Huntington Connects Connecting you to the latest news, tips and academic resources Mon, 12 Nov 2018 22:18:11 -0500 Zend_Feed_Writer 1.12.17dev (http://framework.zend.com) https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog rss@huntingtonhelps.com (Huntington Learning Center) Huntington Learning Center Parents' Guide to the First Report Card The first marking period of the year does not have to conjure up stress for children and their parents. "The report card should be viewed as an opportunity to identify any potential trouble areas, address any issues and set goals with your child," advises Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. As the first academic review of your child's school performance this year, Huntington suggests that parents keep in mind the following when they receive their child's fall report card:

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Wed, 07 Nov 2018 12:28:57 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-to-the-first-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-to-the-first-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The first marking period of the year does not have to conjure up stress for children and their parents. "The report card should be viewed as an opportunity to identify any potential trouble areas, address any issues and set goals with your child," advises Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. As the first academic review of your child's school performance this year, Huntington suggests that parents keep in mind the following when they receive their child's fall report card:

The teacher can offer more in-depth information. Grades should be digested with the help of a teacher, who can provide more insight into and specifics about your child's academic strengths and weaknesses, behavior in the classroom and more. Together, you can identify the areas where your child may need additional support and develop a plan to provide just that—at home and in the classroom.

Poor organization and study skills may hamper a student's performance. Sometimes a child has the ability to learn and comprehend, but he or she is disorganized and unskilled at managing his or her time. If your child is getting bad grades, talk about his or her homework, study routine and approach. Perhaps a few small changes may help your child become a more effective and efficient student.

Last year was last year. It's a whole new school year, with more demanding classes and concepts for your child to learn and different teachers who may approach subjects differently. This means that the challenges that confront your child may be completely different this year. Do not be surprised if your child brings home a lower-than-expected grade in a subject that did not cause trouble last year, and remind yourself that no matter what troubles present themselves, you and your child can overcome them together.

Some problems don't go away on their own. Certain issues need correction sooner rather than later. If your child does not acquire certain "building block" skills in math or reading that are essential for him or her to grasp more difficult and in-depth concepts, for example, he or she will continue to struggle in those subjects. Your child's teacher can advise whether your child would benefit from tutoring that will help him or her close those skill gaps as quickly as possible.

Huntington reminds parents that perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind when grades are declining is that the action taken is what really counts. "Inevitably, issues will arise throughout your child's education," says Huntington. "However, if you stay optimistic and calm and take steps early, you can overcome those issues before they grow into major problems."

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. Huntington offers prep for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit

www.huntingtonfranchise.com

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Dos and Don’ts for College Admissions Interviews It’s college application time and your teen has taken the SAT or ACT, kept up his or her grades, written a stellar essay and completed all college applications. There is one more piece to the college admissions puzzle that could potentially gain your teen the acceptance he or she seeks: the college admissions interview. “Not all colleges require a college admissions interview, but many of the competitive institutions do, as do some colleges’ departments or schools that require secondary admission,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “The admissions interview intimidates many prospective students, but we encourage them to approach this as an opportunity to put a face to a name, make a good impression and articulate face-to-face why they would be a great student at the college.”

Huntington offers a few tips to students as they prepare for the college admissions interview:

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Tue, 02 Oct 2018 14:33:17 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-college-admissions-interviews https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-college-admissions-interviews It’s college application time and your teen has taken the SAT or ACT, kept up his or her grades, written a stellar essay and completed all college applications. There is one more piece to the college admissions puzzle that could potentially gain your teen the acceptance he or she seeks: the college admissions interview. “Not all colleges require a college admissions interview, but many of the competitive institutions do, as do some colleges’ departments or schools that require secondary admission,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “The admissions interview intimidates many prospective students, but we encourage them to approach this as an opportunity to put a face to a name, make a good impression and articulate face-to-face why they would be a great student at the college.”

Huntington offers a few tips to students as they prepare for the college admissions interview:

Do spend time reflecting on yourself as a candidate for admission. The interviewer might want to learn more about your reasons for wanting to attend the college and the components of your background that would make you an ideal fit. There are no wrong answers in an admissions interview, since the interviewer simply wants to get to know you better. However, the more you prepare, the more polished you will come across.

Don’t present yourself as someone different than the real you. While you might feel tempted to embellish your ré or act in a way you think might impress the interviewer, it is better to be honest about who you are and what you have to offer. That may even mean discussing lessons you have learned from challenges or failures.

