lengths that offer proven test-taking strategies, highly-trained tutors, options for coursework and flexible scheduling.  Contact the Huntington Learning Center today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit us online to learn more about our services.

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What Can You Do to Help Your Child Improve His or Her Study Habits? With a new school year underway, it's a great time to examine some tactics parents can use to help their child study more effectively.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:24:43 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-can-you-do-to-help-your-child-improve-his-or-her-study-habits https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-can-you-do-to-help-your-child-improve-his-or-her-study-habits Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What Can You Do to Help Your Child Improve His or Her Study Habits?

With a new school year underway, it’s a great time to examine some tactics parents can use to help their child study more effectively. There's no question that successful academic performance is dependent on work outside of the classroom; however, with so many distractions facing today’s students, it can be very difficult for them to establish good study habits at home. Luckily, there are strategies parents can employ to facilitate the right environment:

Get on your Child's Team: A positive atmosphere will go a long way in facilitating the right environment for your child’s studies. If your child has any questions, you should be there to offer constructive advice or tips that he or she can use to solve the problem. Additionally, good effort should be followed by words of encouragement and praise.

Create Rewards: A reward can serve as great motivation to get your child excited about studying. Something as simple as having study time before he or she can watch television or go outside to play can be just the incentive necessary to encourage your child to complete his or her studies and homework in a timely manner. Over time, the improved grades and self-confidence may serve as their own rewards.

Set up a Study Spot: There are so many distractions in the home, including video games, television, Facebook, siblings, friends and more. It is a good idea to identify a spot in your home where your child can study and be free of these and other distractions. This might take some trial and error. Additionally, a specific daily study time (like right before or right after dinner) is a good idea to establish routine.

Speak with your Child's Teacher: If your child isn't doing well in a particular subject, talk to his or her teacher. The teacher might be able to offer study tips, areas requiring more focus and other strategies to help your child make the most out of his or her study time.

Sometimes these strategies are not enough. If you feel your child needs extra help with their studies, we encourage you to contact us today. Our tutors not only are skilled in their subject areas of expertise; they are dedicated to helping students get the best grades possible.

Whether your child needs ACT test prep to get for ready for college or specific subject tutoring to establish good study habits, our tutors are up for the challenge. Let us help you help your child achieve their best grades through one-on-one instruction and tips, contact The Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. 

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What to Do When Your Child Gets a Bad Report Card One question that is often asked by parents we encounter is what to do when their child receives a bad report card?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:25:59 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-do-when-your-child-gets-a-bad-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-do-when-your-child-gets-a-bad-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What to Do When Your Child Gets a Bad Report Card

 One question that is often asked by parents we encounter is what to do when their child receives a bad report card? There is no concrete way to address this as every situation is different, but we did find some very useful tips in a parenting blog post the New York Times published a few years ago. The blog post featured the question of one parent who asked for advice after her child’s progress report showed grades that were significantly lower than normal. The child was so scared of being punished that she initially hid her report card. Readers of the parenting blog were polled and asked to leave their opinions on what they would do in a similar situation. Here are several key points taken from their comments:

It Might Not Be Effort: Effort is not necessarily the problem when a student receives poorer grades than usual. There are so many variables that affect performance. The class size could be larger than normal, affecting the student's ability to get the one-on-one attention he or she needs. It could also be a matter of the time of day the class is held. Considering the environment and other variables might help to determine why your child is struggling.

Punishment Only Makes It Worse: Parental pressure was a major cause of concern echoed in reader responses, as they thought back to their own school experiences. Rather than learning the material, many of the readers polled recalled being so obsessed with grades that they didn't care about the subject matter itself. If your child is struggling but trying, it might make more sense to offer encouragement rather than punishing him or her right away. This could help foster confidence in the student and allow him or her to relax, which may help put focus on learning versus stressing about grades. 

It All Starts with Communication: Communication was another common theme from reader feedback. It might be advantageous to communicate with your child about interests and current challenges to get a better idea of potential issues. Is your student too focused on extracurricular activities at the moment? Is he or she overwhelmed by a heavier-than-normal workload? You could also speak with your child openly about your own struggles and how you overcame them, so he or she knows that everyone has struggled with school work at times. An open line of communication serves as the best way for a child to ask for help when it's needed.

In the event that you need outside assistance to get your child back on track, we encourage you to contact us today. Our tutors not only are skilled in their subject areas of expertise; they are dedicated to helping students get the best grades possible through proven practices. Whether your child needs specific subject tutoring or ACT test prep to get for ready for college entrance exams, our tutors are up for the challenge. Contact us today to learn more. 

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SAT Help is a Smart Investment for Students Fall is fast approaching and with it comes a new school year for your child.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:51:39 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-help-is-a-smart-investment-for-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-help-is-a-smart-investment-for-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Help is a Smart Investment for Students

Fall is fast approaching and with it comes a new school year for your child. However, this not an ordinary fall for either of you. The SAT looms and you know your child needs all the support they can get to get ready. SAT scores can play a very important role in the college admissions process, but most parents do not know what exactly the SAT entails. What skills does the SAT emphasize? How much geometry and algebra are on the SAT? Does my child need a geometry tutor to be as prepared and confident as possible?

Students often describe preparing for the SAT as one of the most stressful and anxious periods of their teen years; they know that this one test can have a big impact on whether or not they can get into the college of their choice. When students try and prepare for a test that they are not familiar with, stress and anxiety can get worse. Why leave them to navigate the minefield of SAT prep when there are professional experts and respected organizations that specialize in helping students with this specific test? 

Don't leave SAT prep to chance. Don't simply buy your child an SAT prep book and hope that it's enough. Find the professional assistance that is available to you and relieve fears that can damage confidence and scores. When you invest in a professional and reputable tutoring service, you can ensure that your child will get the help they need, both in terms of subject matter and test-taking strategy. This extra assistance will dramatically boost your child’s confidence and allay fears heading into test day.

Through one-on-one instruction, your child can discover his or her strengths and weaknesses and get the help needed to overcome possible deficiencies. If, for instance, geometry is not your child's strong suit, the tutor can provide constructive and tailored lessons on the subject that will enable your child to learn key concepts and even expand upon them. By the time he or she takes the test, your child should be confident in his or her abilities and ready and able to demonstrate new skills.

Beyond understanding and practicing the specific skills demanded during the SAT, the mental edge provided by professional tutoring services cannot be overstated. Study after study reveals that test scores are suppressed by stress and anxiety. Practice with a professional tutor sharpens skills, provides familiarity with the test format, and shows your child how hard work and preparation can influence a more successful outcome.

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How Can Parents Unfamiliar with the Common Core Help their Children at Home? The Common Core State Standards were developed by an independent coalition of education professionals to prepare students for a 21st century global workforce.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:03:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-can-parents-unfamiliar-with-the-common-core-help-their-children-at-home https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-can-parents-unfamiliar-with-the-common-core-help-their-children-at-home Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Can Parents Unfamiliar with the Common Core Help their Children at Home?

The Common Core State Standards were developed by an independent coalition of education professionals to prepare students for a 21st century global workforce. The standards outline the skills that students should acquire at each grade level, and are specific to reading and math. The objective of Common Core State Standards is to create greater consistency among school districts, so that any two students in a grade level should have the same basic foundation for success.

Parents will have a significant role in helping their children meet those standards, which has created some anxiety because many parents feel the standards are more rigorous. According to a Gallup Poll conducted in April 2014, 35 percent of parents had a positive impression of the new standards and 28 percent of parents had a negative one. The remaining 37 percent didn't know what the Common Core State Standards were.

Because the Common Core State Standards are relatively new to everyone involved – students, parents, and teachers – there will be a learning curve. Parents must take an active approach in order to help their children with homework and learning skills at home. Here are several tips that will help parents to get started:

Review the Standards for Your Child's Grade Level: There are a number of different resources that provide easy-to-follow guides on the math and reading standards. The Common Core website is a good place to gain information. Here you will find the standards, links to each state's educational website, FAQs, a history of the standards, and more. The PTA website is another good resource for standards basics, and has several short guides specifically for parents who want to help their children at home.

Be Prepared:  A key element of the Common Core State Standards is analysis. Students are not expected to simply know an answer; they should also be able to explain how they came to it. Some parents who are new to the Common Core State Standards may need to take extra time to review what their children are learning in order to help them succeed.

Seek Help when Necessary: A common misconception is that the standards are the curriculum. The standards are only goals, and how those goals are reached is determined at the local level. Therefore, parents should speak with their children's teachers in order to learn more about what is going on in the classroom and ways that they can help at home. In addition, extra help can be obtained through tutoring. A Huntington Learning Center tutor can develop a personalized lesson plan and monitor success through ongoing assessments to ensure that your child is making a smooth transition to the standards.

For more information on the Common Core State Standards, please contact us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit a Huntington Learning Center near you. 

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Getting a Student to Understand Geometry As parents, you know Geometry can be quite complex and sometimes your child can get lost when trying to remember terms like congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, and theorems, just to name a few.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:53:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-student-to-understand-geometry https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-student-to-understand-geometry Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Getting a Student to Understand Geometry

As parents, you know Geometry can be quite complex and sometimes your child can get lost when trying to remember terms like congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, and theorems, just to name a few. It's easy for him or her to confuse one of these terms with another or simply have problems grasping the concepts.

While it's true that every student has strengths and weaknesses, he or she will need to be able to shine in all subjects in order to do well in school. The good news is that, if you notice that your child is struggling with Geometry, there are things that you can do to help:

Spend extra time on difficult-to-grasp material

Geometry is about figuring out the position, shape, and size of forms and using the information to solve problems. Learning the basic principles of this discipline, however, involves a great deal more memorization and repetition than many other types of mathematics. If your child can't sort out which rules apply to a given situation, you're already fighting a losing battle.

By taking extra time to go over the concepts and to then ensure that your student understands how to use them in a problem-solving capacity, you will keep him or her from falling behind the rest of the class. Find extra problems for him or her to solve and test their skills!

Missing a day can hurt – hire a tutor!

Inevitably, your child will get sick or have a doctor's appointment and miss a day of class. While you may not think that's a big concern (it was just one day, after all), a lost day can actually have a big impact on your child's understanding of the subject matter.

Geometry concepts are built upon each other throughout the year, so if your student misses a key lesson he or she may fall behind. Unfortunately, many teachers just won't have the time to really review the material as fully as your child might need in order to truly grasp what that they missed. This leaves your child responsible for catching up, which could be problematic if he or she is having trouble comprehending the subject already. If this happens, a geometry tutor can get your child back up to speed and bridge the gap of that missed material.

The moment you recognize that your child struggling is the moment you can step in and help him or her to succeed. By taking some extra time to go over the key concepts of geometry with your child and hiring a tutor when they are falling behind, you can ensure that he or she gets the assistance that they need.

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Year-by-Year College Application Checklist The start of a new fall semester takes on a different meaning for parents with college-bound students.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 16:08:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/yearbyyear-college-application-checklist https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/yearbyyear-college-application-checklist Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The start of a new fall semester takes on a different meaning for parents with college-bound students. Juniors and seniors in particular have a great deal to think about—from doing college research to scheduling the SAT or ACT, from staying focused on keeping grades up to filling out college applications. As your teen makes his or her college plans, this four-year checklist will help you both stay on track.

FRESHMAN YEAR

September

  • To get off on the right foot, your teen should meet with the guidance counselor, who can help him or her register for an appropriate college-preparatory course schedule.
  • Consider registering for ACT Aspire, the ACT’s new student readiness assessment system. Learn more at www.discoveractaspire.org.

October

  • Attend college fairs in the area (many are held in October and November). The National Association for College Admission Counseling website has a robust fall lineup of college fairs around the country—visit www.nacacnet.org for dates and locations. Your teen can also check with the guidance counseling office for local or regional college fairs.

November

  • Research pre-college programs or classes. Many colleges, such as Northwestern University, Villanova University, Babson College and the University of Dallas, to name a few, offer enrichment programs for high school students. Some community colleges, too, offer high school students opportunities to take college classes as early as freshman year.

December/January

  • Stay on the right track by seeking help if your teen’s first semester report card is not up to expectations. If needed, talk with a guidance counselor or Huntington Learning Center about supplemental education services that would help your teen correct learning gaps and build skills and knowledge.

February/March

  • Start discussing possible college majors with your teen. With summer coming up, encourage your teen to think about opportunities to explore different careers, such as unpaid or paid internships, classes or even informal job shadowing with an adult family member or friend.

April

  • Start exploring financial aid options for college—it’s never too early!

SOPHOMORE YEAR

September/October

  • Register for the ACT’s new student readiness assessment system, ACT Aspire. Learn more at www.discoveractaspire.org.
  • Register for the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), a practice SAT for sophomores and juniors that also gives your teen a chance to be considered for National Merit Scholar programs. Talk with the guidance counselor to get PSAT dates and visit www.collegeboard.com/psat to learn more.
  • Attend any college fairs in the area.
  • Encourage your teen to meet any college representatives that come to school.
  • Start researching scholarships, both online and through the guidance counseling office.

November

  • Research pre-college programs in areas of interest to your teen.
  • Explore dual-enrollment programs at colleges or community colleges in your area. These programs offer high school students the opportunity to earn high school and college credit at the same time 

December/January

  • Continue to explore financial aid options.
  • Evaluate academic progress and encourage your teen to stay in touch with the guidance counselor.

February/March/April

  • Investigate summer tutoring programs to help your teen overcome school problems, raise grades or even enrich his or her studies.
  • Consider visiting colleges over spring break.

May

  • Begin exploring summer SAT/ACT preparatory programs.

JUNIOR YEAR

September

  • Have your teen start the year with a meeting with the guidance counselor to ensure he or she is taking the right courses and aware of all college-related deadlines in the next two years.
  • Have your teen sign up for the PSAT/NMSQT scheduled for October 16 & 19, 2014. Talk with a guidance counselor to register (online registration is not available). Learn more at www.collegeboard.com.

October

  • Attend fall college fairs at school or in the area.
  • Have your teen begin to narrow down the list of target colleges. Your teen should develop an “A” list of his or her first choices and a “B” list of backup schools.
  • Consider visiting colleges over fall or holiday break. Call the admissions office to ask about tours.

November

  • Contact the financial aid offices at colleges of interest to begin to explore your family’s financial aid options: loans, grants, scholarships and work-study.

February

  • Talk with the high school Advanced Placement (AP) coordinator if your teen plans to take AP exams in early May. Learn more at www.collegeboard.com/ap.
  • Have your teen explore scholarships with the help of the guidance counselor to ensure he or she meets all application deadlines. 

March/April

  • Consider visiting colleges over spring break. Call the admissions office to ask about tours.
  • Your teen should take the SAT (www.collegeboard.com) or ACT (www.act.org) in the spring. The anticipated SAT is March 14-15, May 2-3 and June 6-7, 2015. The anticipated ACT is April 18 and June 13, 2015

May

  • Talk with the guidance counselor to learn more about SAT Subject Tests and whether the colleges in which your teen is interested require or recommend them. Learn more at www.collegeboard.com.
  • Schedule visits to colleges this summer.
  • Consider registering your teen for a summer SAT or ACT exam preparation program to help your teen raise his or her SAT or ACT score.
  • Have your teen request letters of recommendation from teachers, coaches and others, especially if applying to early decision/early action programs.

SENIOR YEAR

September

  • If applying to early decision or early action programs with October or November deadlines, have your teen begin the college application process.
  • Encourage your teen to begin working on application essays.

October

  • If needed, your senior should retake the ACT or SAT to improve his or her score. 

November

  • Pay attention to application deadlines. Many colleges require freshman applicants to complete and turn in all paperwork as early as January 1.

January

Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1. This application will be used to determine your teen’s eligibility for federal aid. It will also be used by states and colleges to calculate your teen’s financial aid packages. Learn more at www.fafsa.ed.gov

February

  • Seniors enrolled in Advanced Placement classes should register for AP exams in May.

March/April

  • Keep an eye out for your teen’s Student Aid Report (SAR), which will arrive between four and six weeks after you submitted the FAFSA. Schools listed on the FAFSA will also receive a copy and will use that to develop your teen’s financial aid package of scholarships, grants, loans and work-study.
  • Keep an eye out for college acceptance letters. Colleges should notify accepted students by April 1.

May

  • Make a decision and have your teen submit his or her acceptance of admission to the school that he or she will attend! Many colleges require students to confirm their enrollment by May 1.
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Six Tips to Keep Your Child Safe Online Cyberbullying...online predators...identity theft. For many parents, the World Wide Web is a source of fear and anxiety.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:57:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-tips-to-keep-your-child-safe-online https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-tips-to-keep-your-child-safe-online Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Six Tips to Keep Your Child Safe Online

Cyberbullying…online predators…identity theft. For many parents, the World Wide Web is a source of fear and anxiety. Yet, in today’s Information Age—and with children who are digital natives—avoidance of digital technologies, social media and cyberspace in general simply isn’t possible or practical.

Here’s the good news: the Internet offers many advantages to students of all ages. It is easier than ever to research any topic or interest, share information, and make connections with people around the world. While the benefits of having so much information at one’s fingertips are many, there are risks and dangers as well, especially for children.  

Here are six tips to keep your child safe online and help him or her learn to use the Internet safely and appropriately:

Tip #1: Set limits. Establish house rules about online time. Perhaps you allow 20 minutes immediately after school while your child unwinds from the day and has a snack. Keep a screen-free house once homework time begins and try to maintain a consistent schedule for homework, dinner and bedtime. If your child has a mobile phone, set rules about when the phone gets turned off each night.

Tip #2: Keep the computer in a visible location. It’s easier to monitor the amount of time your child spends on the computer and the type of content that he or she views if you have it in the kitchen or family room and not his or her bedroom.

Tip #3: Be aware of what your child does online. Just as your parents wanted to know where you went and who you spent time with when you were growing up, you should know who your child interacts with online and what types of websites and tools he or she visits and uses. Make it a rule that your child only chat with, instant message, email or talk on Facebook with friends that he or she knows in person.

Tip #4: Use safety settings. Set up parental controls on any computers, tablets or other devices in your home. These controls can help you limit Internet access, messaging, email and other online communication capability as well as the time your child spends on the computer. You also can personalize individual settings for children of different ages. In addition, you can buy Internet filter software such as McAfee Safe Eyes or Net Nanny.

Tip #5 Talk about privacy. Your child needs to understand from an early age that some people on the Internet might pretend to be people who they are not. Talk about the importance of interacting online only with people he or she knows in real life, and never with strangers. Stress to your child that he or she should never share personal information such as his or her full name, address, phone number or password information with anyone online, no matter who they claim to be.

Tip #6: Talk about social media etiquette. Children need to understand what constitutes bullying online: harassment, repeated cruelty or rumor spreading via Facebook or other social media outlets, for example. The rules for treating others with respect and kindness are the same online. If your child ever becomes the target of a bully online via threats or harassment, he or she needs to know that there are ways to remove him or herself from the situation, such as blocking the person and reporting such incidents to a school official.

Perhaps the most important way to mitigate the risks of going online is to communicate frequently with your child. Talk about the risks of giving out information online, spending too much time online and visiting unsafe websites. Make your child aware of the instantaneous nature of spreading information in an era of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Discuss how social media impacts how he or she feels about friendships and him or herself. As with all aspects of parenting, keeping your child safe online requires maintaining an open and honest dialogue. 

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Summer is the Best Time to Prepare for the SATs Summer break is here, which means that high school students aren't interacting in the classroom or engaging in problem-solving activities in a formal setting.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:03:09 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-is-the-best-time-to-prepare-for-the-sats https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-is-the-best-time-to-prepare-for-the-sats Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer is the Best Time to Prepare for the SATs

Summer break is here, which means that high school students aren’t interacting in the classroom or engaging in problem-solving activities in a formal setting. The bad news about this is that students may not retain important information they learned during the academic year or may continue to struggle with certain subjects. If they have to take the SAT in the fall, this lapse in education is doubly problematic.

The SAT is among the most demanding tests a student will take during their high school career. With math, critical reading and writing on the test, students must demonstrate proficiency in many areas in order to score well.

Many high school students are encouraged to take the SAT because it is one of the most widely used college entrance exams, but are they really prepared for it? The good news is that there are many things parents can do to help their children get ready to take the test, including encouraging them to keep up with their studies during the summer.

Why spend time during the summer studying for the SAT? Aside from keeping the mind active, studying for the SATs during the summer gives students some major advantages.

Perfecting the Test-Taking Process

First of all, summer study can prepare students for the test-taking process itself. While that sounds unnecessary, it's a well-known fact that the SAT contains questions that are meant to engage critical thinking and can confuse those who are not paying attention with nearly correct, but false answers. Trying out sample questions and getting a feel for the types of problems that will be included on the test can help students prepare more effectively and avoid surprises on the day of the test.

Creating a Base of Knowledge

Achieving a high score on the SAT is not merely reliant on cramming and memorizing boring facts; it's actually heavily dependent on having a strong base of knowledge in a field of study. For instance, knowing the meaning of a word won't matter very much if a person can't use it correctly in a sentence or identify it by context. And memorizing theorems in geometry won't do students a bit of good if they can't solve problems using them.

Studying during the summer allows students more time to brush up on the subjects they know and learn the things that they don't. Summer is also a great time to hire a tutor and achieve some real progress before the busy school year.

Balancing the Test, Applications, and Classwork

Balancing college application deadlines and studying for the test can put a lot of pressure on students during the fall and winter months. If students don't study for the SAT test during the summer, they only have a month or so left to do so before the first fall tests – scheduled for October and November.  Early fall will also be crammed with other schoolwork and any extra-curricular activities that they take part in, not to mention any college applications that they are filling out. Sure, students could wait and take the SAT later in the year, but this might put a limit on the number of options they have when applying to colleges. 

By preparing for the test over the summer, students will keep their brains sharp so that they won't have to cram as much at the last minute or hurt their chances on their applications. All of this preparation can lead to better SAT scores, acceptances to better schools and, down the line, perhaps better jobs.

Taking the time to prepare for the SAT during the summer allows students to heave a big sigh of relief when it's time to take the actual test. Having a summer study plan will create a structured routine that students and their parents can feel confident about when it counts. 

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Study Tips for The ACT Exam There is no better time to begin studying for the ACT than during the summer break.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:02:07 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-tips-for-the-act-exam https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-tips-for-the-act-exam Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Study Tips for The ACT Exam

There is no better time to begin studying for the ACT than during the summer break. While many high school students enjoy the time out of the classroom, summer offers a vast amount of time to set aside for college prep. Taking a college entrance exam is crucial to gain admittance, and being prepared to take the ACT can assure a better chance of your child getting into a school of his or her choice.

ACT origins. The ACT is widely used in the heartland of America and the southern states. It has gained popularity, and the ACT is now accepted at any college that takes the SAT entrance exam. However, don’t be misled; parents should be aware that the exam is just as demanding and provoking as the SAT. Your child will be required to use the skills they learned in school to answer questions and put in their best effort.

ACT: Prep for success. The ACT is broken into four different sections that include math, English, reading and science reasoning. What sets the ACT apart from other college entrance exams is the format of the test, and the fact that the scoring system is based on a total of 36 total points. The test is geared towards mathematics, with more of a straight-forward structure than the SAT. It also includes questions based on science content assimilated during school. Another key difference in the ACT is that your child may skip a question if they are truly stumped and not be penalized.

The reading section tests your child’s ability to understand what is directly being stated, and the ability to grasp statements with implied meanings. He or she will be asked to read several passages, and use referring and reasoning skills to determine main ideas. Students must also identify the meaning of context-dependent words, phrases and statements. Each passage is accompanied with a set of multiple-choice test questions.

Know Test Time Limits: Each section of the exam has a time frame: the English section is 45 minutes, math has a limit of an hour, and both science reasoning and reading are 35 minutes each. Students should be aware of the time limits so they can budget their time while taking the exam and not get too hung up on a single question.

Don’t forget a calculator. Students may bring an approved calculator, a number two pencil and a watch to the test. A watch is helpful as some test rooms do not have clocks, and cellphones are not allowed in testing centers.

During the test. Instruct your student to start with the easy questions first. Time is valuable and getting hung up on a tough problem can waste critical time. He or she should have two erasers on hand to fully remove pencil marks from the answer sheet, since tests are graded by a machine and any leftover smudges could cause a grading error.

The ACT also includes an optional writing task. For students planning on completing the writing portion of the exam, taking a few minutes to create a quick outline can help them organize their ideas prior to beginning the assignment. It will make the actual writing go more smoothly and will help ensure the end result is clear and concise. 

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Does Your Child Need Summer Math Tutoring? While summer is typically a time for children to relax and enjoy time off from all-day learning, it's a good idea to take charge of your child's skills during this period.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:55:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-summer-math-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-summer-math-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Does Your Child Need Summer Math Tutoring?

While summer is typically a time for children to relax and enjoy time off from all-day learning, it’s a good idea to take charge of your child’s skills during this period. Summer can be a great time for students to brush up on their math skills, or catch up if there were concepts they didn’t quite grasp during the school year. If your child didn't understand what was being taught, didn't pay attention during math class, or simply wants to get ready for the next school year, summer math tutoring is available to help your child maintain his or her knowledge or get back on track.

Summer math tutoring and home math exercises can prepare your student for the next grade and create a foundation for future success. Some summer math exercises and activities you can play with your child can be found in the U.S. Department of Education's in-depth PDF called Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, "Our increasingly technological world demands strong skills in mathematics, not only in the workforce but also in everyday life, and these demands will only increase over the lifetimes of our children."

This is just one reason why it's important to meet your child's math study needs during the summer.

How do you know if your child needs something more than your attention, the extra time summer offers, and mathematical exercises similar to those in the PDF linked to above? How do you know, for instance, if your child needs extra help like summer math tutoring?

To help answer these questions, below we provide the top reasons why parents enroll their child in math tutoring courses during the summer.

Your child can benefit from summer math tutoring if:

  • Your child has trouble paying attention in school. With friends sitting behind, in front of, and next to your child in math class, it can be difficult for your child to pay attention and learn all of the necessary material. Summer tutoring courses do not have distractions like this and allow your student to give 100% of his or her attention to the math material and designated tutor.
  • Your child has a form of dyscalculia. If your child struggles with a math disability (also known as dyscalculia), enrolling him or her in a summer tutoring class can help your child understand math-related concepts in new ways. Having your child exposed to school teaching and tutoring diversifies your child's learning strategy and may help him or her understand math better.
  • Your child received a C grade or lower. A "C" grade indicates your child did not score well on tests and assignments, which means he or she does not understand the course material. Mathematics is a foundational practice; therefore, one concept needs to be understood before learning another. It's important for your child to understand course material better than a "C" grade indicates.
  • Your child wants to prepare for the future. Your child may understand the material in this year's math course, but it is not guaranteed that he or she will understand the material in next year's course. For this reason, children and their teachers depend on summer math tutoring for future preparation.

If any of these circumstances relate to your child, find a Huntington Learning Center near you today. We offer summer math courses taught by qualified math tutors at hundreds of locations nationwide.

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The Benefits of SAT Prep The college admissions process can be one of the most stressful parts of raising a teenager.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:11:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-benefits-of-sat-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-benefits-of-sat-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Benefits of SAT Prep

The college admissions process can be one of the most stressful parts of raising a teenager. For many parents, it is the culmination of a long process; they hope that those years of decision-making and support will lead to an acceptance letter to a good college, which will pave the way for adulthood, independence, and a worthwhile career.

There are many aspects to the college admissions process, and taking the SAT is routinely cited as a major concern for both teens and parents, for good reason. The test results will be considered heavily when colleges are reviewing applications and could be the deciding factor in your child's acceptance or denial at an institution.

So how does a concerned parent bridge any gaps between their child’s current level of knowledge and the skills that he or she will need to do well on the SAT? One of the most proven methods is to enroll your child in a respected and established SAT prep program. There are many benefits to SAT prep, including the following: 

  • A Higher Score:  In the competitive world of college admissions, even a slight increase in score can be the difference between the desired college acceptance notification and a disappointing rejection letter.
  • Expert Help: Experts on the test know that it's not just your child's knowledge that is being tested, but also his or her understanding and ability to reason. They will be the best able to instruct your child on test-taking strategies that are tailored, both to the test and to your child's particular learning style.
  • Reduced pressure: The combination of practice – which aids familiarity – and expert advice will help to alleviate the pressure that your teen might experience with a test that can have a big impact on his or her future. As your child becomes more familiar with the test, your child’s comfort levels and confidence will rise.
  • Financial Aid: The cost of college has increased enormously over the last decade. Since many colleges provide financial aid based, in part, on an applicant's SAT scores, the investment in a prep program can lead to significant monetary benefits down the road.

The SATs do not have to induce panic in you or your child. By enrolling in a recognized SAT prep program, you can alleviate some of the tension and ensure that your teen is as prepared as possible. Enroll now before the fall SAT season arrives!

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Tips to Beat Summertime Regression Summer vacation is a welcome reprieve from the busy days of the school year, but for many parents, it can bring up concerns about their children losing skills and falling behind. Luckily, there are a number of things parents can do to help students retain knowledge while they’re not in school. “Summer learning activities do not have to be rigorous or mimic classroom learning to be effective,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “With a little planning and creativity, parents can offer their children a variety of fun learning experiences that will help them stay fresh.” Huntington offers these ideas to avoid summertime learning loss:

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Fri, 16 Jun 2017 12:08:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-beat-summertime-regression https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-beat-summertime-regression Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer vacation is a welcome reprieve from the busy days of the school year, but for many parents, it can bring up concerns about their children losing skills and falling behind. Luckily, there are a number of things parents can do to help students retain knowledge while they’re not in school. “Summer learning activities do not have to be rigorous or mimic classroom learning to be effective,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “With a little planning and creativity, parents can offer their children a variety of fun learning experiences that will help them stay fresh.” Huntington offers these ideas to avoid summertime learning loss:

Review last year. Review assignments your child worked on throughout the school year and make a nightly, 15-minute homework session a part of your summer routine. Activities such as flash cards, times tables and spelling word practice are great to do each night to retain concepts and skills from the previous year.

Read, read, read. This summer, help your child learn to love reading for fun. Go to the library every week and let your child pick out books, magazines or other reading materials. As a family, set aside 30 minutes after dinner each night for everyone to settle down with your books. Explore your library’s programs for kids, too.

And write, write, write. Summer is a perfect time to develop a regular writing habit. If your child struggles with writing, make it fun. Keep a family journal of everything you’ve done this summer. Write letters to the grandparents every week. Have your child help you make lists. And if your child is the creative type, encourage him or her to write stories or poems and even submit them to print or online magazines that publish children’s work.

Bridge the gap. Consider investing in workbooks specifically designed to bridge learning between grades.  There are a wide variety of workbooks available that can be purchased online or at bookstores.  Most of the workbooks provide pages of activities for each week of summer, including skill activities in reading, writing, math, language arts, science and geography.

Check out camps and classes. Your local rec center, art museum, history museum, nature and science museum, cultural center and zoo are all great places to look for classes, camps or other programs for children on summer break. You could also check out day or overnight educational camps in your area or around the country.

“The reality is that many students lose some of what they learn each grade during the months they are not in school,” Huntington says. “But with a small amount of effort, you can help your child stay sharp, retain knowledge and be better prepared for the next grade.”

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Different Traits to Look for in a College Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen's life and unsurprisingly, it can be overwhelming for both teens and their parents.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:50:42 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/different-traits-to-look-for-in-a-college- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/different-traits-to-look-for-in-a-college- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Different Traits to Look for in a College

Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen’s life—and unsurprisingly, it can be overwhelming for both teens and their parents. You’ve probably received plenty of advice on what to consider when evaluating your teen’s college options: cost, location, major/program choices and size. However, there are other elements to think about as well. Here are several less common topics to explore during your teen’s college search:

Academic focus – Your teen’s certainty about his or her major and career path should definitely influence the college search process. If he or she is positive about pursuing business, narrow the search to include universities with strong business schools. If your teen is deciding between veterinary sciences and marine science, be sure that the colleges he or she is considering offer both programs. Similarly, if the nearby college is an engineering school, he or she shouldn’t waste effort applying if your teen has no interest in engineering.

Teaching vs. research – Clearly, a student’s experience at a top research university would be quite different  than at a liberal arts college. Perhaps your budding scientist wants to study under the most renowned researchers in the country at a large university, even if it means fewer classes actually being taught by those professors. However, your teen shouldn’t rule out the small liberal arts college, which may offer more undergraduate research opportunities than universities that reserve those opportunities for graduate students. The admissions teams at your prospective colleges can help answer questions about their faculty teaching/research expectations—and how that impacts the student experience.

Class size ratios for all classes – It usually isn’t difficult to find out a college’s student-faculty ratio or percentage of classes with 20 or fewer students (check ranking institutions such as U.S. News & World Report if the information isn’t easy to locate on the college website). However, do a little homework on the class size ratio for general education courses, too, since those will make up most of your student’s schedule during the first year of college. A school that boasts an 18:1 student-teacher ratio might also have a high number of required general education classes with class sizes of 200-300 or higher. If learning under this model would be challenging for your teen, he or she should take this under serious consideration.

Retention rate – One measurement that might matter especially to parents is that of the first- to second-year retention rate. In other words, how successful is a college at retaining students? According to the ACT, which conducts research on this topic, universities and colleges with higher retention rates tend to focus on areas such as involvement experiences, personal future building and academic stimulation. U.S. News & World Report publishes retention rates for many colleges.

Selecting a college should be a careful and thoughtful process. Encourage your teen to explore as many facets of his or her top choices as possible. While the ultimate decision may come down to the “gut feel test,” the more your teen knows about a college beforehand, the more informed his or her decision will be.

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Prevent Summer Learning Loss All students experience summer learning loss when they do not engage in educational activities over the long break.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:45:01 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prevent-summer-learning-loss https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prevent-summer-learning-loss Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Prevent Summer Learning Loss

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Getting a Child to Appreciate Math For some students, math skills come easily, as do the aptitudes needed to be a successful math student: analyzing patterns, thinking logically and critically, and solving problems.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:51:50 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-child-to-appreciate-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-child-to-appreciate-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Getting a Child to Appreciate Math

For some students, math skills come easily, as do the aptitudes needed to be a successful math student: analyzing patterns, thinking logically and critically, and solving problems. However, for others, math concepts are difficult to grasp and the more complex they become, the more students want to give up altogether.

If your child isn’t one of the fortunate students for which math “clicks” effortlessly, it may not be possible for you to convince him or her to like math. However, you can encourage your child to appreciate math for the practical and useful life skill that it is. Here are a few tips on how to help your student appreciate math and its importance.

Point out math in everyday life. You don’t have to look too hard to find math in day-to-day life—from weather forecasting to telling time to using cell phones and computers. From the time your child is old enough to understand the basic concepts of math, highlight math being used everywhere you go.

Call attention to math in various careers. Certainly, it’s easier to see why professionals in accounting, engineering and science need math. However, the reality is that math is a skill required by many jobs. For business owners and entrepreneurs, math is an essential part of the company’s purchasing, budgeting, finance and other functions. Those working in real estate or sales likely have monthly sales targets to meet in order to earn carefully calculated bonuses. Landscapers or architects use math skills to create scaled drawings and to calculate and order the right amount of supplies.

Use money. Your child might not enjoy worksheets of math problems, but there’s a good chance he or she is interested in money—or at least interested in earning money. Help your child open his or her first bank account and teach him or her how to maintain the savings register. Together, calculate how much interest he or she could earn each month based on the account’s interest rate. Put together a spreadsheet that gives your child a weekly savings goal to save up for that iPad.

Discuss your own relationship with math. Does your child see you using math? Be sure to explain how and where you use math in your daily life. If you maintain the family budget, have your child help you with this task so he or she gets a sense of how your family keeps track of your income, expenses, savings and more. Show your child how you use math in cooking and when comparison shopping.

Your child might never feel enthusiastic about math, but with some effort on your part, you can impart in him or her an appreciation for the importance of the subject. Look around and you will find a multitude of opportunities to show your child math in use—from complex math to everyday math.

Keep in mind that math is a subject that requires students to continually build skills. If your child struggles with basic concepts, more complex math will only prove frustrating. If your child is struggling, call Huntington. We can design a customized program to help your child overcome any problems with math and get back on the road to school success.

Helping Your Child Learn Math by Eileen and Raymond Huntington offers tips, strategies and activities to help your child learn math at home and on the go. 

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Implementing Differentiated Instruction Into Your Lesson Plan In order to truly implement the philosophy of differentiated instruction, it is important to get a grasp on the theory and to understand why some teachers and tutors deem it necessary.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:27:08 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/implementing-differentiated-instruction-into-your-lesson-plan https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/implementing-differentiated-instruction-into-your-lesson-plan Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Implementing Differentiated Instruction Into Your Lesson Plan

In order to truly implement the philosophy of differentiated instruction, it is important to get a grasp on the theory and to understand why some teachers and tutors deem it necessary. Differentiated instruction bases your lessons around the very idea that each student is different and as such, they retain and learn information in different ways. Rather than have each lesson exactly the same, which can cause some children to fall further and further behind, differentiated instruction works to meet each of them on some level of their own learning abilities. Many tutors in math, English, and other subjects use differentiated instruction in their teaching process. Whether you're a tutor, teacher, or parent, using various aspects from this method can help you teach a variety of different students.                        

Pre-Assessment and Assessment

As said, differentiated instruction puts a focus on the differences in abilities and learning styles of your students. This can sometimes be a little more taxing on the teacher when it comes to evaluating student progress and gearing each lesson to a student’s sensibilities. For pre-assessment, you’re tasked, as an instructor, to see the prior knowledge that your students are going into a lesson with.  This can help you decide where to begin and where to focus most on. During the assessment process, you will be able to monitor your students’ progress through each lesson through a variety of means, whether they be quizzes, projects, group activities, or reading assignments. 

Content in a Differentiated Instruction Class

The key aspect of differentiated instruction is how it affects what kind of content you teach in class.  Similar to balanced literacy, another teaching theory, differentiated instruction looks to vary the types of mediums that relay information to your students. For example, while your standard classroom may have the students learn directly from a textbook, differentiated instruction may have your students read passages from a novel, poems, or simply watch a relevant movie or film strip. The idea is that effective teaching stimulates a variety of senses and the children will have an easier time absorbing things if given a variety of applications.

Product in a Differentiated Instruction Class

When it comes to differentiated instruction, the product is where your students can truly express what they learn in a variety of interesting ways. Rather than a simple exam or report to show what they’ve learned, students are given the opportunity to express themselves in clever ways. For example, they may choose to write songs on the subject that they just learned or create their own magazine with a variety of articles on the subject at hand. In this way, differentiated instruction allows the students to showcase their knowledge in a way that appeals to them. This is a bit more useful than a simple exam, as it makes the students go a step further and apply their knowledge into a useful and everyday application.

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Strategies for Tackling the SAT As the school year starts, high school juniors nationwide are undoubtedly thinking of the approaching SAT college entrance exam, typically taken in the spring of a student's junior year.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:00:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/strategies-for-tackling-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/strategies-for-tackling-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Strategies for Tackling the SAT

As the school year starts, high school juniors nationwide are undoubtedly thinking of the approaching SAT college entrance exam, typically taken in the spring of a student’s junior year. Depending on the institution, the SAT can weigh heavily on admittance and possible scholarship opportunities, so a good score is of utmost importance.

At Huntington, our goal is to help students achieve the best score possible through comprehensive SAT test preparation. Our tutors are experienced in test-taking strategies, problem-solving skills, and

proven ways to improve vocabulary.

Additionally, the following outlines some of our SAT prep strategies and helpful hints:

Plan Ahead (and Register Early)

Select a specific test date as far in advance as possible to allow for the most preparation. Don’t forget to set aside some budget for associated purchases like exam preparation books and prep programs. Registering early will also ensure you’re not paying late registration fees.  

Make a Smart Study Plan

Help your student develop a smart study plan that allows for thorough preparation. A smart study plan can include:

  • Planning your roadmap. How long will you review each subject? In what order? By what means?
  • Becoming familiar with the test itself (length, style of questions, scoring system, what you’ll need to bring with you the day of the exam, etc.)
  • Reviewing PSAT scores to identify strengths and weaknesses
  • Completing a full length practice test
  • Engaging in additional reading and writing beyond coursework to improve comprehension and fluency
  • Seeking out a tutor for more specialized preparation

Consider Subject Tests

Students also can elect to take SAT Subject Tests, which test information beyond the standard SAT categories of reading, writing, and math. Subject tests can provide college admission boards a more accurate view of a student’s strengths. For example, if your student excelled in his or her Advanced Placement Biology course and is considering majoring in the subject, a Biology Subject test would help highlight your student’s strength in this area. For a full list of subject tests, click here. Most of these tests are an hour in length and offered in multiple choice formats.

Take it Again

Although your student may be satisfied with his or her SAT score, it doesn’t hurt to take the exam again. Studies show that 55 percent of students improve their scores by taking the exam a second time, usually in the fall of their senior year. In the event that a student does worse on the second exam, he or she can submit their original score to universities.

Huntington Helps

Exam preparation is one of our specialties! With years of experience helping students on college entrance exams, consider utilizing Huntington’s professional and effective SAT preparation programs. Our SAT Preparation programs include a range of highly personalized, custom study plans for your student, including three program options, subject tutoring, and an online resource library.

Start your SAT program now! Contact us at 1.800.CAN.LEARN for the Huntington Advantage.