Do act professionally. You should treat the admissions interview as a chance to share your goals, educational journey, future plans and excitement about the college. Although the interviewer wants you to feel comfortable, treat this interview as you would a job interview. Come ready to answer a variety of questions about yourself in a direct and clear way.

Don’t be aloof or act too casual. Avoid cracking jokes, using inappropriate language or sharing too much personal information. Relax and be yourself, but remember that this is still an interview for college admission.

Do be prepared to ask questions. There is a good chance that you will be asked if you have any questions. Do your research about the college and the program or programs in which you are interested and develop a list of questions before your interview. Have them ready just in case.

Don’t waste valuable interview time asking about things you could learn elsewhere. While there may be time allotted for questions, choose those questions wisely. You could easily find out about the admissions process and extracurricular activities on the college’s website.

“The admissions interview is a great opportunity and should not be a source of anxiety,” Huntington reminds students. “Look on the college’s website for any interview guidelines or tips, spend time preparing for the interview, and most important, put your very best foot forward.” 

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Test-taking Tactics to Succeed on the SAT/ACT The SAT (or ACT) is arguably one of the most important exams your teen will ever take. Putting together a solid exam prep plan isn’t just a good idea—it is essential for teens who want to earn the best scores possible as they start their college application process.

While thorough, targeted preparation is critical for success on the SAT/ACT, it’s helpful to have a few tools to rely upon when test day comes around. You can help your teen prepare for the SAT/ACT by strengthening those test-taking tactics. Here are a few tips to share with your teen:

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Mon, 01 Oct 2018 11:42:27 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tactics-to-succeed-on-sat-and-act https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tactics-to-succeed-on-sat-and-act Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington The SAT (or ACT) is arguably one of the most important exams your teen will ever take. Putting together a solid exam prep plan isn’t just a good idea—it is essential for teens who want to earn the best scores possible as they start their college application process.

While thorough, targeted preparation is critical for success on the SAT/ACT, it’s helpful to have a few tools to rely upon when test day comes around. You can help your teen prepare for the SAT/ACT by strengthening those test-taking tactics. Here are a few tips to share with your teen:

Become a pro at time management. One of the most unexpectedly difficult aspects of the SAT/ACT for test-takers is managing one’s time. If your teen practices this, however, it can become a strength. Your teen should get familiar with each test’s structure and question types so that he or she can strategically calculate the amount of time to spend on each question. Here is a high-level overview of the specific sections of each exam:

ACT                                                                                        SAT                

English – 75 questions (45 minutes)                               Writing and Language – 44 questions (35 minutes)

Math – 60 questions (60 minutes)                                   Math –   Calculator – 38 questions (55 minutes)

                                                                                                                No calculator – 20 questions (25 minutes)

Reading – 40 questions (35 minutes)                              Reading – 52 questions (65 minutes)

Science – 40 questions (35 minutes)                               

Essay (optional) – (40 minutes)                                        Essay (optional) – (50 minutes)

Use logic to narrow down multiple-choice answers. Narrow down answer choices to rule out those that are obviously incorrect. Your teen should watch out for answer choices that contain “absolute” words like always, never or all.

Tune out distractions. Encourage your teen to practice concentrating or reading test content with other people around and getting into his or her own “zone” of focus.

Embrace stress management techniques. Even when your teen is prepared for a test, the test setting can conjure up feelings of nervousness and anxiety. Teach your teen strategies to manage any stress, such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, and positive visualization techniques.

Use any spare minutes to check answers. If your teen gets through all exam questions, it’s a smart practice to go back and review the test to ensure he or she did not miss any questions and to revisit any skipped questions.

Test taking isn’t easy for all students, and with the added pressure of the SAT/ACT exams’ significance, it can be downright stressful for some. Remind your teen that studying effectively removes a lot of the anxiety that can come with taking such an important exam. But getting familiar with each exam and learning good test-taking strategies will also help.

The Huntington Learning Center college entrance exam prep programs offer individualized instruction tailored to each student’s precise strengths, weaknesses, needs, and goals. Our highly trained tutors can work with your teen to develop the confidence and test-taking aptitudes he or she needs to succeed on the SAT or ACT.  We offer premier, 32 hour, and 14 hour customized programs for any students’ busy schedule.  Call us at 1 800 CAN LEARN today.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities, please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

 

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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FAQs about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) If you are the parent of a high school student, college is likely on your mind—and so is how to pay for it. Many parents are not as informed as they could be about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), says CEO and Co-Founder, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Centers. “Most families understand that the FAFSA gives them access to federal student aid in the form of federal grants, work-study and loans, but the financial aid process can still be quite overwhelming,” says Huntington. She answers some of the most frequently asked questions about federal aid:

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Fri, 28 Sep 2018 14:44:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/faqs-about-the-fafsa https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/faqs-about-the-fafsa Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center If you are the parent of a high school student, college is likely on your mind—and so is how to pay for it. Many parents are not as informed as they could be about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), says CEO and Co-Founder, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Centers. “Most families understand that the FAFSA gives them access to federal student aid in the form of federal grants, work-study and loans, but the financial aid process can still be quite overwhelming,” says Huntington. She answers some of the most frequently asked questions about federal aid:

What are the requirements to receive financial aid? Students must hold a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate and be enrolled in an eligible program as a regular student seeking a degree or certificate, maintaining satisfactory academic progress. They must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen with a Social Security Number, not be in default on any federal student loans, not have any convictions for the possession or sale of illegal drugs, and register with the Selective Service System if a male and not currently on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces (more details on all of this at https://fafsa.ed.gov).

What do students need to complete the FAFSA? A Social Security Number or Alien Registration Number, federal income tax returns, W-2s, and records of taxed or untaxed income, bank and investment records, and an FSA ID, which parents and students can create at https://fsaid.ed.gov.

Do students need to wait until their/their parents’ taxes are filed to complete the FAFSA? No. For the 2018-2019 school year, students will report their 2016 income information (not 2017).

What are the federal student aid deadlines? The FAFSA for the 2018-2019 school year was available on October 1, 2017 and students/parents can apply between then and June 30, 2019 for aid for the 2018-2019 school year. For the 2019-2020 school year, students/parents can apply between October 1, 2018 and June 30, 2020.

Are state student aid and college aid deadlines different? Yes, they might be. Check online at https://fafsa.ed.gov/deadlines.htm. In New Jersey, for example, the fall and spring term state aid deadline is September 15, 2018. Each college might have its own financial aid deadline, so students need to contact the colleges they’re interested in attending to find out for sure.

Do students need to wait until they are accepted to a college before completing the FAFSA? No. They do have to list at least one college that will receive their FAFSA information, but students can list all schools they are interested in—even if they haven’t applied or been accepted yet. If they submit the FAFSA and later consider a school that they did not list previously, they can submit a correction to the FAFSA online.

Are grades taken into consideration when financial aid is awarded? No. If students want to continue receiving federal student aid, however, they must maintain satisfactory academic progress. This essentially means they must meet a minimum grade-point average and complete a certain number of credits each year. Each school has its own policy, so it’s a good idea to check with them.

What happens after a student submits the FAFSA? The U.S. Department of Education processes the application within 3-10 days, depending on whether the student applied online or not. Then they will receive a copy of a Student Aid Report (SAR), which summarizes the information provided on the FAFSA and includes an Expected Family Contribution. Colleges use this figure to assess eligibility for other federal and nonfederal student aid and creating students’ award packages (and distributing that aid).

These are some of the most common questions about financial aid, but Huntington encourages parents and students to visit the Federal Student Aid website for more information about the FAFSA and federal aid for students: https://fafsa.ed.gov.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Senior Year College Application Calendar Do you have a senior in high school who plans to go to college next year? Although your teen may have put in quite a bit of effort toward the college application process already, senior year is no time to slack, says Co-Founder and CEO Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “These last nine months of high school are when teens really need to stay on track to ensure they do not miss any important deadlines as they make this important life decision,” says Huntington. Here’s a senior year college application calendar that your teen should keep on hand:

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Mon, 17 Sep 2018 11:53:20 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/senior-year-college-application-calendar https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/senior-year-college-application-calendar Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Do you have a senior in high school who plans to go to college next year? Although your teen may have put in quite a bit of effort toward the college application process already, senior year is no time to slack, says Co-Founder and CEO Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “These last nine months of high school are when teens really need to stay on track to ensure they do not miss any important deadlines as they make this important life decision,” says Huntington. Here’s a senior year college application calendar that your teen should keep on hand:

September

  • Make a list of top college choices and their application and financial aid due dates.
  • Make a list of all scholarships to which you plan to apply and their due dates. Put all due dates on the calendar—and keep in mind that many scholarship deadlines are between October and March.
  • Get familiar with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid website (https://fafsa.ed.gov/) and requirements for submitting yours as soon as possible after October 1.
  • Request recommendation letters to give teachers/counselors plenty of notice, as they will receive requests from other students as well.
  • Register to retake the ACT on October 27 if needed (registration deadline is September 28).