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Ways a Tutor Can Help a Student De-Stress about Calculus Just mention the word calculus and you might notice that your high school student will quickly want to change the subject.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:24:13 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/ways-a-tutor-can-help-a-student-destress-about-calculus https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/ways-a-tutor-can-help-a-student-destress-about-calculus Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Ways a Tutor Can Help a Student De-Stress about Calculus

 Just mention the word calculus and you might notice that your high school student will quickly want to change the subject. The truth is that pre-calculus and calculus can be quite intimidating for students. Some might find it too difficult, and as the concepts become more complicated, they'll begin to retreat before they even try to understand them. Others might just find math of any kind boring and prefer other subjects. If pre-calculus and calculus are overwhelming for your child, he or she might be a good candidate for calculus help from a tutor. Here are some ways a tutor can help your student see calculus in a new light:

Adapt to a Particular Learning Style: Conceptualizing complex subjects can be difficult when they are being taught to a large group of students. Some students are auditory learners and can learn just by listening to a lecture; others are technical learners and need to practice in order to make sense of a concept. A teacher might not be able to reach each and every single student, and will only know if someone is having trouble after a couple of less-than-stellar quizzes or tests. Using one-on-one communication and lessons tailored to a student’s learning style, a tutor might be able to reach a student in a way that's just not possible in the classroom.

Show Where Calculus Is Used in Everyday Life and Careers: If algebra deals with how numbers relate to each other, it could be said that calculus is defined by the relationships of equations. With that in mind, concepts of pre-calculus and calculus can be used in a variety of careers and everyday life, especially if a student aspires to an engineering or science career. When a tutor points out ways calculus concepts can be used outside of the classroom, it can help to improve a student’s motivation and understanding.

Organization: One-on-one tutoring sessions help create regularity in a student's schedule, enabling them to devote more time to their calculus studies. Pre-calculus and calculus build on concepts and require a strong foundation. A student that falls behind early in their studies will not be able to move on to new concepts. With regular sessions, students can focus on their homework and prepare for tests, so they can stay on top of what is going on in the classroom.

For more information about how a tutor can help your child fret less about calculus, please contact a Huntington representative today!

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8 Facts to Know about SAT Changes As you may or may not have heard, the College Board recently announced that substantial changes will be made to the SAT, effective spring 2016.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:41:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/8-facts-to-know-about-sat-changes https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/8-facts-to-know-about-sat-changes Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center 8 Facts to Know about SAT Changes

As you may or may not have heard, the College Board recently announced that substantial changes will be made to the SAT, effective spring 2016. These changes are meant to better accommodate what students will need to know in post-high-school life, for both college and their future careers. The new test will shift the focus to analytic thinking and will be more aligned with what is learned in the classroom.

This is a big point of interest for students in junior high and early high school, as the rules they are currently familiar with are now changing. Here are the new rules parents and students will most need to know.

The test is reverting to the old scoring scale. While the current SAT is scored on a 2400-point scale, the College Board has decided to return to the 1600-point scale that was used in 2004 and earlier. The essay score will be separate from the math, reading, and writing sections of the test.

Essay will be optional. Speaking of the essay being scored separately, students will now be given the option to forgo this section altogether.

There will not be point deductions for wrong answers. Formerly, students were encouraged to leave answers blank if they didn't know the answer, since wrong responses resulted in ¼ of a point being subtracted from their scores. On the new test, students are encouraged to use their deductive reasoning skills to choose the most logical answer with no penalty for guessing incorrectly.

Vocabulary will be more 'real world.' It's currently not uncommon to see antiquated vocabulary sprinkled throughout the reading and writing sections of the exam. Archaic words will no longer be prominent in the test, giving way to more useful and modern, though still challenging, vocabulary.

The focus on the math section will be narrower. There will be a smaller range of subjects on the math portion which will emphasize equations, functions, ratios, and other types of math that may be applicable to everyday life.

The use of calculators will only be permitted on specified parts of the test. Relevant mathematic formulas will still be supplied to students at the beginning of the test, but don't ditch your algebra tutor just yet. In keeping with the shifted focus on the math portion, calculators will only be allowed for use during certain parts of the test.

The reading and writing section will look for evidence-supported answers. In order to get high scores on the reading and writing sections, students will need to provide ample supporting facts in order to demonstrate their interpreting and analyzing skills. Each passage that students must read will be accompanied by a question asking them to select a quote from the text that best supports their response to the preceding question.

For the reading section, texts will be chosen more wisely. Rather than choosing passages from old, classic novels and short stories, the excerpts will be taken from multidisciplinary texts such as the Declaration of Independence and other widely-read documents.

What are your thoughts on the new SAT tests? How should students adapt their study habits?

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How to Help a Poor Speller For some children, learning to spell is incredibly frustrating and something that never seems to get easier or less confusing.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:10:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-a-poor-speller https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-a-poor-speller Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Help a Poor Speller

For some children, learning to spell is incredibly frustrating—and something that never seems to get easier or less confusing. The bad news is that spelling troubles are unlikely to go away on their own. The good news is that there are many things parents can do to help their children become better spellers, and as a result, better students. Here are several tips to help your child improve his or her spelling ability:

Encourage mastery of the sight words. You probably recall the words sent home by your child’s kindergarten and first grade teachers that you were instructed to have your child memorize by sight. Sight words—also known as Dolch words—are the most frequently used words in the English language. Many sight words have irregular spellings and it is critical that students memorize them and know how to spell them.

Make sure your student understands the different sounds that letter combinations make. Reading fluency is achieved through a series of “building block” skills, including understanding that words are composed of letters and word units and that letters (and letter combinations) make individual sounds. Your child should be able to sound out:

  • Individual letters (consonants and vowels)
  • Blends (such as pl or sm)
  • Digraphs (two letters that make one sound, such as sh or ng)
  • Diphthongs (two vowels that form as one syllable, such as au or ai)

Help your child recognize word families. Once your child masters train, give him or her a list of other words that share the same ain ending, such as chain and brain. Guide your child as he or she plays with letter combinations to understand word patterns.

Help your child memorize common spelling rules. Scholastic offers a helpful printable chart that summarizes spelling rules for ei vs. ie words, compound words, plurals, possessives, prefixes and suffixes. Once your child memorizes these basics, he or she will be able to apply them consistently and catch his or her spelling mistakes more easily.

Practice, practice, practice. Provided a student has a basic understanding of word structure, letter sounds, common spelling rules and relationships between words, repetition is critical to master spelling. As your child studies his or her new weekly spelling words, try the look, visualize, write, check approach. If your child gets tripped up with the same words over and over, practice them in the same way you would if they were brand new spelling words.

Spelling takes continued practice—and even adults can struggle with it throughout their lives. Frequent reading and repeated exposure to the spoken and written word are the best ways for students to acquire strong spelling skills. And when problems arise, early intervention is critical (as with all literacy skills). The sooner you can spot and correct spelling difficulties, the easier it will be for your child to become a good speller.

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SAT Prep: Tutors vs. Teachers For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to hire a tutor.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:52:33 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tutors-vs-teachers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tutors-vs-teachers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Prep: Tutors vs. Teachers

For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to hire a tutor. Some think it would be unheard of to take the test without being prepared by a tutor or coach, while others seem to think it's an expense that can easily be spared as long as you do well in school. In truth, there are many things tutors can do for students they can't do alone or with the help of a teacher.

Tutors can Provide Discipline

It's true that there are many bright students who may have the capability to prepare themselves for the SAT, but that doesn't mean they have the discipline to do so. It's also not safe to assume that teachers will provide SAT-oriented material. Having an SAT coach means that a student is held accountable for studying specified portions of material, and therefore, it gives the student the discipline needed to do so. There's no doubting that the right amount of studying will improve a test score, but some students need the incentive to actually study. 

Tutors can Provide Specialized Help

Many students do extremely well in certain subjects but not-so-well in others. For example, some students are proficient in math and science courses, but struggle with writing. If this is the case, it can be helpful to get an SAT tutor who specializes in a certain subject. You can't get all the algebra help you need just from sitting in class, because lesson plans are designed to accommodate everyone. With a tutor, you can sit down and explain exactly what you're having trouble with. Specialized help is one of the biggest benefits of hiring a tutor or coach.

Tutors are Familiar with the Expectations of Colleges

The benefit of having SAT tutors is that they're familiar with what colleges expect of their applicants. Together, a student and tutor can goals that are both attainable and specific to the program that the student is applying to, making it more likely they will get into their top choices and excel in their programs.

 

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Five Tips for the Night Before the SAT With many SAT testing dates approaching, there are a lot of tips circulating for doing well on the test.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:59:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-the-night-before-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-the-night-before-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Five Tips for the Night Before the SAT 

With many SAT testing dates approaching, there are a lot of tips circulating for doing well on the test. "Take practice tests," "Review X, Y, and Z," and, of course, "Process of elimination!" are all great tips, but some things that factor into SAT success don't involve studying. Giving it your all largely involves being in the right state of mind – and getting into that "zone" starts the night before exam day. Here are a few things you can do to get into test-taking mode once you're within 24 hours of starting time.

Get Exercise

The day before the big test, go for a jog, play some Frisbee with your dog, or enjoy a game of pickup basketball with your friends. Exercise is great for two things: relieving stress and getting high-quality sleep, two things that are very important before taking the exam. Just make sure not to work out too late, as the adrenaline can keep you awake. 

Get Organized

Make sure to put your calculator, new batteries, your photo ID, and two #2 pencils in a pouch together so you're not fumbling around looking for them as you're about to walk out the door. It might also be a good idea to put a filling snack, like a protein bar, in the bag too in case you get a grumbling stomach on the way there. 

Set your Alarm…Early

Getting up early probably isn't your ideal scenario, but you want to give yourself time to fully wake up before taking the test. Being groggy is distracting and will affect your performance. Reap the benefits of getting up early by doing a brain teaser, such as a Sudoku puzzle or a crossword, before going to the exam. This will help to jump-start your brain and get you into test-taking mode.

Eat Well

Eating a big breakfast will give you the energy and brainpower you need to stay focused. Don't go overboard with something too greasy and filling – otherwise, you'll feel lethargic. Instead, try some fruit, yogurt, and granola, or just snack on two eggs with toast. 

Stop Studying!

Cramming the night before and the morning of the exam sounds like it would be a good idea, but those last few minutes aren't going to give you the information you need to significantly improve your test scores. As a matter of fact, studying for the SAT too close to the day of the test can, in fact, stress you out. Try some light reading or brain games instead.

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How to Help your Child with Algebra Algebra is a challenging subject for many students.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:11:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-child-with-algebra https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-child-with-algebra Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Help your Child with Algebra

Algebra is a challenging subject for many students. Yet algebra is not as difficult as some students
]believe – it may just take more time and attention for some students to learn the basic concepts of the subject. Here’s how you can provide algebra help to your child. 

  • Practice Problems- Repetition is the key to understanding algebra properly. Have your student redo problems that they have had difficulties with on previous quizzes or tests. Then, move on to other math problems in their text book that are similar. Some students learn better through practice instead of conceptually.  Make sure to only do practice problems to which you have the answer key so you can correct your student’s work.
  • Mobile Apps- Technology might be the key to helping your child understand algebra. Many algebra-based apps are available on sites like iTunes for free. The U.S. Department of Education donated $740,000 to the Center for Algebraic Thinking to create these apps in the hope of aiding struggling students. Apps are an alternative for students to practice once they understand the initial principles. These free apps provide practice problems with the answer keys built in. Check to see if any algebra apps on iTunes can help your student.
  • Talk with your Child’s Teacher- Chat with the teacher to better understand your child’s progress. As a professional educator, they’ll convey your student’s weak points and possibly offer you tips on how to help them outside of class. Your student might have trouble with one area, but understand another. This information will help your strategy – and if you ultimately decide to seek tutoring help, you will be able to speak knowledgably about what areas are causing the most concern for your child.

Overall, if you feel your child is having trouble gaining traction in algebra, seek help. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are able to explain subjects in ways that make the most sense to students. Your child’s education is vital to their future, so intervene early if you see problems. Huntington Learning Center helps students with homework, as well as quiz and test preparation, so your student can build a better future today.

 

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Does Your Child Need Tutoring? Tutoring helps students in different situations.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:55:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Does Your Child Need Tutoring?

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The Student's Guide to the SAT Getting stressed out before taking a big test such as the SAT is normal.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:14:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-students-guide-to-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-students-guide-to-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Student's Guide to the SAT

Getting stressed out before taking a big test such as the SAT is normal. Unfortunately, stress can be one of the biggest distractions from doing well on a test, no matter how many hours you've spent pouring over practice exams and brushing up on math equations. Not only can stress cause you to lose sleep and affect your attention, it can also make your time spent studying less effective.

Luckily, there are proven ways to minimize stress and maximize your performance. Here are a few ways to avoid anxiety, both during the study-heavy weeks leading up to the test and during the exam itself:

Do What You Need to Do to Stay Positive

Having a negative attitude toward a test you have to take isn't going to help your performance. Focusing on positive outcomes instead of negatives can be very motivating. Remind yourself that if you do well on the SAT, you might get into your dream school or receive good scholarships. At the very least, once the test is over, you can look forward to whatever your future holds. Yoga, meditation, listening to upbeat music, and exercising can all help boost your mood so that you're optimistic while studying, not stressed.

Don't Overwork Yourself

You may be tempted to pull all-nighters and avoid going out to dinner with the family so you can get in as much study time as possible, but this can be just as detrimental to your performance as not studying at all. Studying is important, but so is relaxation, so do your best to strike a balance. Make a schedule and set aside blocks of time dedicated to reviewing SAT prep materials and studying. Then, set aside some "you" time to enjoy fun activities and relax. 

Pay Attention to Eating and Sleeping

To keep your mind sharp, remain alert, and reduce stress, pay special attention to your diet and sleep schedules. Eat foods that are filling and full of proteins, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats, and try to get a full eight hours of sleep per night in the days and weeks leading up to the test. This will help boost your energy levels and make your study time more efficient.

Take Practice Tests

Whether you're working with a tutor, taking a class, or preparing on your own, practice tests are an instrumental part of SAT preparation. Practice tests allow you to get comfortable with the types of questions you can expect to see, ensuring there are fewer surprises. Preparation and familiarity are keys to remaining calm during the test. 

Stretch

During the test, you'll be given a few breaks. It's best to take advantage of these opportunities to get up and stretch. You may get antsy or sore from sitting down for long periods, and discomfort is distracting. Get the blood flowing during your breaks to perform as well as possible on the test!

So as you prepare for the SAT exam this year, remember that while stress is normal, with these effective strategies for stress management it doesn’t need to make or break your performance on the day of the test. If you’re interested in learning more about how to best minimize exam stress and prepare for the SAT, turn to a reputable SAT test preparation program to help boost both confidence and scores.

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How Parents Can Help Children Prepare for Assessment Tests These days, helping your student strengthen his or her test-taking skills takes on new meaning if you live in a state that has adopted the Common Core State Standards and the standards newly aligned assessment tests.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:05:21 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-parents-can-help-children-prepare-for-assessment-tests https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-parents-can-help-children-prepare-for-assessment-tests Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Parents Can Help Children Prepare for Assessment Tests

These days, helping your student strengthen his or her test-taking skills takes on new meaning if you live in a state that has adopted the Common Core State Standards—and the standards’ newly aligned assessment tests.

Two consortiums are currently creating the next generation of assessments to measure students’ progress toward college and career readiness (the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career (PARCC) and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC)). That means that the standardized tests that your child has taken in the past will look very different as early as this year. In addition, school curriculums and expectations of students are significantly different than under the previous state standards.

How can you help your child do his or her best on assessment tests? Here are several trusted tips to share with your child to help him or her have the best chance for success on these or any important exams:

  • Read all questions carefully and follow the directions. On any test, it is critical that you identify each question being asked before rushing into solving or answering the problem.
  • Narrow down choices. If you are unsure of the answer to a question, eliminate choices that do not make sense or are obviously incorrect (for example, answers that include words such as always and never are red flags).
  • When working on math problems, eliminate extra information provided that has nothing to do with the question being asked.
  • If you get stuck on problems, mark them and move on. You can return to them later if you have time at the end of the test, but don’t waste valuable test time spinning your wheels.
  • Pace yourself. At the outset of a test, do a quick calculation of how many minutes you have for each question—and give a little extra time for essay questions. Try to leave a few minutes at the end of every test to revisit skipped or troublesome problems.
  • Draw out problems to help yourself visualize them better.  
  • Minimize test anxiety by keeping things in perspective. Remind yourself that tests are simply how teachers can evaluate what you know. The best form of test preparation is to keep up with homework and in-class work. 

What can you do to prepare your student for Common Core-aligned assessment tests? Here are a few suggestions:

  • Talk with your child’s teacher about how you can ease your child’s transition to school work and tests under the Common Core State Standards.
  • Continue to emphasize the importance of thinking critically—an area of elevated importance under Common Core. Ask questions about what your child reads and learns. Encourage him or her to talk about how he or she feels about stories, current events and more. Have your child explain his or her thinking—in both math and reading.
  • Embrace technology in your household. The new standards focus heavily on the skills needed by today’s 21st-century digital learners and incorporate research and media skills into all content areas.

As always, one of the best ways to help your child do his or her best on any exam is to equip him or her with good study skills and habits. It is also important that you stay apprised of the curricular changes that are happening in your child’s classroom and understand how those may impact the tests that your child takes. Stay in touch with your child’s teacher on the best ways for you to support your student in the era of Common Core.

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Five Signs Your Child Needs Tutoring It's easy to tell that a child needs tutoring when he or she continues to receive one poor report card after the next, but there are a number of other less obvious signs that parents shouldn't ignore.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:59:15 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-signs-your-child-needs-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-signs-your-child-needs-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ 2/25/14 – It’s easy to tell that a child needs tutoring when he or she continues to receive one poor report card after the next, but there are a number of other less obvious signs that parents shouldn’t ignore. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that parents can look for clues in a number of places. “Stressful study sessions and bad grades are the tangible evidence of a child’s school struggles, but there are several other indicators to watch for,” says Huntington. “The sooner you recognize school problems, the faster you can help your child overcome any issues and boost his or her confidence.”

Huntington shares these five warning signs that your child may need tutoring help—and questions to answer about your child’s behavior:

Difficulty getting started. Does your child seem unexcited and unmotivated about anything to do with school—especially working on assignments? Does he or she put off homework time every night and frequently spin his or her wheels when working?

Sloppy homework and overall disorganization. Is your child disorganized in most areas of his or her life? Does your child consistently hand in unfinished or messy homework? Does it seem that your child used to care about doing quality work and does not anymore?

Personality change. Have you  noticed a dramatic change in your child’s disposition in recent months? Is your child more angry or volatile than ever before? Does he or she seem unhappy—about school and other areas of his or her life such as friends?

Diminished self-esteem. Does your child get down on him or herself easily during homework? Is your child pessimistic about school, his or her abilities, and more? On a day to day basis, does your child appear frustrated with him or herself?

Lack of interest in learning. Is your child totally apathetic about school and anything associated with school? Was your child interested in learning previously and now is not? Does that indifference translate to other areas,  such as socializing or being involved in extracurricular activities?

“School can be a bumpy road for students who are struggling, so it is important to take action if you notice your child showing any of these signs,” Huntington says. “Experience has showed us that early tutoring intervention is key to getting students back to where they need to be as quickly as possible.” For questions about how a customized tutoring program could help your child, call the Huntington Learning Center at (201) 261-8400.

About Huntington

Founded in 1977, Huntington is a pioneer and leader in the tutoring industry. For over 35 years, Huntington has provided quality instruction to hundreds of thousands of students. Huntington prides itself on being “Your Tutoring Solution” for students in all grades and subjects.  They tutor in academic skills, such as reading, phonics, math and study skills; and in advanced math and science subjects ranging from algebra through calculus and general science through physics. They also prepare students for state and standardized entrance exams, such as high school entrance exams and the SAT and ACT and provide free school tutoring to eligible schools. Learn more about Huntington at www.huntingtonhelps.com.  For information on franchise opportunities, visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Tips for Boosting your High School Student's Reading Comprehension Reading comprehension is one of the most important skills high school students can develop, and it's also one of their most common weaknesses.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:15:00 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-boosting-your-high-school-students-reading-comprehension https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-boosting-your-high-school-students-reading-comprehension Tips for Boosting your High School Student's Reading Comprehension

 Reading comprehension is one of the most important skills high school students can develop, and it's also one of their most common weaknesses. It can't be improved overnight – it requires discipline, and often that discipline starts with the parents.

 If you manage to improve your child's reading fluency and the amount of information that is gleaned from reading a book, he or she will be equipped with one of the most important skills for taking standardized tests, getting into college, and being proficient in a new career field. On the flip side, a struggling teen reader has poor chances of achieving high SAT skills and will quickly become discouraged.

 A parent only has so much influence on how well their student absorbs reading material – but it's important to make the most of the opportunities you have to help. 

Encourage More Frequent Reading

As with anything, practice makes perfect. Help your student find out what he or she likes to read – whether it's sports coverage articles, fantasy novels, or biographies – and have him or her read on a regular basis. When a student reads material that is on par with their reading level, they can fully understand the majority of the words and learn a few new ones. If he or she tries to read material that is too difficult for your child, they won't understand a lot of it and it will be a lost cause. Reading material that introduces a few new words here and there is the best way to build up to a higher level and improve your vocabulary. 

Talk About It

Get interested in what your student is reading. Have him or her explain it to you. Paraphrasing content forces a reader to truly think about the meaning of what was read, and not simply focus on the fact that they completed the task. Ask questions about why a character did a certain thing or what they think is going to happen next. 

Develop a Strategy

The time will come when the student will be assigned material that he or she finds difficult, so preparedness is important. Rereading portions of the text and breaking it down sentence-by-sentence are the most common and useful strategies. Using context clues to figure out the meaning of foreign words is also a very useful skill. In essence, teach your reader to break passages into smaller, more manageable chunks to decode meaning. 

Hire a Professional

Sometimes, you as a parent are simply not equipped to teach your child new skills. As long as you are making the effort to foster improvement, you are doing your job. Hiring a professional reading tutor has been proven to be successful in improving grades and teaching new, useful skills.

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Helping Your Child be More Organized Good study habits and organizational skills can mean the difference between a successful student and a poor performer.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:59:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-be-more-organized https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-be-more-organized Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Helping Your Child be More Organized

Good study habits and organizational skills can mean the difference between a successful student and a poor performer. A student who possesses the intellect to do well in school but lacks the organizational skills may easily fall behind and suffer from poor grades—especially as the workload in school increases and his or her schedule becomes more demanding. On the other hand, a child who struggles in school already and has trouble keeping track of assignments or is constantly losing things may find school challenges even more insurmountable.

Here are a few tips to help your child become a more organized student:

Establish a homework routine. Studies show that set routines and schedules are positive for children. Your after-school and evening routine should include a set time for homework, dinner, extracurricular activities and bedtime. During homework time, your child should begin by making a to-do list of his or her top priorities for the session, and he or she should check off items as completed. Your child’s study space should be free from distractions and stocked with the supplies needed so that your child can quickly dive into each homework session.

Make use of a planner, homework notebook or planner app. One of the most common issues with disorganized students is not that the students are incapable of doing homework, but rather, they forget or lose track of what they are supposed to work on each evening. Your child should have a simple notebook in which to write down the following—each and every day:

  • Each class/subject
  • Homework assigned for each class (or “no homework”)
  • Upcoming test/quiz dates or projects mentioned by the teacher

Check this notebook every night to ensure all work that is assigned is being completed at home. If your child is old enough to make effective use of a planner/calendar, teach him or her to block out time on the daily calendar for all commitments (school, activities, work, studying, dinner and sleep) and write down all upcoming tests, quizzes and projects on the appropriate calendar dates.

For students who use smartphones or tablets, consider a student planner app such as myHomework or iStudiez Pro, which each allow students to track homework, tests, projects and lessons, receive reminders for upcoming tests and assignments, and manage their class and life schedules. The better your child is at time management, the more prepared he or she will be for high school and college academics.

Make checklists. Introduce routines for all chores and tasks in your household and create checklists to help your child get familiar with the necessary steps. This also will help your child become more independent and confident and give him or her a sense of responsibility and fulfillment. For example, a morning checklist  might include picking out clothes and getting dressed, brushing teeth, making the bed, putting pajamas in the laundry basket, brushing hair, preparing the backpack, refilling the water bottle, making lunch and so on. Show your child that good organization is important in everything that he or she does.

Make tidying up a nightly activity. Every study or homework session should be followed by five minutes of putting away supplies, straightening the desk and getting the backpack ready for the next day. Get your child into the habit of finishing each homework period this way.

Effective organization is an asset that will help your child as a student and a person throughout his or her life. Work on this skill at home and talk with your child’s teacher about the specific areas that seem to need the most improvement. As your child embraces this skill, studying and homework will become much more fluid processes—and your child will have the tools to be a more independent, successful student. 

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Research Suggests that Retrieval Practice Promotes Better Learning Retrieval practice is a form of memorization that goes something like this: You read a passage. You recall information from that passage immediately after reading by taking a test. You retain more information over time compared to people who don't use retrieval practice.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:50:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/research-suggests-that-retrieval-practice-promotes-better-learning- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/research-suggests-that-retrieval-practice-promotes-better-learning- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Research suggests that retrieval practice promotes better learning 

Retrieval practice is a form of memorization that goes something like this:

You read a passage. You recall information from that passage immediately after reading by taking a test. You retain more information over time compared to people who don't use retrieval practice.

One study published in Science, a journal by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, found this third point to be true.  The researchers who conducted the study divided 200 college students into four groups of 50 and had each group study a short science-related passage. 

The first group simply read the passage for five minutes; the second group used rote learning by reading the passage for five minutes four consecutive times (20 minutes altogether); the third group used concept mapping by drawing diagrams and using them to link the passage's concepts together; and the fourth group used retrieval practice by reading the passage, taking a recall quiz, and repeating the process once more.

A week after the four groups interacted with the passage in different ways, each student in the study was given a short test regarding the passage's contents.  What the researchers found was that students in the fourth group who used retrieval practice retained 50% more of the information from the passage than students in the other groups.

This is why one New York Times headline read, To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test.

Mentioned in the article for this headline was Robert Bjork, a psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles.  When asked why he thought the students who used retrieval practice performed better in the study, he said, "When we use our memories by retrieving things, we change our access [to the information].  What we recall becomes more recallable in the future. In a sense you are practicing what you are going to need to do later.”

While this study suggests that retrieval practice is better than other study tactics, it also explains why taking SAT prep courses that involve practice tests is so effective.  In other words, reading a book about mastering the critical reading portion of the SAT won't help you as much as taking reading tests similar to those on the real SAT.

When looking through past studies, it's easy to become confused about which study tactic is the best.  This is because new studies often disprove the findings of previous studies – much like the retrieval practice study disproved the findings in studies that supported concept mapping's effectiveness.  Like concept mapping was found to be one of the most effective kinds of learning in the past, new studies show that retrieval practice is now the most effective.

Regarding research and studies, it's best to adopt the latest and most popular findings as technology and awareness are always improving.  And because the latest and greatest amount of studies suggest that retrieval practice is the most effective form of learning, it's wise to use retrieval practice to increase your chance of success, whether you're studying for the SAT, ACT, GED, or other exam.

 

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Fostering an Achievement-Oriented Student in a Common Core Setting The ability and drive to set and achieve goals is a skill that can be applied throughout life, from elementary school to varsity sports to career life and onward.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:41:29 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fostering-an-achievementoriented-student-in-a-common-core-setting https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fostering-an-achievementoriented-student-in-a-common-core-setting Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Fostering an Achievement-Oriented Student in a Common Core Setting

The ability and drive to set and achieve goals is a skill that can be applied throughout life, from elementary school to varsity sports to career life and onward. Most parents aim to help their students improve, but need the right tools to help set their sights on measurable achievements.

When your student is learning in a school that has implemented Common Core State Standards, it is a great opportunity to begin guiding him or her toward a more achievement-oriented work ethic. It'll help your student to be more successful in the classroom, enabling him or her to apply newly acquired skills to other aspects of life. In order to foster this type of personality, though, parents have a lot of work to do. 

Getting to Know your Student's Curriculums

Almost every teacher hands out a grading rubric and syllabus in the beginning of a school year. Parents need to recognize the value in them – they essentially outline what the student will need to achieve in order to effectively absorb the content and receive good marks. Go class by class and think of measurable and achievable goals that your student can set, whether it's getting an A on the end-of-semester research paper or studying for a set number of hours per week.Then, help him or her to take the steps necessary to reach those goals. If the goals aren't reached, try to find out what went wrong.

Recognizing Areas that Need Improvement

Every student has their strengths and weaknesses. The ability to overcome weaknesses is the ability to recognize them. Communicate with your student and his or her teacher to find out what areas could be improved upon. Then, make it a goal to improve in a measurable way. This can be achieved through studying with friends, hiring a tutor for Common Core help, or seeing a teacher for clarification after class.

Praising Areas of Excellence

There are very few students who excel in every subject, but every student has their strengths. It's important not to focus entirely on what's lacking in your student's personal skills, as that will give them a negative attitude toward school. Reward him or her for doing well and foster his or her strong suits – for example, purchase books for a student who enjoys literature or take a trip to a cool museum if they do well on that difficult science test. Consider using identifiable strengths as a basis for long-term goals, such as college programs or internships.

Keep an Eye on the Prize

Always encourage your student to look ahead, no matter how far. Maintaining the attitude that your student can achieve big things one, five, or ten years down the line is a form of encouragement.

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Spotlight on Writing Standards To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:57:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/spotlight-on-writing-standards https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/spotlight-on-writing-standards Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Spotlight on Writing Standards

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events. They learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and they begin to adapt the form and content of their writing to accomplish a particular task and purpose. They develop the capacity to build knowledge on a subject through research projects and to respond analytically to literary and informational sources. To meet these goals, students must devote significant time and effort to writing, producing numerous pieces over short and extended time frames throughout the year.

Common Core State Standards

One of the big changes that students and parents will notice with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards is an elevated focus on writing and overall literacy.  To be better prepared for college and the workforce, students will be expected to develop their ideas in writing, write effectively, conduct research to gather evidence and background prior to writing, make connections between reading and writing, and more.  Specifically, the standards state that students must build their writing abilities in three areas: argument/opinion writing, informative/explanatory writing, and narrative writing.

Student Achievement Partners, a nonprofit organization founded by three lead writers of the Common Core State Standards, offers a variety of resources for teachers and parents to get familiar with the Common Core State Standards and understand how to put them into action.

As your students work on more rigorous and in-depth writing assignments moving forward, here are a few key points to keep in mind about different types of writing, as derived from writing samples provided on Student Achievement Partners’ website, www.achievethecore.org:

Argument/opinion writing – Students are provided (and read) texts and a writing prompt that asks them to form an opinion or claim about a focusing question.

  • For students in the early elementary grades, opinion writing should offer a brief introduction, state the opinion, provide one or a few reasons for the opinion expressed, and provide a simple concluding statement.
  • As students progress through elementary school, their opinion essays should become more robust and should have an introduction, clear statement of an opinion, evidence from the text to support that opinion and explain the student’s thinking, several paragraphs and a conclusion.
  • Middle school students’ opinion writing should introduce a claim, acknowledge competing claims and rebut them with credible evidence and reasoning, organize reasoning and evidence logically, support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence, and provide a concluding section that supports the initial argument presented.
  • In early high school, students’ argument/opinion writing must introduce a precise claim with context and distinguish that claim from alternate claims, establish a formal style and objective tone, develop the claim with supporting evidence and reasoning, develop counterclaims fairly, and provide a concluding statement.

 

Informative/explanatory writing – Students are given a set of texts (or a video and a text, if younger) and a writing prompt that requests them to convey complex ideas and information.

  • For students early in elementary school, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, supply facts about it and end with a reflective concluding sentence.
  • As students approach the later elementary school years, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, provide a general observation and focus, use precise language to explain the topic, develop the topic with details, facts and examples, link ideas using words and phrases, and structure the essay to make it easy to follow.
  • In middle school, informative/explanatory writing must introduce the topic, name the work about which the student is writing (and the synopsis of the story), offer relevant facts and details, give examples from the text, clarify the relationship among the ideas presented, give examples, establish a formal style and use precise language.
  • In high school, students must give context to set the stage for an essay, use precise language to delve into the complexity of the topic, transition smoothly to clarify relationships among ideas and concepts, organize complex ideas and information to make connections, develop the topic with facts and details, establish a formal style and objective tone, and analyze ideas and information to make connections. 

 

Narrative writing – Students write from a writing prompt and stimulating idea to develop narrative about experiences or events.

  • In early elementary school, students must use temporal words or phrases (once, every week) to signal event order, recount sequenced events and include some details.
  • Later in elementary school, students write narratives by first orienting the reader and introducing a narrator, using a variety of transitional words to maintain sequence, use narrative techniques to develop events and show characters’ response, use concrete details to convey experiences and provide a conclusion.
  • In middle school, students engage and orient the reader by establishing context for narrative and introducing main characters, use dialogue to develop characters and events, use transitional clauses, use dialogue to develop character, use precise words and phrases and descriptive details, use description and reflection to build toward an outcome, and provide a conclusion.
  • In high school, students build on the narrative techniques learned in middle school and also use description to develop experiences and character, build tension toward an outcome in their narratives, use sensory language and details to focus a reader’s attention on important parts of the story, and provide a conclusion that reflects upon the experience or observation written about.

 

For an even deeper understanding of the type of writing that is expected of students, read In Common: Effective Writing for All Students, accessible at www.achievethecore.org.

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Six Best Practices for Broadening your Vocabulary It's important for students to be continually building up their vocabularies over time.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:56:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-best-practices-for-broadening-your-vocabulary https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-best-practices-for-broadening-your-vocabulary Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Six Best Practices for Broadening your Vocabulary

 It's important for students to be continually building up their vocabularies over time. Having a comprehensive vocabulary means you'll have an easier time understanding and responding to standardized test questions; it helps you to write more coherently; it also aids in reading comprehension to help better absorb learning materials. Expanding your vocabulary is something you should never stop doing.

 If you're looking for ways to broaden your verbal horizons, here are a few things you can do:

 Read More Often

The easiest way to learn new words is through context – by exposing yourself to new words within a sentence or paragraph. As you read books, essays, and even test questions, pay attention to the words you don't know and try to derive their meanings from how they're used. Then, look up their definitions. Gradually start introducing more challenging material into your reading list for best results.

Put New Words to Use

When you learn a new word, make a mental note of it, what it means, and how it's used. Then, try using it yourself. Incorporate it into an essay response or simply use it in conversation. This will make it a more natural component of your vocabulary and help to ensure you don't forget its definition. 

Make Associations

If you're having trouble remembering what a word means, associate it with something similar. For example, "gargantuan" sounds like "gigantic" and they have essentially the same meaning. You can also rhyme it with words that will help you remember its definition, or even associate it with a proper noun if that helps. Use mnemonics, or memory tricks, to make funny associations that you'll never forget. 

Take Advantage of Challenging Situations

Throughout school and work, you're going to be put in a lot of challenging situations. For example, you might have to take a standardized test or write a dissertation. If this is the case, take it as an opportunity to learn new things. Enroll yourself in an SAT/ACT prep course or try to explain what you're writing about to your peers as a form of practice.

Play Word Games

Expanding your vocabulary can be fun! Scrabble, Boggle, and crossword puzzles are a great way to learn new words and dredge up old ones that you haven't used in a while. You might have to bring out the dictionary to see if that 20-point word is legitimate, but it's rewarding when it is!

 Sign up for a 'Word of the Day' E-mail

Many dictionary sites, like Merriam-Webster, will send you a Word of the Day when you subscribe to their e-mail list. Learn something new every day!

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Huntington Learning Center Curriculum Now Fully Aligned with Common Core State Standards Throughout our 36-year history, Huntington Learning Center has stayed in tune with the needs of our students.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:23:43 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-curriculum-now-fully-aligned-with-common-core-state-standards https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-curriculum-now-fully-aligned-with-common-core-state-standards Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Curriculum Now Fully Aligned with Common Core State Standards 

Throughout our 36-year history, Huntington Learning Center has stayed in tune with the needs of our students. As American education has evolved and changed—from standards-based education reform evolving throughout the 1980s and 1990s to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 making waves in the 2000s—Huntington has adjusted its curriculum as appropriate in order to ensure our students receive the tutoring support they need to be successful students.

Today, Huntington remains at the forefront when it comes to supplemental education.  Three years ago, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative was introduced, and those standards have since been adopted and implemented by schools and school districts in most states.  We too have aligned with the CCSS in all of our academic, SAT/ACT and other preparatory programs. And in December 2013, our curriculum implementation was complete.

What does this mean for the families we serve? It means that Huntington stands ready to help students meet the challenges of these new, more rigorous educational standards. As schools’ curricula and assessment testing evolve, students will need help that extends beyond the type of support they may have needed previously. Huntington is prepared and excited to embrace those challenges together.

Here are several ways Huntington has adjusted its curriculum and operations to prepare for tutoring and test prep in the Common Core era: 

  • Updated math curriculum and skill matrices that adhere to CCSS mathematics standards.
  • Updated reading/writing curriculum that adheres to CCSS English-language arts standards.
  • Trained Huntington teachers who understand how the Common Core State Standards impact teachers, schools and teaching strategies and are prepared to teach to the more rigorous standards.
  • A refined focus on college and career readiness throughout Huntington’s programs.
  • A greater emphasis throughout Huntington’s programs on key CCSS objectives, including better problem solving, enhanced critical thinking, etc.

As always, Huntington is dedicated to delivering the best possible education to our students —and today, that means helping students navigate the significant changes taking place at their schools and in their classrooms. For questions about Huntington’s CCSS-aligned curriculum, visit Huntingtonhelps.com.

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Today's Distractions Impeding Your Child's Academic Success Technology can open up doors to interactive learning, but use of technology for personal reasons during classes or while studying can break academic focus.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:18:25 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/todays-distractions-impeding-your-childs-academic-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/todays-distractions-impeding-your-childs-academic-success Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Today's Distractions Impeding Your Child's Academic Success

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Goal-setting in a Standards-Based Educational Era Parents, you already know the importance of teaching your child to set goals and work toward them throughout his or her education.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:55:58 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/goalsetting-in-a-standardsbased-educational-era https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/goalsetting-in-a-standardsbased-educational-era Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Goal-setting in a Standards-Based Educational Era

Parents, you already know the importance of teaching your child to set goals and work toward them throughout his or her education. However, with the recent implementation of the Common Core State Standards, which not all states are using, the time is right to teach your child to set goals that are not only achievable and measurable, but also tied to school standards. Here are a few tips for developing goals with your student:

For older students, use a class syllabus to set specific class goals. Encourage high school students to set goals by class, using a class syllabus or other guide to identify the things toward which he or she should work. For example, a student might look ahead to all test and project dates in his or her history class and set a goal to develop a detailed study calendar/plan and avoid procrastinating.

Keep big picture goals in mind. No matter how old your student is, it can be helpful for him or her to “keep an eye on the prize.” For a high school student, earning scholarship money or getting into a particular competitive college might serve as a good long-term goal. For a younger student who loves reading and writing, a goal might be to enter a writing contest or write a story or book.

Target weaknesses. Using past report cards and/or teacher feedback, encourage your child to focus his or her efforts on improving areas where he or she is struggling or not consistently meeting expectations. Be sure to look at your state’s most up-to-date academic standards and the report card/progress report rubric that details expected progress toward skill mastery. Your child’s teacher can help you lay out a plan to help your child improve in specific areas.

Build upon strengths. While it is important to take note of areas of weakness, it is also important to help students recognize their strengths. Perhaps your child is weaker in math but enjoys and excels at reading. Be sure to incorporate this strength into his or her academic goals. You can build your child’s self-esteem by providing him or her opportunities to experience success.

Goal-setting can be a highly effective process, and while setting less specific goals—such as improving in a subject or having a better attitude about school—is worthwhile, there is great value in identifying specific, tangible academic goals for your child to work on. Spend time at report card time (or more often) going through this exercise and revisit goals frequently throughout the school year.

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Instilling a Drive to Learn into Your Student In the era of the Common Core State Standards, one thing is certain about the way students will be taught moving forward: teachers will expect more.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:29:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/instilling-a-drive-to-learn-into-your-student https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/instilling-a-drive-to-learn-into-your-student Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Instilling a Drive to Learn into Your Student

In the era of the Common Core State Standards, one thing is certain about the way students will be taught moving forward: teachers will expect more. Skills such as critical thinking and problem solving are integrated into every aspect of Common Core, and teachers are working to facilitate students’ deeper comprehension of concepts and ideas in both English and mathematics. Ultimately, the new standards will help students be prepared to succeed at college and in their careers.

Without a doubt, students and parents will find the new standards more rigorous than in the past. These heightened expectations of students will definitely pose challenges; however, you can greatly help your child by igniting his or her inner learner. Here are several tips to help fuel your child’s motivation and drive to learn:

Teach your child to embrace challenges. Talk with your child about something that he or she wants to achieve—whether that’s raising a grade or learning something new. Set goals together and help your child define the steps to achieve those goals. And no matter what types of challenges your child faces, teach him or her about the importance of perseverance. A big goal may take a lot of work and he or she may fail sometimes, but sincere effort and a good attitude generally yield positive results.