October

  • If applying early decision/early action, begin working on applications. Many colleges have early admissions application deadlines as soon as November 1.
  • Begin drafting any application essays.
  • Register to retake the SAT on November 3 if needed (registration deadline is October 5).

November

  • Register to retake the SAT on December 1 if you want one more chance to raise your score (registration deadline is November 2).
  • Register to retake the ACT on December 8 if you want one more chance to raise your score (registration deadline is November 2).
  • Request that the guidance counselor send first-semester transcripts to all colleges to which you are applying.

December

  • Submit any college applications due in early 2019.
  • If you submitted your FAFSA in the fall, keep an eye out for the Student Aid Report, which colleges use to put together your college financial aid package. Make sure to review this report carefully to check that everything is correct.
  • If you applied for early decision, keep an eye out for admissions letters. You should hear something in mid-December.

January and February

  • Continue working hard in school to maintain a high GPA. Colleges often want to see spring semester grades.
  • After winter break, touch base with the guidance counselor to make sure there’s nothing you’ve overlooked.
  • Relax! The hardest part is behind you, and now you wait to hear from colleges.
  • Review your scholarship list. Have you submitted applications on time? Remember that the more you apply, the greater your chances are of receiving some scholarship money. Every dollar counts.

March and April

  • If you applied for regular decision, keep an eye out for admissions letters. You should expect to hear something within six to eight weeks—so if you sent your application in mid-January, a notification by mid-April is likely.
  • Once you do hear from all colleges, review your acceptance letters and compare financial aid offers. Contact each college’s financial aid office with any questions.
  • Make your college decision and let all colleges know. Many colleges request that you notify them of your plans by May 1.

May

  • Request that the guidance counselor send final transcripts to the college you’re attending.
  • Celebrate!

“Senior year is an exciting time for teens and their parents, but it’s essential to pay attention to any and all deadlines,” says Huntington. For questions about preparing for the SAT or ACT, how to give your teen’s college application package a boost or the college admissions process in general, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Dos and Don'ts When Encouraging a Child in His or Her Academic Endeavors Without a doubt, students flourish when they have the support and encouragement of their parents, but there are a number of ways that well-meaning parents unintentionally discourage their children. Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says that providing children the right type and level of support can make all the difference in their motivation and self-esteem. “Encouragement must be genuine and positive, and although a parent’s intentions might be good, certain types of comments can send the wrong message,” says Huntington. She offers several dos and don’ts for parents when encouraging their children in school:

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Thu, 06 Sep 2018 16:43:03 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/dos-and-donts-when-encouraging-a-child-in-his-or-her-academic-endeavors https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/dos-and-donts-when-encouraging-a-child-in-his-or-her-academic-endeavors Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington Without a doubt, students flourish when they have the support and encouragement of their parents, but there are a number of ways that well-meaning parents unintentionally discourage their children. Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says that providing children the right type and level of support can make all the difference in their motivation and self-esteem. “Encouragement must be genuine and positive, and although a parent’s intentions might be good, certain types of comments can send the wrong message,” says Huntington. She offers several dos and don’ts for parents when encouraging their children in school:

Do celebrate progress and successes. There are subtle differences between praise, which is more of a subjective expression of approval, and encouragement, which inspires a child’s self-confidence through fact-based observations. Instead of complimenting your child for earning that A, point out that his or her hard work and diligent studying paid off. Always focus on your child’s efforts, which will help build your child’s self-assurance and pride.

Don’t overreact about mistakes. Keep in mind that for every mistake your child makes, he or she has done many other things right. On a 25-question test where your child answered four wrong, you might be tempted to jump right into dissecting incorrect answers, but don’t forget to congratulate your child for any successes or improvement. Also remember that mistakes are an essential part of life and learning.

Do believe in your child. Studies show that children do better in school when their parents and teachers expect them to and communicate those expectations to them in positive ways. Tell your child regularly that you believe in his or her ability to learn and you’ll always be there for support.

Don’t be unrealistic in your expectations. High expectations are good, but holding your child to a standard that he or she is unable or unlikely to ever reach does more harm than good. Similarly, comparing your child to another student may only cause feelings of inadequacy or embarrassment. Children generally lose motivation when they feel they have no chance of achieving parental expectations.  

Do give your child tools to problem solve. From an early age, children should be encouraged to attempt to solve their own problems. When a challenge arises—whether a math problem or another dilemma—you can help your child think through solutions or next steps by asking reflective questions, soliciting ideas and encouraging your child to try out different solutions.

Don’t take the driver’s seat on homework or projects. Giving your child too many tips and suggestions on how to solve a problem or do an assignment is not only aggravating, it tells your child that you don’t trust his or her ability to do things. Step back, and give your child the chance—and the support—to attempt tasks independently.

When you encourage your child the right way, you build your child’s self-esteem and positive attitude. Just as importantly, you teach him or her that school takes effort and persistence. Huntington adds, “Parents can make a tremendous positive impact by pointing out to their children when they are working hard and making progress. Those children will believe that learning is their responsibility, and if they also feel encouraged but not overpowered by their parents, they will be far more likely to give school their best effort and actually enjoy learning.”

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Common “Academic Pitfalls” of High School Students High school is a different world when it comes to academics—and for many students, it can mark the beginning of academic problems or exacerbate issues that were minor in middle school. According to Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center, parents can help their teens avoid such academic pitfalls—if they know the signs. “High school is a time when parents need to pay very careful attention to what is going on with their teen in school because they will be more removed from the classroom than they ever have been,” says Huntington. “Communication with your teen and teachers is important, as is watching your teen’s grades and demeanor overall.”

Huntington shares five academic pitfalls that can plague students in high school—and tips on what to do if you notice your teen falling into any of them.

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Thu, 06 Sep 2018 17:12:05 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-academic-pitfall-of-high-school-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-academic-pitfall-of-high-school-students Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington High school is a different world when it comes to academics—and for many students, it can mark the beginning of academic problems or exacerbate issues that were minor in middle school. According to Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center, parents can help their teens avoid such academic pitfalls—if they know the signs. “High school is a time when parents need to pay very careful attention to what is going on with their teen in school because they will be more removed from the classroom than they ever have been,” says Huntington. “Communication with your teen and teachers is important, as is watching your teen’s grades and demeanor overall.”

Huntington shares five academic pitfalls that can plague students in high school—and tips on what to do if you notice your teen falling into any of them.

Slacking off – High school offers an abundance of opportunities to meet new people, get involved and have fun. For some students, that can have a negative impact on their motivation and/or commitment to their studies. If you notice your teen spending a disproportionate amount of time on his or her social life (vs. school) and poor grades come home early in the school year, talk about how to put a plan into place that will help your teen find a better balance.

Apathy – Some intelligent students get to high school and lose their sense of responsibility (especially without as much nudging from parents). Does your teen seem to lack self-discipline and independence when it comes to school work and studying? Does your teen rush through homework, often leaving it incomplete? Students who become lazy in high school need intervention immediately. With the help of your teen’s teachers, you can set goals and a study plan to achieve them (as well as a follow-up plan). With time and effort, your teen will begin to understand how his or her actions affect school achievement.

Effort that doesn’t yield results – In high school, it’s normal to expect that your teen will spend more time on homework. However, if you observe that your teen’s hard work is not yielding positive results or that simple homework is taking more time than seems reasonable, you should investigate whether there are gaps in your teen’s skills causing him or her to struggle.

Disorganization – Up until high school, many students lean on the help of teachers and parents to stay organized and on top of everything. However, some teens who are otherwise capable students become overwhelmed by the volume of high school work. If your teen suddenly has difficulty keeping track of homework, maintaining a neat study space, or making the most of each study session, he or she may need help establishing effective study and organizational habits.

Avoidance – Avoidance of school work can take many forms, but the most obvious is procrastination. If your teen consistently puts off work until late at night or avoids planning ahead for big, important projects, there’s no doubt that this will quickly become a major problem in high school. Pay attention to whether the issue is with all subjects or one in particular.

High school definitely steps up the academic challenge. Huntington reminds parents to take note of how their teen handles the change. “Most parents are intuitive enough to recognize when there is a problem with their children, but it isn’t always easy to know exactly what’s going on,” she says. “If you have a child in high school and you sense issues arising, call Huntington. No problem is too big to overcome, and we can help your teen get and stay on the right track.”