Encourage your child to ask questions. The Common Core State Standards go deeper in all areas and expect students to understand the “why” and “how” of problems and concepts and not just the “what.” So, as you work through homework, urge your child to take ownership of his or her learning. Children should be capable of explaining how they arrive at answers to questions and discussing why they feel the way they do about certain topics. Encourage your child to think through homework and speak up when he or she has an idea, opinion or question.

Nurture your child’s interests. Nothing intrinsically motivates a child more than discovering a passion. Give your child opportunities to try new things and explore his or her interests. Have your child build upon his or her strengths and help him or her find ways to do so outside of the classroom.

Emphasize the importance of learning, not grades. While you might love to see your student achieving high grades on every test and report card, your child should believe that his or her hard work, effort and persistence are more important than his or her achievements. Teach your child to value the step-by-step method of tackling homework and the overall learning process. Ideally, grades will reflect effort, but they should not be your only measurement of your child’s school success.

The Common Core definitely changes the way teachers approach teaching and should also change the way you view your child’s education. Your child will need to master skills that fall outside of content acquisition—skills such as problem solving, real-world application of classroom knowledge and of course, critical thinking. Teaching your child to take initiative and embrace learning will benefit him or her in the short and long run.

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How to Create Your Own Lesson Plans to Improve Study Skills Find out how to create a lesson plan with your child to help improve his or her study skills. Tips for scheduling and organization are also included.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:06:55 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-create-your-own-lesson-plans-to-improve-study-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-create-your-own-lesson-plans-to-improve-study-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Create Your Own Lesson Plans to Improve Study Skills

It's no secret that a child's study skills have a significant impact on school success. School can be incredibly difficult if a student is disorganized, can't effectively manage study time, and/or lacks the skills necessary to systematically process new information. If you are concerned about your child's study skills there are simple things you can do at home. Consider creating study skills lesson plans geared toward your child's individual needs that will improve academic performance and increase confidence. 

Some of our favorite study skills lesson plans include:

  • Master scheduler A consistent study schedule is a great way to ensure that all academic skills and knowledge are mastered in a timely fashion. Working with your child to develop a weekly study schedule will help you both discover consistent times to devote to studying. Using a large calendar, start by having your child insert all commitments including school, athletic practices and competitions, rehearsals, club meetings, after school activities, and part-time employment. Talk with your child about the schedule and determine which days have the best study blocks available. Write these study blocks directly on the calendar and ensure there is no overlap with other commitments. Check in with your child on a regular basis to see if the schedule works and is providing plenty of time to study.
  • Let's get organized Take inventory of your child's current organization system and assess ways it can be improved. Provide ideas and support to boost organization and ensure it has a positive effect on your child's study skills. Consider investing in school supplies that are color coded to help with organization. Assign one color to each subject area and provide your child with a binder, notebook, and folder that all match. This is a simple way to gather materials needed for each specific class.

Your child's at-home study area may also benefit from some organizational help. Make sure your child has a dedicated space to study and it is free of clutter and unnecessary items. Stock this area with pens, pencils, plenty of paper, and ample light. Make sure this study area also has a copy of your child's study schedule that is easily viewable. Remove distractions and make sure other family members are aware of the study area and the need for quiet. 

  • What's missing? Taking notes is an important research skill that many students struggle with. High performing students often take notes when listening to lectures, reading a textbook, or reviewing for an exam. You can help your child boost note taking skills by creating opportunities to practice the "what's missing" challenge. Using a piece of academic text create an outline that is missing key components of the reading. Challenge your child to use your      outline and insert the missing information into your draft. This forces your child to think critically about the reading and determine which information is missing. This will also have long term effects on your child's note-taking skills and can have a positive impact on future studies. 

The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are also available if your child needs help in improving study skills. An initial assessment will allow your child's tutor to create a customized learning plan that will boost both your child's skills and confidence. Over time, your child will experience improved study skills that will have a positive impact on all areas of academic study. Our study skills program focuses on time management, organization, and research skills at appropriate development levels based on a student's ability and readiness. 

 

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Intro to Common Core Standards for ELA The Common Core State Standards have revolutionized K-12 education across the United States. Find out all you need to know about the new ELA standards.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:30:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/intro-to-common-core-standards-for-ela https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/intro-to-common-core-standards-for-ela Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Introduction to Common Core Standards for ELA

The Common Core State Standards have revolutionized K-12 education across the United States. This set of national standards aligns learning and teaching with the skills and knowledge necessary for college and career readiness. Standards for both Mathematics and English/Language Arts (ELA) are at work every day in classrooms from coast to coast. 

The Common Core Standards for ELA carefully detail what a literate person in the twenty-first century should be able to know, understand, and do. Students performing at mastery on the Standards read critically, express themselves in writing, enjoy complex vocabulary, and are able to interpret and understand a variety of literary genres. They also are able to determine importance in a world filled with media, both print and digital, and engage thoughtfully with quality informational and literary texts. Students who have mastered the Common Core State Standards possess a strong foundation for writing, reading, listening and speaking, and have the skills necessary to succeed both in college and future careers.

The Common Core Standards for ELA are divided into standards addressing reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Each content strand is divided into grade specific learning targets that translate the broad goals of the Common Core State Standards into age and ability appropriate terms and targets. 

  • Reading From grades K-12 the Common Core Standards for ELA have established a careful progression of increasingly demanding skills and knowledge necessary to meet the rigor of college and career level reading. This progression also includes reading comprehension skills that challenge students, over time, to understand and apply more of what they've read. Students are engaged in a wide variety of literary and informational texts that will require them to gain insights, explore possibilities, broaden their perspectives, and build knowledge. 
  • Writing The writing standards include a variety of skills and applications required to write across multiple genres. Students are expected to demonstrate an increasing proficiency in their language use, the organization and development of ideas, a unique voice, and the ability to access relevant sources and content. Students will develop the ability to write logical arguments centered on substantive claims, relevant evidence, and sound reasoning. 
  • Speaking and Listening The speaking and listening standards require students to participate in regular, structured opportunities to talk in pairs and small groups. These discussions are designed to include the expectation that students contribute accurate and relevant information to the conversations and respond appropriately to what others have said. 
  • Language The language portion of the Common Core State Standards ELA requires students to increase their vocabularies through reading, direct instruction, and conversations. Students will learn ways to determine word meanings, understand the derivations and nuances of words, and increase their overall vocabularies of words and phrases. This expanding vocabulary will boost a student's reading ability and provide depth and meaning to written work. 

 

The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers have worked hard to align our tutoring philosophy and expectations with the rigor of the Common Core State Standards. Students enrolled in academic skills tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers benefit from personalized tutoring plans designed to meet their individual needs that are also aligned with the Common Core State Standards. Ongoing assessment allows our tutors to monitor your child's progress and adapt the original tutoring plan to meet current needs. Not only will your child be making the individual gains necessary for success in school, but the learning will be carefully aligned with these national academic standards.

Have you noticed a difference in the reading and writing expectations for your child since the adoption of the Common Core Standards ELA? What else would you like to know about the implementation of these standards? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter using the buttons at the top of the page.

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SAT Prep Tips for Middle Schoolers Find out why it is important to begin SAT preparation for students who are still in middle school. Don't wait until it's too late.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:52:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tips-for-middle-schoolers- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tips-for-middle-schoolers- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s Never too Early: SAT Prep for Middle Schoolers

Many parents assume they can wait until their children are in high school to begin preparing for the SAT exam. However, your child's middle school years are formative and have an incredible influence on future academic success.  Don't let these years pass by without committing to some SAT prep. Early preparation shouldn't be overwhelming, pressure packed, or stressful. Instead, preparing for the SAT in middle school is more about building solid academic skills, expanding your child's knowledge on a variety of subjects, and early intervention when problems present themselves.

SAT prep for middle schoolers can be a simple process. Make sure you:

  • Read, read, read Encourage your child to read a wide variety of texts and challenge your child to explore new subjects. Success on the SAT depends largely on whether your child has a working understanding and prior knowledge of a variety of subjects. There is no better way to build this understanding than through reading. To encourage your middle schooler to read more you can establish a family book club, take frequent trips to the public library, subscribe to magazines that cover a wide range of topics, and discuss the books your child is currently reading.
  • Focus on vocabulary Focusing on vocabulary words is an excellent way to integrate SAT prep for middle schoolers into your child's academic preparation. Sentence completion items award about 200 of the 800 critical reading points available. Vocabulary learning shouldn't be rote or boring though! There are many great ways to build vocabulary knowledge slowly over time to ensure understanding and retention. If your middle schooler has a smart phone or a tablet consider downloading a vocabulary app that teaches a new word each day. Your child can interact with the app to understand the word's definition, how it is used in context, and related words. Many "tear off" desktop calendars also offer a word-of-the-day. You can challenge your middle school student to read and understand the new word each morning and then find as many ways as they can to use it during the day. Don't doubt the impact reading and talking can have on your child's vocabulary understanding. Learning about new concepts and having engaging conversations with others is one of the best ways to increase vocabulary. 
  • Build foundational skills One of the most important things you can do to prepare your middle schooler for the SAT is to build solid foundational skills. The skills and knowledge mastered in middle school will lay the groundwork for both confidence and success once in high school. For example, middle school math teaches many different algebraic concepts such as quadratic and linear equations, logarithms, and polynomials. Understanding these concepts helps boost confidence and the likelihood of success in high school math classes such as algebra trigonometry, and calculus. A solid math foundation encourages both continued academic growth and proper preparation for the SAT exam. 
  • Address concerns early If you notice that your child is struggling in any academic area don't wait to address your concerns. Early intervention will increase your child's academic understanding and confidence. Huntington Learning Centers are an excellent resource if you are concerned about your child's academic performance. Our professional tutors will work with you to determine the root cause of your child's struggles and will then create a personalized learning plan to address these concerns. The tutor will also ensure that the work done during the tutoring sessions aligns with your child's classroom work and will communicate, as needed, with your child's teachers.

 

Huntington Learning Centers offer a variety of subject area, academic skill, and test prep tutoring services. Our professional tutors are specially trained to assess a student's individual needs and design a tutoring program that maximizes current understanding while mastering new skills. Ongoing assessment allows our tutors to make adjustments to these tutoring programs to boost a middle school student's confidence, preparation for future learning, and the skills needed to be successful on the SAT exam. 

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Why Tutoring Can be the Key to ACT Success How specialized tutoring can help prepare students for success when planning to take the ACT college readiness assessment.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:28:51 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-tutoring-can-be-the-key-to-act-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-tutoring-can-be-the-key-to-act-success Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When School Isn’t Enough: Why Tutoring Can be the Key to ACT Success

We've encountered many parents over the years who have questions about the benefits of the ACT tutoring programs at Huntington Learning Centers. These parents are searching for answers about the effectiveness and impact of exam prep programs. Often, their questions are very similar and indicate that many parents have the same concerns when their children are preparing to take the ACT.

We've gathered some of the most frequently asked questions about ACT tutoring and hope the answers help you determine whether such a program is right for your child. 

Why choose ACT tutoring? The ACT is a high stakes test that assesses your child's ability as a snapshot
in time. Years of hard work preparing for college admissions can be negatively affected by a weak ACT score. Investing in ACT tutoring provides your child with the extra practice, knowledge, and confidence necessary for success on the exam. The content and format of the ACT exam may feel overwhelming if you are working to prepare your child on your own. How do you know exactly what to study? How much emphasis should you place on each content area? What is the best way to prepare for the specific format of the exam? The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are specifically trained to help students prepare for the exam. Through a careful combination of assessment, instruction, and practice your child will gain the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare for the exam. 

What are the benefits of tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers? The main goal of the ACT tutoring programs at Huntington Learning Centers is to prepare students for the rigors of the ACT exam focusing on academic knowledge, test taking skills, and time management skills. Your child will learn from the best and experience a comprehensive and prescriptive tutoring program based on ongoing assessment data. Not only will your child gain the skills and knowledge necessary for success on the ACT exam but you'll likely notice an increase in confidence as well. Your child will be able to confidently look forward to the exam.

What are the differences in tutoring programs? We offer three different tutoring programs and are confident one of these will meet your child's specific needs. The Premier Program is recommended for students that have six to eight weeks to devote to ACT tutoring and is customized to meet your child's individual needs. Ongoing progress monitoring and interim conferencing provide you the assurance that your child is benefiting from the tutoring program. The 28-Hour Program is designed as a five to seven week program that prepares students in all content areas in a limited amount of time. The 10-Hour Program is designed for students with limited time that want targeted practice in a single content area. If you'd like more information about which of these programs is a best fit for your child contact a professional with Huntington Learning Centers.  

How will tutoring complement my child's high school education? Your child is learning a lot in high school and the mastered skills and acquired knowledge will be incredibly beneficial on the ACT exam. Using careful assessments, we determine what your child already knows and what content areas remain a struggle. We'll work to close the gaps and strengthen your child's academic foundation. The tutoring sessions also expose students to the exam's format and teach successful test taking tips. Many of these lessons are also applicable to other exams your child will take during both high school and college. The benefits will continue to pay off over time. 

Huntington Learning Centers are proud to serve local communities by offering high quality tutoring for students preparing for the ACT exam. Will your child be taking the ACT exam this school year? What other questions do you still have about the benefits of ACT tutoring? Let us know on one of our social media pages or share this information with others who may benefit by clicking on one of the social media buttons above.

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Prepare Students for NYS Common Core Standards Find out how the Common Core Standards are affecting the curricula of New York students and how they can best prepare for these new standards.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:44:01 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-students-for-nys-common-core-standards- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-students-for-nys-common-core-standards- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How NYS Common Core Standards Affect Students

If you're a parent of a New York school student you've likely heard of the Common Core State Standards. Implementation of these national standards is underway from coast to coast and schools, teachers, and students quickly have to adapt to the more rigorous academic expectations. The NYS Common Core Standards are already present in your child's school and now is a great time for you to learn more about the standards and how they will affect your child's school career.

What are the NYS Common Core Standards? The New York Common Core Standards are part of a
national effort to refocus K-12 education and provide a clear and consistent understanding of what students are expected to learn and master. The standards were designed to be both robust and relevant to practical, real-life applications. They reflect the skills and knowledge that are necessary for success in college and future careers and systematically build on previous learning. The consistency of the standards across the country and throughout New York State helps ensure that every student, regardless of school, is mastering the same material and being held to the same rigorous standards.

How do the NYS Common Core Standards change a child's schooling? The NYS Common Core Standards are more rigorous than previous versions of state standards and require deeper understanding. Teachers are busy implementing assessment tools and innovative curriculums aligned with the standards and are working to ensure a consistent learning environment. The education that is now taking place in New York schools expects more from students and challenges them to work harder to master grade level and subject area standards. 

How can tutoring impact a child's mastery of the NYS Common Core Standards? There's no denying that the NYS Common Core Standards have had an impact on the academic expectations of New York students. The increase in rigor can present a challenge to students and your child may be experiencing frustration with the new academic expectations. This is where Huntington Learning Centers can help. Investing in academic tutoring with one of our professional tutors can help your child master the skills and knowledge required  by the Common Core State Standards.

Our tutoring programs are:

  • Personalized Because no two students are alike all of our tutoring programs are tailored to meet students' individual needs. Careful assessment allows our tutors to plan comprehensive tutoring programs that maximize your child's strengths while focusing on areas of weakness. As your child learns and grows the expectations will shift and new material will be presented. Each session will be tailored to meet your child's needs and ongoing academic progress.
  • Data driven Beginning with an initial assessment, your child's tutoring program is created based on clear and concise data. Ongoing progress monitoring allows your Huntington Learning Center tutor to know exactly what your child needs and the skills that will require additional practice. As your child demonstrates mastery the tutoring will shift toward mastering new goals. 
  • Linked to school In order for a tutoring program to be successful it must be linked to school expectations. Our tutors are adept at aligning the content of a tutoring program with school, state, and national standards. The shift to the Common Core Standards has provided even greater consistency between our tutors and your child's school. The clear and concise standards allow everyone involved in your child's learning to be working toward the same goals. 

If you feel this information would benefit others please click on one of the social media buttons above to share with interested parents.

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Reading Programs for Struggling Readers Tue, 25 Feb 2014 11:39:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Develop-Reading-Comprehension-Skills-Over-The-Summer-With-These-Tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Develop-Reading-Comprehension-Skills-Over-The-Summer-With-These-Tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Struggling Readers Can Suffer In all Academic Subjects but Reading Programs Can Help

Reading isn't just about opening a book and being able to read the Middle School Student Struggling with Readingstory. It is a complex process that requires students to interpret new concepts, make connections between previously read texts, evaluate their own understanding, make inferences and predictions, and draw conclusions based on previous knowledge. When a child is struggling with reading skills it affects much more than the ability to read and comprehend a book. Reading permeates every facet of life, impacts all subject areas, and can have a major effect on a student's academic confidence.

Multiple academic disciplines are affected when a student is struggling in reading. Areas of concern may include:

  • Math Students are expected to read and interpret mathematical word problems, follow complex directions, and apply critical thinking skills to mathematical scenarios. Before beginning any mathematical calculation a struggling reader will likely face difficulty comprehending the problem and determining where to begin. 
  • Science Science courses, such as chemistry, biology, physics, and earth science, require students to read and understand textbooks, follow laboratory directions, and interpret scientific reports. Struggling readers face additional difficulties with complex vocabulary and academic terms that impact overall understanding. 
  • History and social studies Solid reading skills are essential for success in social studies and history courses. Students must be able to read and understand textbooks, academic articles, biographies, and primary documents. Many of these texts include specialized vocabulary, require students to identify historical connections, and are best understood within the context of previous reading and learning. 
  • Foreign languages Learning a foreign language requires a student to understand and be able to apply phonological (blending sounds together and segmenting sounds from words) and orthographic (the sound-symbol connection) processes. Struggling readers may face difficulties with these basic processes which impact both their reading ability and the comprehension required to learn a foreign language. 
  • Career preparation Your child's success in school will have a direct impact on career preparation and the ability to succeed in future work. A struggling reader is less likely to successfully access professional or technical texts, understand and process complex directions, and apply new learning. Poor reading skills can hamper a student and will limit future educational and vocational options. 

 

The reading programs for struggling readers at Huntington Learning Centers are designed with the individual child in mind. Our professional tutors begin with an academic evaluation that covers all areas of reading to determine a student's weak skills and areas for potential growth. The results of this evaluation are then used to develop a personalized reading program that builds on a student's strengths to address areas of need. Since no two students are alike, no two reading programs are alike either. You can trust that your child's individual needs are being met and our tutors are committed to your child's unique set of strengths and challenges. 

Huntington Learning Center tutors are trained to address a variety of reading skills with their students based on readiness and developmental ability. Elementary reading skills range from basic letter and sound recognition to reading comprehension concepts such as drawing conclusions, following directions, and identifying main idea and details. Middle school reading skills include increasing a student's reading rate, making inferences, and integrating critical thinking skills. Struggling high school students often receive instruction in applying reading skills to other subject areas, making connections between genres and individual texts, and discovering the plot, theme, and conflict of a narrative piece of work. Regardless of a child's age or ability, Huntington Learning Centers can help. 

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Reading Programs for Struggling Readers Tue, 25 Feb 2014 11:39:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Develop-Reading-Comprehension-Skills-Over-The-Summer-With-These-Tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/Develop-Reading-Comprehension-Skills-Over-The-Summer-With-These-Tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Struggling Readers Can Suffer In all Academic Subjects but Reading Programs Can Help

Reading isn't just about opening a book and being able to read the Middle School Student Struggling with Readingstory. It is a complex process that requires students to interpret new concepts, make connections between previously read texts, evaluate their own understanding, make inferences and predictions, and draw conclusions based on previous knowledge. When a child is struggling with reading skills it affects much more than the ability to read and comprehend a book. Reading permeates every facet of life, impacts all subject areas, and can have a major effect on a student's academic confidence.

Multiple academic disciplines are affected when a student is struggling in reading. Areas of concern may include:

  • Math Students are expected to read and interpret mathematical word problems, follow complex directions, and apply critical thinking skills to mathematical scenarios. Before beginning any mathematical calculation a struggling reader will likely face difficulty comprehending the problem and determining where to begin. 
  • Science Science courses, such as chemistry, biology, physics, and earth science, require students to read and understand textbooks, follow laboratory directions, and interpret scientific reports. Struggling readers face additional difficulties with complex vocabulary and academic terms that impact overall understanding. 
  • History and social studies Solid reading skills are essential for success in social studies and history courses. Students must be able to read and understand textbooks, academic articles, biographies, and primary documents. Many of these texts include specialized vocabulary, require students to identify historical connections, and are best understood within the context of previous reading and learning. 
  • Foreign languages Learning a foreign language requires a student to understand and be able to apply phonological (blending sounds together and segmenting sounds from words) and orthographic (the sound-symbol connection) processes. Struggling readers may face difficulties with these basic processes which impact both their reading ability and the comprehension required to learn a foreign language. 
  • Career preparation Your child's success in school will have a direct impact on career preparation and the ability to succeed in future work. A struggling reader is less likely to successfully access professional or technical texts, understand and process complex directions, and apply new learning. Poor reading skills can hamper a student and will limit future educational and vocational options. 

 

The reading programs for struggling readers at Huntington Learning Centers are designed with the individual child in mind. Our professional tutors begin with an academic evaluation that covers all areas of reading to determine a student's weak skills and areas for potential growth. The results of this evaluation are then used to develop a personalized reading program that builds on a student's strengths to address areas of need. Since no two students are alike, no two reading programs are alike either. You can trust that your child's individual needs are being met and our tutors are committed to your child's unique set of strengths and challenges. 

Huntington Learning Center tutors are trained to address a variety of reading skills with their students based on readiness and developmental ability. Elementary reading skills range from basic letter and sound recognition to reading comprehension concepts such as drawing conclusions, following directions, and identifying main idea and details. Middle school reading skills include increasing a student's reading rate, making inferences, and integrating critical thinking skills. Struggling high school students often receive instruction in applying reading skills to other subject areas, making connections between genres and individual texts, and discovering the plot, theme, and conflict of a narrative piece of work. Regardless of a child's age or ability, Huntington Learning Centers can help. 

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How Important Listening Skills Really Are For Academic Success Learn four great ways to improve a student's listening skills and why these skills are essential for achieving excellence in school.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:04:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-important-listening-skills-really-are-for-academic-success- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-important-listening-skills-really-are-for-academic-success- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Important are Listening Skills for Academic Success?

Sometimes it feels like your child just isn't listening, doesn't it? Failure to complete tasks, inability to follow directions, and the sense that your child just isn't paying attention can be frustrating. Your child's attention may be affected by a variety of factors but failure to improve the ability to listen can have a significant impact on academic learning. Research suggests that children need adequate listening skills to develop vocabulary, oral language, and comprehension abilities. As a parent there are simple things you can do to boost your child's listening skills and have a positive impact on cognitive development as well.

We've compiled a list of our favorite ways to improve a child's listening skills:

  1. Practice following oral directions Depending on your child's age and listening ability, start with either one or two step directions. Instruct your child to "listen carefully" and then proceed with a simple set of directions such as, "Hop on your left foot" or "Walk up the stairs then pick up the basket at the top." As your child becomes more successful following oral directions increase the number of steps. Eventually you will be able to give complex multi-step directions such as, "Take three steps, turn around, and then clap your hands five times."
  2. Use familiar rhymes or stories Use your child's favorite rhymes and stories to boost the ability to listen. You can substitute an incorrect word and challenge your child to identify the mistake."Hickory dickory dock, the mouse ran up the sock." You can also pretend to forget a word as part of the rhyme or familiar story and your child will have to supply what's missing.
  3. Practice blending and segmenting Depending on your child's listening and literacy skills you can practice blending and segmenting words of various lengths. Begin by using a word with three sounds and build up to words with additional sounds. Have your child listen to the separate sounds, "C-A-P", then answer with the blended word, "CAP". Work up to more difficult words that involve complex sounds. You can reverse the directions by providing your child the word and then requesting the word be segmented into individual sounds.
  4. Turn homework into listening practice You can use your child's homework assignments as additional listening practice with a few simple modifications. Word problems on your child's math homework are an excellent opportunity for listening practice. Begin by reading the problem out loud to your child several times then presenting the challenge of trying to solve it without reading it. If your child needs the problem re-read, ask which specific information is necessary. This will require your child to carefully consider all components of the problem and serves as a definite listening challenge.

Our professional tutors are trained in improving a child's listening skills as part of our personalized tutoring programs. Regardless of your child's age, or the focus of the tutoring, your child will gain valuable skills that will improve the ability to listen effectively and follow directions. Much of the instruction provided in our tutoring sessions is delivered orally and your child must be able to interpret spoken directions to complete a task or provide an answer. If your child struggles with listening, the sessions will be an excellent opportunity to practice these skills. As listening improves the tasks or directions will become more challenging based on individual needs.

How are your child's listening skills? Which of the above activities do you think would have the most impact on your child's listening? Please click one of the buttons at the top of the page to share this information with other parents who may find it valuable and share your own experiences. 

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Upcoming ACT Test Dates Find out when the next ACT test date will be and get tips on how to best prepare for the exam.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:22:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/upcoming-act-test-dates https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/upcoming-act-test-dates Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Prepare for Upcoming ACT Test Dates

High school students have the
opportunity register for one of the six ACT test dates each school year. The ACT exam is designed as a standardized achievement test to assess the college readiness of American high school students. You can elect to send your ACT scores to colleges and universities that you are interested in attending as part of your application portfolio. Your ACT score is an important indicator of your college potential and the degree to which you are prepared for advanced studies.

Careful preparation for the ACT is crucial for maximizing your success. Huntington Learning Center is proud to offer a variety of programs designed to prepare students for the ACT exam. Our professional tutors are skilled at determining each student's level of readiness and crafting personalized preparation programs through either individual or group tutoring. These tutoring sessions will help you understand both the format and content of the ACT exam while boosting your confidence and readiness.

There are several ACT test dates remaining for the 2013-2014 school year; December 14, February 3, and April 12. As you prepare for the exam there are specific things you should do in the months, weeks, and days leading up to the ACT exam.


In the months before the ACT exam:

  • Create a study schedule Waiting until the last minute to cram for the ACT likely won't boost either your score or your confidence. The most effective way to prepare is to plan and maintain a consistent study schedule. This allows you time to map out all of your studying and ensure every area of the exam is covered during your preparation. Creating a consistent weekly schedule is a great way to ensure the studying gets done. Make sure you have extra study sessions on the schedule each week in case unforeseen circumstances arise.
  • Enroll in ACT tutoring If the thought of preparing for the ACT exam seems overwhelming you may want to enroll in an exam prep program at Huntington Learning Center. We offer three different programs designed to fit any need. The Premier program is ideal for students with 6 to 8 weeks to commit and will fully prepare you for the ACT exam. You can begin tutoring with the 28-Hour program immediately and will benefit from the 5 to 7 weeks of preparation. The 10-Hour program is perfect for students with limited time who want to prepare in a single exam content area. 

In the weeks before the ACT exam:

  • Take a practice test The ACT website offers several practice tests for your use. Scheduling time for a simulated test experience is a great way to prepare for exam day. You should mirror exact testing conditions as closely as possible paying special attention to what tools you can use and time limits for each section. Score the practice exam when you are finished to learn which areas still require additional preparation.
  • Focus on your weakest areas Once you've completed the practice test you can use the results to modify your preparation schedule. If you feel confident in an area shift your focus to others that may be weaker. Don't waste the days leading up to the exam on subject areas that you are already fully prepared for.

In the days before the ACT exam:

  • Confirm your test time and location It's important to know exactly where your test center is and what time the exam begins. Verify this information with your exam confirmation, the ACT website, and a map or other driving directions. If possible, take a test drive to find your exam center and know exactly how long it will take to arrive.
  • Understand test center rules All of the ACT test dates utilize the same testing guidelines and regulations. Understand what you can bring into the testing center, what items are approved for use on the exam, and the time limits for each section. Failing to follow these guidelines can result in a dismissal from the exam center or a nullification of your score.

Are you and your friends preparing for the upcoming ACT test dates? Share this important information with others that are preparing for the ACT exam.

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Standardized Test Practice Tips Students can prepare for standardized tests with the right practice. Learn about four ways to effectively practice for tests.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:58:08 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-test-practice-tips- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-test-practice-tips- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Practice Makes Perfect When it Comes to Standardized Tests

With the implementation of the Common Core Standards in nearly every state, standardized testing is becoming more prevalent throughout all grade levels. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of the standards and perform accordingly based on grade level expectations. Standardized test practice is an essential component of preparing for these exams because it boosts confidence and helps students know exactly what to expect on test day.

There are a variety of ways to implement standardized test practice. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers implement a range of methods to prepare their students. Our favorite test prep tips include:

Practice both content and format

Simply understanding the assessed content isn't enough. If a student has never encountered authentic practice the format may present a significant roadblock. Students should understand and be familiar with how the test is administered, the best ways to answer different exam items, and the types of questions most likely to be on the exam. This knowledge allows your child to focus on the content being assessed instead of spending time trying to interpret confusing test directions and wrestling with the format. 


Require an explanation 

Asking your child to explain something is great practice for standardized tests and for learning in general. Knowing how to complete a question or arrive at an answer is just the first step.  A student must also be able to explain the answer to display full mastery on many standardized tests. Part of the standardized test preparation we offer at Huntington Learning Centers teaches students how to explain their work. Upon completing a math problem or arriving at a conclusion on a reading comprehension item students are often asked to explain the answer. We work alongside students to help them construct an explanation that shows how they arrived at an answer. This support is personalized and the amount of assistance provided is based on individual student needs.

Put old tests to good use

Many organizations that administer standardized tests publish previous forms for student use and practice. The old forms of a standardized test can be used in a variety of ways. Our professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers use previous forms for initial assessment, targeted practice, and ongoing progress monitoring. They are also used to reinforce the different types of exam questions and to present test taking tips. When students have the opportunity to participate in a practice test under actual testing conditions they will gain confidence and an understanding of how the exam is administered.

Monitor ongoing student progress

Careful standardized test preparation should carefully monitor your student's progress. An initial assessment that identifies a student's strengths and areas of need is an ideal way to begin practicing. These assessment results are invaluable in determining what areas to focus on and a child's individual needs. The progress monitoring should be ongoing to understand how the learning needs may have changed. Our tutors use assessment results to create customized tutoring plans that meet the individual needs of every student. No two children are alike, no two students learn in the exact same way, and each of our students receives instruction based on assessment data and individual strengths and weaknesses. You can trust that your child will receive personalized instruction that mirrors the data from ongoing progress monitoring assessments.

Click on one of the social media links above to share this with other parents that may benefit from the information.

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What PSAT Scores Can Tell You in Preparing for the SAT Analyzing PSAT scores can effectively help fine tune a student's preparation for the SAT. Find out how you can use PSAT scores to improve SAT scores.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:25:27 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-psat-scores-can-tell-you-in-preparing-for-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-psat-scores-can-tell-you-in-preparing-for-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What PSAT Scores Can Tell You in Preparing for the SAT

College is just around the corner and your exam preparation is vital to ensure your best SAT and PSAT scores. Your scores will help boost your college admission portfolio and indicate your readiness for college success. Performing well on the PSAT is also an indicator of success on the SAT. Research by the College Board, the organization that administers both the SAT and PSAT, indicates the importance of a student's PSAT scores.

Importance of the PSAT

Many view the PSAT as simply a preparation for the SAT, but it is also quite important on its own. High school students typically sit for the PSAT exam one year before taking the SAT. PSAT scores are available shortly after the test is completed allowing you the time to examine the score reports and determine which parts of the SAT will require the most preparation. Although the PSAT isn't normally used by colleges to determine admission, the scores are often utilized in student recruitment. Colleges contact prospective students who scored well on the PSAT and encourage them to consider their programs for future studies. The PSAT is also used as a determinant for honors awarded by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation.

Preparing for the PSAT

Your preparation for the PSAT exam should be comprehensive and allow plenty of time for practice and review. As you are beginning your preparation consider:

  • Taking practice tests The College Board provides practice tests online that students can take as part of their preparation. We suggest taking one before you begin studying to assess your readiness and which areas of the exam are the most difficult for you. You can take additional practice tests throughout your preparation to monitor your progress and determine areas of continued need.
  • Planning your preparation Cramming rarely works and inconsistent preparation may not help you be fully ready for exam day. Instead, take the time to schedule your work sessions and plan your studying. Make a master schedule of your study plans leading up to exam day and then find blocks of time each week to devote to your preparation. Work hard to stick to this schedule to ensure you are ready.
  • Studying the exam's format, directions, and types of questions Preparing for the content of the exam is not enough. You also need to familiarize yourself with the PSAT's directions, types of questions, and the format of the exam. Read through all test information to also learn the exam day schedule and determine what items are restricted in the testing center.
  • Working with the experts Sometimes your best preparation can benefit from the expertise of a professional tutor. Huntington Learning Center is proud to offer comprehensive and personalized tutoring for the PSAT exam. Through careful assessment we can help you determine your areas of strength and need. Your tutoring plan will be carefully crafted to meet your individual needs and ensure you are ready for exam day.

Preparing for the SAT

One of the most important parts of the PSAT is the information you'll learn to aid your preparation for the SAT exam. Once you receive your PSAT results take the time to examine the data and determine the areas that will require the most preparation in advance of the SAT. Use this information to create a study schedule that allows you plenty of time to measure your progress and carefully prepare. If you need help interpreting your PSAT results and using this information to prepare for the SAT the professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers can help. We offer a variety of exam prep programs that vary in length and format and can help you determine which would work best for you.

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Understanding the Common Core Standards for Math Put common core standards to work by learning about the eight standards for mathematical practice that students are expected to understand.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:21:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/understanding-the-common-core-standards-for-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/understanding-the-common-core-standards-for-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Putting the Common Core State Standards to Work

The Common Core State Standards for math established a singular set of standards for kindergarten to 12th grade mathematical education in the United States. Teachers and other educational professionals across the country are working diligently to integrate these standards into their assessments, curriculum, and instruction. The ultimate goal of the standards is to ensure that when students graduate from high school they are prepared to begin a two or four year college program or enter the workforce with sound mathematical skills.


The staffs at Huntington Learning Centers across the United States have also been hard at work ensuring that the Common Core State Standards for math are integrated into students' personalized tutoring plans. We understand the importance of linking mathematical tutoring to what is occurring in a student's classroom and adhering to established instructional standards. You can be assured that each tutoring plan is aligned with these educational standards and designed to meet your child's specific needs. 

There are eight standards for mathematical practice that students are expected to understand during their educational career:

1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them
Students are expected to explain the meaning of a mathematical problem and then search for ways it can be solved. The standards encourage students to critically analyze the problem, determine the form and meaning to the solution, and then devise a plan to solve the problem.

2. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others
Students should use theorems, definitions, and established outcomes when constructing mathematical arguments. Their conclusions should be justified by using logical claims and citing examples.

3. Reason abstractly and quantitatively
Students must make sense of quantities and how they relate to one another when solving mathematical problems. Creating coherent arguments, using appropriate mathematical symbols, and utilizing operational properties are all essential reasoning skills students should possess. 

4. Model with mathematics
Students should understand math's relevance to life outside the classroom. As students get older, and mathematical skills become more complex, this standard evolves. Students need the ability to connect their in-class learning to everyday encounters and situations. 

5. Attend to precision
Students are expected to communicate what they have learned effectively and concisely. Mathematical definitions and units of measure should be used to accurately and clearly explain their reasoning and problem solving.

6. Use appropriate tools strategically
There a variety of mathematical tools available to students including math software, a protractor, a calculator, and paper and pencil. Students must be able to identify which tool will be the most helpful and then use it appropriately.

7. Look for and make use of structure
Students should be able to identify patterns and mathematical structures depending on ability and grade level standards. These mathematical structures include the commutative property of addition (3+4 is the same as 4+3) and the steps necessary to expand an algebraic equation.

8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning
As students progress through mathematical courses and acquire more knowledge and skills, they should be able to identify repeated calculations and when shortcuts can be utilized. They should always be evaluating their reasoning to determine whether they are on the right track or if an error has occurred. 

The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are adept at using these Common Core State Standards for math to create personalized and relevant instruction. As students undertake the learning presented in their math tutoring sessions they will be expected to meet the standards outlined above. These standards were designed to help students achieve at a higher level and to deeply understand mathematical practice. You can be confident that your child will be challenged to not only answer a question correctly but also to understand the reasoning behind the solution and the evidence that proves its accuracy.

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Why You Should Opt to Take SAT Subject Tests Learn the basics of the SAT Subject Tests and how taking them can help you achieve your academic goals.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:29:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/-why-you-should-opt-to-take-sat-subject-tests- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/-why-you-should-opt-to-take-sat-subject-tests- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Stand out from the College Admission Crowd by taking the SAT Subject Tests

If you're preparing for college admission you may be wondering if you should take any of the available SAT Subject Tests. These tests are designed for you to showcase your achievement and ability in specific subject areas while enhancing your college application portfolio. When you are applying to colleges you want your portfolio to speak for itself and paint a picture of your strengths, assets, and abilities. These tests help you do just that.

Basics of the SAT Subject Tests:

  • Each Subject Test is an hour in length and is based on content previously covered in high school courses.
  • There are 20 different Subject Tests representing five academic areas: history, English, foreign languages, science, and mathematics. 
  • The Subject Tests are administered six times per year in October, November, December, January, May, and June. Not all exams are offered on all testing dates. It's best to plan ahead to ensure that you are able to take the exams of your choosing.
  • You can sit for three Subject Tests on a single day. You are not allowed to take a Subject Test the same day you take the SAT exam.
  • The Language with Listening exams are only given in the first testing hour of each testing day. You can only complete one listening test per exam date. 
  • The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are available to help you prepare for the Subject Tests. We will determine your initial level of mastery and then work to ensure you are progressing through all of the content necessary for success on the exam. 


It is vital to understand how sitting for the Subject Tests can impact your college applications. Taking these exams allows you to:

  1. Stand out from the crowd 
    The Subject Tests provide you the opportunity to differentiate yourself from other candidates. Even colleges and universities that don't require the Subject Tests will likely use the results to make admission decisions. Set yourself apart from the competition by showcasing your knowledge and ability. For example, if you are applying to Northwestern University and want to major in Chemical Engineering demonstrating mastery on the Math Level 2 exam and the Chemistry exam will provide evidence of your achievement and potential.
  2. Showcase your unique abilities 
    If you are an ESL or international student the Subject Tests allow you to shine on exams that don't heavily rely on English language mastery such as science, math, and foreign languages. You can also utilize the Subject Tests to demonstrate your multilingual skills or complete foreign language competency requirements. Huntington Learning Centers offers personalized tutoring programs for a wide range of Subject Tests. We will create a customized tutoring plan that uniquely matches your strengths and areas of need. Since no two students are alike no two tutoring programs are alike either.
  3. Provide evidence for your homeschool education 
    Because homeschool curricula are incredibly varied and often designed to meet individual needs, the Subject Tests are an excellent opportunity to add insight to your education. Colleges will get a better picture of your education,  achievement, and ability while you discover your mastery levels compared to standardized expectations.
  4. Get a jump start on college courses 
    The Subject Tests are often used to place students in college courses. By taking these tests you may have the opportunity to test out of introductory courses, earn college credit, and satisfy basic program requirements. The University of Texas is one college that uses the Subject Tests to determine college credit. Once a student is accepted at the University of Texas the Subject Test scores are evaluated based on program requirements to help determine placement and possible credit.
  5. Paint a complete picture of yourself 
    Your high school transcript only tells the story of courses completed in school. But what about everything you learned in other settings? Enrichment programs, distance learning courses, and self-study will likely not appear on your transcript but have an amazing impact on your knowledge and ability. Use the Subject Tests to display additional competency not attained in school. 
  6. Meet program requirements 
    Some university programs require applicants complete one or more Subject Tests as part of their portfolios. As you are compiling your list of possible colleges pay attention to the requirements. Plan ahead to take these exams so they can be included in your application.
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Knowing Which SAT Subject Tests to Register For Aligning your future college plans with the appropriate SAT Subject Tests is important. Get some great tips on choosing the right SAT Subject Tests.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:31:47 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/knowing-which-sat-subject-tests-to-register-for https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/knowing-which-sat-subject-tests-to-register-for Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Know Which SAT Subject Tests to Register For

The SAT Subject Tests are designed so students can showcase their specific academic achievements. They also provide students the opportunity to prove their knowledge and abilities in a variety of subject areas related to potential fields of study. They are the only national tests that allow students to choose which exams will help boost their college admission portfolios and paint a fuller picture of their academic abilities. 

Choosing which SAT Subject Tests to take doesn't have to be a daunting task! Aligning your future college major with the appropriate SAT Subject Tests is a great way to determine which tests to take. For example:

  • Engineering Students planning to major in engineering should use the SAT Subject Tests to display academic achievement in math and science. If you know the particular engineering discipline you plan on studying you can make your choices even more specific. For example, if you are planning to major in chemical engineering you will benefit the most from choosing the chemistry subject test and either Math I or Math II.  
  • Psychology If you are planning to major in psychology you should take SAT Subject Tests that show a diversity of knowledge. The biology subject test is an excellent choice for future psychology majors because of the field's focus on neuroscience. Choosing a math and a language exam will help balance your portfolio and display a well-rounded academic background to potential colleges. 
  • Business Students that are planning to pursue a degree in business, administration, or management should use the SAT Subject Tests to display a depth of knowledge. Consider signing up for a math, science, and humanities exam. If your high school studies included a foreign language you should also opt to take an SAT Subject Test that reflects that learning. 