 

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Six Habits of Successful Students As parents, we all want to help our children be as successful in school as they can be. But what is the best way to do so? At Huntington Learning Center, we encounter a range of students—some who are highly motivated to get into excellent colleges and others who are looking to make improvements in one or more subjects. In the 41 years we have been in business, we have observed that the best students have a lot in common—and they embrace many of the same academic habits. Here are six such habits to keep in mind as you guide your own children toward school success:

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Mon, 29 Oct 2018 12:24:30 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-habits-of-successful-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-habits-of-successful-students Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington As parents, we all want to help our children be as successful in school as they can be. But what is the best way to do so? At Huntington Learning Center, we encounter a range of students—some who are highly motivated to get into excellent colleges and others who are looking to make improvements in one or more subjects. In the 41 years we have been in business, we have observed that the best students have a lot in common—and they embrace many of the same academic habits. Here are six such habits to keep in mind as you guide your own children toward school success:

  1. They commit to study time. When it comes to studying, top-performing students are dedicated. They stick to best practices: choosing to study at a time of day when they are most focused and alert and avoiding distractions during that study window.
  2. They are skilled at prioritizing. Highly successful students make the most of study time by prioritizing assignments and tasks before they dive in. At the start of each study session, they review their tasks and rank them from most to least pressing, and only begin working once they’ve done so.
  3. Time management rules all. The best and brightest are often involved in more than just school. As active young people, these students recognize that there’s no room for procrastination when they want to get a lot accomplished. Such students put everything in their planners, from the hours they’re in school to all extracurricular activities, from wakeup time to bedtime. They schedule everything to ensure they make time for all of it. And they are good at using their hours wisely and not losing it to meaningless time-wasters.
  4. Organization is a habit. Great students know that a messy backpack or desk leads to lost time—and that’s counterproductive. These students develop an organizational system that keeps them on task and minimizes the chances they lose important papers or “spin their wheels” during study time because they can’t locate the supplies they need.
  5. They take good notes. An organized approach to note-taking leads to more effective studying later on. Students who become accustomed to taking notes that help them remember important information and key ideas are better equipped for success in college and beyond.
  6. They aim to learn, not memorize. Memorization is a requirement sometimes, but excellent students strive to think critically, analyze and evaluate that which they are taught in school. They listen actively in class and strive to process information so they are able to retain it.

Parents, the next time you wonder if you’re doing all you can to help your children in school, refer to this list. Everything you do to support your children as students should work toward these habits, which together create the “gold standard” of being a student.

As always, Huntington is here to help. If your child is struggling with his or her grades and also seems to need help figuring out reliable methods for school success, call us to schedule an academic evaluation. We’ll pinpoint the areas where your child needs the most support, and together, we can develop a customized learning program that will help him or her become a better, happier student.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Joins the Coalition for the Homeless to Collect 5,000 Filled Backpacks for NYC Students in Need For the third year in a row, Huntington Learning Center has partnered with the Coalition for the Homeless for its annual drive, Project: Back to School, to provide homeless children with the supplies they need to be successful in the classroom. Together, the organizations and additional partners, hope to collect and distribute more than 5,000 new backpacks filled with supplies for students in kindergarten to 12th grade prior to the start of the new school year.

Through August 22, select Huntington Learning Center locations will serve as collection centers. Interested participants are encouraged to bring backpacks and school supplies to any of the following drop-off locations:

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Fri, 10 Aug 2018 12:09:02 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-joins-coalition-for-the-homeless https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-joins-coalition-for-the-homeless Annual Drive Aims to Better Prepare Students and Alleviate Constraints for Homeless Families

Oradell, NJ, August 8, 2018 – For the third year in a row, Huntington Learning Center has partnered with the Coalition for the Homeless for its annual drive, Project: Back to School, to provide homeless children with the supplies they need to be successful in the classroom. Together, the organizations and additional partners, hope to collect and distribute more than 5,000 new backpacks filled with supplies for students in kindergarten to 12th grade prior to the start of the new school year.

Through August 22, select Huntington Learning Center locations will serve as collection centers. Interested participants are encouraged to bring backpacks and school supplies to any of the following drop-off locations:

Wish List

  • #2 Pencils
  • Pocket Folders
  • Ruler
  • Markers, Crayons
  • Glue Sticks, and More!

Participating Locations

  • Bronx - 1807 Williamsbridge Road
  • Brooklyn (Park Slope) - 808 Union Street
  • Brooklyn (Bay Ridge) - 514 86th Street
  • Queens (Flushing) - 35-30 Francis Lewis Blvd #205
  • Staten Island - 2791 Richmond Ave, Suite 200


According to the Coalition for the Homeless, over 115,000 NYC students experienced homelessness in 2017. At this rate, 1 in 7 elementary students will face homelessness before their elementary school graduation. With many resources scarce or nonexistent for homeless families, students often show up to school empty handed. Project: Back to School was established to change that.

“We believe every student has the right to the best education possible,” said Anne Huntington, Vice President of Huntington Learning Center. “We are proud to join the Coalition for the Homeless again and come together with our community to make sure NYC students have the tools they need to thrive in the classroom.”

“For so many kids whose families simply can’t afford to buy school supplies, the start of the school year can bring feelings of stress and shame,” said Dave Giffen, Executive Director of the Coalition for the Homeless. “We are so happy that Huntington Learning Center has been so committed to helping us ensure that every homeless child can walk into school on that first day feeling proud, prepared, and ready for whatever lays ahead.”

To learn more about Project: Back to School, visit: http://www.coalitionforthehomeless.org/event/2018-project-back-to-school/. 

About the Coalition for the Homeless

Established in 1981, the Coalition for the Homeless is the nation's oldest advocacy and direct service organization helping homeless men, women and children. The Coalition helps more than 3,500 homeless New Yorkers each day living in extreme poverty, offering a variety of programs that address immediate needs and help men, women and families overcome long-term barriers to employment and stability.  For more information about the Coalition for the Homeless, visit www.coalitionforthehomeless.org

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the nation’s leading tutoring and test prep provider. Its certified teachers provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Huntington is accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

Contact Information:
Kim Jaffe
JaffeK@HLCmail.com

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Does Your Student Need High School Entrance Exam Preparation? Attention parents: if you are considering sending your middle school student to a private, parochial or college preparatory high school, it is important to begin the process of preparing for the school’s entrance exam as early as possible so that your child can perform his or her best. “Studying for any test can be nerve-wracking for a student, but preparing for a high school entrance exam can be especially scary,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Solid preparation involves understanding the structure of these exams, building test-taking skills and plenty of practice.”

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Tue, 07 Aug 2018 12:14:34 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-high-school-entrance-exam-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-high-school-entrance-exam-prep Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington Attention parents: if you are considering sending your middle school student to a private, parochial or college preparatory high school, it is important to begin the process of preparing for the school’s entrance exam as early as possible so that your child can perform his or her best. “Studying for any test can be nerve-wracking for a student, but preparing for a high school entrance exam can be especially scary,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Solid preparation involves understanding the structure of these exams, building test-taking skills and plenty of practice.”

Huntington offers a quick download on some of the well-known high school entrance exams for which Huntington has significant experience helping students prepare:

  • The Independent School Entrance Exam (ISEE) is required by many private and competitive magnet schools as part of the admissions process. There are three levels of the test for candidates entering grades 5–6, 7–8 and 9–12 and five exam sections: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, reading comprehension, mathematics and a 30-minute essay.
  • The Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT) – The SSAT is used by some private and competitive high schools and middle schools to help rank applicants. There are three levels of the test: elementary, middle and upper. The test consists of two parts: a writing sample and a section with multiple choice questions in math, verbal and reading comprehension.
  • The High School Placement Test (HSPT) is used for admissions, scholarship selection and course placement. The test is administered to eighth graders seeking ninth grade placement in parochial high schools. The standard test covers language skills, vocabulary, reading, mathematics and an optional section on either Catholic religion, mechanical aptitude or science.

What does Huntington’s exam prep program offer? Huntington says that parents can expect a customized program of instruction built off the same successful method used in Huntington’s SAT and ACT prep programs. Features include:

  • An initial academic evaluation that has students take a full-length exam.
  • A post-academic evaluation conference to discuss results and Huntington’s recommended program.
  • A personalized program tailored to each student's needs and designed to help achieve test score goals.
  • Several full-length exams to measure progress.
  • One-to-one tutoring with a highly trained professional tutor (all Huntington tutors are state certified or Huntington certified).
  • Interim conferences to discuss progress towards goals.
  • Flexible scheduling.

For more information about Huntington’s high school entrance exam preparation programs, call 1 800 CAN LEARN.

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Simple Ways Parents Can Contribute to The Betterment of their Child’s School Every parent knows that teachers and staff are part of what makes a school great, but parents have a lot to do with a school’s success as well. “There are objective measures of schools’ performance such as test scores and teacher-student ratio, but there are a number of other intangible factors as well,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “A positive school culture that fosters student success truly does take a village, and parents are key members of that village.”

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Tue, 07 Aug 2018 12:20:24 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/simple-ways-parents-can-contribute-to-their-childs-school-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/simple-ways-parents-can-contribute-to-their-childs-school-success Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington Every parent knows that teachers and staff are part of what makes a school great, but parents have a lot to do with a school’s success as well. “There are objective measures of schools’ performance such as test scores and teacher-student ratio, but there are a number of other intangible factors as well,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “A positive school culture that fosters student success truly does take a village, and parents are key members of that village.”