Your intended major shouldn't be the only determining factor when you are preparing to register for SAT Subject Tests. You should also consider your:

  • Strengths 
    Many majors would benefit from a variety of SAT Subject Tests but you can't sit for every single one. Choose the SAT Subject Tests that will reflect your strengths and do the most to boost your college application portfolio.
  • High school coursework 
    The courses you take in high school are an excellent indicator of which SAT Subject Tests you should take. The subject tests are designed to reflect your understanding of specific high school subject areas and the skills necessary for success. 
  • Interests 
    There may be Subject Test that is unrelated to your intended major but that reflects a personal interest. Consider taking a subject test in an area that interests you as a way to show colleges your diversity of studies and to paint a fuller picture of yourself as a student.  
  • Potential colleges 
    Each college has different testing requirements. Take careful note of your potential colleges when preparing to register for SAT Subject Tests. You should also plan ahead to ensure you have plenty of time to complete all the exams you are interested in. 

 

Huntington Learning Centers are proud of the tutoring we offer to help students prepare for SAT Subject Tests. Our tutoring sessions are designed to meet your specific needs and are personalized based on assessment data. Your tutor will align your assessment data with the SAT Subject Test's expectations to devise a tutoring plan that will better prepare you and boost your confidence level. Ongoing monitoring and assessment will help your tutor determine continued areas of need and growth.

Are you ready to register for SAT Subject Tests? Which tests are you considering taking for your intended major? Let us know using the social media buttons at the top.

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Guide to Owning the SAT Math Knowledge is power. Prepare for the SAT math with this guide including a breakdown of topics that will be tested.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:57:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/guide-to-owning-the-sat-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/guide-to-owning-the-sat-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center’s Guide to Owning the SAT Math

Consisting of two multiple choice sections, the SAT math is an assessment of your knowledge and skills in both high school algebra and geometry. Understanding the format, assessed skills, and most frequently asked questions can help better prepare you for the exam and ultimately boost your score. The SAT math section consists of four different content strands, each with several different points of related content:

Number and Operations:

This section consists of arithmetic word problems, rational numbers, counting techniques, sets, number theory, sequences and series, and properties of integers.

Algebra and Functions:

This will test exponential properties, algebraic word problems, linear equations and inequalities, equations of lines, absolute value, algebraic expressions, radical and rational equations, direct and inverse variation, and algebraic functions and symbols.

Geometry and Measurement:

Focus will include volume of 3D shapes, area and perimeter of polygons and circles, Pythagorean Theorem properties, geometric visualization, coordinate geometry, transformations, similarity, and slope.

Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

This section will focus on descriptive statistics (mean, median, and mode), probability, and data interpretation (tables and graphs).

Knowledge is power! Understanding the assessed content and skills on the SAT is important, but using this information to enhance your preparation is even more vital. The staff at Huntington Learning Center is specially trained to help students succeed on the math section of the SAT and employs a variety of innovative methods to help you best prepare. They can be your trusted ally in the weeks and months leading up to the SAT exam and will ensure you are ready for test day. Some of our favorite test prep methods include:

  • Taking practice tests Practice tests allow our tutors to understand your individual strengths and areas of need. They also provide important information to help create your personalized tutoring plan. Over time, these same practice tests serve as progress monitoring tools so our staff can      determine the areas in which you've made growth and which content areas require additional practice. Leading up to the exam day the practice tests may be used to help you feel comfortable with the format of the SAT and as a simulation of the actual exam.
  • Learning how to use your resources Many students worry that they will be unable to remember important mathematical formulas and will struggle with answering the questions. Don't worry! The SAT exam doesn't require you to memorize any formulas. Often used formulas are included in the test booklet at the onset of each math section. It is your responsibility to choose which of these formulas should be used on individual items. This is just one example of using the included resources of the SAT to boost your confidence and your score. Each of your tutoring sessions will provide instruction on how to use the test format to your advantage.
  • Practicing specific skills All of the already mentioned content strands and specific skills are important. But our tutors understand how to prioritize your learning during the tutoring sessions. Using your assessment data and the knowledge of which types of questions are most likely on the exam, your tutor will create specific goals for your SAT prep. For example, you may have struggled with items about calculating slope on your practice test. Our tutors understand that questions about slope appear on every SAT exam and that you'll most likely be asked to find the slope of two ordered pairs. Using this knowledge you'll be specifically prepared for the most      frequently asked questions and the content strands that you struggle with the most.

If you are planning to take the SAT exam this school year now is a great time to begin your preparation. Contact a nearby Huntington Learning Center to learn more about our innovative tutoring methods and the benefits you will experience during your preparation for the SAT math section.

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Make Your Standardized Testing Prep Fun Test preparation doesn't have to be boring. Learn some ways to have fun while preparing for standardized tests.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:36:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-your-standardized-testing-prep-fun- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-your-standardized-testing-prep-fun- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Preparing for Standardized Testing While Having Fun

Many students think preparing for standardized testing must be rote and boring, when in reality it is a great opportunity to have fun while mastering new knowledge and skills. Finding ways to infuse fun into study sessions will boost students' confidence and give them something to look forward to as the testing day draws near. Making it fun shouldn't be difficult. Instead, find ways to integrate your child's interests and strengths into these study sessions.

  • Find a friend 
    Many students work well with peers and learn more within a study group. If your child is preparing for a standardized test, consider building peer based study sessions into the preparation calendar. Once a week your child could join a study group with others who are preparing for the same exam. This peer interaction can help build confidence and provide a welcome change of pace from the typical solo study session.
  • Celebrate strengths 
    At times, your child may feel overwhelmed by standardized testing preparation. A great way to keep the studying fun and stress free is to celebrate your child's achievements and strengths. Build incentives into the study schedule for the amount of material mastered or when your child becomes proficient with a difficult skill or concept. Some children respond well to goal setting with a tangible incentive at the end of a set period of time. For example, at the end of a successful week of studying for the ACT your child may earn a trip to the movies with a friend or the ability to opt out of a weekly chore.
  • Make a game out of it 
    Studying for a standardized test doesn't have to be boring. There are many great educational games you can play with your child while preparing for exam day.
  • Card Sharks 
    If your child likes playing card games you can put a fun diversion to good use. Use sticky notes to attach test prep strategies or content specific information to the cards. During the next study break ask your child to play the game, solitaire is a good choice, and remove the sticky notes as they appear on the cards. At the end of the game collect the sticky notes and review the each before placing them back on the cards for a future study break.
  • Online vocabulary games 
    There are many great online or mobile app vocabulary games that students can use to study for a standardized test. These games boost your child's understanding of challenging vocabulary over time using an engaging and interactive platform. Many of them allow your child to earn badges or play games against other users for additional challenges.
  • Track the Train 
    Math problems involving two trains leaving the station are quintessential on standardized tests. They assess a student's algebraic proficiency and the ability to accurately solve a problem. Spice up studying for these problems using a United States map and the cities your child has already visited. The distance formula, d = r*t (distance =rate * time), won't seem nearly as tedious when it involves familiar places and travels. 
  • Create the perfect study space 
     
    Having a dedicated space to study often helps students focus on the content and avoid being distracted by the surroundings or other family members. Help your child create the perfect study space and invest in fun touches that your child will enjoy. Allow your child to decorate the space or pick out desk accessories that add a touch of whimsy to the weekly study schedule. 
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Get Help With Homework From The Tutors At Huntington Learning Center Students struggling with homework should seek help from Huntington Learning Center. After a few sessions, students will feel confident about their work.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:47:13 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-help-with-homework-from-the-tutors-at-huntington-learning-center https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-help-with-homework-from-the-tutors-at-huntington-learning-center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Why Students Need Homework Help Early in the School Year

This school year is off to a roaring start and you may have already discovered you are in need of homework help. The amount of help necessary likely depends on your class load, coursework, and learning in previous courses. Do your upcoming projects and exams seem overwhelming? Are you unsure about the best ways to study for this year's courses? Don't let these valuable early days of the school year slip by without asking for the support you need now.

Seeking out necessary homework help early in the school year will:

  • Boost your confidence in your academic ability and help you tackle challenging coursework.
  • Help you master the fundamentals of this year's coursework.
  • Keep you from slipping behind as the term progresses.
  • Reinforce important study habits that help you succeed in school.

Developing strong study habits is important to completing homework and maximizing your learning. If your study habits are in need of refinement consider these effective tips for completing homework and boosting study skills.

  • Don't be surprisedTake the time early in the school year to make a master list of all course requirements. Seeing all of these requirements together in one place allows you the time to plan ahead. You may have a very slow week with very few assignments, projects, or exams but the next week may be packed. Writing out a master list or devising a master calendar will prevent     homework and course requirements from sneaking up on you.
  • Stick to a scheduleA study schedule is an excellent tool to keep you on track and ensure you have plenty of time to complete your homework and course requirements. Evaluate your home, school, and extra-curricular commitments and find time to devote to studying. Reserve these times in your weekly schedule and if an unforeseen conflict pops up reschedule the study session.
  • Make a weekly to-do listBefore each week begins make a list of the week's work. Plan out when you are going to study, complete projects, and finish homework. Keep the to-do list handy so you can check things off as they are completed. Sticking to this weekly to-do list keeps you on track and helps ensure all of your work is completed on time.
  • Put your skills to workThink about everything you've already learned in previous courses. You've likely mastered important skills and knowledge that are essential to this year's learning. When you are facing the challenge of new courses it is essential to put your previously mastered skills to good use. Note-taking, outlining, and reference skills are just a few of the important study skills that are effective across a variety of subject areas. If you find you need help with your study skills the staff at Huntington Learning Centers can help. We've devised a study skills tutoring curriculum that reinforces these essential study habits while meeting students' individual needs.
  • Prepare a spaceWhere do you study best? At the kitchen table? In your room? At the library? Regardless of where you choose to study the space should be prepared to meet your homework needs. Is the lighting adequate? Do you have access to important materials? Are you able to focus without distraction? Take inventory of the space you are studying in and make the changes necessary to help you focus and complete your best work.

If your homework is becoming overwhelming it may be time to seek out professional tutoring services to help you stay on track. The tutoring professionals with Huntington Learning Centers have the skills necessary to help you with this year's courses and homework. Your personalized tutoring plan will meet your individual needs by providing homework and study skills support. Asking for homework help is a great way to get a jump start on this school year.


How is your school year going? Could you use help with your homework and study skills?

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What You Should Do Before SAT Registration SAT registration is important and so is the preparation leading up to the exam. Contact Huntington Learning Center today and start prepping for test day.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:27:51 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-you-should-do-before-sat-registration https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-you-should-do-before-sat-registration Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What You Should Do Before SAT Registration

It's time for SAT registration! If you are planning on taking the SAT exam this year you can visit the SAT website to register, choose your testing date, select a testing center, and learn about testing day guidelines. If you haven't spent time learning about the SAT you may be risking a mistake that can jeopardize your score. Don't take that chance! Begin early, prepare carefully, and learn everything you can about the exam.

Beginning your preparation for the SAT doesn't need to be overwhelming. Taking the time now to do your research and plan your preparation will pay off in the long run. There are five easy steps to follow before SAT registration:

1. Check your calendar The SAT is offered on seven different testing dates each school year. The testing dates for 2013-2014 are

          
      • October 5, 2013
      • November 2, 2013
      • December 7, 2013
      • January 25, 2014
      • March 8, 2014
      • May 3, 2014
      • June 7, 2014

Before you choose your testing date take the time to review your calendar. Evaluate which testing date is best for you by considering your family, school, and extracurricular schedules. For example, if you are committed to an athletic team, school club, or musical ensemble during the winter months it may be beneficial to wait to take the SAT exam until one of the spring testing dates. You should also determine if this year's coursework will have an impact on your overall knowledge and skills. Will your courses this year better prepare you for the SAT? You may want to wait until these courses are complete before you take the exam.

2. Find your testing center There are hundreds of testing centers across the country. Before you register for the SAT exam spend time determining which testing center is best for you. Consult an area map for the testing centers that are closest to you and which testing center is the most convenient. Many students choose to stay at their own high school for the SAT exam, if possible, because of the familiarity of the campus.

3. Know what is allowed The SAT has strict limitations regarding what is allowed in testing centers and what specific items and behaviors are prohibited. Don't be caught off guard and risk both your careful preparation and your score. The SAT website details the specific requirements for all students taking the test and what is allowed on exam day.

 
4. Start your preparation early
Careful preparation for the SAT exam requires time. Waiting until the last minute to begin preparing will not serve you well on exam day. Several months before the exam spend time with your calendar determining when you can study and how you can work devoted study sessions into your weekly schedule. 

5. Utilize all your resources The SAT website has plenty of resources available to students including study guides and practice tests. Many students find success by starting their preparation with a practice test. This is a great way to find out which areas of the exam will require the most preparation. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are an excellent resource as well. Before any tutoring begins you will be assessed to determine your strengths and your weaknesses. These assessment results will be re-evaluated as the tutoring sessions progress to adapt the individualized plan to meet your specific needs.


Huntington Learning Centers has developed a comprehensive tutoring curriculum designed to prepare students for the SAT exam. Our professional tutors are specially trained to develop a customized learning plan that will meet your individual needs. 

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Students Can Build Strong Study Habits At An Early Age With These Tips Study habits develop over time and students that start to build organizational skills from an early age will be better prepared for academic challenges.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:01:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/students-can-build-strong-study-habits-at-an-early-age-with-these-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/students-can-build-strong-study-habits-at-an-early-age-with-these-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Ways to Develop Good Study Habits From an Early Age


It's no secret that strong study habits are an integral component to academic success. Understanding how to study, ways to stay organized, and strategies for prioritizing work will help students lay a strong foundation for ongoing learning. These crucial skills should be developed at a young age, as early as the toddler years, instead of waiting until high school when the coursework is quite difficult. Young minds are like sponges and seek out things to learn and new activities to explore. Working with your child from a young age to build strong study skills will pay off exponentially in future years.

There are many things you can do to build study habits regardless of your child's age, including:

  • Starting young It's never too early to expose children to academic work. There are a variety of academic activities toddlers can participate in, such as read alouds, puzzles, counting, painting, and educational games. The work shouldn't be frustrating or too difficult but should instead build foundational learning skills that will impact future achievement. These activities may seem like play now but they'll certainly contribute to strong study skills as your child gets older. 
  • Building strong homework habits Children often begin receiving homework assignments as early as Kindergarten. Work to devise a routine for completing homework that is consistent and appropriate for your child's age and ability. Homework is a way of life for students but it doesn't have to be dreaded or frustrating. FInd a quiet area of your home that can be dedicated to homework. Stock the space with materials and ensure appropriate lighting. Set work expectations with your child and make sure that the routine is consistently followed and meets your child's needs. 
  • Fostering independence As your child gets older it is important to participate in a gradual release of responsibility. Over time you should expect your child to take more responsibility for homework and studying. Check in often with your child and ensure the work is being done correctly, mistakes are rectified, and the assignment's objectives are met. 
  • Helping children identify resources A child has many different resources available if homework seems confusing or overwhelming. Even if you're expecting a child to take responsibility for a majority of the homework and studying responsibilities you should remain a trusted resource. Encourage your child to talk to teachers, counselors, or other students about homework and maintaining strong study skills. If you find that you need additional support with developing study skills consider investing in tutoring sessions. Huntington Learning Centers offers tutoring for students that is focused on important study skills such as research, note taking, and organization. 
  • Making it a priority Families are busy. There are work, school, and extra curricular schedules to juggle and family and household priorities to balance. Don't let homework and the development of strong study skills take a backseat to other commitments. Make sure that your child's homework and studying remains a priority, even during your family's busiest times. If there is a significant change to your family's routine or schedule find ways to adjust the dedicated study times. Keep updated on assignments, exams, and classroom expectations. Find times to talk to your child's teacher about any concerns you have or for additional ways to help your child. 

Huntington Learning Centers has a comprehensive study skills tutoring program designed for students of all ages. Depending on age, grade level, and ability the professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers have a plan for every child. The skills covered in the tutoring sessions apply to a variety of subject areas and will help students as they advance grade levels and tackle tougher courses. 

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5 Essential Study Skills That Every Middle School Student Should Master Developing study skills in middle school is the foundation that students will use to excel. Students that hone these skills will have a bright future.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:40:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-essential-study-skills-that-every-middle-school-student-should-master https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-essential-study-skills-that-every-middle-school-student-should-master Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Improving Back to School Study Skills for Middle School Students

Middle school is a vital time in a student's educational career and middle school study skills are essential to success in high school and beyond. Think of middle school much like the practices leading up to a big game. An athlete's practice performance is important because that time spent mastering the fundamentals pays off when the stakes are high during a game. Middle school is the same way. There are many different study skills that students should master in middle school that will play a valuable role when the stakes are much higher.

As a parent it is vital for you to play an active role in your middle schooler student's education. Working with your child now to master essential middle school study skills will help lay a strong foundation for future grades. Parents and students should work together to:

  • Find the best time to study Every student is different. It is important to remember what works for others, or what worked for you, may not be best for your child. Spend time experimenting with study times to see when your child is most effective. For several days have your child complete homework and other school tasks immediately upon arriving home. Then try switching the study time to later in the evening, perhaps immediately after dinner. If neither of these times work for your child, evaluate your family's daily schedule for other available study blocks that may be more beneficial.
  • Keep materials organized Many middle school students don't naturally possess essential organizational skills. The ability to organize materials, schedules, and assignments can be difficult. Work with your child to establish and maintain an organizational system that is efficient and tailored to this year's coursework. Provide the materials necessary for your child to stay organized such as binders, folders, and an assignment planner. Take the time to help your child keep the materials organized and intervene if your child is experiencing difficulty.
  • Learn to take notes Taking notes is a critically important study skill in high school and college. Middle school is an ideal time to learn note taking skills because it provides plenty of opportunity to practice and refine this skill. Huntington Learning Centers offers students the opportunity to learn study skills, including note taking, from highly trained professionals. Your child's tutor will teach specific note taking skills to help with this year's courses. There will also be an emphasis on general note taking skills that can be applied to a variety of subject areas. This helps your child view note taking as a universal study skill that can be used in any course.
  • Develop a study schedule Your child has a schedule full of challenging academic work and may be overwhelmed by the prospect of managing all of the assignments, projects, quizzes, and tests. Ask your child for course schedules and syllabi and work to create a master schedule. Help your child see the big picture and understand that planning ahead is essential for success. Work together to devise weekly and monthly study schedules that provide plenty of time for all coursework.
  • Build foundational research skills Think about all the research papers and projects in your
    child's future. High school and college courses require students to research topics to write papers, complete laboratory work, prepare persuasive arguments, and present material. This research based coursework will be much easier if your child has the research skills necessary for success. As part of the study skills tutoring sessions at Huntington Learning Centers students learn how to conduct effective research and how to use valuable reference skills to determine important information. Students learn how to find the information they're looking for and ways to compile it for use in papers, projects, and presentations.
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Review of Test Prep Techniques That Ensure You Are Ready For Any Exam Strive for academic excellence by using test preparation techniques. Time management is one skill that should be mastered in order to be fully prepared.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:50:46 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/review-of-test-prep-techniques-that-ensure-you-are-ready-for-any-exam https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/review-of-test-prep-techniques-that-ensure-you-are-ready-for-any-exam Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center A Comprehensive Review of Back to School Test Prep Strategies

School is back in session and it's the perfect opportunity to get to work and ensure your test prep review is in great shape. Honing your test taking skills will prepare you for exams in your high school courses as well as any achievement exams you will take this year. Focusing now on your test taking skills will pay off in the long run as you approach each exam with confidence in your abilities.

The staff at Huntington Learning Centers has helped thousands of students improve their test taking strategies. Some of our favorite strategies include:

  • Understanding the directions Each exam is different and has its own testing guidelines. It's important to do your research before exam day arrives to ensure you understand these guidelines. Pay attention to what is allowed in the testing center, your time limitations, and what portions of the testing materials you may write in, complete your work, or jot notes.
  • Using your time wisely Standardized achievement tests all have time limits that must be strictly adhered to. Knowing your time limits is important but you should also focus on using every minute wisely. If a question is posing a particular problem, skip it, answer the questions that you're      more confident in and return to answer it later. You should also check for errors, reread written passages, and scan your math work until time is called.
  • Finding strategies that work for you No two students are alike and during your preparation you'll find specific test taking strategies that are most effective for you. A good way to discover strategies that work for you is to take several practice exams before testing day. You'll learn about the layout and content of the exam while discovering how you work best. Some students like to jot notes as they read while others prefer to read all of the questions before turning their attention to the corresponding written passage.
  • Checking for errors Identifying errors is crucial to your success. Several times during the testing session make sure that your response sheet corresponds with the exam questions. This mistake is much easier to solve if you identify your errors early. Double check that you have followed all of the testing guidelines, erased any errant marks, and answered every question.

Huntington Learning Centers provides comprehensive test prep review and test taking strategies for achievement exams. Our tutors are specially trained to provide general strategies and test specific information for a variety of exams, including:

  • SAT The SAT Exam is an achievement exam that plays an important role in determining college admission and scholarship opportunities. The SAT Exam is offered on seven testing dates each year and most students take the exam during their junior year with the option to retest
    during senior year.
  • ACT  The ACT Exam is an achievement exam that is offered six times each school year and is designed to assess a student's academic achievement and readiness for college. Results from the ACT Exam are typically used to help determine college admission and are accepted by all four year universities and colleges in the United States.
  • PSAT Most students take the PSAT in October of their junior year in high school. It is similar to the SAT exam and is a good indicator of a student's potential on the SAT. Academic organizations, such as the National Merit Scholarship Program, award scholarships based on PSAT scores.
  • SAT Subject Tests In recent years the College Board began offering individual subject area tests as part of the SAT exam. These tests are designed for students to display the specific knowledge they have gained during their high school courses. Colleges use the SAT Subject Tests to form admission decisions, determine readiness, and place students in courses.
  • AP Exams After completing a year-long AP course students have the opportunity to sit for a subject specific AP Exam. These exams cover college level material and are typically taken to highlight a student's knowledge and earn college credit. There are 31 AP Exams offered in the five general subject areas of science, math, history, language, and English.
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Learn More About The ACT Registration Process Today Complete the ACT registration process in time for the next test date using the tips found here. Register online or by mail and be fully prepared for test day.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:32:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/learn-more-about-the-act-registration-process-today https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/learn-more-about-the-act-registration-process-today Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Understanding the ACT Registration Process

The new school year is upon us and it is nearly time to confirm the details of your ACT registration. If you are planning to take the ACT exam this year it is never too early to prepare for the registration process. Understanding as much as you can about the exam is important to ensure the registration process goes smoothly and you can focus on your academic preparation.

ACT Examination Information:

  • The ACT is administered on six national test dates. The test dates for the 2013 - 2014 school year can be found here and on the Huntington Helps website:
    • September 21, 2013
    • October 26, 2013
    • December 14, 2013
    • February 8, 2014
    • April 12, 2014
    • June 14, 2014
  • Plan ahead when registering for the ACT. The registration deadline is typically four weeks before the exam date. You can register after the deadline but will be assessed a late fee.
  • There are fees associated with the ACT exam. A fee of $36.50 includes the ACT exam (no writing) plus reports for you, your high school, and up to four colleges. The ACT Plus Writing requires a fee of $52.50 which includes a report for you, your high school, and up to four colleges. There are additional fees assessed for additional college reports, standby testing, telephone re-registration, testing changes, and international testing.

Registering online:

  • Online registration is recommended unless you have extenuating circumstances that require registration by mail. The ACT registration process is secure and you can be confident that your personal information is kept private.
  • You will first need to create an ACT Web account. This is where you will register, verify testing center details, receive score reports, and determine the colleges that will receive your reports. 
  • The ACT Web account initiation will require you to create a log-in and password for future use. Make sure you take note of both of these so you will always have access to the site.
  • You will know instantly whether your preferred testing center has available space for you. You will also be able to print your admission ticket directly from your ACT Web account.
  • The ACT now requires a clear photo with a new registration. You must upload a clear photo of yourself against a light background before your registration is complete. This photo is used as a means of verifying identification on the testing day and on the score report that your high      school will receive. The ACT website contains full quality and technical requirements for your uploaded picture.

Registering by mail:

  • You are required to register by mail if you are younger than 13 years old or are unable to pay by credit card.
  • A registration-by-mail packet is available from your high school or by requesting a packet on the ACT website. 
  • Once your registration materials are received you will then be notified by mail of your testing date and which testing center you've been assigned to.

Special circumstances:

  • There are a variety of special circumstances that may require you to pursue arranged testing options. Details of the arranged testing requirements can be found online at the ACT website. Special circumstances include:
    • Being homebound or confined.
    • Living more than 75 miles from a testing site.
    • Needing international testing.
    • Requiring a Sabbath/Sunday testing center.
  • You may be eligible for extended time if you have a defined learning disability and extended time is part of your Individualized Education Plan (IEP). You must submit an Application for ACT Extended Time National Testing signed by you and a school official. Regardless if you register online or by mail this application must be submitted by mail.
  • ACT testing centers are able to provide a variety of accommodations to students with defined disabilities. These accommodations include a wheelchair accessible testing room, a large type booklet, snacks in the test room for diabetics, and the use of a sign language interpreter. Registration details can be found online with guidelines for requesting special accommodations.
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Find Out How Tutor Services Help Students Increase Their Understanding Subject tutoring and test preparation are just a few of the tutor services offered by Huntington Learning Center that prepare students for the school year.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:57:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/find-out-how-tutor-services-help-students-increase-their-understanding https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/find-out-how-tutor-services-help-students-increase-their-understanding Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Get a Jump on the New School Year by Investing in Tutor Services!

There's no better time to choose tutor services than the start of a new school year. Investing in tutoring services can help your child master new concepts, improve study skills, prepare for an upcoming exam, or build a solid foundation of academic skills. Many students benefit from the personalized sessions that aim to increase both understanding and confidence.

Huntington Learning Centers offer tutoring services in:


Subject Tutoring

Your child can benefit from tutor services in a variety of subject areas, primarily in the mathematics and science domains. These tutoring sessions are designed to meet the rigorous demands of school coursework. Students seek subject tutoring for a variety of reasons including difficulty mastering new skills and knowledge, letter grade improvement, and homework help. Regardless of the reason for tutoring, each student is treated as an individual and is presented with a tutoring plan that is customized for specific needs. Perhaps your child is struggling in 8th grade pre-algebra. Before the very first tutoring session your child will be assessed for both strengths and weaknesses. This information is used to create a tutoring plan that addresses weak areas while reinforcing the new learning occurring in the pre-algebra class.


Test Preparation

A child's education is filled with high stakes tests including state achievement tests, college placement tests, and advanced placement exams. What exams will your child be taking this year? Success on these exams is determined by academic preparation and a specific set of test taking skills.  The tutors at Huntington Learning Center can help with both. Tutors review and coach students on each tested academic area and the kinds of questions that will be asked. For example, a portion of the SAT exam assesses a student's vocabulary with cloze items. A cloze question requires students to choose the missing word in a sentence, completing the sentence with proper syntax. Students may choose to complete the sentence with an appropriate word that maintains the sentence's meaning before reading any of the multiple choice answers. Upon reading the answer choices the student can then find a synonym for the initial response. A portion of a tutoring session may be dedicated to specific strategies and then followed by guided practice.

Study Skills

Strong study skills are the foundation to ongoing success in school. A child who lacks sound study habits and proper organizational skills is more likely to struggle to keep pace with academic demands. A new school year is an excellent opportunity to reinforce your child's study skills or learn additional ways to study for the year's upcoming courses. Consider a student that is enrolled in a physics class for the first time. Although he experienced previous success in biology and chemistry he may quickly learn that his study skills need a boost to handle all the new content physics will present. Investing in tutoring sessions to target a different set of study skills more appropriate for physics will allow him to experience success and feel more confident in class.

Academic Skills

Core academic skills, such as reading, writing, vocabulary, and math, are crucial for a student's success during the upcoming school year. If you are concerned with the foundation of your child's academic skills now is a great time to invest in tutoring sessions. These sessions are designed to meet a student's specific needs. Each academic area is broken down into specific skills typically present in various grade levels. For example, an elementary student receiving tutoring in math concepts and computation would focus on basic computation, fractions, and decimals while a high school student would be working on algebra skills and advanced word problems. The developmental sequence of academic skill attainment is used in planning what areas a student should be mastering next.

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Tips to Improve Learning Skills & Academic Success Planning & organization are learning skills that students can implement in order to succeed & reach their potential, learn more about other skills here.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:17:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-improve-learning-skills--academic-success- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-improve-learning-skills--academic-success- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Essential Learning Skills for Academic Success

The upcoming school year is almost here but it is never too late to work on improving your child's learning skills. Focusing on specific learning and academic skills will help prepare your child for future learning and will provide a strong foundation for success. Many of these skills are easy to integrate into daily learning activities and can have a profound effect on your child's academic future.

Consider these learning skills to help prepare your child for a successful school year:

  • Planning ahead Knowing what is on the horizon is essential for academic success. Most teachers will provide a course syllabus or outline that details expectations and a calendar for the term. This is an important document so your child knows what to expect. Work with your child to add course expectations and deadlines to a master calendar. Once your child sees all of the required coursework in one place you can begin to plan ahead for the work load. You may notice that one particular week is full of exams, quizzes, projects, and presentations while the weeks leading up to it are relatively quiet. This knowledge will help your child plan and prepare carefully while ensuring that no deadlines are missed and no requirements sneak up unsuspectingly. 
  • Reviewing what has already been learned Looking ahead to this year's classes is important, but not at the sake of previously mastered learning. In order to properly prepare for the upcoming school year it is vital your child spends time reviewing what has already been learned. Revisiting mastered concepts, skills, and knowledge is a great way to connect with future learning. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are trained to reinforce previously mastered concepts while helping students become proficient with new skills and knowledge. For example, if your child participates in tutoring sessions for trigonometry the tutor will ensure new concepts are mastered while reinforcing what was already learned in the student's algebra classes. 
  • Staying organized Many students struggle simply because of disorganization. It is hard to buckle down and begin studying when you can't find the proper reading material, notes, or a class syllabus. Staying organized provides your child with a system to ensure all classroom texts and materials are readily available and easily accessible. There are no perfect organizational systems, and every student will do things a little differently, but working with your child to become more organized is highly beneficial. You may want to start by providing school supplies with built in organization. Consider a color for every class and buy a binder, folder, and notebook that all match. Some students prefer an all-in-one system that organizes all materials, regardless of the class, together. Check your child's materials on a regular basis to make sure the system you helped devise is still operating smoothly.
  •  Being proactive Don't wait until your child feels overwhelmed by the required classwork to ask for help. Intervening early when your child needs additional assistance is an excellent way to boost both confidence and academic learning. Spend time with your child on a regular basis reviewing classwork and discussing class requirements. This will help your child identify when to ask for help and what, specifically, is causing the most trouble. Being tuned in to these struggles will benefit your child when asking for help. Teachers, and tutors, can be of the greatest assistance when they know where the specific learning breakdown occurred. This information, coupled with careful diagnostic assessment, helps Huntington Learning Center tutors devise a customized tutoring plan. These tutoring plans meet students where they currently are and work to move them forward in both understanding and academic confidence.
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Why You Need to Ace the SAT [Infographic] Find out the importance of proper SAT prep from real data. Acing the SAT is also acing your future: it helps you get into a better university, and find better and higher-paying jobs afterward.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:29:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-you-need-to-ace-the-sat-infographic https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-you-need-to-ace-the-sat-infographic Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Find out the importance of proper SAT prep from real data. Acing the SAT is also acing your future: it helps you get into a better university, and find better and higher-paying jobs afterward.

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Back to School Learning Center Sessions Huntington Learning Center provides children with tutoring help and supplemental work in math, writing, and more.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:42:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/back-to-school-learning-center-sessions- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/back-to-school-learning-center-sessions- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Back to School Learning Sessions Make a Big Difference!

Pencils are being sharpened, books are being distributed, and students are eagerly anticipating the beginning of a new year both at school and at learning centers across the country. Even though the new school year is nearly upon us it's not too late to consider enrolling in back to school learning sessions. Specially trained tutors can help ensure you are ready for the upcoming school year, your confidence gets a healthy boost, and all of the material you've previously mastered can be put to good use next year.

If you're considering enrolling in tutoring sessions at one of our Huntington Learning Centers locations ask yourself these important questions:

Are you prepared for the upcoming term?
You work hard in your school classes and you don't want to waste precious time on poor organization or ineffective study skills. Back to school learning sessions at Huntington Learning Centers will help you discover your studying preferences and can improve your ability to study effectively. Strong study skills and consistent habits will have an incredible impact on your grades next school year. Simple changes to your study routine can make a big difference.

Do you want to reduce summer slide?
Research shows that students may lose previously mastered skills during the summer months. The time spent away from school and in a more relaxed atmosphere may impact what you learned last year. Think about everything you knew and were able to do at the end of last school year. Could you still perform at the same level?

If you are worried about the skills and learning you may have lost, Huntington Learning Centers can help. The specially trained staff members on location at each learning center are prepared to ensure you return to school as sharp as when you left before summer break. Careful assessment will determine your current performance level and will help your tutor devise a custom learning plan just for you. If summer has been tough on your previously mastered skills your tutor will work with you to review material and prepare for next term.

Are you scheduled for a new subject area next term? Perhaps it is your first year taking chemistry or you're anxious about the difference between geometry and the algebra you've already mastered. If you're faced with a subject area you've never taken before it's beneficial to get a head start. Think about back to school learning sessions like the warm up before a big game. The players take time to stretch their muscles and walk through game expectations. Back to school study sessions at Huntington Learning Centers are very similar. We'll help you look forward to your courses and build the foundational skills necessary for success in a new subject area. You'll enter your new class at the beginning of the school year confident in your ability to succeed.

Could you use a boost of confidence? Having confidence in your ability to succeed academically is just as important as the skills and knowledge you possess. If you're doubting whether you are ready for the upcoming term it may be a great idea to enroll in back to school learning sessions to gain the confidence you need. The tutors at Huntington Learning Centers will help assuage any fears you have, assess your current strengths and weaknesses, and develop a personalized learning plan. You'll have the opportunity to reinforce previous learning, master new skills, and gain confidence in your ability to succeed. Waiting to seek help once the work is too hard or you feel completely overwhelmed may be too late. Taking action now will provide the confidence that you're ready for whatever is ahead.

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Prepare for SHSAT Registration Students with the best scores on the SHSAT will be admitted to New York City's specialized high schools, such as the Bronx High School of Science.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:43:07 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-shsat-registration- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-shsat-registration- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center An Essential Guide to the SHSAT

 The Specialized High School Admissions Test is almost here and it is time to start helping your child prepare for exam day. This test is important to incoming freshman in the New York City Public School System and helps determine which high schools they will attend.

What is the SHSAT?
The Specialized High School Achievement Test (SHSAT) is an exam administered to nearly 30,000 eighth and ninth grade students in the New York City Public Schools. These students are all vying for approximately 3,000 seats at the city's Specialized High Schools of New York. The exam consists of two parts:

  • Verbal The verbal section has 45 questions and measures a student's ability to order sentences to form a paragraph, apply logical reasoning, and analyze, interpret, and understand written passages. 
  • Math The math section is comprised of 50 questions testing a student's computational skills and ability to apply mathematical knowledge to word problems.

Why is the SHSAT important?
The results of the SHSAT exam, along with other relevant academic information, help determine whether or not a student will be offered a seat at one of the city's nine specialized high schools. Students only have two opportunities to take the exam, in eighth grade for ninth grade placement and in ninth grade for tenth grade placement. 

What are the best ways to prepare for the SHSAT?
Preparing for the SHSAT doesn't have to be complicated. Spending time reviewing what has already been learned and preparing for the exam format will help ensure your child is ready. There are many effective ways to get ready for exam day, including:

  • Taking practice tests A great way to determine if your child is ready for the SHSAT is to administer a practice exam. This will help you determine your child's strengths and weaknesses and which areas to focus on. The New York City public school system has published two different sample tests that students can use. Many students take one of these exams as a preliminary benchmark and then take the second one several weeks later to measure growth.
  • Pacing the preparation Cramming rarely works. Your child will do best if the exam preparation is spread out over time. Create a study schedule that allows your child to pace the preparation and maximize the amount of time necessary to master the exam.
  • Understanding the exam format The SHSAT is a specialized standardized test that assesses math and verbal skills. Its format is very different from other exams. Using the sample questions available online, makes sure your child understands the exam format. Spend time discussing and reviewing the specific types of questions that will be asked. 
  • Prepping both body and mind It is just as important to prepare the body as it is to prepare the mind. Don't waste your student's careful preparation on a lack of sleep or an empty stomach. Make sure your child is getting plenty of rest in advance of exam day and is eating healthy meals. Avoid sugary foods the morning of the exam and prepare a breakfast with the nutrition      necessary for success.
  • Asking for help If SHSAT preparation feels overwhelming it is a great idea to ask for help. Customized tutoring sessions provide your child the space and time to learn from highly qualified professionals experienced with preparing students for the SHSAT. The staff at Huntington Learning Centers prides itself on understanding the local importance of the SHSAT exam and preparing New York City students for success. 

The SHSAT registration typically begins in September. Is your child ready? The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are available for exam preparation in advance of the SHSAT. These tutoring sessions are customized to your child's needs and the SHSAT exam. There are Huntington Learning Center locations throughout New York City and our tutors are known for their commitment to students and their success. 

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Use The Summer Wisely & Build Academic Skills With These Simple Ideas Academic skills can be improved during the summer months. Follow the steps found here and you are sure to be up to speed when the school year starts.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:23:19 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/use-the-summer-wisely--build-academic-skills-with-these-simple-ideas https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/use-the-summer-wisely--build-academic-skills-with-these-simple-ideas Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Use Summer Vacation to Boost Your Child's Academic Skills!

The upcoming school year is just around the corner and it isn't too late to discover ways that academic summer programs can help your child. The lazy days of summer are a perfect time for you to reflect on the past school year, your child's performance and behavior, and ways that you can help reduce frustration with both school and homework.

If you believe that your child is struggling and needs help with academic skills there are certain questions you may be asking yourself, such as:

  • What do teachers think of my child's school performance? Perhaps teachers have told you that your child is a class clown, a day dreamer, or acts out when the academic material becomes too difficult. You may have had conversations with teachers about retention, a study team evaluation, or additional  academic interventions.
  • Are there observable signs of struggle when my child is completing homework? If completing homework is an ongoing struggle for your child you may be locked in a constant cycle of frustration or refusal. Your child may be indicating the homework is too hard if it takes too long, completion is a battle, or there is constant refusal or avoidance.
  • Does my child's schoolwork seem too hard? You may have noticed that your child isn't able to read the textbook and classroom materials, gives up easily, receives grades that don't reflect  effort, is disorganized and lacks strong study habits, or seems to struggle with time management. Each of these is an indicator that the academic content is too difficult.
  • What impact are the academic struggles having on my child's behavior? When a child is struggling academically the frustration and lack of understanding often manifests itself in behavior issues. If your child is angry, withdrawn, unruly, or disrespectful these may be signs that the academic work is simply too difficult and frustration has set in.

 If you are concerned about your child the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers are available to help. We are committed to creating academic summer programs that help struggling learners better prepare for future learning. Don't let the next couple of months slip by when your child could be working side by side with a professional tutor who is committed to helping meet your child's needs.

Our approach is unique and completely child-centered. We will work with you to boost academic skills and better prepare your child for the upcoming school year.

  1. Academic Evaluation We start by determining your child's specific needs. We use a variety of assessments based on your child's age, developmental ability, and your specific concerns. Your child's behavior and response to the assessments are also observed and measured.
  2. Data analysis The results from the academic evaluation are analyzed and your child's strengths and weaknesses are identified. These assessment results form the baseline for your child's ongoing growth.
  3. Parent conference Once we have determined your child's areas of strength and weakness we meet with you to fully develop a tutoring plan. This conference is focused on our observations, conclusions, and recommendations and the ways that Huntington Learning Centers can help. It is an opportunity for you to learn more about your child and to ask questions about how our tutoring approach will help reduce frustration, increase academic understanding, and better prepare your child for future learning.
  4. Personalized tutoring sessions Once the parent conference is complete and your child's specific learning plan is created, the real work begins. The tutoring sessions are focused on your child's specific needs and utilize instructional methods that are centered on your child's areas of identified growth.
  5. Ongoing feedback We pride ourselves on maintaining close contact with parents and work to keep you updated and informed. Results from ongoing assessments, observations from tutoring sessions, and changes to the learning plan are communicated to you in a timely fashion. We will make sure you understand your child's successes and the areas of ongoing need.
  6. School communication With your permission we will be in contact with your child's school once the fall term begins. Our tutors will share information with your child's teachers and will shape tutoring sessions to meet the school's academic curriculum.

 

Are you concerned about your child's academic abilities? What difference could academic summer programs make in your child's learning?

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Summer Tutoring Is One Way Students Can Prepare For The School Year Learn new academic skills and maintain old ones with summer tutoring sessions that will build upon your strengths and improve your weaknesses.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:04:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-tutoring-is-one-way-students-can-prepare-for-the-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-tutoring-is-one-way-students-can-prepare-for-the-school-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer Tutoring: 10 Benefits that Help Keep Students Sharp

The warm summer months are perfect for trips to the beach, lazy days by the pool, relaxing weekends with family, and investing in summer tutoring sessions for your child. Spending the summer months in strategic and customized tutoring sessions will help your child prepare for the upcoming school year, get a jump on new learning, and ensure previously learned skills don't slip away. 