What can parents do to contribute to a great school environment? Huntington suggests these simple tips:

Be supportive. Without parental support, teachers cannot do their jobs to the best of their ability. Reach out to your child’s teacher early in the school year to establish a positive working relationship. Communicate often and make it clear that you want to help your child succeed in school and do your part at home. Ask how you can support the teacher’s efforts in the classroom and follow through on fulfilling those requests.  

Collaborate. The best schools are those where parents and teachers maintain collaborative partnerships for the benefit of the students. So, seek suggestions from the teacher on how to support your student’s learning. If your child is struggling, don’t just assume that the teacher will handle it. Solicit suggestions of things you can do at home to help, such as enrolling your child in a tutoring program. When it comes to homework, ask about the best ways you can relate assignments to real-world learning.

Uphold high expectations for your child. Research shows that upholding high expectations for students results in increased confidence and motivation, improved learning and more. Communicate with your child’s teacher about the most appropriate learning tasks that will spark your child’s interests and foster his or her success. When you and the teacher are on the same page about your child’s capabilities and potential, together, you can offer him or her consistent support.

Get involved. Involved parents make a great school. Volunteer in the classroom if you can, but if your schedule prevents this, there are many alternatives.  Attend school events. Go to Parent-Teacher Organization meetings to learn more about your school and how you can help make it the best possible environment for students. Also, one of the simplest ways to get involved is to show your child that you value his or her education. Establish a good relationship with teachers and school staff and talk to your child about his or her school day, interests, homework and projects.

“Schools should offer children a well-rounded education and help them become capable, independent citizens, but parents play an essential role in schools’ efforts,” says Huntington. “Parental support at home and at school will have a direct and indirect positive impact on your child. Get involved, communicate with teachers and show your child through your actions that you want to support their school however you can.”

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Five Back-to-School Tips for Parents and Children With summer coming to a close, families with children are gearing up to head back to school. According to Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington, of Huntington Learning Center, there are several things parents can do toward the end of summer break that make a tremendous difference in getting children mentally prepared to start the year off right. “Students need summer break to relax and recharge their batteries, but the beginning of a new grade can be a little bumpy if parents and children remain in ‘summer mode’ until that first school bell rings,” says Huntington. Luckily, a little preparation can make the back-to-school transition easier. Here are five back-to-school tips for parents and children:

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Thu, 26 Jul 2018 11:28:17 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-back-to-school-tips-for-parents-and-children https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-back-to-school-tips-for-parents-and-children Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center With summer coming to a close, families with children are gearing up to head back to school. According to Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington, of Huntington Learning Center, there are several things parents can do toward the end of summer break that make a tremendous difference in getting children mentally prepared to start the year off right. “Students need summer break to relax and recharge their batteries, but the beginning of a new grade can be a little bumpy if parents and children remain in ‘summer mode’ until that first school bell rings,” says Huntington. Luckily, a little preparation can make the back-to-school transition easier. Here are five back-to-school tips for parents and children:

  1. Revisit the organizational system. Go over the importance of staying organized with the use of a homework notebook (for younger students) or student planner or smartphone planner app (for older students). Clean off the desks and make sure your home is ready for the school year, with new pencils, paper and other supplies, a family calendar in a central location and a reliable system for keeping track of papers that come home from teachers and school.
  2. Meet the teacher. Attend back-to-school night to meet any teachers and staff as well as school leaders. Ask the teacher how you can support your child in school and the best way to stay in touch about any issues that might arise.
  3. Go over the school day routine. For most families, summer offers a more relaxed pace and schedule, but come August, it’s a good idea to go over the routine your family will resume once school is back in session. Update the family calendar with any scheduled activities, start waking your child up a little earlier the week or two before the first day of school, and get back to a regular evening routine (dinner, reading before bed and lights out at a reasonable hour).
  4. Refresh the memory on last year’s school work. The “summer slide” is a serious problem, with many students losing several months of knowledge gained in the prior school year. If your child hasn’t touched a book all summer, you can still make up some ground by having him or her review last year’s assignments or textbooks and re-establishing a nightly reading habit.
  5. Have positive conversations. The end of summer can induce stress for children who didn’t have the best experience last school year or struggle with one or more subjects. Embrace a positive attitude and talk to your child about what changes you would both like to make this school year. Talk about your child’s biggest areas of worry and how you can offer support. Remind your child that no problem is insurmountable and that you’re there to help.

If your child wants to make it a great school year, Huntington can assist. Huntington encourages parents to reach out to Huntington to share their concerns. Huntington can develop a customized plan to help children improve their study habits, build their confidence and close any knowledge gaps that caused school challenges