Investing in summer tutoring sessions with Huntington Learning Centers is a great way to:

  1. Maintain newly acquired skills Students that participated in tutoring sessions during the school year likely have newly acquired skills that would benefit from ongoing practice. Don't put those valuable tutoring sessions to waste. Continuing with tutoring during the summer months will help your child maintain newly acquired academic skills. 
  2. Prevent summer slide Most teachers will attest that students are likely to experience "summer slide" during the summer months and may struggle to maintain knowledge and skills that were previously mastered. Tutoring sessions during the summer months will help your child maintain all of the important content knowledge and skills that were mastered in previous grades. 
  3. Learn new test taking skills Knowing how to take a test is almost as important as mastering all of the required content knowledge. Tutoring sessions this summer may help your child learn valuable new test taking skills that will boost confidence and better prepare your child for success.
  4. Be proactive about continued learning Don't wait until your child is struggling to seek valuable tutoring. Tutoring sessions at Huntington Learning Centers can be a tremendous asset to new learning because they are designed to meet your child's specific needs. As your child acquires new skills and knowledge the tutoring sessions are adapted to maximize learning.  
  5. Make the transition to a new school easier If your child will be starting at a new school in the fall tutoring sessions this summer can help make the transition easier. The time spent with a summer tutor will provide a great review of previous learning and will help prepare your child for the added challenge of learning in a new environment. 
  6. Get a jump on test prep Will your child be taking a standardized test this year? The ACT? SAT? Mandatory state assessments? Test prep tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers is a great way to help your child prepare for the exam. Your child's customized tutoring plan begins with a careful assessment of strengths and weaknesses. The tutoring sessions are then designed to help your child prepare for the specific skills and content of the standardized test. 
  7. Prepare for an unfamiliar subject If your child will begin a new area of study in the fall the summer months are a great time to get a head start. Personalized tutoring sessions will help your child master pre-requisite skills, understand important vocabulary, and prepare for the content that will be new learning once the school year starts. 
  8. Boost study habits Does your child struggle with study habits? Would a comprehensive approach to effective study habits help? Even students that understand the content and quickly acquire academic skills may struggle because of deficient study habits. Tutoring sessions can help your child prepare for the upcoming year by mastering a series of study skills that are relevant across subject areas. 
  9. Increase academic confidence Many times academic struggles manifest themselves in different ways; decreased confidence, behavior issues, or lack of motivation. Investing in tutoring sessions this summer can boost academic confidence and help your child prepare academically and mentally for the upcoming school year. 
  10. Support summer school courses If your child benefited from subject area tutoring during the school year continuing these sessions through summer school may be beneficial. An ongoing tutoring emphasis will help your child maintain newly acquired skills and prepare for the upcoming school year. 

 

Are you considering summer tutoring for your child? What are your goals for this summer's learning?

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Summer Study Programs Can Improve Many Academic Skills By attending summer study programs, test taking skills & overall organization, are just a few of the skills that can be built upon.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:03:39 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-study-programs-can-improve-many-academic-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-study-programs-can-improve-many-academic-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Let Summer Study Programs Work for You!

 If your study habits have you worried about the upcoming school year it is a great time to take advantage of summer study programs. Spending a part of your summer dedicated to improving your study habits will help you better prepare for the courses on your fall schedule and can boost your confidence. Gaining the academic knowledge, and mastering the cognitive skills, is just one part of finding true success in school. Efficient study habits are equally important and will help prepare you for future learning.

Summer study programs can benefit your academic preparation next term in a variety of ways, including:

Improved test taking skills The reality of today's educational landscape is that students are required to pass a variety of high stakes tests. Refining your study skills will help regardless if you're preparing for end of course assessments, state proficiency tests, or college entrance exams. Preparing for an exam is all about mastering these test taking skills so you can focus on the subject areas being assessed. When you enroll at Huntington Learning Centers your tutor will not only focus on academic content but will also help you boost your test taking skills. The results of your academic evaluations will be used to present you with a customized program that strengthens these skills before progressing to the next skill level.

Greater organizational efficiency Part of developing solid study habits is creating strong organizational systems that benefit your learning. When you have a fixed amount of time to study you don't want to waste valuable minutes searching for assignments, deciding which are the most current lecture notes, or fumbling through class materials looking for the most recent lesson. Maintaining an organizational system will allow you to focus on the subject area content and put every minute to good use. There are a variety of methods to organizing your materials that will aid your studying. Some students find that a daily inventory is helpful to not losing valuable classroom materials and study aids. Each time you leave a class, make sure everything is properly stored. At the end of each day spend a few minutes making sure that no materials are left unfiled in your locker or in your bag. Returning all materials to the proper place, either in a folder or binder, will prepare you in advance for your next study session.

More efficient time management An important part of any student's study habits is the ability to efficiently manage available time. You may feel like there is never enough time to study, or that your study sessions are unproductive, but there are certain things you can do to boost your time management. Consider creating a consistent weekly schedule of dedicated study blocks. Evaluate your family, extra-curricular, and work commitments to find set times that can be dedicated to studying. Build in a few extra blocks of time to compensate for unforeseen circumstances. Over time compare this weekly schedule to the expectations of your classes. Do you have enough time to prepare for upcoming exams, projects, or papers? If your class requirements don't correlate with the amount of time you have committed to studying you will likely need to rearrange your schedule and add more blocks of dedicated study time.

The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are specially trained to help students reach their full potential. Our carefully designed tutoring sessions will help you better prepare for next school year by improving your current study habits. These skills are carefully woven into a customized tutoring plan that builds on your strengths while reinforcing your identified areas of weakness. The carefully designed instructional program is tailored to your exact needs.

Have you participated in summer study programs before? What benefits did you experience?

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Eight Quality Summer Learning Activities For Students Of All Ages Exercise your brain over the summer with these 8 learning activities that will stimulate your mind & have you fully prepared for the new school year.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:56:55 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-quality-summer-learning-activities-for-students-of-all-ages https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-quality-summer-learning-activities-for-students-of-all-ages Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Escape the Summer Brain Drain!

The summer months are the perfect time for you and your family to embark on a world of learning and to participate in summer learning activities. Learning shouldn't stop when the school year ends; there are a wealth of summer learning activities at your fingertips for your family to explore.

This summer consider:

  1. Mapping the route If your family is taking a road trip challenge your child to map the route ahead of time. Allow online access to sites such as mapquest.com and provide your child the necessary street maps and an atlas.
  2. Beginning a family challenge Many families thrive on competition, does yours? Challenge your family to a reading competition to see how many pages the group can read during the summer months. Set a reasonable goal and keep track of how many pages until the goals is met. Once the group meets the goal it's time to celebrate!
  3. Exploring the animal world If your town has a zoo, animal park, or wildlife preserve you can use these attractions to learn more about the animal world. Ask your child to choose a specific animal to study and begin by checking research books out of the library. Once you've read these books and have learned more about the animal you can take your child to see it up close and personal.
  4. Going somewhere new Challenge your family to think of a place or attraction you've never visited. It could be as simple as taking a hike in a local park or could involve a day of travel. Before you depart discuss what you might see, hear, or feel. Use your visit as a way to learn something new.
  5. Keeping a family blog The world has gone digital and keeping a record of your family's adventures has never been easier. There are several different free blogging sites that allow you to create an online blog. Involve your kids in this endeavor by challenging them to participate in creating and editing blog posts.
  6. Going on a virtual vacation Even if you don't have any vacation plans for this summer you can still send your kids on a trip. Choose a location to "vacation" to and then work to learn as much as possible about your virtual trip. Encourage your child to do online research, check out books from the library, or interview friends or family that have already been.
  7. Going professional The summer months are a great time to explore future careers for your child. Ask your children what careers are most interesting to them and what things they may want to do when they grow up. Help your child research the requirements for these jobs and what level of education is necessary. You could also work to arrange a shadow or mentor program for your child to learn from the professionals. A child that is interested in becoming a fire fighter will learn an amazing amount by simply spending a day at the station.
  8. Seeking reinforcements If you're hoping to use the summer months to better prepare your child for the fall courses at school consider contacting Huntington Learning Centers. We offer tutoring programs that bridge the summer months and provide valuable learning opportunities.

 

The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are specially trained to help your child make the most of summer vacation. We can work with your child to review previously learned content or to prepare for the upcoming school year. Programs designed especially to boost study habits or improve test taking skills are also available. Participating in tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers is all about finding ways to better prepare all children for future academic challenges.

What has been the best part of your summer so far? What fun summer learning activities has your family participated in?

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Develop Reading Comprehension Skills Over The Summer With These Tips Reading comprehension can be improved over the summer and visiting the library with family and friends is one of the ways students can make this happen.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:49:49 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-reading-comprehension-with-summer-learning https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-reading-comprehension-with-summer-learning Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Four Fun Ways to Boost your Child's Reading Comprehension this Summer!

Summer is here and it is the perfect time to get in some extra reading comprehension practice for your child. You can utilize summer's wide variety of educational opportunities, extra time, and lazy days to get in some valuable reading practice for your child. The best part is that your child won't even think that the family is working on reading. Instead your comprehension-building activities will feel like fun ways to spend a summer day learning with the family.

If you're looking for some ways to increase your child's reading comprehension this summer consider trying these fun activities:

  1. Launch a family study What topics of study intrigue your family? Insects? The Civil War? Dinosaurs? No matter which topic you choose for a family summer study there are many great ways to integrate reading practice. Your family can visit the library to check out books on the topic, read them together, and create a list of questions you still want answered. Take time to extend the reading and learning to real life experiences. Visit a museum or participate in another educational opportunity about your topic to search for answers to the questions your family generated. Ongoing study will prompt your child to ask questions, seek answers, and improve reading skills while participating in a fun family activity.
  2. Visit the library Many public libraries sponsor fun summer activities for children of all ages. You can visit your library to learn more about summer programs and to gather plenty of reading materials. Don't limit your children to books they can easily read themselves; there are a wide range of materials to choose from that you might not normally consider. If your child is an early reader the summer is a perfect time to choose a chapter book to read aloud. Reading a chapter a day will help boost comprehension and expose them to topics, authors, and genres they haven't yet experienced. Graphic novels, comic books, and magazines are also available at the library and are great ways to motivate reluctant readers. Talking about what your child is reading will boost comprehension regardless of the reading material.
  3. Form a book club Finding multiple copies of a single book is a great way to start a family book club. Establish a schedule for the club and make sure all readers are able to experience success. Set a specific reading goal (perhaps a chapter at a time) and then meet as a group to discuss what you read. Encourage input from each book club member, regardless of reading ability. You can shape the book club discussion around your child's reading needs. For example, if your child struggles with making connections between texts you can spend a part of the book club discussion talking about ways the book is like other books they've already read.
  4. Invest in tutoring Even though there are many great ways to improve comprehension for your child at home you may also be interested in receiving professional tutoring services. The tutors at Huntington Learning Centers know how to engage students in activities that are both fun and highly effective. Comprehension and critical thinking skills are woven into tutoring activities that often utilize a student's favorite reading genre. Your child will be learning valuable new comprehension skills while gaining academic confidence and having fun!

Your child's reading comprehension shouldn't suffer during the summer months. The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers are trained to help all their students maintain the knowledge and skills gained in previous years. Our tutoring sessions are customized to meet your child's specific needs and are created using data gathered in ongoing assessments.

What are some other fun ways to boost your child's reading this summer?

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Prepare For The SAT With These Surefire Tips Implementing a proper strategy helps students conquer the SAT and the tips found here can help students achieve the scores they desire on test day.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:43:37 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-the-sat-with-these-surefire-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-the-sat-with-these-surefire-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Students who have already taken their SAT exams will tell you there are specific SAT tips you should follow on the day of your test. There’s no denying it is an important day and you’ll likely feel a certain level of anxiety of stress as you prepare. But there are things you can do to reduce the anxiety and relieve the stress that will have you calm and focused during your SAT exam.

Consider these SAT tips for a successful exam day:

  1. Know where you’re going Your test center may be in an area of town you are unfamiliar with or in a nearby town you’ve never visited. Take the time ahead of test day to determine its exact location, research the best route, and take a trial run. You want to give yourself plenty of time to arrive and knowing the true duration of the trip will help. You can also look online for a layout of the test center to know which door to use and where to go once you are in the building. 
  2. Rest and relax It is important to relax before the exam and to get as much sleep as possible. Spend the week prior to the test going to bed early and finding ways to relax. As your test day gets closer you may want to curb your test preparation in an effort to unwind. The SAT preparation programs at Huntington Learning Centers will provide you the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful on the SAT test. Each program is personalized to match your needs and skills and is carefully designed based on assessment data.
  3. Gather your materials Read through your test directions to know exactly what you can and cannot bring with you to the testing session. Log-in to your My SAT account and print off your admission ticket and make sure you have a valid photo ID. Sharpen plenty of No. 2 pencils and ensure your calculator has batteries and works properly. The SAT exam restricts the type of calculator you can use to a basic four function model. Don’t risk not being able to use your calculator; stick to the type that is recommended.
  4. Nourish your body (and brain) Plan time to eat a good breakfast ahead of the exam. Choose foods such as eggs, toast, juice, and yogurt that will keep you energized, alert, and won’t result in a sugar crash. Avoid a sugar filled breakfast that may give you an instant energy burst but will fade by test time. 
  5. Give yourself plenty of time Since you know your route to the test center you should allow plenty of time to arrive and get checked in. This helps eliminate the unforeseen and gives you time to relax. Make sure you bring something to pass the time while you wait for the exam to start such as a book or a magazine. 
  6. Pack a snack The SAT exam morning is long and you are allowed to eat and drink during the designated test breaks. Packing a snack will help you sustain the energy necessary to focus on the test. Energy bars, juice, cut fruit, or yogurt are perfect for a test snack. 
  7. Leave your cell phone behind The use of cell phones is strictly prohibited in SAT testing centers. You are better off leaving your cell phone at home or in the car to prevent you from being asked to leave and having your scores invalidated. This policy isn’t limited to just cell phones. Prohibited devices also include PDAs, iPods, iPads, MP3 players, laptops, tablets, and cameras. 
  8. Focus on the moment The SAT is a monumental exam but it is also one that you have carefully prepared for. Focus on the task at hand and the knowledge you have gained as you prepared. Once you complete a section don’t dwell on your performance or doubt your answers. Move on and focus on the section currently underway. Trust your preparation and have complete confidence in your ability!

The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers are available to help you succeed on the SAT exam. Test taking strategies, specific content knowledge, one on one tutoring, practice exams, and ongoing feedback are all part of the personalized program.

The day of your SAT exam is a big day and you want to be prepared as possible. What else could you do the day of the test to be prepared and focused? What other SAT tips would help other students?

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Prepare for the Math SAT* in Eight Easy Steps SAT math practice is mandatory for students looking to ace the math portion of the SAT. Here are some tips for students to improve math scores.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:43:22 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-the-math-sat-in-eight-easy-steps https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prepare-for-the-math-sat-in-eight-easy-steps Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center You’ve sat through countless math classes during high school and now is the time to get to work on your SAT math practice to help show everyone what you’ve learned. Looking forward to the SAT exam may leave you feeling confused or wondering where to start. Devising a plan and preparation schedule can help you feel confident and ensure you are ready for the SAT exam.

SAT math practice shouldn’t be difficult or overwhelming. There are specific things you can do to boost your score and feel successful in your preparation.

      • Understand the exam Start your preparation and studying by understanding the exam. The College Board SAT website provides students with Skills Insight, an interactive tool that correlates a score band with the necessary understanding for each skill group. This allows you to focus your preparation on the specific types of questions that will be asked and provides you the information you need to hone your skills.
      • Schedule your preparation It is important to create a weekly study schedule that provides you plenty of time to study for the SAT Math Exam. Look for blocks of time in your typical weekly schedule that you can devote to studying. You will avoid cramming for the exam and can rest assured you’ve taken full advantage of your time. Use the results from your practice exam to know which tested areas will require the most study time. 
      • Take practice exams Several times throughout your SAT math preparation you should undertake a practice exam. These full length practice exams allow you to simulate an actual testing session and provide valuable information to help modify your future studying. You’ll understand your areas of strength and the areas that require additional preparation. If the results of a practice exam leave you feeling overwhelmed and unsure of where to start in your test preparation, call the professionals with Huntington Learning Centers. We can help you prepare for the math SAT, based on data from practice exams, in an environment that is tailored specifically to your needs. 
      • Segment your practice Research shows that the best way to prepare for an exam is to segment your practice. After you have created a study schedule make sure to alternate between different math skills. Instead of working solely on geometry questions for an extended period to time alternate periodically with another skill such as numbers and operations. 
      • Become formula familiar Did you know that the SAT exam includes commonly used formulas in the test materials? You don’t need to memorize the formulas and you can spend more time focused on understanding their proper use. Use a portion of your preparation time to understand the application of common formulas and which type of problems you should use them on. 
      • Hone your drawing skills On some problems it may be helpful to sketch or draw in your test booklet to answer the question. These visual representations will help you "see" the problem and arrive at the correct answer. This skill may be most beneficial on the geometry and measurement section when you need to connect a mathematical formula to a mathematical model.
      • Prepare your materials Take the time to understand what you can and cannot bring into the testing session. Verify that your calculator is an accepted model and leave your cell phone behind. 
      • Ask for help If you begin to feel frustrated or overwhelmed with your preparation know when to ask for help. Contact us at Huntington Learning Centers if you feel you need additional support while studying for the SAT Math Exam. Huntington offers one on one tutoring designed to tailor your preparation to your specific needs.

 

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Improve Test Taking Skills With These Proven Strategies Enhance your test taking skills through the proven methods found here. Learn how to prepare for your next exam with help from our certified tutors.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:27:45 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-test-taking-skills-with-these-proven-strategies https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-test-taking-skills-with-these-proven-strategies Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It's Never too Early to Learn Test Taking Skills

Our children live in a world of high stakes tests and there are specific test taking skills that make any exam easier, regardless of grade level, age, or exam format. Federal and state governments, local school districts, and individual schools all have specific tests that children must take to display proficiency, earn credit, or advance academic studies. All of these exams follow different protocol and assess different skills but there are universal exam strategies that can benefit every test taker.

Regardless of age, there are certain things students can do to prepare for a test and develop important exam strategies. These test taking skills are important if your child is 8 or 18:

Avoid Test Anxiety
A certain amount of anxiety is normal when preparing for a test and can often help students work more efficiently, prepare more effectively, and focus on the importance of the test. However, this anxiety should never be paralyzing. If your child is encountering a heightened level of anxiety over a test there are certain things you can do to help alleviate the worries. You can reframe how you talk about the test and remove any of your own anxiety from your child's presence. Try coaching your child to focus on the preparation and not the test. If your child is well prepared and confident the anxiety should subside.

Develop a study schedule
Work with your child to develop a study and practice schedule that allows for careful preparation of all test material. Emphasize that cramming for an exam rarely works. Even the youngest test taker can work within a study schedule when preparing for a test. Consider making a visual schedule on a poster or large calendar that will prominently remind everyone of the practice that needs to be accomplished. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers can be an effective part of your test preparation schedule. When you invest in test preparation sessions with one of our tutors your child will receive customized instruction based on specific needs and assessment data. These tutoring sessions can be integrated into your child's study schedule.

Prepare the mind AND body
It's not enough to prepare a child's mind for the test, you also need to prepare the body. Focus on your child's sleep and ensure a proper bedtime every night leading up to the test. You should also evaluate what your child is eating for breakfast. Try to avoid sugary breakfast cereals that provide temporary energy but may ultimately lead to a sugar crash. Fix protein based breakfasts such as eggs, breakfast burritos, or smoothies made with Greek yogurt and berries.

Emphasize following directions Every test has a specific set of directions that each test taker must follow. Do some research ahead of time to see if you can find the specific directions for your child's test. Use these directions during your study sessions to simulate testing conditions. Make sure your child understands the importance of following the directions.

Focus on known questions
One tried and true test taking strategy is to answer known questions first. This is a skill that any aged child can practice. Students should skip difficult questions and answer those they know for sure, then come back to grapple with ones that pose particular difficulty. Help your child practice this skill by simulating testing situations with sample questions.

If you are concerned about coaching your child on test taking strategies contact the tutoring professionals with Huntington Learning Centers. We can create a customized plan that will provide instruction and practice on these crucial test taking skills. There are many different skills that we integrate into our tutoring sessions. What are some other important skills students should practice before taking a test?

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Get Ready: Ten Final Exam Study Tips Proper study tips can reduce anxiety that students face leading up to final exams. Use these ten study tips to see a difference come test day.

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Fri, 09 Dec 2016 16:21:49 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-ready-ten-final-exam-study-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-ready-ten-final-exam-study-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The end of the term is quickly approaching and there’s no better time than now to evaluate helpful study tips for final exams. You’ve worked hard for months and now’s the opportunity to display what you’ve learned. Understanding what works best for you when you study, and how to make the most of your study sessions, will ensure you pass the exams with flying colors. It is important to remember that no two students are alike and you need to find the study tips that work best for you. There are, however, general pieces of advice that apply to all students and may help in preparing for your final exams

  1. Find your perfect place Evaluate the space you’re currently studying in. Does it fit your study style and provide a productive environment? If you think your study space is lacking it may be time to make a switch. Consider visiting a quiet library, an isolated corner of a coffee shop, or rearranging your bedroom to provide the space you need. 
  2. Join a group While some students study better alone, joining a study group can be incredibly beneficial. If you learn best with others consider forming a study group with students from your class. Set guidelines with the group at the onset to ensure everyone is working toward the same goals and the sessions are productive. Huntington Learning Centers offer study skills and tutoring support in a variety of settings. There may be an established tutoring group, led by a professional, already in place at a learning center near you. 
  3. Take a practice test (or two) You can evaluate your exam readiness by taking a practice test. This is a great way to determine how prepared you are and what studying still needs to occur. Ask your teachers early if there are sample tests, or forms from previous years, that you can use.
  4. Stay rested and avoid hunger It’s simple, really. Get plenty of sleep each night and make sure you’re eating balanced, healthy meals. Your brain won’t function to its maximum potential if you aren’t taking proper care of your body.
  5. Stick with what works Determine how you learn best and stick with it. If you are a visual learner spend time rereading your notes and reviewing charts, diagrams, and graphic organizers. If you are more of an auditory learner consider taping lectures or in-class explanations for additional review. 
  6. Plan your study blocks Make a weekly schedule that provides an appropriate amount of study time. Stick to this schedule and ensure that you are spending time studying each subject in preparation for exams. 
  7. Stay organized Establish an organization system that allows you to focus on studying and removes the distraction of disorganization. Keep your classroom notes and study materials for each subject together and routinely remove unnecessary items from binders, folders, and your backpack. 
  8. Alternate subjects Once you’ve created your weekly study schedule determine how you’ll align studying for each subject. Many students find alternating subjects helps them retain more information than focusing on a single subject for an extended period of time. 
  9. Avoid cramming Start studying for final exams several weeks before testing begins. Waiting to study will result in cramming for the exam and will prevent you from retaining material. Cramming may also impact your rest and nutrition and can be avoided by sticking to an established study schedule. 
  10. Ask for help Know when you need help! There is nothing wrong with asking for assistance or support when studying for exams. Talk to your teachers, friends, and parents when you are feeling confused or overwhelmed. Huntington Learning Centers can also provide professional assistance in advance of your final exams. These personalized tutoring sessions may be just the boost you need to succeed!
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Eight Essential Strategies for Succeeding on Standardized Tests Read more about these tried & true standardized test taking strategies that can help you succeed & get into the college of your dreams.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 13:25:01 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-essential-strategies-for-succeeding-on-standardized-tests https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-essential-strategies-for-succeeding-on-standardized-tests Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Careful preparation and utilizing smart standardized test taking strategies are the first steps to ensuring a high score and success on a standardized test. It is unwise to sit for a standardized test without thorough and thoughtful preparation. This preparation should start early and continue to the testing day to ensure the highest score possible.

Some of the most effective standardized test taking strategies include:

  1. Giving yourself plenty of time to prepare Cramming for the standardized test is both foolish and ineffective. Your brain needs time to reinforce existing concepts and to connect to new learning. Expecting a few short weeks (or days) of test preparation will be enough is a common mistake made by students. Many students spend months preparing for the test and are incredibly well prepared on assessment day.
  2. Planning your preparation Careful preparation should include an established plan to ensure all subject areas are covered. You should also allow time to practice each test section because the types of questions and response formats will vary. Establish a schedule that provides plenty of time to review and practice every section and each subject area. 
  3. Practicing under testing conditions Simply answering practice questions isn’t enough. You should spend some time simulating actual testing conditions. Set aside time in a quiet setting to practice under conditions similar to what you’ll encounter on the actual testing day. You should also familiarize yourself with the directions and structure of the test during these simulation sessions. 
  4. Eliminating the unforeseen Don’t risk your success on the standardized test by not preparing for the unforeseen. Get plenty of rest before the testing session, have directions to the testing center ready, gather your materials ahead of time, and don’t forget to eat so you avoid being hungry. Success on a standardized test will be difficult to achieve if you’re rushed, frantic, hungry, or anxious. 
  5. Previewing the test Before you dive in and begin answering questions you should spend a few moments previewing the test. Glance through the booklet and determine the total number of questions, the type of questions asked, and any potential pitfalls you can identify. Make notes, as allowed, on sections that seem the most difficult or in areas of the test you are concerned about. 
  6. Using materials wisely You should make good use of the test booklet and scratch paper as allowed under the testing guidelines. Use the test booklet like a workbook as permitted under the directions by circling key phrases, underlining important concepts, drawing a line through incorrect answers, and working the math problems near the test item. Be careful though! Review the testing directions to ensure this allowed.
  7. Pacing yourself Since standardized tests are most often designed around a time limitation it is important to pace yourself. You want to complete the exam and ensure you have answered all the questions you definitely know the answer to. If a problem or question seems too hard you should skip it and come back. You’re better off completing all the questions you know for sure instead of dedicating too much time to an unknown question. 
  8. Using process of elimination Many standardized tests rely on multiple choice questions as the main evaluation tool. You can employ a process of elimination strategy when answering multiple choice questions. If you are unsure of an answer take a moment to eliminate the options you know are incorrect. Cross them out and then refocus on the remaining answers. You’re more likely to choose a correct answer if you’ve eliminated ones you know are incorrect. This also cuts down on careless mistakes that can negatively affect your score. 

 

What are some additional standardized test taking strategies that you’ve found especially beneficial?

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Read it and Understand: Six Strategies for Improved Reading Comprehension Implementation of reading comprehension strategies is a critical component of understanding any piece of text. Learn about these strategies here.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:45:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-strategies-for-improved-reading-comprehension https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-strategies-for-improved-reading-comprehension Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Reading comprehension strategies - a technical term for a common problem. It’s happened to every reader. You sit down with a book, magazine, or technical text and begin to read. Several pages in you discover you have no idea what you just read. What you just experienced was a breakdown of reading comprehension; you simply read the words without using any strategies to understand. This is a common struggle for many students. The ability to understand what is being read, and to independently apply specific reading strategies, provides students with deep and meaningful comprehension.

When students are unable to independently use comprehension strategies, reading achievement gaps grow and frustration occurs. It will become harder and harder for these students to understand what they are reading. The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers have developed an intervention method for students struggling with their reading comprehension. These tutoring sessions focus on improving specific reading strategies, including:

    • Making connections Readers deeply understand when they connect what they are reading to their lives, prior knowledge, past experiences, other texts, events, and issues. Each of these connections strengthens a reader’s comprehension and helps provide context for deep understanding. Encouraging a student to examine complex connections between the text and literary themes, world events, and interrelated issues will enhance comprehension even further.
    • Visualizing All readers should form pictures in their heads as they read. These “mind movies” allow the reader to visualize the story as it is happening and deepen text comprehension. Readers should also integrate their senses to clarify visualizations and ask themselves what they can hear, taste, smell, or feel. 
    • Asking questions Asking questions before, during, and after reading deepens comprehension and provides a better understanding of the author’s purpose. Readers should ask questions throughout the reading such as: 
      • “What is the author trying to tell me?”
      • “What will happen next?”
      • “Do I understand what I am reading?"
      • “What do I already know about this topic?”
      • “How is this text like others I’ve already read?”
    • Inferring Reading comprehension isn’t just text deep. Readers must dive into the text and read between the lines to understand the deeper meaning. Drawing meaning from conclusions and questions allows the reader to make inferences based on text clues and background knowledge. Making inferences is a sophisticated comprehension skill and often requires direct and targeted practice.
    • Determining Importance In both fiction and non-fiction texts readers must determine the most important parts. Understanding the most crucial sections of a story’s plot provides the reader with clues about the conflict or character traits. Understanding the most important ideas in informational texts supports the reader’s ability to comprehend complex topics. Readers should use clues such as titles, headings, pictures, and captions to determine importance. 
    • Synthesizing Finishing a piece of text or an entire book isn’t the end. It should be just the beginning! Good readers find ways to use what they’ve learned to create their own ideas. Synthesizing requires readers to create a single understanding by combing prior knowledge and new learning. Readers must also be able to integrate a variety of other reading skills and strategies independently. It is a complex skill and can be developed while reading a variety of texts and participating in engaging discussions.

The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers offer tutoring sessions to students who are struggling with independently utilizing reading comprehension strategies. These sessions are directed by ongoing assessment data and are specifically designed to meet the needs of the individual student. This personalization tailors the tutoring sessions to the student’s specific needs and is highly effective at improving the use of reading strategies and overall comprehension.

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Help Your Child Master Essential High School Study Skills The art of studying is not an easy feat to master, but the study tips found here can take a novice to a master in no time at all.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:59:00 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-master-essential-high-school-study-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-master-essential-high-school-study-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Study skills high school students need to be successful may come easily to some and may be harder to manage for others. Understanding that your student may require more assistance in managing high school study skills is a great first step to helping boost academic performance and future work habits. Even if your high schooler is earning great grades you may want to implement these essential study skills as a way to build a strong foundation for college or career.

There are certain study skills high school students need to be successful. Sharing these tips with your child is a great first step to creating effective study skills in high school.

  1. Make a schedule Creating a personalized study schedule should be the first thing your child does at the beginning of each semester. This may change weekly or monthly but having a general studying schedule outlined will help with planning ahead. This schedule should build in time around extra-curricular activities, athletic practices, and after school jobs.
  2. Trade your time If unexpected events arise that impact the study schedule encourage your child to trade time instead of simply missing a study session. Find ways to adjust the schedule. Many students find that using one of the three weekend nights as a reserve study session provides enough time to make up missed studying.
  3. Create an organizational system No two organization systems for studying are alike. Some students prefer organizing everything digitally on a laptop or tablet, others rely on a folder and binder system, and some may choose hanging file folders in a caddy for organization. Give your child the freedom to find a system that works but provide support in creating the structure. Help your child identify better ways to organize and encourage maintenance off the organizational system.
  4. Plan ahead Your child should review the to-do list, assignment schedule, and studying schedule regularly. Flagging or highlighting important or upcoming assignments eliminates the urgent response of missed or forgotten work. If your child does forget or miss an assignment it should be completed immediately along with adjusting the standard study schedule so no other assignments suffer.
  5. Set your own deadlines Even though each assignment comes with a built in deadline from a teacher students should work to set their own deadlines. These personal deadlines help prevent procrastination and allow for extra time in case an unseen event arises and your child needs more time to complete the work. Teachers will appreciate the effort students have put in to completing work in advance of the set deadline.
  6. Plan for review Your child should find time in the weekly study schedule for a brief review of previous coursework. It should cover all the work already completed and give your child an opportunity to look forward to future work. This review will help to remind students of what has been learned and how it connects to upcoming assignments.
  7. Find a friend There may be times that your child needs to study with peers or work on classroom assignments. Encourage your child to choose classmates with successful study habits. Having friends to study with is beneficial as long as their habits don’t get in the way.
  8. Work with the teachers Your child’s teacher works as instructor, facilitator, and cheerleader. Work with the teachers to ensure the study schedule is followed and work is being completed. Teachers want their students to succeed and feel accomplishment. Contact your child’s teachers as soon as you discover a problem that needs to be addressed.

 

Do you have any other study skills high school students may find useful? What have you found that works best for your family?

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Questions to Ask When Choosing a Math Help Program Find out more about the types of questions you should ask to find a math help program that suits your child.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:45:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/questions-to-ask-when-choosing-a-math-help-program https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/questions-to-ask-when-choosing-a-math-help-program Huntington Huntington If your child is struggling in school it is natural to search for a math help program that can provide the assistance needed before gaps grow too wide and misunderstanding snowballs out of control. Watching your child struggle with math is hard and finding the perfect program can raise a child’s understanding and boost confidence. A carefully designed program will work to fill in gaps in your child’s learning and build on established strengths. You want to choose a program that carefully evaluates students, is aligned with adopted standards, personalizes instruction to the individual child’s needs, and provides ongoing feedback.

As you research programs that provide math help it is important to ask questions. Make sure you find the answers to these helpful questions:

  1. What format is the program? There are a variety of different formats for programs that provide math help. You can choose a program that is housed in an enrichment or tutoring center and offers help sessions on a regularly scheduled basis. There are programs available online that provide an interactive, self-directed learning model and are available at any time. You may find that a textbook curriculum is a good fit for your child and can choose a program that utilizes individual instruction in your home by a parent or other adult. As a parent you will know which format is the best for your child and can evaluate how your family’s schedule and work habits will impact the choice you make.
  2. How is my child evaluated? Since no two children are alike, a program designed to provide math help must carefully evaluate the student’s ability before prioritizing necessary skills. This evaluation should be thorough and based on learning standards to identify areas of strength and need. Evaluation also shouldn’t end with the onset of instruction. The program should employ evaluation methods throughout the instructional time to monitor progress and check for understanding. This ongoing evaluation will provide valuable information on how your child learns.
  3. What is the curriculum aligned with? A child’s evaluation results are crucial when determining programming and instruction but ensuring that it is aligned with age based or developmental standards is just as important. A program can be aligned with a variety of standards including state and local standards, national Common Core State Standards, developmental standards, or a scope and sequence that carefully spirals instruction and skills. Carefully planned instruction, aligned with a set of standards or as part of a scope and sequence, will help to prevent gaps in your child’s understanding.  
  4. Is the program personalized? Once the evaluation is complete and your child’s strengths and weaknesses are aligned with age based or developmental learning standards, instruction can begin. This instruction should be personalized to the child’s determined needs and built on established strengths. This personalization targets your child’s individual needs and prevents further gaps in your child’s math achievement. An effective program will also employ instructional strategies and activities based on your child’s interests. Research proves that learning is most effective when it is engaging, interactive, and based upon what a child is interested in.
  5. What type of feedback will I receive? As the math instruction continues it is important that you receive feedback on your child’s progress. This feedback will provide you with information that you need on your child’s developing skills, continued areas of need, and the effectiveness of the program. Evaluation data and progress reports will paint a picture of your child’s work in the program.

 

What insights have you discovered in your search for an effective math help program? What characteristics in a program are most important to you?

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Improve Your Study Habits To Maximize Your Success Students that use the study habits found here can transition from average to exceptional. Achieving academic success is not easy, but these tactics can help.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:28:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-your-study-habits-to-maximize-your-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-your-study-habits-to-maximize-your-success As a high school student you understand the need for effective study habits. You’re likely very busy; involved in after school activities, working a part time job, and focused on your studies. The busy life of a teenager doesn’t always lend itself to the best study habits, but working to improve the duration, habits, and schedule of your studying can help improve your grades and strengthen your academic portfolio.

Many of these effective study habits require little to no additional time and most are focused on improving the time you already spend studying. 

  • Create a weekly schedule Take inventory of your typical weekly commitments and decide when you can schedule regular study sessions. Be creative and find pockets of time that can be set aside for studying. Instead of studying only in the evening, after the rest of your commitments have ended, consider several short morning study sessions each week. If you are a morning person this may help you to get up and hit the books, making efficient use of your day. Build extra study sessions into your schedule so you can easily rearrange your studying when an unforeseen event causes conflict.
  • Don’t procrastinate Once your weekly schedule has been established stay on top of information as it is presented in class and avoid procrastination. Don’t wait several weeks to revisit material. Ongoing attention to new material allows you to build strong connections between concepts, effectively use your resources, and quickly identify when you don’t understand. Waiting to study immediately before exams or assignment due dates will prevent you from deeply understanding the concepts.
  • Stay organized You should begin each term with an organizational system that will allow you to easily access resources, assignments, and reading materials. As the term progresses you should work to maintain this system. Falling into disorganization will affect you academically and will lead to wasted study time. 

If creating an organizational system isn’t one of your strengths the professionals with Huntington Learning Centers can help you devise a way to stay organized and focused on your studying. Part of Huntington’s personalized study skills sessions is to work with you to create an organizational method that fits your personality, habits, and busy life. 

  • Use your teachers as a resource Your teachers are more than just professionals that present information each day in class. They are committed to your academic success. Use them as a resource when you feel your studying isn’t effective. If you are confused, don’t understand a specific concept, or feel like you are falling behind it is incredibly beneficial to talk to your teachers. Don’t wait, either. As soon as you feel the work is slipping away ask for help!
  • Do your research Don’t settle for just the information presented in class. Use a portion of your weekly study schedule to perform further research into important concepts. Finding ways to connect your learning to other subject areas, current events or news developments, and a deeper understanding of the concepts will build a strong foundation for your ongoing study sessions.
  • Find what works for you Your study skills are personal and what works well for others may not contribute to your best learning. As you work to improve your skills pay attention to what is most effective and what isn’t producing results. Be willing to change your study location, materials, and methods to find what works for you!

Huntington Learning Centers can help boost your study skills by providing personalized support focused on building individual habits. An initial evaluation of your current study methods is analyzed for areas of strength and weakness. Your individual program will teach you the necessary skills that build upon one another for continued academic success.

How have you improved your study habits? Do you have any successful tips that may help other students improve their habits?

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Simple Reading Practice Tips to Boost Your Child's Reading Skills The reading practice tips found here not only improve comprehension, but lead to success in other subjects as well.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:55:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/simple-reading-practice-tips-to-boost-your-childs-reading-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/simple-reading-practice-tips-to-boost-your-childs-reading-skills Huntington Huntington Have you ever wondered about methods of reading practice for kids that can boost your child’s reading skills and academic success? Sometimes the challenges of a struggling reader can feel overwhelming and it is difficult to know where to start to help your child succeed. The good news is that boosting reading skills isn’t impossible and you are fully equipped as a parent to help improve your child’s learning with targeted reading opportunities that extend to all subject areas.

Consider these helpful methods of reading practice for kids that support your struggling reader:

    • Read every day You can never underestimate the power of simply reading to or with your child. The time spent in books is beneficial and magical and will help to unlock untapped reading potential. Not only are you exposing your child to a world of reading you are modeling that reading is both useful and enjoyable.
    • Think outside the book Reading practice shouldn’t be limited to books. Think about what your child enjoys most and find a variety of materials to support these interests. Consider magazines, manuals, brochures, or online reading. Using magnet letters or letter cards with emerging readers is  also a great way to practice reading without using books. 
    • Understand expectations As a parent it is important to stay up to date on current grade level expectations for your child. Knowing what the mastery standards are can help you gauge your child’s progress. Comparing your child’s skills to the grade level and developmental expectations will provide information on your child’s strengths and areas of necessary growth.  
    • Utilize all possible resources If your child is struggling it is important to utilize every resource available to you. Investing in targeted reading tutoring can help your child gain the necessary skills for success and an online reading program can build skills while providing an interactive learning environment. Talk with your child’s teacher about what is available and what would best match your child’s ; needs. 
    • Boost vocabulary As children become better readers they are confronted with more complex topics, plots, and vocabulary. Understanding increasingly difficult vocabulary is vital for reading success. Teach your child to identify unfamiliar words and find ways to search for meaning. Encourage the use of context clues around the word or work as a team to look it up in a dictionary to find the meaning.  
    • Picture it Good readers, regardless of age, picture the story in their minds. These “mind movies” should play along as each word is read. Many struggling students fail to visualize the story and errantly miss important information. You can easily practice this strategy with your child by reading a passage aloud and then discussing the scenes you formed in your mind. If your child is unable to visualize the passage you can reread and prompt him with questions to elicit more information. 
    • Emphasize a book’s structure Every genre has a different layout and different text features to support the organization. For example, reference books utilize headings, subheadings, table of contents, glossaries and appendices while novels have chapters, dedications, and occasional illustrations. A child should understand the text features and how they work together for an intended purpose. This is especially beneficial to success in other subject areas that utilize content specific reading. 
  • Talk about books Reading with your child is important but talking with your child about books is just as powerful. Your child will benefit from viewing you as a reader and someone who learns from books. Take time each day to ask your children about what they are reading, discuss a library book you checked out as a family, or share something you learned from your own reading. 

These are just a few tips to help improve a child’s reading ability. What are some other ways to engage in reading practice for kids?

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Master Today's Study Skills For Tomorrow's Success Proper study skills are essential in order to obtain competitive scores on exams. Use these studying tips to see the academic improvements you desire.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:37:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/10-study-skills-that-will-help-you-achieve-academic-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/10-study-skills-that-will-help-you-achieve-academic-success Huntington Huntington Long term academic success depends on solid study skills. What you do today will have an impact on your immediate understanding and is also important for your ongoing knowledge. The skills and understanding you acquire today will build the foundation of success for tomorrow.

There are many surefire study skills that are certain to boost your long term academic success, including:

  1. Finding The Perfect Space Preparing the area where you'll study is crucial to long term academic success. Find a place that is quiet, free of distractions, and offers a comfortable place to work.
  2. Gathering Materials Before You Start Take a few minutes to assess what you plan on studying  and then gather all the necessary materials. If you have to break from your studying to find a book, calculator, or set of notes you will likely loose your focus and waste precious studying time.
  3. Planning Your Work Having a weekly study schedule is a great way to ensure you spend plenty of time on each subject area. Find regular blocks of time, each week, that can be dedicated to studying. Use these blocks of time wisely by prioritizing which subject areas require the most time each week.
  4. Being Patient It can take time to learn new skills and master new concepts. Be patient with your learning and information retention. Repeated practice and review can help cement new concepts and propel you toward mastery.
  5. Using Your Notes Make sure you are taking notes during your classes that you can refer to once you start studying. It is hard to remember everything that is covered in class and taking notes will help you reconnect with the day’s in-class learning. Note taking is a skill. If you could use some help learning the best way to take notes the tutors at Huntington Learning Centers can help. You will benefit from personalized sessions that teach efficient note taking strategies.
  6. Starting Early Cramming rarely works. Waiting until the last minute to start studying may result  in temporary understanding but will do very little to impact overall knowledge. Plan ahead to ensure you have plenty of time to study before exam day.
  7. Eliminating Distractions Turn your cell phone off, log off of social media  sites, and fully connect with your studying. It’s ok to go offline during these sessions because you want to ensure you can focus completely on the subject you are studying. 
  8. Taking A Break If you plan to study for an extended period of time make sure you find time to take a few breaks. Leaving the books behind for a short walk, snack, or brief conversation will help recharge your batteries to finish the study session strong. 
  9. Discovering What Works For You Each student is different. What works for others may not be what is best for you. The most important part of studying is knowing what works for you and sticking to your plan. The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers can work with you to help discover which strategies work best for your learning style. These personalized sessions will transform your studying and can help ensure long term academic success.
  10. Preparing Your Body And Mind In order to get the most out of our your study sessions you should pay attention to both your body and your mind. Being hungry or tired can affect your study habits and may prevent you from learning. Make sure you are getting plenty of sleep at night and are eating a balanced diet. Stay away from sugary snacks and caffeine to ensure mental acuity. 

 

The tutoring professionals at Huntington Learning Centers are specially trained to help you improve your study skills. What are your studying strengths? What could use improvement?

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Follow This ACT Study Guide To Stand Out From The Crowd On Test Day A thorough ACT guide can make all the difference in the world come test day. Review these 5 ACT tips and make sure you are ready for the exam.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:41:09 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/follow-this-act-study-guide-to-stand-out-from-the-crowd-on-test-day https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/follow-this-act-study-guide-to-stand-out-from-the-crowd-on-test-day Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Essential ACT Study Guide 

Many high school students can attest that an essential ACT study guide is crucial to maximum success when sitting for this high stakes exam. Preparing for the ACT shouldn't be stressful or consume all of your available time. Carefully planning your preparation, understanding which portions are likely to be difficult, and utilizing all of your available resources will strengthen your studying and help you to perform at your best.

There are several components to our essential ACT study guide and each will help ensure you are ready for the big day:

  1. Plan your preparation- The ACT is too important of an exam to leave your preparation to chance. Once you have determined which day you will sit for the exam, you should begin to map out your study time and prioritize which parts of the test require the most intense studying. Establishing a consistent weekly schedule will maximize your available time and provide the consistency vital to careful preparation. Be sure to build in extra study sessions in case your weekly schedule changes or unforeseen circumstances arise. 
  2. Understand the parts of the test- Studying the academic content areas of the exam isn't enough. To maximize your potential on the ACT you must also understand the different components of the exam and know what is necessary to achieve a high score. The ACT exam consists of English, mathematics, reading, and science and the ACT Plus Writing also includes an optional writing exam. Each of these subtests assess specific academic knowledge and skills and require exam candidates answer multiple questions within a specific time frame. 
  3. Utilize available resources- There are many different resources available to you during your ACT test preparation. The ACT website offers candidates a comprehensive online prep system, five retired exams (each containing the optional writing test), an ACT practice question of the day, a Preparing for the ACT guide, and hundreds of easily accessible practice test questions. Additionally, the professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are a valuable resource that can boost your ACT preparation and ensure you're ready for the big day. They will work with you to maximize your available study time and ensure your preparation is focused and driven by your individual strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Know your strengths, focus on your weaknesses- An important part of any exam preparation is the use of practice tests. Strategically taking practice tests will provide data on which sections of the test are your strengths and which will require more time. It is important to focus on the portions of the test that allow for the most growth. 
  5. Ask for help- It's possible to manage your ACT preparation on your own, but if you begin to feel overwhelmed or confused, it may be time to ask for help. Consider contacting the professionals at Huntington Learning Center if you are ready for individualized ACT study support. Your specific strengths and weaknesses will be expertly combined to determine a perfectly tailored study plan. The Huntington Learning Center tutors are experts at creating personalized study sessions that will help ensure you are prepared for the ACT.

 

The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are available to assist with your ACT preparation. We will work with you to devise a customized tutoring plan, based on assessment data, that focuses on the areas of the exam where you can make the most growth. No two students are alike and the staff at Huntington Learning Centers is committed to providing individualized tutoring programs tailored to your specific needs.

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Use Summer Vacation to Boost Your Child's Academic Skills! Mathematical skills are central to academic success. Our tutors can teach you about everything from fractions to functions to further your academics.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:22:47 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/use-summer-vacation-to-boost-your-childs-academic-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/use-summer-vacation-to-boost-your-childs-academic-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Building Mathematical Skills For Academic Success

As a parent it is difficult to watch your child struggle with math homework. The nightly routine of completing the assigned homework may lead to frustration, confusion, and feeling overwhelmed. Math shouldn't be the dreaded evening chore. Instead it should be an opportunity for your child to apply previous knowledge to current understanding while completing the assigned homework tasks. 

It is important to understand the core knowledge strands that comprise a student's mathematical learning. Whether your child is in second grade or a sophomore in high school these concepts are vital to mathematical understanding:

  • Counting and Cardinality - Counting, cardinal numbers, comparing numbers, and understanding quantities
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking - Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, use of multiple operations, relation of operations to one another, factors, multiples, numerical expressions, patterns, and relationships
  • Number & Operations in Base Ten - Place value, sequencing, place value in arithmetic, place value in fractions and decimals, and applying and understanding relational place value skills
  • Fractions - Equivalence, ordering, building fractions, and arithmetic with fractions
  • Measurement and Data - Understanding measurable attributes, classifying, measuring length, telling time, representing and interpreting data, estimating, counting money, applying geometric measurement principles, using probability to evaluate outcomes, and converting measurements
  • Geometry - Identifying, analyzing, comparing, classifying, creating, and composing shapes with specific attributes, graphing points on a coordinate plane, understanding congruence and similarity, and using geometrical understanding to solve real life problems
  • Proportional Relationships - Ratios, analyzing proportional relationships, and applying rate reasoning
  • Expressions and Equations - Algebraic expressions, reasoning with equations and inequalities, quantitative relationships, variables, radicals, integer exponents, and linear equations
  • Functions - Defining, evaluating, and comparing functions and modeling quantity relationships
  • Statistics and Probability - Statistical variability, distributions, random sampling, comparative references, probability models, and bivariate data

These skills are distributed among grade levels to provide a careful progression of skill attainment. Students are expected to master basic and prerequisite skills before moving on to more difficult concepts. These basic skills are then applied to current understanding to create ongoing learning and mastery. Tutors at Huntington Learning Centers use their deep understanding of mathematics and knowledge of how students acquire math skills to create customized tutoring sessions. Regardless of a student's current understanding or skill mastery, the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers can create a program that is ideal for cultivating basic academic skills.

There are several effective strategies that parents and students can utilize to improve academic skills, including:

  • Knowing the standards Each state and school district has different mathematical standards for each grade level. Understanding what your child is expected to master, and which specific skills are assessed, is crucial to cultivating strong academic skills. Taking the time to read and understand the standards documents will give you insight into essential academic skills and how these skills build upon one another. 
  • Working the problems Math is learned by working the problems. Students must spend time in ongoing practice to master basic concepts, understand formulas, and connect math skills to prior learning. If your child is struggling with a specific skill you can generate multiple opportunities for ongoing practice. This repetition will build solid foundational skills over time.
  • Applying basic concepts True mathematical understanding occurs when a student is able to apply basic concepts to larger problem solving tasks. Many tasks require students to apply a variety of skills across mathematical strands. Consider a problem requiring a student to calculate elapsed time. This problem is far more complex than just reading the time on an analog clock. A student must be able to tell time to the minute, subtract, add, regroup, apply basic problem solving strategies, and participate in mathematical communication. 
  • Asking for help If your child is continuing to struggle with the assigned math homework it may be time to ask for help. The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are experts at understanding why a student is struggling in math. Assessment data is used to create a customized learning plan that incorporates both a student's strengths and weaknesses. Personalized tutoring sessions are carefully crafted to meet the specific needs of each student.
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Standardized Test Taking Strategies That Will Help On The SAT or ACT Prepare for test day with these strategies for standardized tests. The 10 tips found here can help you reach your potential on the SAT or ACT.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:58:34 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-test-taking-strategies-that-will-help-on-the-sat-or-act- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-test-taking-strategies-that-will-help-on-the-sat-or-act- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Top Ten Strategies for Standardized Test Taking

 Doing your very best on an exam requires careful preparation, a positive outlook, and an understanding of highly effective standardized test taking strategies. Taking a standardized test is high stakes, but it doesn't need to be high pressure. These ten standardized test taking strategies will set you on the right path!

  1. Plan your preparation and allow plenty of time Cramming rarely works. The best way to excel on any standardized test is to carefully plan your preparation while allowing plenty of time to study. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers can help you identify which areas of the exam will require the most preparation. Using careful assessment practices they will identify both your strengths and your weaknesses while planning individualized tutoring sessions tailored to your specific needs.
  2. Prepare for the format Every standardized test is different. They each emphasize different skills, knowledge, and test formats. Understanding the specific format of the test you are going to take is vital. Spend time researching the tested subject areas, the skills included in the assessment, and the time allowed for each section.
  3. Understand what is allowed Each standardized test specifically outlines what is allowed in the exam and what is not. There are limitations on electronics, materials, and calculators. Make sure you know what you can and cannot bring into the test and leave all prohibited items at home. Don't let a wayward cell phone ring jeopardize your exam performance.
  4. Get plenty of rest and fuel your body properly Your mind can't work to its maximum potential without proper rest and fuel. Make sure you are focusing on your physical health, as well as your cognitive preparation, leading up to test day. Get plenty of sleep and choose healthy meals high in protein and low in sugar.
  5. Know where you are going Don't wait until the last minute to find out where the exam is being held. Take a trial run to find your testing center and the room you will be in. Allow plenty of time on the day of the test to account for traffic or unforeseen delays.
  6. Use your test booklet Put your test booklet to good use! You can underline, circle, cross out, draw diagrams, jot notes, and work problems in your test booklet. Make sure to avoid errant marks on the answer sheet to avoid confusion with electronic scoring.
  7. Scan the exam Before you answer any questions take a minute to scan the exam. Look for the types of questions asked, how many questions are in each subtest, and any potential pitfalls. This will help you to pace yourself during the exam and allow you to maximize the available time.
  8. Get active You don't have time for passive reading. Once you start answering questions it is critical for you to read actively and interact with the exam. Use context clues, critical vocabulary, and connections to other topics to help you answer questions. If you are unsure how to use active reading strategies during a standardized test, the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers can help. Your personalized tutoring sessions will help you gain the skills necessary to quickly and effectively navigate and understand the exam questions.
  9. Pace yourself If a question seems too difficult, or may require too much time, it is a good idea to skip it and come back to it. Make sure to spend a majority of your time on questions that you are confident in your answers. If there is time available you can go back and answer questions that you skipped.
  10. Use every available second If you finish before time is called you should return to the test booklet and review your answers. Take a second look at items that posed a challenge and reread the questions for clarity. You should also scan the answer sheet for errant marks or areas that need to be clearly erased.
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Build Mathematical Skills With Help From Our Highly Trained Tutors Help your child build math skills and reading skills with highly trained tutors at tutoring centers.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:44:54 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/build-math-skills-with-tutoring-services---huntington-learning-center https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/build-math-skills-with-tutoring-services---huntington-learning-center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Building Mathematical Skills For Academic Success

As a parent it is difficult to watch your child struggle with math homework. The nightly routine of completing the assigned homework may lead to frustration, confusion, and feeling overwhelmed. Math shouldn't be the dreaded evening chore. Instead it should be an opportunity for your child to apply previous knowledge to current understanding while completing the assigned homework tasks.

It is important to understand the core knowledge strands that comprise a student's mathematical learning. Whether your child is in second grade or a sophomore in high school these concepts are vital to mathematical understanding:

  • Counting and Cardinality - Counting, cardinal numbers, comparing numbers, and understanding quantities
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking - Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, use of multiple operations, relation of operations to one another, factors, multiples, numerical expressions, patterns, and relationships
  • Number & Operations in Base Ten - Place value, sequencing, place value in arithmetic, place value in fractions and decimals, and applying and understanding relational place value skills
  • Fractions - Equivalence, ordering, building fractions, and arithmetic with fractions
  • Measurement and Data - Understanding measurable attributes, classifying, measuring length, telling time, representing and interpreting data, estimating, counting money, applying geometric measurement principles, using probability to evaluate outcomes, and converting measurements
  • Geometry - Identifying, analyzing, comparing, classifying, creating, and composing shapes with specific attributes, graphing points on a coordinate plane, understanding congruence and similarity, and using geometrical understanding to solve real life problems
  • Proportional Relationships - Ratios, analyzing proportional relationships, and applying rate reasoning
  • Expressions and Equations - Algebraic expressions, reasoning with equations and inequalities, quantitative relationships, variables, radicals, integer exponents, and linear equations
  • Functions - Defining, evaluating, and comparing functions and modeling quantity relationships
  • Statistics and Probability - Statistical variability, distributions, random sampling, comparative references, probability models, and bivariate data

These skills are distributed among grade levels to provide a careful progression of skill attainment. Students are expected to master basic and prerequisite skills before moving on to more difficult concepts. These basic skills are then applied to current understanding to create ongoing learning and mastery. Tutors at Huntington Learning Centers use their deep understanding of mathematics and knowledge of how students acquire math skills to create customized tutoring sessions. Regardless of a student's current understanding or skill mastery, the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers can create a program that is ideal for cultivating basic academic skills.

There are several effective strategies that parents and students can utilize to improve academic skills, including:

  • Knowing the standards Each state and school district has different mathematical standards for each grade level. Understanding what your child is expected to master, and which specific skills are assessed, is crucial to cultivating strong academic skills. Taking the time to read and understand the standards documents will give you insight into essential academic skills and how these skills build upon one another.
  • Working the problems Math is learned by working the problems. Students must spend time in ongoing practice to master basic concepts, understand formulas, and connect math skills to prior learning. If your child is struggling with a specific skill you can generate multiple opportunities for ongoing practice. This repetition will build solid foundational skills over time.
  • Applying basic concepts True mathematical understanding occurs when a student is able to apply basic concepts to larger problem solving tasks. Many tasks require students to apply a variety of skills across mathematical strands. Consider a problem requiring a student to calculate elapsed time. This problem is far more complex than just reading the time on an analog clock. A student must be able to tell time to the minute, subtract, add, regroup, apply basic problem solving strategies, and participate in mathematical communication.
  • Asking for help If your child is continuing to struggle with the assigned math homework it may be time to ask for help. The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are experts at understanding why a student is struggling in math. Assessment data is used to create a customized learning plan that incorporates both a student's strengths and weaknesses. Personalized tutoring sessions are carefully crafted to meet the specific needs of each student.
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SAT Tips That Will Ensure You Are Fully Prepared For Test Day Use these simple tips to get ready for the SAT. Follow these 5 guidelines and you will surely be confident and prepared on the day of the exam.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:54:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-tips-that-will-ensure-you-are-fully-prepared-for-test-day- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-tips-that-will-ensure-you-are-fully-prepared-for-test-day- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Get Ready for the SAT: Five Simple Tips

 Preparing for the SAT is more than just practice questions and memorizing vocabulary words. Proper SAT practice should follow an SAT study guide that is focused on comprehensive preparation that helps ensure students are ready for exam day. Using past performance data, applying current skills and knowledge, and understanding SAT testing conditions will maximize your potential and help propel you toward your academic future.

This SAT study guide is focused on maximizing available test prep resources and helping you to improve your understanding of various concepts prior to test day. You'll quickly understand how preparing wisely now will pay off when you feel confident about your preparation and are pleased with your performance.

Prepare your mind AND body
Preparing your mind for the SAT without also taking care of your physical needs is not ideal. Your brain can only work as hard as your body allows. During the entire SAT preparation you should also focus on proper nutrition, getting plenty of sleep, and finding time for physical activity. If you expect your brain to be in great shape for the SAT exam you also need to carefully prepare your body for the big day.

Don't cram
Cramming rarely works. Trying to prepare for a high stakes test in a small window of time will likely only leave you frustrated, confused, and overwhelmed. The best means of preparation is to carefully plan your studying to ensure you have plenty of time to cover all assessed subject areas.  It is imperative that you take practice exams and these should be taken under testing conditions. Doing this will improve both your overall knowledge and test taking skills. Set aside specific blocks of time each week that are dedicated to SAT prep and ensure you meet a minimum amount of study time each week. 

Increase your academic vocabulary
Possessing a wide range of academic vocabulary is an essential part of doing your best on the SAT. Not only will increasing your vocabulary help with vocabulary test sections, it will also boost your understanding of reading passages, refine the content of your written essays, and increase your chances of correctly answering a wide variety of test questions. If you are looking for additional ways to improve your academic vocabulary, the professionals with Huntington Learning Centers can help! Part of the SAT tutoring sessions available through the learning centers focuses on increasing relevant academic vocabulary.

Source content for the essay portion 
The prompts used on the SAT utilize general topics accessible to all exam candidates. Because the writing time is limited on testing day it is vital to source evidence and content before you begin the test. Take the time to gather scholarly examples that could be used to answer a variety of prompts such as novels or literary characters, current news stories, global or national issues, and historical events. Sourcing and studying this content ahead of time will allow you to focus on writing a thoughtful essay instead of racking your brain for applicable content.

Practice under testing conditions
Preparing for the SAT exam is all about understanding what is expected of you on test day. Don't leave anything to chance. While you are studying it is important to spend time adhering to the actual testing conditions you'll encounter on exam day. Turn off your cell phone, ensure your calculator is an approved model, use only questions released by the SAT and the College Board, and take at least one practice exam while following the specific testing conditions and time guidelines. 

If you are feeling overwhelmed by preparing for the SAT exam consider contacting the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers. The highly skilled tutors are specifically trained to help students prepare for the SAT while focusing on the areas of the exam that provide the most opportunity for growth. Each individual tutoring session will be carefully designed to meet your individual needs and will help you in your pursuit to achieve the highest score possible.

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Summer Learning in Your Community According to the National Summer Learning Association at Johns Hopkins University, all students experience learning losses when they are not involved in educational activities over the summer. Eileen Huntington, Cofounder of Huntington Learning Center agrees that planning meaningful activities for the summer months can prevent children from regressing—and help them be ready for the next grade. “It sounds overwhelming to come up with a summer full of educational activities, but there are so many great things children can do to continue learning in the summer that don’t involve homework and studying,” says Huntington. “Look within your community for inspiration. You’ll likely find lots of fun programs and opportunities that your child will enjoy—and his or her teacher will appreciate!” Huntington offers these sparks to find fun summer learning activities in your community:

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Mon, 12 Jun 2017 12:41:54 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-learning-in-your-community https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-learning-in-your-community Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center According to the National Summer Learning Association at Johns Hopkins University, all students experience learning losses when they are not involved in educational activities over the summer. Eileen Huntington, Cofounder of Huntington Learning Center agrees that planning meaningful activities for the summer months can prevent children from regressing—and help them be ready for the next grade. “It sounds overwhelming to come up with a summer full of educational activities, but there are so many great things children can do to continue learning in the summer that don’t involve homework and studying,” says Huntington. “Look within your community for inspiration. You’ll likely find lots of fun programs and opportunities that your child will enjoy—and his or her teacher will appreciate!” Huntington offers these sparks to find fun summer learning activities in your community:

 

  1. Search for summer programs or camps. There are many camps, schools and programs around the country focused on overall academic enrichment and others targeted to specific subjects. Contact your local college or library (or ask your child’s teacher) for summer learning programs in your area.
  2. Do fun science experiments. Your child’s teacher may have ideas for summer science experiments that will captivate your child from June until September. Try tracking and charting the daily temperature and weather, planting a garden and measuring (and journaling about) its progress, or other observation projects—birds or other animals in your area, neighborhood traffic or even the mailman’s daily schedule. For short experiments, check out the “Fun Stuff” section of the National Geographic Kids website, which features many easy science experiments. Your local nature and science museum may have resources and suggestions for educational and fun activities for kids, and may also offer classes and camps.
  3. Turn a hobby into an educational activity. Summer is an ideal time for your child to explore interests. Why not turn his or her passion into a summer-long lesson? Give your baseball fan a list of the Major League Baseball teams and have him or her research five fun facts about each—such as the oldest player, year founded or origin of the team name. Check out baseball documentaries and books from the library about your child’s favorite player and team. Learn together how to calculate a batting average and track the performance of your five favorite hitters.
  4. Plan hometown field trips. Vacations are great ways for families to research and learn about new places, but there are many opportunities right in your community for your child to explore the history, science and culture of your area. Regularly visit the library for programs and events for kids and the whole family, and be sure to also explore the zoo and the local art, nature, science, history and other museums in your town. Your local chamber of commerce may also be an excellent resource.

 

Talk with your child’s current teacher and, if possible, his or her teacher for next year about ideas for summer activities that will help your child transition smoothly into the upcoming school year. Your child’s future teacher may have curriculum information to share with you that can guide the level, types and format of activities you choose. “Be creative,” says Huntington. “With a little creativity and thinking ahead, parents can keep their children engaged and learning all summer long.”

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Learn Proper Study Habits And Apply Them In Every One Of Your Classes Proper study habits are essential if you want to maximize your potential. Learn planning and organization and you will achieve your academic goals.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:33:28 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/learn-proper-study-habits-and-apply-them-in-every-one-of-your-classes- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/learn-proper-study-habits-and-apply-them-in-every-one-of-your-classes- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Simple Tips to Improve Your Study Habits and Grades

It's no secret that your study habits can have a serious impact on your academic achievement, classroom performance, and grades. Effective study skills allow you to properly manage your time, retain important classroom learning, and prepare for assessments designed to test your academic achievement. If your studying is getting in the way of your success there's no better time than now to make some changes. Altering your habits now can help prepare you for future academic work and will certainly boost your achievement and grades.

There are several easy changes you can make that will improve both your study habits and your grades:

  • Plan ahead Take the time to write assignments in a planner, add due dates to an electronic calendar, and review course syllabi as the term progresses. Seeing all of your projects, exams, and assignments on one comprehensive calendar allows you to plan ahead and not miss a deadline. If you can see well in advance that a particular week is going to be busy you can spend the prior weeks working ahead to complete everything on time.
  • Stay organized If you are constantly searching for your notes, supplies, or reading materials you are going to waste your precious study time. Make a concerted effort to stay organized. Consider maintaining a separate folder (on your computer or within your materials) for each course. Keep all of your things together and work to eliminate supplies, paperwork, and notes you don't need.
  • Create a dedicated study space Consider where you currently spend your time studying. Is it conducive to your learning and achievement? Are you able to concentrate without distraction? If your study space could use an upgrade consider finding ways to create a dedicated study area. Perhaps a larger table in your room would help with your organization or a desk in your family's living room will provide the quiet escape you need to study.
  • Review prior learning Studying new information is essential to your academic success. But reviewing previous coursework and prior learning can be just as powerful. Find time in your study sessions to include a review of previous material. This will help to maintain a strong foundational understanding and connect with current learning. If you find that some of your basic skills are lacking consider investing in customized tutoring sessions. The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are experts at reinforcing basic skills. Each personalized tutoring plan includes dedicated time for reviewing prior learning and ensuring a student's basic skills remain strong.
  • Disconnect We live in an increasingly digital age and it is hard, but vital, to turn off electronic devices in order to truly concentrate. Silence your phone, turn the tablet off, and don't be tempted to "check in" while you work. Picking up your phone to quickly check Facebook or to read a few Tweets may not seem like it will take a long time, but the distractions quickly add up. Don't waste your valuable study time playing on unnecessary electronic devices.
  • Seek help before it's too late If you are struggling with making changes to your study skills on your own it may be time to ask for help. Don't squander time this term trying to figure it out on your own when there are professionals that can be of incredible help. The expert tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are dedicated to serving as trusted advisers to students in need of a study skills boost. Each tutor is trained to help students maximize their study time, connect to previously learned material, and stay on track for academic success and improved grades.
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Incentivizing Your Child to Read Although many parents may wish that their child would always choose a good book over a television show or video game, reading may not necessarily be every child's go-to activity. If you’re looking for ways to encourage your young reader to read more often "or simply consider reading as an alternative to other activities" here are a few suggestions.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:28:49 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/incentivizing-your-child-to-read https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/incentivizing-your-child-to-read Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Incentivizing Your Child to Read

Although many parents may wish that their child would always choose a good book over a television show or video game, reading may not necessarily be every child’s go-to activity. If you’re looking for ways to encourage your young reader to read more often—or simply consider reading as an alternative to other activities—here are a few suggestions. These simple ideas, incentives, tips and activities will help you get your child into the reading habit.

Read together. Make reading a family event. If you think your child may be too old to be read to, think again. Reading aloud is an enjoyable activity at any age, and if you let your child choose the book, you may have greater success at capturing his or her interest. Try alternating readers each night.   

Go interactive. For the techie child, try e-books or interactive stories on your tablet, laptop or even your smartphone. Many tablet-based stories make for an entirely unique story-reading experience, whereby readers can sing along, personalize the story, make choices, play games and take quizzes along the way, and much more.

Uphold a nightly 20-minute reading period. From a young age, make 20 minutes of reading a part of the nightly routine. The earlier you begin this habit, the better—but if you’re just starting this when your child is already of reading age, make it a family activity. Every night after dinner and homework, make hot chocolate or lemonade, put out some snacks and have everyone grab a place on the couch or the floor with a favorite book. Check out new books from the library every week or every other week.

Create a rewards chart. Try celebrating your child’s reading success with small rewards. Create a chart to track your child’s nightly reading, and establish a few goals and prizes for when those goals are achieved. For example, if your child reads 20 minutes a night for two weeks, maybe he or she can have a friend over for a sleepover. For every book read, your child could earn a prize from a prize box that you fill with inexpensive treats and small toys—or your child could save up his or her “points” for a bigger prize.

Make reading the reward. Reading for pleasure is a luxury for many busy adults, so as your child’s school and extracurricular schedule gets busier, perhaps try a different approach to make reading the prize that he or she can earn. For example, if your young child completes his or her chores without being asked, let him or her have 10 extra minutes of reading time that night, an afternoon at the library with mom or dad, or some “book dollars” that he or she can put toward building the home library. 

Hold a reading raffle. Put a bowl or jar in your kitchen and have your children write their names on a slip of paper and drop it into the bowl each time they finish a book. Each month, pick one slip of paper from the bowl and reward the winner with a prize or fun outing. 

Give a book allowance. If your child receives an allowance, consider making a part of it an allowance for books. Then, take your child to the bookstore once a week or once a month, or shop for inexpensive books at www.scholastic.com.

Let your child stay up late. Now and again—a weekend night might be best—let your child stay up late as long as he or she is reading a book or magazine. Give him or her a flashlight to make it even more fun. Make those lights-on nights a treat or a reward for putting forth good effort on that test or project.

Without a doubt, reading is an activity that becomes more enjoyable and exciting as a child becomes a stronger reader. If it takes occasional or even frequent nudges to get your child to read more, that’s okay. The incentivizing may very well pay off in the long run. Once he or she becomes engrossed in the adventure and joy of books, there will be no stopping your child from choosing to read. Of course, encouragement and incentives are only effective if your child is capable of reading well. If you sense that your child is having difficulty with reading basics, no amount of incentives will make him or her want to read. Don’t wait to seek help. Contact Huntington for a diagnostic evaluation of your child.

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The Impact Of Your SAT Scores: How They Are Calculated & What Do They Really Mean? SAT Scores are a critical component of any college application. The tips found here gives students insight into how the exam is scored and can help improve their scores.

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Fri, 09 Dec 2016 16:37:37 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-impact-of-your-sat-scores--how-they-are-calculated--what-do-they-really-mean https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-impact-of-your-sat-scores--how-they-are-calculated--what-do-they-really-mean Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Impact Of Your SAT Scores:  How They Are Calculated & What Do They Really Mean?

Many high school students may wonder how important their SAT scores are in relation to other parts of an accomplished academic portfolio. The short answer? They're important. These scores remain a relevant way to demonstrate the skills and knowledge you've gained in high school. Understanding your scores and the impact they can have on your future is crucial to preparing for your college admissions.

SAT scores are used in a variety of ways, including:

  • College admissions. Each college determines its individual admissions requirements and a vast majority of schools require students submit a set of scores from the SAT exam. These scores will provide additional achievement data and reflect the knowledge and skills you have gained in high school. 
  • Scholarships and grants. As the cost of higher education increases the competition for scholarships and grants has also skyrocketed. Your scores from the SAT exam can help you stand out from the crowd. Consider the scores as an additional piece of evidence that proves you are highly qualified for the award. 
  • Merit based financial aid. Some financial aid is based on need as well as merit. The professionals that award merit based financial aid are committed to ensuring that highly qualified students in need of financial assistance receive the support necessary to attend college. A strong SAT score will help your application if you plan to apply for any merit based financial aid. 

Don't fear the SAT exam. View this milestone as a way to boost your academic portfolio and demonstrate the knowledge you've gained in high school. Preparing for the SAT and utilizing your scores to your best advantage will help set you apart. 

Seek help in preparing for the exam. Because the SAT is a high stakes test you are wise to seek support in your preparation. Consider enrolling in a series of personalized tutoring sessions that are designed to match both your strengths and weaknesses. Huntington Learning Centers offer several different SAT preparation courses that are individualized to help you succeed. Spending the weeks and months leading up to the exam in intentional practice will ensure you are ready for test day.

Understand how the test is scored. When you receive your scores you will likely be focused on the total score and the individual scores of each subtest. Just as important is the process that was used to calculate the scores. You will receive one point for each correct multiple choice answer and will lose 1/4 point for each incorrect multiple choice answer. You will receive zero points for an omitted answer or an incorrect answer on a student-produced math response. The essay portion of the writing test is scored on a scale of 1 to 6  by two independent readers. The raw score for each subtest (math, reading, and math) is converted to a scaled score with 800 as the maximum score. These three subtest scores are combined for your overall score on the SAT.

Since one subtest can have a significant impact on your overall score it may be beneficial to seek targeted subject tutoring for specific academic areas. Huntington Learning Centers offer tutoring in a wide variety of subject areas, as well as test preparation, to ensure that their students are able to succeed on all portions of the SAT exam. 

Know the admissions policies of schools you are applying to. Every college in the country has a different admissions policy and set of criteria for determining which students are granted admission. Spend time researching the admissions policy for each school you are interested in. Determine what is required and the amount of emphasis placed on SAT scores. Each college takes into account high school grades, test scores, achievements, and activities but may place emphasis on certain parts of a student's admissions portfolio. 

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Gain College Acceptance The Write Way Exceptional writing skills are helpful when crafting a personal statement as part of a college application. Use these tips to improve your statement and get into college.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:45:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/gain-college-acceptance-the-write-way https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/gain-college-acceptance-the-write-way Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Gain College Acceptance The Write Way

Gaining college admission requires a delicate balance of high school grades, personal history and participation, test scores, and college writing skills. A student works for years to gain the grades and personal history required to stand out in a crowded admissions field. But the SAT exam and the personal statement required by most colleges provide only a brief window for success.

College writing skills are unique in that they benefit both the student's SAT scores and the directed personal statement as part of a college admission portfolio. Even if your child has received excellent writing instruction during high school, the professionals at Huntington Learning Centers can help fine tune the writing skills of even the most established writer. The time spent in these tutoring sessions will provide insight on how to write focused pieces of literature carefully crafted for the: 

  • SAT ExamEach student that sits for the SAT exam is required to complete a written essay. Students are expected to read a passage or excerpt and develop a point of view from the presented material. This point of view must be based on sound reasoning and supported by a student's studies, reading, observations, and experiences. The writing portion of the SAT exam is a powerful opportunity for a student to express their thoughts, communicate effectively, utilize precise language, and develop ideas. 

The essay prompts are typically general statements that are applicable to all students regardless of location, race, ethnicity, or gender. The most recently released prompts from the March 2013 administration asked students to consider the importance of paying attention to details, setting goals, or resolving conflict. Students interpreted the reading passages and crafted careful responses to a series of guiding questions. Since the writing portion is timed, students must be able to write efficiently and process ideas quickly.

  • Personal Statement. Each college has a different admissions process and most institutions require students submit a personal statement as part of the admissions portfolio. This statement should contain a balance of spirit and substance and allow the admissions panel an opportunity to learn something about your child. It should stand out without being contrived and be substantive without being too serious. 

When crafting a personal statement a student should:

Connect to experiences. Simply listing past experiences isn't effective in a personal statement. Students should include specific examples of past experiences and discuss how these experiences will help them with their future educational endeavors. Showing a clear link between personal history and future college education provides weight to the admissions portfolio.

Look to the future. Being admitted into the college isn't enough. A student should find ways in the personal statement to describe and explain how the college can help them achieve future goals and to be successful after the education ends. 

Avoid clichés. Clear word choice is crucial since most personal statements have a word limit. Don't waste these words on hyperbole, cliches, or vague language. Students need to be clear, concise, and communicate effectively.

Be honest. Students should paint themselves in the best light possible while remaining honest. Stretching the truth or offering unsubstantiated evidence doesn't make the personal statement better, these tactics make it false. 

Huntington Learning Centers are committed to creating high quality individual tutoring sessions aimed at increasing a student's writing skills. We will begin by assessing your child's writing and determining areas of strength and weakness. Based on this assessment data we will carefully craft a series of tutoring sessions that will meet these defined needs. Ongoing assessment and feedback will provide you the assurance you need that the tutoring is a wise investment and will benefit your child's writing skills and future college placement.

Consider your child's writing skills. What areas of their writing could use attention? How can tutoring sessions with a Huntington Learning Center writing specialist boost their college writing skills?

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Encouraging Literacy Through Public Service Many parents work hard to find ways to teach their children to be good citizens and caring people, but with a little planning, you can also foster your child's interest in reading at the same time.

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Fri, 09 Dec 2016 15:45:39 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/encouraging-literacy-through-public-service https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/encouraging-literacy-through-public-service Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Encouraging Literacy Through Public Service

Many parents work hard to find ways to teach their children to be good citizens and caring people, but with a little planning,  you can also foster your child’s interest in reading at the same time. If you volunteer as a family or are looking for opportunities to help worthwhile organizations in your community, here are a few ideas that may benefit your child.

Read in a sibling’s classroom.

If you have an elementary school student and a preschooler, talk with your preschooler’s teacher about having your older child read to his or her little brother’s or sister’s class. This is a great chance for both children to feel special and an opportunity for your older student to see how much younger children enjoy being read to.

Work with organizations to help low-income children.

Your child might be surprised to know how many children in the United States and around the world do not have access to books. Organizations like First Book (www.firstbook.org), a nonprofit that strives to provide books to schools and programs for children in low-income families, works in hundreds of communities across the U.S. You and your child can reach out to a First Book Advisory Board near you to find out how you can help. For other ideas, check with your local library.

Share your books.

Your child could get involved with BookCrossing (www.bookcrossing.com), a worldwide book sharing program. This program is a fun way for your child to celebrate literature by sharing and tracking books he or she no longer needs. Talk with your school or local library, too, for other ideas on how your family can share books you no longer want with organizations in need (or volunteer with those same organizations).

Start a book drive.

There are many great local and national organizations that strive to add to libraries’ inventories, give books to organizations in need (homeless shelters or nursing homes, for example) and get books into the hands of children. Check with schools and libraries in your area, and also check out organizations near you for ideas on how to start or get involved in a book drive. BooksEnds in California, Chicago Book Drive (www.chicagobookdrive.com) and Books4Cause (based in Chicago but serving the Midwest) are all great examples.

Volunteer at the library.

One of the best ways for students to serve their communities while gaining valuable exposure to books and literature is to volunteer at the library. Your public library likely has many opportunities for young students to get involved, such as read-aloud programs, children’s story times and other programs, special projects, shelf and display organizing, and materials sorting.

Look throughout your school and town for opportunities to help others enjoy reading and encourage your student to get involved. The more you can incorporate reading into your child’s daily life—both by having him or her read and fostering reading in your community—the better. Of course, while these are great activities, there is no substitute for frequent reading. If your child is struggling or could use targeted help, call Huntington. We can develop a customized learning program to help your child become a stronger reader, which will help him or her learn to enjoy this wonderful pastime. 

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SAT Subject Tests & Huntington Learning Centers: A Winning Combination SAT Subject Tests can be the difference between the college of your child's dreams or a community college. We can get your child to the next level.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:53:37 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-subject-tests--huntington-learning-centers-a-winning-combination https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-subject-tests--huntington-learning-centers-a-winning-combination Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Subject Tests and Huntington Learning Centers: A Winning Combination

Over the last twenty years there have been many developments in the SAT examination process including the opportunity to register for SAT Subject Tests. These exams are each one hour long and are multiple choice standardized tests. The only exception to the hour long test is the series of language tests with a listening component. The listening section adds additional time to the exam. The goal of these tests is to improve a student's credentials when applying to colleges. Students may choose to take the SAT Subject Tests to prepare for a college application or to meet a college's specific entrance requirements. 

SAT Subject Tests are available in 20 subject areas representing a wide range of high school curriculum. You can choose to register for SAT Subject Tests in any of these areas and may take as many tests as you would like. The SAT Subject Tests include exams in multiple curricular areas including:

  • Biology (Ecological or Molecular) There are two SAT Subject Tests in biology. The Ecological Biology Test is focused on the natural world and assesses concepts such as populations, energy flow, and biologically based communities. The Molecular Biology Test assesses your abilities in micro-level biology including cell structure, cellular processes, and biochemistry. The Huntington Learning Centers' subject tutoring sessions are designed to help you transfer the skills you've learned in high school to being prepared for the SAT Subject Tests.  
  • Chemistry If you are considering majoring in science or engineering you will likely want to take the Chemistry Subject Test to provide further support to your high school grades. This tests your ability to understand and display a knowledge of major concepts in chemistry and apply this understanding to specific problem solving situations. The Huntington Learning Centers' SAT Subject Test tutoring sessions will help you prepare for solving chemistry related problems. 
  • Mathematics 1 The Mathematics 1 test evaluates math skills from three years of college preparatory math, including one year of geometry and two of algebra. You can choose to take the Mathematics 1 test to show an interest in math related majors, support your high school grades, or set you apart from other applicants. The SAT Subject Test tutoring program at Huntington Learning Centers combines test taking skills with algebra and geometry concepts to prepare students for a successful test administration. 
  • Mathematics 2 This test covers all of the material in the Mathematics 1 test (algebra and geometry) and includes material from trigonometry and calculus. The tutoring sessions for the SAT Subject Tests can help you determine which of the two mathematics tests you should take. 
  • Physics The Physics Subject Test evaluates your understanding of one year of college preparatory physics and the reasoning skills honed in the physics laboratory. You are expected to understand basic physics concepts and to apply problem solving skills to physics problems. The Huntington Learning Center's tutoring team will coach you in ways to effectively translate your physics knowledge to the SAT Subject Tests.

 

Huntington Learning Centers offer subject tutoring in the above curricular areas aligned with the SAT Subject Tests. Participating in these enriching and worthwhile tutoring sessions will prepare you for the SAT Subject Tests. Competition can be fierce to receive admission into a top university and every point on the SAT can help strengthen your application. Don't overlook the benefits that subject area tutoring can provide when you are preparing to register for SAT Subject Tests.

What SAT Subject Tests will you be taking? How have you been preparing for these exams?

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How to Help Your Teen Stop Procrastinating It's Sunday night, and once again your teen has put off a big school project 'due tomorrow' until the last minute. If frantic trips to the library or the office supply store are all too familiar, you're likely dealing with a procrastination problem. It is possible to help your student change, however. Here are a few ideas to help your teen overcome procrastination:

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:12:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-teen-stop-procrastinating https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-teen-stop-procrastinating How to Help Your Teen Stop Procrastinating

It’s Sunday night, and once again your teen has put off a big school project—due tomorrow—until the last minute. If frantic trips to the library or the office supply store are all too familiar, you’re likely dealing with a procrastination problem. It is possible to help your student change, however. Here are a few ideas to help your teen overcome procrastination:

  • Break down large or complex projects into manageable tasks. The idea of a looming paper or project can overwhelm students who can only see the many cumulative hours required to cross the finish line. Work together to break a large task into smaller subtasks and schedule those to-dos well in advance of the final due date.
  • Get started—and only work for manageable periods of time. Often the biggest obstacle for a student is getting going on a project. Set a small goal—such as writing two sentences for that term paper or brainstorming for five minutes on the topic of that science project. For sessions thereafter, set similar “mini” goals that will help keep your teen’s wheels turning.
  • Define the most important tasks for each day or study session. Making a short list of things to accomplish for each study session can help keep your student focused and prevent him or her from feeling overwhelmed, which can easily lead to procrastination. This will also help your teen learn to prioritize.
  • Set goals and rewards. Try incentivizing your teen to work toward small milestones and involve him or her in selecting the rewards. Remember to hold him or her to the standards you put into place. While a reward system can help ignite your teen, long term, your student must be intrinsically motivated. The greatest reward for not procrastinating should be the satisfaction of completing work on time and the relief that accompanies not waiting until the last minute to do something.
  • Practice using a calendar. All students need an organizational system, and using a planner effectively will help your teen stay on task. Show your teen how you use your own calendar or planner to record appointments and deadlines. Then, sit down together with his or her planner to record daily homework time and extracurricular activities, subtasks for big projects, study sessions for upcoming tests and more.
  • If all else fails, let your student fail. Though it may be hard to do, allowing your teen to experience the negative outcomes of procrastinating may be the best way for him or her to learn a valuable lesson—and become more responsible. Let your student suffer the consequences of his or her own actions so he or she can identify the bad patterns that result from his or her behavior.

Procrastination can be a self-fulfilling cycle—and a difficult problem to solve. However, with persistence and patience, your efforts will pay off. Encourage your teen to take ownership for his or her own successes and failures and establish good study habits and watch him or her become a more responsible student and person.

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How to Spot Problems in Children's Writing Homework For many children, learning to write well is one of the most demanding parts of the school experience' and English and language arts classes come with many frustrating challenges. Perhaps your child has always struggled with writing or maybe he or she is just starting to experience difficulties. You can help by taking time to review all writing assignments and graded homework for issues and teacher notes, making your own observations of your child's work, and sharing feedback with your child.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:14:02 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-spot-problems-in-childrens-writing-homework https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-spot-problems-in-childrens-writing-homework How to Spot Problems in Children’s Writing Homework

For many children, learning to write well is one of the most demanding parts of the school experience—and English and language arts classes come with many frustrating challenges. Perhaps your child has always struggled with writing or maybe he or she is just starting to experience difficulties. You can help by taking time to review all writing assignments and graded homework for issues and teacher notes, making your own observations of your child’s work, and sharing feedback with your child.

As you review your child’s written work, keep an eye out for red flags by asking yourself these five questions:

Did my child follow directions? If your student was asked to answer a specific question and instead rambled on about something off topic, perhaps he or she needs to spend more time on the brainstorming and/or outlining stages of the writing process. Read through the assignment together and help your child come up with possible topics and angles he or she could take with each. Help him or her take those ideas and develop a loose outline to write from as well.

Does it make sense? Whether the assignment is a simple book report or an in-depth essay, your student needs to learn to write clearly and communicate his or her main point in a logical and compelling way. Any time you read your student’s writing, make sure it reads well and is not confusing. Can you easily grasp what he or she is trying to say?

Are words misspelled and are there any grammar issues? By high school, your student should be a capable speller—so if spelling is a consistent problem, you’ll want to ask the teacher how you can help your child improve. Also look for improper grammar in writing homework. At the very least, take note of things such as run-on sentences, unclear wording, unnecessary commas, sentence fragments and the like.

Does the piece follow an outline or basic structure? You don’t need to be an English teacher to notice when a book report doesn’t do what it is supposed to do (summarize a story and put forth the student’s opinion on it) or an essay lacks a conclusion or compelling main point. The basic essay structure and the outline as a writing tool will become your child’s trusted writing companions as he or she navigates middle and high school. Be sure your child understands the underlying framework of a well-written report, essay or paper.

Did my child give this a final review? If an assignment is full of errors, it’s a safe assumption that he or she simply wrote it, printed it and turned it in. Teach your student the importance of reviewing one’s work after setting a draft aside for a day or so. Fresh eyes can do wonders for the editing process, as can slowly reading aloud. Students must learn to be strong self-editors as they move into high school.  

Help your student become a better writer now, and you will be arming him or her with an invaluable lifelong skill: the ability to communicate well through writing. The more your child practices, the more his or her writing will improve—especially with your support. Also remember that if writing is a continued source of frustration and struggle for your child, there may be other issues worth exploring. Call Huntington to arrange an academic evaluation to uncover any issues and develop a plan to correct them.

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DESTINATION: HIGHER EDUCATION A College Admissions Calendar for the Year to Come Learn how to help your child schedule last minute SAT prep, campus visits, recommendation requests, and everything else.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 12:57:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-admissions-calendar-for-the-year--huntington-learning-center https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-admissions-calendar-for-the-year--huntington-learning-center Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington SEPTEMBER

In September, sophomores and juniors should register to take the PSAT, a practice run for the SAT, or the PLAN, which is a pre-test for the ACT. The PSAT is given in October, and the PLAN is given on different dates at different schools. A good result on the PSAT can also help you qualify for The National Merit Scholarship Competition and the National Achievement and National Hispanic Scholars programs.

Seniors who have not taken the SAT or ACT (or those who want to take them again in hopes of higher scores) should sign up for the SAT Reasoning Test and/or SAT Subject Tests, which should be taken in October and November, or the ACT, which should be taken in September or October. Seniors should also make sure they have all of the applications for colleges they're targeting, and the forms needed for financial aid.

Sophomores, juniors and seniors who are concerned about their test-taking skills and those who need to strengthen their content knowledge should consider test preparation programs. The best programs offer personalized instruction, provide real education as opposed to simple tips and tricks, and use official SAT and ACT exams to help students strengthen their skills. Students should not wait until the last minute to prepare; school counselors can direct students to the programs that are best for them.

OCTOBER

In October (or earlier), sophomores, juniors and seniors should attend college fairs. Also in October, if not before, seniors should ensure that they have lined up character recommendations for any colleges that may ask for them. Teachers, employers and coaches can all write letters of recommendation. Seniors who are applying for early decision should send their applications in now. Seniors who haven't taken the SAT Reasoning and/or Subject Tests or the ACT (or those who want to take the tests again in hopes of better results) should sign up to take them in December.

NOVEMBER

In November, all students in need of financial aid should be searching for grants, scholarships and work-study programs, with help from counselors and other sources, such as the National Research Center for College and University Admissions (www.nrccua.org) and the National Association for College Admission Counseling (www.nacacnet.org). If you're hoping for federal aid, you'll need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (www.fafsa.ed.gov)

DECEMBER

In December, sophomores and juniors should receive the results of the PLAN and the PSAT. Review the results carefully to determine the skills and knowledge that you need to strengthen prior to taking the ACT or SAT. If you're planning to take the ACT in February you should register now.

If you're a senior, make sure you send your official test scores to the colleges and universities you're considering.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY

In January and February, and throughout the spring, students should continue investigating colleges that suit their interests. Visiting during the months that classes are in session will give you the best sense of campus life.

If you're a junior and you've completed the math courses covered on the SAT Reasoning Test, you should register to take this test in April. If you haven't done the coursework, you can register to take the test in May or June - but make sure you prepare.

If you're a senior hoping for financial aid, encourage your parents to complete their income tax forms as soon as possible, since you'll need the data from those forms for your FAFSA. If you've already completed your FAFSA, you might receive your Student Aid Report (SAR) in February. Review this carefully and correct any errors. If you sent in the FAFSA more than four weeks earlier and haven't received your report, contact the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 319 337 5665.

MARCH-APRIL

If you're a sophomore, you should register now for the June SAT Subject Tests. These are one-hour exams testing your knowledge of subjects that you've completed. Talk with your counselor to determine which tests you should take, and when.

If you're a junior, you should register now for the May or June SAT Reasoning Test and/or the May/June SAT Subject tests. Sophomores and juniors who want to take the ACT in June can also register up until May 4.

Seniors should be reviewing college acceptances and financial aid awards. If you've decided on a college, inform the institution of your decision. If other colleges have accepted you, you should inform them that you're not going to attend so slots can be filled by other students.

MAY and JUNE

If you're a sophomore, you should be thinking about summertime activities that will build skills suited to the academic tracks or careers you're considering. Juniors should likewise be looking at activities that strengthen their academic records.

Seniors should decide by May 1 which college they want to attend. Seniors should also affirm when payments for tuition, room and board are due.

JULY and AUGUST

Many students prefer to visit colleges during the year for a good view of campus life, but the summer is also a good time. If possible, make it a family event.

While it's easy to become overwhelmed with the college preparation process, being well-organized and well-informed will lessen the pressure considerably, giving you more time to experience what can be one of the most important - and exciting - phases of your life.

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ASSESS YOUR CHILD'S ACADEMIC SUCCESS AT MID-YEAR Here are some recommendations for assessing your child's math and reading skills for the months ahead.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 15:49:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/assess-your-childs-academic-success-at-mid-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/assess-your-childs-academic-success-at-mid-year Take stock of progress so far

Poor grades - and grades that dropped noticeably from the first quarter to the second - mean your son or daughter is heading toward trouble, particularly since future assignments will build on the knowledge and skills your child is supposed to have gained thus far.

Test scores are another good indicator. While it's natural for parents to simply look at the scores for the assurance that students are "measuring up," it can usually be helpful to look more closely at the areas in which your child excelled or faltered. If your child has scored at the top percentile in reading or mathematics, this should encourage you - and your child's teachers - to consider Advanced Placement or Merit courses that will make the most of these skills. Poor scores obviously call for extra attention to ensure that your child catches up before the work gets much more difficult.

Assess the impact of attitude and study habits

Sometimes, bright students get bad grades for behavior-related activities. Does your child hand in his or her homework? Is it correct and on time? Is your child bored with schoolwork, and not paying enough attention? These are not excuses; they are symptoms of different problems. You must identify these issues before you can remedy the problems.

Another important factor is your child's study habits - and the studying environment in your home. Many parents kick off the school year by talking with teachers about how much homework they expect to assign and then set up firm schedules for "homework time" after school and in the evenings. But by mid-year, many of these schedules become a bit more flexible. If your child tends to be self-motivated and is showing strong progress, flexibility can be a good thing. If he or she is faltering, it's time to put that schedule back in place, and stick to it.

Broaden the lines of communication

If your son or daughter received poor grades, have a frank discussion about why. Let your child know you're supportive - and that you believe in his or her abilities.

Remember the power of praise.

Finally, make sure your son or daughter knows that you're a watchdog for both problems and progress. Which means that the mid-year check-up should also be an opportunity to acknowledge the special skills and qualities that are unique to your child. Recognizing and nurturing all of these qualities will give your child solid footing for years to come.

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Huntington Learning Center Helps College Applicants Stand Out Among the Competition Huntington Learning Center helps thousands of students every year do better in school -- and stand out in a highly competitive college admissions landscape.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:24:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-helps-college-applicants-stand-out-among-the-competition https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-helps-college-applicants-stand-out-among-the-competition ORADELL, NJ, Oct 21, 2013 In today's world, most jobs require some form of post-secondaryeducation. And while higher education is a necessity to achieveeconomic success, the reality is that college admissions remaincompetitive, despite some signs that both college enrollments andhigh school graduates have hit their peak:

--According to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, college enrollments decreased 2.3 percent in spring 2013 as compared to spring 2012. This is a change from the previous decade marked by growing enrollments. --High school graduates also may be on the decline for the first time in many years. According to the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), the class of 2011 is projected as the largest that the nation has produced, at 3.4 million. "That peak will mark the end of a 17-year run of continuous growth in the number of graduates, during which time graduating cohorts increased by an average of 2.2 percent annually," the WICHE stated in their report, "Knocking at the College Door," published in 2013.

 

Dr. Raymond Huntington, chairman and founder of Huntington LearningCenter, stated that there is a quandary facing American students."The country needs more skilled, educated workers, yet it is morecompetitive to get into college than ever before," said Dr.Huntington, referring to the National Association for CollegeAdmission Counseling's 2012 "State of College Admission" report,which claims that acceptance rates for four-year institutionsdeclined from 69.6 percent in 2002 to 63.8 percent in 2011. "At atime when policymakers are working to make college more attainable,we don't anticipate that competitiveness changing dramatically in thenear future."

Huntington Learning Center helps thousands of students every year dobetter in school -- and stand out in a highly competitive collegeadmissions landscape. "The reality is that high school graduates whowant to go to college today must attempt to stand out from themasses," said Dr. Huntington. "The best way to do this is to achievethe best high school GPA possible, take the most challengingcurriculum one can handle, and do one's best on college admissionsexams. Those things, after all, are among the top factors thatcolleges consider."

Huntington offers tutoring services for students from kindergartenthrough 12th grade as well as college entrance exam preparatoryservices. Learn more at huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Founded in 1977, Huntington is a pioneer and leader in the tutoringindustry. For over 35 years, Huntington has provided qualityinstruction to hundreds of thousands of students. Huntington pridesitself on being "Your Tutoring Solution" for students in all gradesand subjects. They tutor in academic skills, such as reading,phonics, math and study skills; and in advanced math and sciencesubjects ranging from algebra through calculus and general sciencethrough physics. They also prepare students for state andstandardized entrance exams, such as high school entrance exams andthe SAT and ACT and provide free school tutoring to eligible schools.Learn more about Huntington at huntingtonhelps.com. Forinformation on franchise opportunities, visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

Contact: Laura Gehringer Director of Marketing and Advertising Huntington Learning Center (201) 261-8400 x 431 gehringerl@hlcmail.com

 

 

SOURCE: Huntington Learning Center

(C) 2013 Marketwire L.P. All rights reserved.

 

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Using Chores to Teach School and Study Skills If your household is like most, there are many day-to-day duties that must be completed. While tasks like laundry and doing dishes may seem tedious for children, research conducted by the University of Minnesota's College of Education and Human Development shows that "involving children in household tasks at an early age can have a positive impact later in life."

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:23:39 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/using-chores-to-teach-school-and-study-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/using-chores-to-teach-school-and-study-skills If your household is like most, there are many day-to-day duties that must be completed. While tasks like laundry and doing dishes may seem tedious for children, research conducted by the University of Minnesota's College of Education and Human Development shows that "involving children in household tasks at an early age can have a positive impact later in life."

Without a doubt, chores foster a good attitude about working hard and being responsible and have many other important benefits. Here are several suggestions to help your child build valuable skills while contributing around the house.

    • Picking up clutter - Make time each day for your child to pick up his or her bedroom or around the house. Try setting a timer and challenging your child to see how much he or she can accomplish in five or 10 minutes. Learning to understand how long different tasks take will help your child become better at budgeting his or her time—for homework as well as timed tests and assignments at school.

 

    • Cooking - Helping in the kitchen is an excellent way to put math concepts into action, including fractions (using measuring cups and spoons, for example), addition (when counting ingredients, measuring and more), multiplication (when doubling a recipe), and telling time and temperature. Older children can learn about chemistry from the changes that foods undergo during the cooking process.

 

    • Preparing menus and grocery lists - Planning your family's weekly menu and making an accompanying grocery list requires many different skills. Children must think ahead about what they want to eat, other commitments each evening (such as soccer practice or club meetings), and what ingredients they will need to cook the meal. Planning and managing a project—dinner in this case—are skills they will use again and again.

 

    • Organizing - As any busy parent knows, there is much to keep track of in a household. Ask your older child to help organize the pantry, a closet or another area of the home, developing a reliable organizational system. You could also put your child in charge of collecting and sorting the mail every day, maintaining the family calendar or filing papers, bills and other important documents in the family filing cabinet. Organization chores emphasize the importance of having a designated place for everything. Students who are organized are more likely to avoid misplacing their homework and being tardy and later, will better understand how to manage multi-step assignments and projects.

 

    • Cleaning - Cleaning the kitchen or bathroom can be a science experiment waiting to happen. Use all-natural cleaning products, such as vinegar, baking soda and lemon juice and do some research with your child on how they work and how they differ from chemical cleaning products. Find recipes for homemade cleaners online.

 

  • Feeding pets - Caring for and feeding the family pet teaches your child about commitment, being relied upon and keeping to a schedule. It also reinforces the lesson that your child's actions have consequences. Have your child develop a chart to keep track of feedings, or take things further and bring him or her along to veterinary appointments so he or she can learn about your animal's health.

 

Age-appropriate chores teach responsibility, work ethic, organization and time management—and they even help children build self-esteem as they gain the satisfaction of seeing tasks through to completion. Chores can also reinforce school skills such as math, reading, critical thinking and more. With all of these benefits, assigning chores takes on new meaning. Not only will you gain extra hands around the house, your child will be learning and growing as a person and student.

Dr. Raymond J. Huntington and Eileen Huntington are co-founders of Huntington Learning Center, which has been helping children succeed in school for more than 30 years. For more information about Huntington, call 1-800 CAN LEARN.

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Huntington Learning Center Suggests Winter Break Learning Activities It's holiday break, and if you are in need of a few ideas to help keep your child entertained and learning these next few weeks, Huntington Learning Center has several suggestions. "Your child deserves a reprieve from school work, but there are many things you can do as a family that will keep your student engaged," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers the following winter break learning activities for inspiration.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:25:10 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-suggests-winter-break-learning-activities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-suggests-winter-break-learning-activities It's holiday break, and if you are in need of a few ideas to help keep your child entertained and learning these next few weeks, Huntington Learning Center has several suggestions. "Your child deserves a reprieve from school work, but there are many things you can do as a family that will keep your student engaged," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers the following winter break learning activities for inspiration.

Get scientific - Safe and fun science experiments are a great way to pass the long days of holiday break and encourage your student's scientific thinking. Check out the University of Michigan's BioKIDS website for an animal tracks and sign guide and send your child out to explore your local habitat for signs of animals. Browse the Steve Spangler Science or Weird Science Kids websites for educational experiments that your child will enjoy.

Develop a menu - Have your child help you from start to finish with your holiday menu or even weeknight meals during his or her break. Set your child up with a cookbook or send him or her to a recipe website to come up with meal ideas, make a list of ingredients and even create a paper menu for dinner guests. Have your child help you do the shopping and compare prices of different brands in the grocery store.

Make a holiday scrapbook - Bring out your child's inner crafter by having him or her work on a family scrapbook for the year or just the holiday season. Have your child collect photos and mementos (such as plane ticket stubs) from any vacations or other special outings and share his or her finished product on New Year's Eve. Websites such as http://www.mymemories.com and scrapbooksetc.com offer lots of ideas and also have free printable templates and patterns.

Write a family history book - Work together on a family tree. Your child could take the project further and interview grandparents, aunts and uncles to learn more about different family member's experiences growing up—your child may be surprised at how different life as a kid was for a grandparent. Try a "Favorite Family Holiday Memories" book in which your child can record his or her own reflections as well as those of other members of the extended family.

With a little creativity, winter break can be both educational and memorable. Seek out fun activities that will keep your child happily occupied—whether that's creating photo thank-you notes or spending time researching an imaginary travel itinerary to the moon or Antarctica. "Long breaks don't have to feel long," Huntington reminds parents. "Keep a list of ideas handy and encourage your child to use this free time to do things he or she is interested in and doesn't normally have time for."

For more information about Huntington Learning Center, please visit huntingtonhelps.com

About Huntington


Founded in 1977, Huntington is a pioneer and leader in the tutoring industry. For over 35 years, Huntington has provided quality instruction to hundreds of thousands of students. Huntington prides itself on being "Your Tutoring Solution" for students in all grades and subjects. They tutor in academic skills, such as reading, phonics, math and study skills; and in advanced math and science subjects ranging from algebra through calculus and general science through physics. Huntington also prepares students for state and standardized entrance exams, such as high school entrance exams and the SAT and ACT. Learn more about Huntington at huntingtonhelps.com.

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Inspiring Better Writing and Communication Through Blogging Good verbal and nonverbal communication is a critical skill that your teen will use for the rest of his or her life, but for many students, writing is a difficult task that they are not eager to practice. One great way to get your teen working on those writing and communication skills is by encouraging him or her to start a blog. For today's social-media-savvy students, blogging is a natural fit with the things they enjoy. And as an added benefit, it's a wonderful way for students to learn to express themselves better through writing.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:29:05 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/inspiring-better-writing-through-blogging https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/inspiring-better-writing-through-blogging Good verbal and nonverbal communication is a critical skill that your teen will use for the rest of his or her life, but for many students, writing is a difficult task that they are not eager to practice. One great way to get your teen working on those writing and communication skills is by encouraging him or her to start a blog. For today's social-media-savvy students, blogging is a natural fit with the things they enjoy. And as an added benefit, it's a wonderful way for students to learn to express themselves better through writing.

Here are several things to keep in mind to help your teen enjoy-and gain the most from-blogging:

Your teen should blog about something he or she is passionate about. Forcing your teen to blog about his or her English class may backfire on you, but if your teen loves movies, why not create a movie review blog? If he or she is on the road to college, how about a blog about those adventures? Fun is the key, as your teen is unlikely to keep up a blog that feels like homework.

Blogging is a chance to express one's views. Teens have opinions, and a blog is a great way for them to share those viewpoints. As with in-person discussions and written reports, your teen will learn through blogging that articulating his or her ideas to others takes focus and effort.

Blogging can help your teen with the brainstorming process. Just like a writing assignment for school, each blog post that your teen develops will require thinking and planning. This is a beneficial process-to identify a topic, distill it down into the key points to cover, and communicate those points thoughtfully.

A blog may even strengthen your teen's research skills. The more your teen gets into blogging, the more likely he or she is to delve into the topics he or she writes about. For example, if your teen blogs about music (favorite bands, perhaps), writing quality blog posts will require him or her to research those bands, cite sources and the like.

Blogs will gain feedback. Because it is a public and interactive forum, your teen's blog may develop a following of readers who offer their compliments and opinions in the blog's comments. They may challenge your teen's ideas, make suggestions, or make your teen think about things in new and different ways. Writing for an audience in this way will help your teen learn to reflect on his or her writing and strive to write better each and every time he or she posts.

Quality writing rules apply. Well-written blogs speak to their audience. They put forth compelling ideas in a clear way. They are concise, not wordy, and they keep people reading. Whether your teen is writing an essay for English class or a college application essay, these are valuable lessons on what it takes to write well.

Keep it clean. Remind your teen that a blog is public and visible to anyone-including college admissions officers, future employers, teachers and others. It's fine to express him or herself, but he or she should do so in a tasteful, tactful and professional way. A good rule of thumb is to never post anything on a blog (or anywhere online) that he or she wouldn't want one of those people to read.

Blogging has many educational benefits and may be a lot of fun for your teen. Most importantly, it can help your teen hone his or her communication and writing skills and learn to enjoy writing as a form of self expression.

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Guiding Your Freshman in High School Toward Success If your teen is about to begin high school, you may be concerned about the transition. High school, after all, brings higher academic expectations and is a significant time of change for most students as they grow into young adults. As a parent, how can you help your teen survive and thrive his or her first year of high school?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:57:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/guiding-your-freshman-in-highschool-toward-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/guiding-your-freshman-in-highschool-toward-success If your teen is about to begin high school, you may be concerned about the transition. High school, after all, brings higher academic expectations and is a significant time of change for most students as they grow into young adults. As a parent, how can you help your teen survive and thrive his or her first year of high school? Here are several tips:

Get to know the support staff

Establishing good advocacy relationships at the outset of high school will be important during the next four years. Encourage your teen to stop into the guidance counselor's office early on. If he or she feels a connection with a teacher, seek that teacher's advice and help. Your support will certainly be important throughout high school, but your teen should establish a team of individuals to whom he or she can turn throughout the high school years.

Don't wait for help

High school isn't easy for everyone-be sure your teen understands the long-term consequences of falling behind and poor grades, and knows that he or she can and should ask for help. While high school teachers expect students to be more independent, don't let your teen wrongly assume he or she shouldn't seek assistance during tough times. He or she should visit the teacher outside of class and get outside tutoring help if needed. Let your teen know you are there to help when he or she feels overwhelmed by a difficult subject or issue.

Get organized

If your teen isn't a naturally organized person, now is the time to improve those organizational skills. Help your teen set up a reliable system of keeping track of papers that come home. If he or she has a desk, teach him or her to keep it tidy and consistently put things in their proper place so that homework time is productive, not frazzled. Make sure your teen establishes a study routine and sticks to it.

Work on time management

Perhaps your teen has grown used you helping manage his or her time, giving frequent reminders about outside commitments, homework and project due dates, and the like. Let your teen take the reins now. Teach him or her to make use of a planner or calendar to stay on top of homework assignments, upcoming tests and other obligations-and plan ahead properly. Guide him or her on this early in high school, but let him or her take responsibility quickly.

Remind your teen to prioritize

High school is a new and exciting social scene for your teen, and there's no doubt he or she will want to explore it. This is fine, but remind your teen that school comes first. Hanging out with friends should not take precedent over homework, but with effective time management, your teen can have a social life and keep up with school. Teach him or her about prioritizing to-dos (what assignments should he or she tackle first?) and setting goals and rewarding him or herself for meeting them (Facebook time comes after math homework is done).

High school is sure to bring many changes to your teen's life-and your entire household-but with your support and encouragement, your teen can make his or her freshman year a great one and lay a positive foundation for the next four years.

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What to Look for in a Summer SAT/ACT Prep Program The hustle and bustle of the school year leaves little time for college entrance exam preparation, but summer is an ideal time for the college-bound student to prepare for this important test.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:27:21 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-look-for-in-a-summer-satact-prep-program https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-look-for-in-a-summer-satact-prep-program The hustle and bustle of the school year leaves little time for college entrance exam preparation, but summer is an ideal time for the college-bound student to prepare for this important test. "Your teen has so much else to think about during the school year, but summer is a great opportunity to develop a concentrated study schedule customized to his or her specific needs," says Eileen Huntington, co-found of the Huntington Learning Center. What should parents and teens look for in a college entrance exam prep program? Huntington offers several tips:

Don't start without a starting point. It's impossible to design an effective study program without first understanding your teen's strengths and weaknesses. Before any studying, your teen should take a practice exam to determine the areas on which he or she should focus.

Incorporate time management into the program. The ACT and SAT are timed exams with no time to waste. Your teen will need to manage his or her time well to ensure he or she can achieve the best score possible. Thus, it is important to understand the structure of the exams and the different question types.

Work on test-taking strategies. Certainly, the most important component of performing well on the ACT and SAT is having solid subject-matter knowledge, but there are many other things your teen can do to improve his or her performance. Learning to work well under pressure and quickly eliminate wrong answers are two examples.

Continue to practice. Taking full-length, timed practice exams is a crucial part of studying and the best way for your teen to get a feel for the exam's organization, the time he or she will have for each section and the various types of questions.

Develop a study timetable. Each week of your teen's summer SAT or ACT prep schedule should be carefully planned out with goals and areas of focus. Perhaps your teen is only concentrating on one exam area. Be sure he or she doesn't overlook the other sections, and remember that even preparing for one exam section will require a time commitment and good study plan.

"The ACT or SAT may be the one of the most important tests your teen ever takes," says Huntington. "There truly is no better time than summer break to focus on exam prep. A targeted program that addresses your teen's weaknesses and helps him or her develop good test-taking skills and strategies will help him or her achieve the best possible score."


About Huntington

Founded in 1977, Huntington is a pioneer and leader in the tutoring industry. For over 30 years, Huntington has provided quality instruction to hundreds of thousands of students. Huntington prides itself on being "Your Tutoring Solution" for students in all grades and subjects. They tutor in academic skills, such as reading, phonics, math and study skills; and in advanced math and science subjects ranging from algebra through calculus and general science through physics. Huntington also prepares students for state and standardized entrance exams, such as high school entrance exams and the SAT and ACT.

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How to Avoid Summertime Regression It's a common problem among students: summertime regression. Studies show that most students lose at least some knowledge that they gained during the school year over the course of summer vacation. According to Eileen Huntington, co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center, a little effort can go a long way when it comes to helping children avoid significant regression during the summer months. "It doesn't take eight hours a day of studying for your child to stay fresh," says Huntington. "Try projects and activities that make learning fun."

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:05:50 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-summertime-regression https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-summertime-regression It's a common problem among students: summertime regression. Studies show that most students lose at least some knowledge that they gained during the school year over the course of summer vacation. According to Eileen Huntington, co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center, a little effort can go a long way when it comes to helping children avoid significant regression during the summer months. "It doesn't take eight hours a day of studying for your child to stay fresh," says Huntington. "Try projects and activities that make learning fun." Huntington suggests several ideas:

Look for educational summer camps or programs. Check with your child's school for educational summer camp ideas. Perhaps your budding scientist will enjoy your local nature and science museum's summer series for youth. If your child enjoys reading, check out writing programs for children and teens at your local library. If your town has a university or college, investigate programs there, too.

Make library visits a weekly excursion. Whether your child is seven or 12, the library should be your home away from home during the summer months. Most libraries host a variety of programs and classes for children and teens-from history classes to science programs to book clubs for all different genres. For younger children, the library may offer fun classes, clubs and more.

Request reading lists and activity sheets from your child's teacher. Your child's teacher can offer ideas to develop a realistic academic plan for summer. Ask for book recommendations based on your child's reading level and request other activities your child can do with you or independently that will reinforce concepts learned this past year.

Make reading a daily occurrence. Reading can be one of the most drastic regression areas, so develop a nightly reading routine for the whole household. Turn off the television and cell phones and have everyone in the family pull out their books or magazines for 30 minutes or longer. If your child needs help, read together. Keep it fun-let your child choose the reading material when you go to the library.

Summer is a great time for children to follow their interests and review what they learned last school year-and they can do so at a more relaxed pace. "A summer learning routine doesn't have to be rigorous, and it takes just a little creativity to come up with great anti-regression activities," says Huntington. "Get your child involved in the process, and remind your child that a little work this summer will have a great impact when he or she goes back to school in the fall."

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Seven Ways Parents Can Support Their Child's School Studies show that parental involvement has a direct positive benefit on students' academic achievement. If you're looking for new ways to support your child's school outside of volunteering in the classroom or donating to the school fundraiser, here are seven ideas on how you can help make your child's school a better place:

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:55:19 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-ways-parents-can-support-their-childs-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-ways-parents-can-support-their-childs-school Studies show that parental involvement has a direct positive benefit on students' academic achievement. If you're looking for new ways to support your child's school outside of volunteering in the classroom or donating to the school fundraiser, here are seven ideas on how you can help make your child's school a better place:

Join the Parent Teacher Association (PTA), Parent Teacher Organization (PTO), or school advisory board. Your school's PTA (or similar organization) is one of the most important links between you and your child's school. It is designed to enhance school-parent communication and help parents be more involved in their children's education. PTA will help you get to know teachers and other parents and learn the most effective ways to suggest and implement changes at your school.

Enrich the learning experience. Great schools do more than teach students what they need to know for standardized tests. Find ways to enhance your child's classroom. Talk with the teacher or principal about potential enrichment activities and ask how you can help. If your child's teacher is interested in offering students learning opportunities outside of the classroom, offer to help coordinate and/or facilitate.

Share your knowledge. Perhaps you have an interesting job, hobby or life experience that you could share with a class or group of classes. If leadership is your strength, consider devoting some time to coaching a sports team or advising a fledgling but important student group.

Improve communication. At any school, good communication with families is a key to success. You could help create a parent newsletter (or improve the newsletter your school has) or start a phone tree. Ask your child's teacher how you can help him or her stay connected to classroom parents.

Be an advocate for your school. Sometimes, being a resource for your school can be as simple as writing your school board members or legislators about issues that are important to the school. Attend a school board meeting on behalf of your grade or class or in support of an initiative. If you see an area of improvement at your school, explore the proper channels to voice your ideas.

Help increase financial and other resources. Aside from school fundraisers, there are other ways you can help your school secure needed funding or supplies. Help research or apply for federal or private grants to benefit specific school programs. If you have access to materials the school needs, why not make a donation?

Help other parents. If you are bilingual, you could volunteer to help translate at parent-teacher meetings or translate signage and materials for the school. Volunteer to provide transportation for students or parents to attend functions they could not otherwise easily attend. If you have particular expertise, offer to host a parenting seminar and share your knowledge with other parents.

With a little creativity, you can find many ways to help your child's school be an enriching academic environment—and a vibrant and welcoming community for all students and their families.

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Achieving Math Standards by Grade Get your kids to develop the math skills that all students must achieve throughout their years in elementary, middle and high school.

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Wed, 13 Jan 2016 10:30:34 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-with-math-by-grade--huntington-learning-center- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-with-math-by-grade--huntington-learning-center- Your state's Department of Education or other educational governing body sets the mathematics standards that all students must achieve throughout their years in elementary, middle and high school. Those curricular standards are then implemented by school districts. While standards may be worded differently from state to state, the idea is to teach every student to reason, communicate, problem-solve and make connections mathematically. For example, as stated in the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Mathematics, the vision of the math standards is "to enable all of New Jersey's children to acquire the mathematical skills, understandings and attitudes that they will need to be successful in their careers and daily lives."

Standards typically fall into these general categories:

  1. Numerical operations, analytical thinking
  2. Patterns and algebra
  3. Geometry and measurement
  4. Data analysis and probability and statistics
  5. Problem-solving, reasoning, connections and other mathematical processes

In 2010, Achieve, an independent, nonprofit education organization, coordinated a state-led effort to develop the Common Core State Standards for English and math. As examples, here are high-level summaries of what second- and fourth-grade students should be able to do:

Grade 2

  • Operations/algebra: Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction, add and subtract within 20, and work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
  • Numbers: Understand place value and use place value understanding and properties to add/subtract.
  • Measurements/data: Measure and estimate lengths in standard units, relate addition and subtraction to length, work with time and money, and represent and interpret data.
  • Geometry: Reason with shapes and their attributes.

Grade 4

  • Operations/algebra: Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems, gain familiarity with factors and multiples, and generate and analyze patterns.
  • Numbers: Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers, perform multi-digit arithmetic.
  • Fractions: Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering, build fractions from unit fractions, understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
  • Measurements/data: Convert measurements from larger to smaller units, represent and interpret data, and understand concepts of angle and measure angles.
  • Geometry: Draw lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.

Get detailed standards for all grades at www.corestandards.org.

While you likely feel unqualified to assess whether your child's math abilities meet grade-level standards, you'll certainly be able to tell when he or she is struggling. If your child did not gain basic skills in first grade, he or she inevitably will have difficulty with second-grade math. If you notice a slide in grades, a worsening attitude about math or see your child regularly struggling to complete homework in a reasonable amount of time (or at all), it may be time to request a conference with your child's teacher. Succeeding in math takes practice and persistence, and requires gradual building on concepts. Prevent your child from falling behind by getting him or her the individualized help he or she needs as soon as difficulties arise.

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Drawing Out Your Child's Creativity Thu, 01 Mar 2012 00:00:00 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/drawing-out-your-childs-creativity https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/drawing-out-your-childs-creativity When children are very young, they are naturally curious, inventing games, songs and stories, seeking answers to endless questions, and much more. Yet as children become older, some lose some of their creativity. Instead, they look to teachers and parents for direction and approval, concerning themselves with "right" answers instead of appreciating the process by which they come to conclusions.

However, creative thinking is incredibly valuable and teaches children to enjoy learning for learning's sake, which will generally result in a more successful student. How can you encourage your child to think creatively? Here are several ideas:

Expose your child to a variety of creative people. Take your child to open mic night at the coffee shop or to a local art gallery to watch an artist sculpt or paint. If you're a woodworker, gardener or knitter, show your child what you do and invite him or her to participate. Showing your child the many different types of things he or she can do—from art to music, from science to writing—and introducing him or her to people who enjoy and excel at those things will encourage him or her to attempt new undertakings.

Let your child experiment. Whatever the activity, let your child be his or her own guide. Let your budding cook make up recipes in the kitchen. Offer tools and supplies, and let your child create whatever he or she can imagine. The more you encourage your child to choose activities and support him or her in developing new interests and skills, the better.

Offer quiet time. From a young age, set aside free time each day for your child to play independently—doing whatever he or she chooses. Better yet, designate quiet time as a family activity. While your child gets out his or her Lego's, why not work on your scrapbook? Giving your child opportunities to explore will also fuel his or her inquisitiveness and help him or her become self-reliant.

Try games or activities that teach problem-solving. Games like chess, Battleship and Risk teach creativity and strategy, showing children how to consider multiple scenarios, weigh pros and cons, and debate different ideas. Try open-ended games that offer children opportunities to think creatively and use their imaginations.

Ask why. When your child asks you to double-check his or her work, have him or her explain how he or she arrived at the answer, step by step. When your child shares an idea or opinion, ask why. How did he or she develop that opinion? Why does he or she feel differently than you or a friend? Why is this important to him or her?

Fostering creativity in your child leads to many important benefits. Your curious learner is more likely to challenge him or herself, learn from his or her mistakes, question assumptions and think critically. Such skills will help your child grow into an independent student and a lifelong learner.

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Decoding the Financial Aid Award Letter Here are six tips to decoding the financial aid award letter and questions to ask before your teen chooses a college.

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 12:17:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/decoding-the-financial-aid-award-letter--huntington-learning-center https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/decoding-the-financial-aid-award-letter--huntington-learning-center When you begin receiving financial aid award letters from colleges, how can you compare them to make the best college decision for your teen and your family? Here are six tips to decoding the financial aid award letter—and questions to ask before your teen chooses a school:

Compare out-of-pocket costs. To put together a financial aid package, each college calculates your financial need—the projected cost of attendance less your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Large variances in out-of-pocket cost are likely due to a college's total cost (tuition and fees, room and board, supplies and other expenses). Is the cost of attendance figure at each college consistent? How does each college calculate your EFC?

Understand that you may need to pay more than the EFC. If a college's cost of education is $20,000 and your EFC is $5,000, that leaves $15,000 in unmet financial need. However, if the aid package totals $12,000, that leaves a $3,000 gap you'll have to cover. You should consider this gap when comparing colleges.

Review any student contribution. Some colleges' financial aid award letters may list a student contribution figure—the amount that a student is expected to contribute from private scholarships and savings. They might also list a self-help expectation—a student's earnings from a job. You and your student should evaluate this figure carefully and determine how much he or she would need to work throughout the school year and in the summers to raise this amount.

Review additional information. Some financial aid award letters offer a web address where you can review terms and conditions of loans, grants and scholarships, as well as required next steps to accept or deny aid. Even if you understand the information provided in the letter, it will be helpful to get more details and understand the "fine print."

Consider how much debt your student can realistically handle once he or she graduates. Remember that the aid you view in an award letter is for one year. Think beyond one year—if a student takes out a loan for $7,000 each year for four (or more) years, that's a sizeable amount of debt at graduation. Also consider factors such as repayment terms and interest rates.

Find out what aid will go away in future years. Ask the financial aid office how much aid to expect in future years if your family's financial situation stays about the same. Are all grants listed on the financial aid award letter four-year grants, or are some of them for freshmen only? How about scholarships—did the letter list any one-year scholarships? For four-year scholarships, what will be expected of your student to keep them?

Financial aid award letters vary from college to college, so don't be afraid to ask financial aid administrators to explain any sections that are ambiguous. An award letter should give you a good understanding of what the college will cost your family. Before you make any decisions, get the clarity you need.

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SEE IT; ACHIEVE IT! GOAL SETTING FOR THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR After several weeks of summer vacation, your child should be heading back to school rested and determined to make the most of his or her potential. As a parent or guardian, you can facilitate this mindset by setting goals in each of the areas that are so important to academic achievement. Here are some suggestions:

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Mon, 04 Jan 2016 16:25:02 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/see-it-achieve-it-goal-setting-for-the-new-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/see-it-achieve-it-goal-setting-for-the-new-school-year Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington GOAL ONE: Raise the bar

Whether your child is an excellent, capable or struggling student, earning the best possible grades should be one of the most important goals. This means envisioning certain targets and committing to the hard work it takes to reach them. If your child had relatively good study habits, worked moderately hard and earned "B"s and "C"s last year, set a goal to earn all "A"s and "B"s this year. In most schools, this GPA level will qualify for the honor roll and signify that your child is performing at grade level, and is well-prepared for increasingly difficult work. If your child is already an "A/B" student, set a goal to earn all "A"s and do everything possible to help achieve that goal. If your child struggled last year and ended up with "C"s and "D"s, talk with teachers right now about the subject areas that proved most troublesome so they can shape their instruction and find the extra help your child will need.

GOAL TWO: Create and stick to a firm study schedule

From the beginning of the school year to the end, study time should be part of your child's daily schedule. This should be a certain period of time, every weekday and one day on the weekend, when your son or daughter completes homework, prepares for tests and engages in "free-choice" learning to explore special learning interests and aptitudes. Keeping on schedule tends to be easiest if this period is the same time each day of the week, with more flexibility on the weekends.

If you're like many families, you should find it easier to stick to this schedule if it's aligned to your child's biological learning clock. This is the period of time after the end of the school day when your son or daughter is most alert and attuned to the learning process. Some students may need to jump into study time and "get it over with" as soon as they get home from school. Others may need a break for physical activity or socializing before they're in the right mindset to buckle down and make best use of the time.

Effective sequencing will make this time more productive. Homework assignments should be completed first. Studying for upcoming exams - including those scheduled for the next day or in the next week or so - should come next. If all the homework is done and your child tells you there's no test to study for, he or she should fill the rest of the schedule with independent learning activities that could include reading, working on an extra credit project or utilizing the Internet and other resource materials to explore special interests.

GOAL THREE: Take action when trouble lies ahead

If your child is struggling to understand quadratic equations or the symbolism in a novel assigned for an English Literature class, the problem may go beyond simply not paying attention or not applying enough effort. You should encourage your child to alert you whenever he or she is struggling and then talk with teachers to see what kind of extra help is available. This may include some remedial work to build or strengthen basic skills, or the use different teaching strategies to convey concepts in a way that better suits your child's learning style. Taking action early is absolutely critical - you don't want to find out about a major learning issue the day before a big test, or at the end of a quarter when it may be too late to address the problem.

GOAL FOUR: Get an extracurricular boost

While academics should always be job number one, extracurricular activities can also expand your child's learning horizons and strengthen the impression he or she will make on college admissions applications. Reading groups, language clubs, political campaigns, academic competitions and volunteer projects can extend your child's natural aptitudes and interests and pack a lot more learning into the day. These activities can also lead to stronger friendships and connections to your school and community, which can give your son or daughter a stronger sense of well-being and purpose.

GOAL FIVE: Maintain a can-do attitude

Your child's self-esteem can be a very big factor in social and academic success, and students who truly believe in their abilities are in a better position to overcome bad test scores and master especially difficult coursework. You can foster this self-esteem by showing how much you value your son or daughter's hard-work and accomplishments. When your child gets a bad grade, position it as a temporary setback, not a failure, as long as he or she learns from the experience, and make sure that major successes are acknowledged from the beginning of the year to the very end.

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HELP YOUR CHILD DISCOVER THE REAL-WORLD POWER OF MATHEMATICS In addition to being critical for success in school, mathematics skills are vital for many of today's most lucrative and interesting careers. One of the best ways to you're your child prepare for these opportunities is to understand what he or she should be learning at each level of K-12 schooling, based on recommendations from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:52:03 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-discover-the-real-world-power-of-mathematics https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-discover-the-real-world-power-of-mathematics Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington In pre-kindergarten through 2nd grade, children at this age should understand whole numbers and commonly used fractions such as 1/4, 1/3 and 1/2. They should also be able to recognize, name, build, draw, compare and sort two-and-three dimensional shapes. By the second grade they should also be able to sort and classify objects by size, recognize two and three dimensional shapes and understand the attributes of length, weight, volume, area and time.

From the 3rd to the 5th grade, students should develop a solid understanding of fractions, decimals and percents. They should also be able to represent and compare whole numbers and decimals. They should be assembling the building blocks of algebra by analyzing patterns and functions, and be preparing for advanced geometry studies by being able to classify two-and three-dimensional shapes according to their properties. They should also be exploring numbers less than 0 and be able to carry out conversions, such as from centimeters to meters.

During 6-through-8, students are developing firm conclusions about their abilities and limitations. Children who adopt the attitude that "I'm just not good at math" will find this to be a self-defeating prophecy while those who make steady progress develop the confidence that's vital for higher-level work. This means being able to use fundamental algebraic and geometric concepts to solve problems and understand ratios, proportions, prime numbers, and exponents.

By the 12th grade, a student must be able to solve problems using algebra, geometry, statistics, probability and discrete mathematics. This means being able to understand and use formulas to determine the area and volume of geometric figures, understanding the characteristics of well-designed studies such as those used in surveys and experiments, and understanding how to use Cartesian coordinates and other coordinate systems.

If your child is struggling to reach these basic levels, you need to get extra help right away. Begin by talking with your child's teachers and ask for an honest assessment of any obstacles that may be getting in the way of success. With a positive outlook and a concerted focus on problem areas, every child can find the winning formula for success.

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Make a Mathematical Connection to Children's Academic Success Does the mere idea of helping your child tackle algebra or geometry make your head spin? If so, you're not alone. Plenty of math-o-phobic parents find it difficult to help youngsters learn these subjects when their own skills are lacking. Fortunately, helping your child build a foundation for learning mathematics may be a lot easier than you realize. Here are a few activities that will pave the way:

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:28:37 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-a-mathematical-connection-to-childrens-academic-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-a-mathematical-connection-to-childrens-academic-success Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Basic Arithmetic:

Children learn to do arithmetic by first mastering different counting strategies, beginning with rote counting. Use building blocks with your child to test his or her counting skills - "How many blocks can you count?" Grouping objects helps children to learn the concepts of adding, subtracting, and multiplying. Use visual examples to demonstrate: "If I have 6 blocks and pick up 2 more, how many blocks will I have? If I have 6 blocks and take away 2 of them, how many blocks will I have? If I make 3 piles of 10 blocks each, how many blocks will I have?"

Geometry:

Becoming familiar with shapes and patterns will prepare your child to understand the principles of geometry and the way mathematics is used in architecture, clothing design, science, and recreation. Let your child fix a favorite sandwich. Explain that a square has four equal sides, and trim the sandwich edges to make a square. Next, cut the sandwich across the diagonal to make two triangles, each representing one-half of the square. Put the two halves back together and make a square again. Discuss the changes as they take place. Have your child identify circles, squares, triangles, rectangles, cylinders, and spheres in other everyday objects.

Measurement:

Introduce your children to length and weight measurements by letting them experiment with a ruler and scale. Show them the difference between English and metric systems by using inches and feet as well as centimeters and meters, and ounces and pounds as well as grams and kilograms. Your children will quickly learn to estimate longer or shorter, lighter or heavier, closer or farther. When driving in a car, have your children guess how far they think you need to go to travel one mile. Check the odometer and tell them how far you have actually traveled when your children say, "One mile now." Try this activity with varying distances and test their judgment with kilometers as well.

Algebra:

Number activities are tools that help children apply their imagination and skills to problem solving and introduce the concept of algebraic formulas. Assign a value to each letter in the alphabet (A=1, B=2...Z=26). Spell out the name of each family member and assign the corresponding number value. Then compare to see whose name has the highest word value. For example, Jack is 10+1+3+11=25.

Statistics and Probability:

Many students take on projects in which they collect, organize, and record information in graphs or tables, activities that may very well be assigned in the context of a scientific experiment. Encourage your children to embark on their own "research projects" and experiments. In a package of 20 cookies, how would you determine the average number of chocolate chips per cookie? If you toss a coin four times, what is the probability of getting heads twice?

In spite of - and often because of - its challenges, mathematics can be as enjoyable as assembling a puzzle or solving a mystery when approached with a spirit of exploration and discovery. Making mathematical connections from an early age is a great way to avoid learning and achievement gaps in the years to come.

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Study Skills: the Foundation for Lifelong Learning Good study habits are essential for students of all ages. Certainly, no two children have the exact same style of learning, and what works for one student may not work for another. However, when it comes time to do homework, every child can benefit from a little organization. Read on for a few tips on how parents can help children form strong study habits early in school that will carry them through college and beyond:

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:01:42 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-skills-the-foundation-for-lifelong-learning https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-skills-the-foundation-for-lifelong-learning Create a system for keeping track of homework and tests


Homework for early-elementary school children may be in the form of worksheets, but older children may simply be told by their teachers what to do and when. No matter how great a memory your child has, every student should develop some kind of simple technique to keep track of unfinished homework, due dates and upcoming tests or quizzes. For a younger student, consider investing in two-sided folders for each subject: your child can store blank paper and unfinished assignments on one side and completed homework on the other. Younger children may also do well with a blank notebook labeled "Homework." Older students might enjoy feeling grown-up by using a small calendar or day planner. Have your child accompany you to the office supply or bookstore to pick one out, and show them your own method of tracking appointments.

Set a schedule.
Just as adults must set aside time for things they want and need to do, children need to allocate time in their busy days to do homework. Some children may do well with a structured routine - 6:00 to 6:45 dinner, 6:45 to 7:00 relaxation, 7:00 to 8:00 homework, 8:00 to 8:30 television - while others may be more diligent about completing their homework on time without much prodding. Clearly, the length of study time and amount of parental involvement with assignments will vary depending on a child's age, but no matter how old, children do better in school when they reserve some portion of their day for studying and homework.

Designate a quiet study place.
Whether doing math and science problems, reading a chapter or writing an essay, effective comprehension and learning requires concentration. And though your child may try to convince you otherwise, doing homework in front of the television will make it nearly impossible for your child to get much done. While a clutter-free desk in your child's bedroom is an ideal study spot, other good places include a dining room table, kitchen counter or parent's home office or study, as long as the area is quiet, well lit and has all the supplies your child will need (pencils, paper, erasers, etc.).

Encourage breaks.
When children come home from school, they need and deserve some downtime. Encourage your child to play (outside if the weather is nice) with siblings or friends so that your child can get a little exercise and social time. While many children will want to watch television as soon as they walk in the door, too much television may make it difficult for them to reenergize for homework time later in the evening.

No child - or adult - should study for hours without small breaks. Encourage your child to take five-minute timeouts in between subjects and stand, stretch, walk around or get a glass of water.

Whenever possible, allow for some amount of fun or relaxation after homework and before bedtime. Children will be more efficient during study time when they know they'll get to watch a television show or talk on the phone after they're finished.

Give your child choices.
While homework time should never be negotiable, let your child to have some say in his or her study schedule and approach for homework. If your child prefers to start with a favorite subject first, don't force him or her to do the opposite just because it would be your preference. Establish ground rules for homework, but still allow your child flexibility.

As children move into middle and high school, most teachers will assume students already have strong study habits. Children will receive less "hand holding" and will be expected to take notes and stay apprised of the semester's schedule for homework, projects, quizzes and exams. Lay the groundwork early on by teaching your young student the importance of homework and study time. Treat studying as a subject of its own that requires practice and commitment like all other homework.

Huntington helps thousands of children refine their study skills and tackle subjects where they may be struggling. If your child needs additional help, don't wait to correct the problem. Call Huntington today to find out more about our customized tutoring programs.

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Accentuating the Positive When Talking to Your Child About School As parents, we all want to see our children succeed and be happy in school. While it is natural for parents to take for granted their child's achievements and instead focus on the subjects or areas where a child may have room for improvement, remember that every child needs support and encouragement.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:56:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/accentuating-the-positive-when-talking-to-your-child-about-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/accentuating-the-positive-when-talking-to-your-child-about-school Here are a few tips on how to focus on the positive when talking with your child about school, in even the most difficult situations:

Avoid regular disapproval:

Most likely, a child who is struggling in school already feels upset about it. Reminding your child frequently that he or she has disappointed you, or pointing out in a negative way what they already know ("This is a terrible report card," or "You need to bring up your grades or you'll end up failing fifth grade") is likely to make your child feel more discouraged rather than motivated to do better. Instead, ask your child open-ended questions and listen to the answers. How does your child feel about his or her teacher or teachers? What subjects does your child find the most interesting or exciting? What subjects does your child dislike? Why? Understanding your child's situation will arm you with the information you'll need to help your child (and seek additional help if necessary).

Notice your child's successes:

Positive reinforcement comes in many forms, but one way to encourage your child to do better in school is by taking regular notice of his or her achievements, big or small. Particularly as your child becomes older, specific, positive comments about your child's efforts ("You've really been working to make your study time more productive, and that's great") are more meaningful than nonspecific, vague praise ("Good job"). Remember to recognize improvements-if your child produces an improved mid-semester report card or a better grade on a math test than last time, don't let it go unnoticed. Congratulate your child right away and acknowledge his or her hard work.

Ask how you can help:

By asking questions, you are encouraging your child to open up to you not only about school, but about his or her life outside the home (including aspects of your child's life that may be negatively impacting their studies). At the same time, you can show your child that you're supportive by opening the floor to him or her to offer ideas on how you can help. Your child's answer may shed new light on the best path forward, but more importantly, it will provide your child the opportunity to think through one or more possible solutions to his or her problem.

Help your child believe in himself or herself.
In the long run, a child who perseveres even when school gets tough is more likely to demonstrate those same valuable skills later in life as a college student or in a job. How do you instill such determination in your child? By letting your child know that you believe in him or her, too, unconditionally. Accepting a child for who he or she is results in a confident child.

Empower your child to succeed in school and in life by employing positive parenting whenever possible. You may notice a change in your child's attitude, motivation and overall happiness. At Huntington, we understand that it's hard to know where to turn when your child is struggling in school. We can help. Huntington will work with you and your child to uncover the root of the problem and tailor a program to focus on the areas where your child needs the most assistance. If your child needs help in school, call Huntington Learning Center.

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Help Your Child Be a Confident Student and Person As many parents know, self-esteem plays a significant role in a child's academic career. Children with healthy self-esteem feel confident and capable, resulting in a "can-do" attitude and a willingness to be persistent when it comes to tackling difficult subjects or trying new activities. Read on for a few pointers on how to help boost your child's confidence when it comes to school...and life.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:19:05 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-be-a-confident-student-and-person https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-be-a-confident-student-and-person Praise the effort, not the outcome.

It's hard not to jump for joy when your child gets an A on a test or announces that he or she won a spelling bee at school. However, when it comes to your child's achievements, remember that more important than the positive end result is the road your child travelled to get there. Surely, working for that A took a commitment on your child's part. Let him or her know that you're proud of his or her efforts and willingness to stick with the studying.

It is just as important to praise improvements; if your child brought his or her report card up from straight-Cs to all Bs and one C, congratulate this progress. Avoid insincere or hollow compliments. "Good job, but let's keep shooting for those As," isn't as likely to motivate your child to continue taking steps in the right direction as a comment that focuses on his or her accomplishment, such as, "You've worked hard, and it's paid off. I'm proud of you for making such a big improvement."

Let your child make mistakes.

A big part of school and life is learning from our mistakes. The more parents provide their children opportunities to learn and practice new things, the better. For example, a child who takes up tennis may initially struggle to make his or her racquet connect with the ball. With practice, encouragement and coaching, your child will be more likely to understand what he or she needs to do to hit the ball, clear the net and more. Just as you wouldn't expect your child to be a flawless tennis player after an hour on the court, neither should you or your child expect every math problem or writing assignment to be easy. The key is to help your child learn from past challenges and apply that knowledge in the future.

To encourage independence, avoid interrupting your child during homework time to "show" him or her the right way to do a problem. Instead, let your child take his or her best shot. If your child makes a mistake, don't offer the right answer, but rather provide help to get there. In a frustrating moment, consider reminding your child of a time when he or she overcame an obstacle to learn something new. Whenever possible, guide your child toward accomplishments from the sidelines so that he or she can experience the excitement and pride that comes with overcoming a challenge all on his or her own.

Be a positive influence.

A child's parents have the greatest potential to make an impact on him or her, particularly at a young age. Remember that young children are like sponges: they absorb everything. Because your child emulates you, maintain a positive attitude toward your own activities or work. If your child senses that you have a negative self-image or often feel discouraged in your own life, there's no doubt he or she will be influenced. Are you showing your child that you, too, are willing to persevere even in a difficult situation?

At the same time, your child needs to know that sometimes, we all try and do not succeed. Your positive attitude is important, but be sure that you don't overcompensate by making your child feel that you rarely have trouble picking up a new concept or activity. If your child is ready to give up on a homework problem or assignment, share with him or her a time when you experienced something similar, either in school, work or otherwise. Be honest about the outcome, and let your child know that it's okay to be stronger in certain areas than others.

One of the most important qualities you can impart upon your child before sending him or her off to high school and college is confidence. When your child feels confident, he or she will approach school and life with an unafraid and optimistic demeanor. Self-belief grows upon itself; show your child that you believe in him or her, help guide your child toward small successes and watch your child start to believe in himself or herself, too.

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TAKE STOCK OF ALL OPTIONS FOR MAKING COLLEGE AFFORDABLE For many students and their parents, the arrival of a college acceptance letter is a time to celebrate the years of hard work that it took to prepare for higher education - and a cause for concern over how much it's going to cost. Year after year, at most colleges and universities across the nation, expenses for tuition, fees, books and lodging have increased, and according to most experts that trend will continue. Fortunately, the total amount of student aid available, including grants, loans, scholarships, work-study programs and other sources has also increased, making college more affordable than many students and families realize. Here are some tips for tracking down the support that will put your child's dreams within reach.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:05:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/take-stock-of-all-options-for-making-college-affordable https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/take-stock-of-all-options-for-making-college-affordable Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Step One: Talk with school counselors. Advising students on financial aid options is one of the most important roles of school counselors. They should know about the different types of aid available and guide you and your child through the application process, which can be daunting. Counselors can also provide information on grants and loans from your state government, and those offered by the colleges and universities you're considering.

Step Two: Make sure your child is eligible for most types of available aid. To qualify for financial aid, your child must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. If your son would like to receive federal aid, he'll need to register with the U.S. Selective Service when he turns 18 (Selective Service registration is in fact required for all men aged 18 to 25). All students must also graduate from high school or earn a GED before receiving aid.

Step Three: Order the FAFSA. Most of the available aid comes from the federal government, and to access it you need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You'll use the information from your tax returns to complete the FAFSA, which you can submit by mail or online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA site is a good source of information about all of the federal aid available, and it includes a link to the financial aid offices for most states as well.

Step Four: Understand the full range of federal aid options available. Grant options include The Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, which are offered to students from families in the lowest income brackets. Loan options include the Federal Stafford Loan, which has a variable interest rate, and the Federal Perkins Loan, which has the lowest fixed rate of any federal student loans. You can also consider Federal Work-Study programs, which provide jobs that pay minimum wage or above.

If you show significant financial need, your child might also qualify for a Subsidized Stafford Loan, which does not start accruing interest until after you graduate from college, saving you a considerable sum. If you don't show enough need, your child may be eligible for an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, which isn't based on need. Unsubsidized loans begin accruing interest as soon as the money is disbursed, which means the debt will grow while your child attends college, although interest rates on student loans are generally very low. You can learn more about Stafford Loans at www.staffordloan.com, and about many more loan and grant options at the U.S. Department of Education's Federal Student Aid Web site, located at: studentaid.ed.gov.

Step Five: Pursue the full range of available scholarships. Many scholarships are available to students interested in a particular field of study, which makes them perfect for students who already have careers in mind. Having an athletic or artistic talent can also open the door to scholarships for students who earn special recognition for those talents. Awards are also available for those in underrepresented groups, such as Hispanic and African-American students, and those who will be the first in their family to attend college. Many scholarships are based on academic merit, but others - from businesses, civic and religious groups and corporate and financial organizations - are awarded based on family income or demographic factors. Creating a checklist of your child's talents, interests, and demographic factors will help you both hone in on the various angles you can pursue.

Step Six: Remember the value of high achievement. Many loans and grants are increasingly based more on academic merit than financial need. This is one more reason your child should develop good study skills and get extra help to address any issues that are impacting grades. It's also important to raise the bar as high as possible by taking Advanced Placement, honors or other advanced courses. Good performance in these courses is especially crucial if your child is hoping to receive aid from colleges and universities because it shows decision-makers that he or she is well-qualified for college-level work - and well positioned to ensure the institution's financial investment pays off.

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MAKE COLLEGE ACHIEVABLE AND AFFORDABLE If your teen has earned good grades in challenging courses and achieved a high score on the SAT or ACT, he or she has a good chance of being admitted to a desirable college or university. Unfortunately you might be in for some serious "sticker shock" when you find out just how much it's going to cost to attend.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:34:59 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-college-achievable-and-affordable https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/make-college-achievable-and-affordable If so, you're not alone. According to The College Board, the annual cost of tuition and fees for in-state students at public four-year colleges and universities averaged more than $5,400 for the 2005-2006 academic year - a 7.1 percent rise from last year. If you're son or daughter is hoping to attend a private four-year college you'll pay an average of over $21,000, nearly 6 percent higher than last year. Even if you started saving years ago, you're probably going to need some assistance in the form of scholarships, grants and loans.

If that's the case, don't panic. While college costs have risen significantly during the past 10 years, the total amount of student aid available, including grants, loans, work-study programs and tax benefits has doubled. What's important is that you chart a course to obtain as much support as possible for the journey ahead. Here are some tips.

Step One: Talk with school counselors. Advising students on financial aid options is one of the most important roles of school counselors. They can tell you about the different types of aid available and guide you through the application process, which can be daunting. You can also find helpful information by visiting the Web site for the National Center for College and University Admissions (NRCCUA) at www.nrccua.org.

Step Two: Make sure you're eligible. To qualify for financial aid, your child must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. If your son would like to receive federal aid, he'll need to register with the U.S. Selective Service when he turns 18 (Selective Service registration is in fact required for all men aged 18 to 25). All students must also graduate from high school or earn a GED before receiving aid.

Step Three: Order the FAFSA. Most of the available aid comes from the federal government, and to access it you need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You'll use the information from your tax returns to complete the FAFSA, which you can submit by mail or online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA site is a good source of information about all of the federal aid available, and it includes a link to the financial aid offices for most states as well.

Step Four: Understand the full range of federal aid options available. Grant options include The Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, which are offered to students from families in the lowest income brackets. Loan options include the Federal Stafford Loan, which has a variable interest rate, capped at 8.25 percent, and the Federal Perkins Loan, which has the lowest fixed rate of any federal student loans. You can also consider Federal Work-Study programs, which provide jobs that pay minimum wage or above.

If you show significant financial need, you might also qualify for a Subsidized Stafford Loan, which does not start accruing interest until after you graduate from college, saving you a considerable sum. If you don't show enough need, you may be eligible for an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, which isn't based on need. Unsubsidized loans begin accruing interest when you sign on the bottom line, although interest rates on student loans are generally very low.

Step Five: Take stock of the additional options available. Many scholarships are based on academic merit, but others - from businesses, civic and religious groups and corporate and financial organizations - are awarded based on family income or demographic factors. School counselors can also advise you on grants and loans from your state government, and those offered by the colleges and universities you're considering.

Step Six: Develop a plan. The wide range of options and application deadlines might make you feel as if you're stuck in a maze, but it will be easier to navigate your way through if you begin early. While no aid will be awarded until your child is accepted into a higher education institution or program, you should start learning about your options as early as the middle school years or even before. Make a checklist of every type of grant and loan aid available. Itemize all of the forms and documentation you'll need, and create a calendar of deadlines for applying.

Step Seven: Focus on high achievement. Many loans and grants are increasingly based more on academic merit than financial need. This is one more reason your child should develop good study skills and get extra help to address any issues that are impacting grades. It's also important for your son or daughter to do everything possible to prepare for the SAT and ACT - two high stakes exams that have a big impact on college admissions. Top performance on these tests can also lead to significant opportunities for scholarship money.

Your child should also raise the bar as high as possible by taking Advanced Placement, honors or other advanced courses. Doing well in these courses is especially crucial if your child is hoping to receive aid from colleges and universities because it shows decision-makers that he or she is well-qualified for college-level work - and well positioned to ensure the institution's financial investment pays off.

You'll also want to remember the power of the financial investment you're making. As noted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) college graduates earn an average of $49,000 each year, compared to high school graduates, who earn roughly $30,000. This amounts to a difference of more than $800,000 (in today's dollars) throughout your son or daughter's professional life - further proof that now, and in the future, the path to high achievement leads to rich rewards.

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SEE IT; ACHIEVE IT! GOAL SETTING FOR THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR After several weeks of summer vacation, your child should be heading back to school rested and determined to make the most of his or her potential. As a parent or guardian, you can facilitate this mindset by setting goals in each of the areas that are so important to academic achievement. Here are some suggestions:

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Mon, 04 Jan 2016 16:25:29 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/see-it-achieve-it-goal-setting-for-the-new-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/see-it-achieve-it-goal-setting-for-the-new-school-year Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington GOAL ONE: Raise the bar

If your child earned "B"s and "C"s last year, set a goal to earn all "A"s and "B"s this year. In most schools, this GPA level will qualify for the honor roll and signify that your child is performing at grade level, and is well-prepared for increasingly difficult work. If your child is already an "A/B" student, set a goal to earn all "A"s and do everything possible to help achieve that goal. If your child struggled last year and ended up with "C"s and "D"s, talk with teachers right now about the subject areas that proved most troublesome so they can shape their instruction and find the extra help your child will need.

GOAL TWO: Create and stick to a firm study schedule

From the beginning of the school year to the end, study time should be part of your child's daily schedule. This should be a certain period of time, every weekday and one day on the weekend, when your son or daughter completes homework, prepares for tests and engages in "free-choice" learning to explore special learning interests and aptitudes. Keeping on schedule tends to be easiest if this period is the same time each day of the week, with more flexibility on the weekends.

Effective sequencing will make this time more productive. Homework assignments should be completed first. Studying for upcoming exams - including those scheduled for the next day or in the next week or so - should come next. If all the homework is done and your child tells you there's no test to study for, he or she should fill the rest of the schedule with independent learning activities that could include reading, working on an extra credit project or utilizing the Internet and other resource materials to explore special interests.

GOAL THREE: Get an extracurricular boost

While academics should always be job number one, extracurricular activities can also expand your child's learning horizons and strengthen the impression he or she will make on college admissions applications. Reading groups, language clubs, political campaigns, academic competitions and volunteer projects can extend your child's natural aptitudes and interests and pack a lot more learning into the day. These activities can also lead to stronger friendships and connections to your school and community, which can give your son or daughter a stronger sense of well-being and purpose.

GOAL FOUR: Maintain a can-do attitude

Your child's self-esteem can be a very big factor in social and academic success, and students who truly believe in their abilities are in a better position to overcome bad test scores and master especially difficult coursework. You can foster this self-esteem by showing how much you value your son or daughter's hard-work and accomplishments. When your child gets a bad grade, position it as a temporary setback, not a failure, as long as he or she learns from the experience, and make sure that major successes are acknowledged from the beginning of the year to the very end.

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LOOK BEYOND TEST SCORES TO FIND OUT IF YOUR CHILD IS ON COURSE When your child has a stuffy nose and persistent cough, chances are your doctor will use a thermometer and stethoscope for a careful diagnosis before determining how to treat the ailment. You should review the results of your child's next "big test" in the very same way. Instead of simply cheering an "A" or a "B" or threatening "no videogames for a week" for a "D," look carefully at the specific areas where your child excelled or struggled. An excellent response to an essay question, for example, could show a special aptitude for writing, reading and debating that could be nurtured with AP and honors classes. Multiple errors on a math test could likewise call for special help to master basic computation skills before your child moves on to algebra and geometry.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:26:33 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/look-beyond-test-scores-to-find-out-if-your-child-is-on-course https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/look-beyond-test-scores-to-find-out-if-your-child-is-on-course Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Either way, it's important to look beyond the grade to diagnose the strengths and weaknesses that are impacting your child's achievement - and find the right treatment for addressing them long before the next big test comes around. Here are some additional tips for ensuring your child is prepared for the challenges ahead:

Take a second look at statewide exams.

In the fall and spring of each school year, schools across your state are required to give students tests to measure proficiency in meeting standards for what every child should know and learn in core academic subjects. If your child performed well on the test in the fall, you can be reasonably assured that he or she has the academic grounding to handle grade-level work throughout the rest of the year. If not, you need to closely review the test and identify and address the problem areas immediately.

Maintain contact with teachers.

Once you become aware of the trouble spots, set up a meeting with your child's teacher to discuss how to bring skills up to speed. Teachers can likewise offer suggestions on how to nurture and hone special aptitudes that may qualify your child for accelerated learning opportunities that can enhance preparation for higher education.

Look at academic performance school-wide.

In addition to being useful barometers of individual student success, tests given in the fall and spring also impact the annual U.S. Department of Education "report cards" that signify every school's success in maintaining and raising achievement among students overall. As a parent, you should be interested in this information, but you should also be aware that lower rankings for a school as a whole may not mean failure on behalf of all students. Many schools are improving significantly, and many are also going to great lengths to provide additional help for students with special learning needs. What's most important is knowing that the school and teachers are committed to seeing your child succeed.

Keep a constant vigil

Pay close attention to mood swings and take special note of the evenings when your child seems too tired or disinterested to complete homework satisfactorily. It may just be because he or she is having a tough day, or it may be because of mounting academic difficulties or even too much time spent in extracurricular activities. Too many evenings like this could call for a heart-to-heart talk, which is always a good opportunity to show your child that you truly care.

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HELP YOUR CHILD BUILD A WINNING WAY WITH WORDS Solid reading skills are vital for success on many of the tests your child will take between Kindergarten and high school graduation - including the SAT and ACT. Students therefore need to possess a strong vocabulary and be confident in their ability to discern the meanings of many words. Here are some tips for building word power:

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:41:34 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-build-a-winning-way-with-words https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-build-a-winning-way-with-words Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington 1. Read extensively. Whether your child is enjoying the adventures of Ernest Hemingway or reading books about his or her favorite subject or hobby, viewing words in the context of a narrative builds an intuitive understanding of their meanings. Your son might simply shrug when seeing the words "gargantuan" and "gilded" on a vocabulary test, for example, but he'll probably understand the meaning right away if he's reading a passage that notes "With more than 2,200 passengers, including a dozen millionaires, on board for what was supposed to be the fastest-ever Atlantic crossing, the gargantuan Titanic was the most technologically advanced maritime vessel of the Gilded Age."

2. Learn how to "decode" words. Students can make a well-educated guess about a word's meaning by recognizing certain clues. One of the most effective strategies is to understand the meanings of common prefixes and suffixes. A few examples include:

Un - which generally means "not," as in unacceptable, unusual and unaware
Re - which usually means "again," as in return, remember and reiterate
In, and im - which usually refer to something being "in" or "not," as in ineligible, immutable and implausible
Inter, which commonly means "between," as in interloper, or intervention
Dis - which usually means "apart," as in disassociate, dissension and disagree
Sym and syn, which refer to being "together," as in symmetrical and synergy

Common suffixes - meaning letters at the end of words - will provide clues as well. When you see the letters "less" at the end of a word, the word will often mean something related to "without," as in hopeless, thoughtless and careless. "Ful" refers to being "full," as in hopeful, helpful and thoughtful.

3. Make flashcards of new words. Once your child learns the most common prefixes, suffixes and word roots, he or she can use www.dictionary.com or a regular dictionary along with reading assignments to learn words that incorporate them. Try setting a goal - such as learning five new words a day for five days a week. Once your child finds a new word, he or she should make a flash card, with the word on one side and the definition on the other. Your son or daughter should then keep the flashcards on hand and run through them often to strengthen familiarity with the words. Setting a goal to learn five new words a day for five days a week can boost your child's vocabulary by 200 words in just two months.

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GET YOUR CHILD READY FOR A SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL YEAR For many students, going back to school is an exciting occasion - a chance to make new friends, embark on new extra-curricular activities and take on new responsibilities. For all students - including those who may have struggled through the last semester - it's also a chance for a fresh start toward academic success. Here are some key steps parents and caregivers can take to prepare them for the journey ahead.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:22:57 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-a-successful-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-a-successful-school-year Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Step One: Schedule a conference with your child's teachers.

Whether you attend an "open house" or schedule a one-on-one conference, you should meet with your child's teachers. Ensure that they have contact information for you and encourage them to call or email you to discuss your child's progress during the year. Most teachers will also appreciate a brief recap of your child's educational experiences to date, such as any major successes or stumbling blocks along the way. Did your child score off the charts in mathematics? Did he or she require extra tutoring to improve reading comprehension? Providing a snapshot of your child's educational "resume" will help the teacher personalize instruction to suit your child's special needs.

Step Two: Look out for key benchmarks on the academic calendar.

In the early fall, many school districts administer important tests to gauge students' preparedness for the months ahead. By talking with your child's teachers and/or going to the Department of Education Web site for your state, you can usually find out which tests will be given to students by grade level, and when. You can find out the key subject matter that will be tested, and when you should expect to see your child's results. Keep in mind that these tests are not given simply to see how your child "measures up." They're offered as a diagnostic tool for revealing academic strengths and weaknesses. Understanding these strengths and weaknesses in the fall will help you and your child prepare for the higher stakes tests given in the spring - the results of which may be factored into decisions about grade advancement and graduation.

Step Three: Raise the bar on expectations.

Whether your child is an excellent, capable or struggling student, earning the best possible grades should be one of the most important goals. This means envisioning certain targets and committing to the hard work it takes to reach them. If your child had relatively good study habits, worked moderately hard and earned "B"s and "C"s last year, set a goal to earn all "A"s and "B"s this year. In most schools, this GPA level will qualify for the honor roll and signify that your child is performing at grade level, and is well-prepared for increasingly difficult work. If your child is already an "A/B" student, set a goal to earn all "A"s and do everything possible to help achieve that goal. If your child struggled last year and ended up with "C"s and "D"s, talk with teachers right now about the subject areas that proved most troublesome so they can shape their instruction and find the extra help your child will need.

Step Four: Establish a learning schedule.

The beginning of the school year is also a good time to establish parameters for homework. Setting aside a designated period of time after school or in the early evening that is to be used only for schoolwork is a strategy that has been proven effective for countless students over the years. There are several factors that can influence the decision about which time is best. Some children, for example, may complete homework more successfully by beginning immediately after school, leaving the rest of the late afternoon and evening for other activities. Others may need time to "wind down" after being in school all day before they're relaxed and focused enough to complete homework successfully.

Step Five: Balance learning time and leisure time.

You should also think through the right balance of academics and extracurricular activities. Keeping in mind the significant amount of study time most children need to make good grades, take a look at all of the other activities that your child wants to fit into his or her day. Have a frank discussion to determine which activities are most important to your child, and see if you can arrive collaboratively at a decision about which should be pursued. Then see if you can also determine, together, the best time to be set aside for studying in the midst of these activities.

While it's important to set and maintain a schedule throughout the year, most high- achieving students also plan ahead to ensure they have enough flexibility to fit in extra effort that may be needed during high-pressure periods, such as the approach of mid-term and final exams. By establishing the right environment at home and a strong, positive connection to what's happening at school, you can give your child a head start that will drive success all year long.

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GO FIGURE: MATH AND SCIENCE PAVE THE WAY FOR LIFE SUCCESS Many students find advanced mathematics courses required by most secondary schools to be very difficult - particularly if they haven't built basic mathematics skills and knowledge in the earlier grades. That's why you need to be aware of what your child should be learning from pre-kindergarten on. Here are some recommendations from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:54:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/go-figure-math-and-science-pave-the-way-for-life-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/go-figure-math-and-science-pave-the-way-for-life-success Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington In pre-kindergarten through 2nd grade, students are developing the foundation for future learning, so it's important to focus on the basics right away. Children should therefore understand whole numbers and commonly used fractions such as 1/4, 1/3 and 1/2. They should also recognize two-and-three dimensional shapes. By the second grade they should be able to classify objects by size, recognize two and three dimensional shapes, and understand the attributes of length, weight, volume, area and time.

From the 3rd to the 5th grade, students should develop a solid understanding of fractions, decimals and percents. They should also be able to compare whole numbers and decimals. They should be assembling the building blocks of algebra by analyzing patterns and functions, and be preparing for advanced geometry studies classifying two-and three-dimensional shapes according to their properties. They should also be exploring numbers less than 0 and be able to carry out conversions, such as from centimeters to meters.

During grades 6-through-8 students are developing firm conclusions about their abilities and limitations. Children who adopt the attitude that "I'm just not good at math" will find this to be a self-defeating prophecy while those who make steady progress develop the confidence that's vital for higher-level work. This means being able to use fundamental algebraic and geometric concepts to solve problems, understanding ratios, proportions, prime numbers, and exponents and - according to the NCTM - being able to "create and critique inductive and deductive arguments concerning congruence, similarity and the Pythagorean relationship."

By the 12th grade, a student must be able to solve problems using algebra, geometry, statistics, probability and discrete mathematics. This means understanding and using formulas to determine the area and volume of geometric figures, understanding the characteristics of well-designed studies such as those used in surveys and experiments, and understanding how to use Cartesian coordinates and other coordinate systems.

Keep in mind that doing well in mathematics - or most any subject - is a lot like building a house. Your child will need a solid foundation in basic computation skills and a basic understanding of numbers and shapes, followed by framework of skills and knowledge to support the challenging and rigorous work that will cap his or her high school career. With a positive outlook and a concerted focus on addressing problem areas, every child can find the winning formula for success.

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GET YOUR CHILD ON TRACK FOR READING SUCCESS Is your child struggling to develop basic reading skills? If so, you're not alone. By the latest estimates, as many as 40 percent of the nation's 4th graders aren't reading at grade level.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:24:46 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-on-track-for-reading-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-on-track-for-reading-success Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Fortunately, many schools are now emphasizing phonemic awareness in their reading instruction, particularly for young children. Yet parents should still be highly alert for signs that their children are struggling. As noted in Why Kids Can't Read: Challenging the Status Quo in Education, by Phyllis Blaunstein and Reid Lyon, here are some signs that a child may be in trouble:

Great difficulty in understanding that words are made up of individual sounds that can be pulled apart and combined to make words: for example, that batboy can be pulled apart into bat and boy and that the word bat can be broken down still further and sounded out as: b aaaa t;

 Struggling to read and sound-out common, one-syllable words, such as dog, cat, hop, nap.

 Frequently mispronouncing complicated words, leaving out parts of words or confusing the order of the parts of words, saying amulium instead of aluminum, for example;

 Stumbling when reading multi-syllable words, without coming close when trying to sound out the full word;

 Omitting parts of words when reading, so that it sounds as if there's a hole in the word, reading convertible as conible, for example;

 Poor performance on multiple choice tests, and an inability to finish tests on time;

 Disastrous spelling skills.

Signs of Effective Reading Instruction

If your child is experiencing these problems, it's important to look closely at the reading instruction he or she is receiving. Here are the qualities of sound, proven instruction for phonemic awareness:

  1. Children are learning the sounds of language, and teachers are helping them practice with sounds that make up words.
  2. Children are learning how to put sounds together to make up words, and how to break words apart into separate sounds.
  3. Children are learning the letters of the alphabet, and can recognize the names and shapes of letters.
  4. Children's teachers are reading to the class and talking about what the students are reading.
  5. Children are learning phonics - how sounds and letters are related - and practicing phonics by reading books that focus on the letter-sound relationships they're learning.
  6. Children are being asked questions to help them think about the meaning of what they're reading, and are learning the meanings of new words.
  7. Children are learning to expand their vocabulary by using the dictionary, using known words and word parts to figure out words, and using clues from the rest of a sentence to better understand the meaning of words.
  8. Teachers are checking to see if students understand what they're reading by asking questions about the story or the material.
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GET A RUNNING START ON THE SECOND LEG OF THE ACHIEVEMENT RACE For most students, December brought at least two weeks of respite from the rigors of schoolwork at the midpoint of the academic year. But this midpoint is also a good time for both parents and children to take stock of the accomplishments and challenges of those first two quarters. By looking at four key indicators, you can develop a good sense of your child's preparedness for the semester that lies ahead.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:46:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-a-running-start-on-the-second-leg-of-the-achievement-race https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-a-running-start-on-the-second-leg-of-the-achievement-race Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Indicator #1: Grades and teacher conferences

Listening, following directions, putting forth enough effort and completing classwork neatly and on-time all have an impact on grades. Conferences with teachers are a good way to determine your child's performance in all of these areas. When you meet with your child's teachers, ask for suggestions of specific activities you can undertake at home to support efforts at school. It's also important to tell the teacher about any issues that may affect your child's academic success. Family tension, financial concerns, health issues or marital problems directly impact a child's ability to concentrate in school.

Indicator #2: Standardized test results

In recent years, parents and students have paid the most attention to standardized tests during the spring - when many states and districts administer exams that now determine a student's ability to graduate or move on to the next grade. But you can get a good idea of which skills should be strengthened in advance of these tests by taking a second look at the results of other standardized exams that may have been given during the fall. This is particularly true in school districts that administer tests at the beginning of the year and then again at the end of the year to measure students' progress. If your child scored less than satisfactorily in reading or mathematics at the beginning of the year, for example, you might pay particular attention to these areas as he or she prepares for the high stakes tests that will be given in just a few months.

Indicator #3: The Work/Life Balance

Take a look at your child's academic success during the first half of the year and weigh it against all of the extracurricular activities that filled his or her schedule. Were there enough hours in a typical day last semester to keep up with schoolwork while enjoying every activity? Working collaboratively, parents and students should prioritize activities that are most important, and create a schedule that strikes the right balance.

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SUMMERTIME IS PRIME TIME FOR BUILDING READING SKILLS Ask many teachers why some children read better, and more often, than others, and you're apt to hear it's a function of "competence," "confidence" and "a desire to escape."

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Mon, 04 Jan 2016 16:26:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-is-prime-time-for-building-reading-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-is-prime-time-for-building-reading-skills Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington In other words, those who have strong reading skills are more self-assured when tackling challenging reading assignments. And those who truly enjoy reading - and are accustomed to losing themselves in a good book - are more apt to turn to reading during their leisure time.

So what can you do if your child is a reluctant reader? That's a particularly good question during the summer months, when homework isn't looming and your child has more time to build reading skills and discover new books. If building skills is a challenge, you can find some terrific tips in the booklet, "A Child Becomes a Reader," which has been developed especially for parents of children in kindergarten through third grade. Available at www.nifl.gov/partnershipforreading and by mail by calling 1-800-228-8813, the booklet offers easy-to-follow advice on how to strengthen reading skills at home. Here are some highlights for the very important early years:

For children in kindergarten and first grade: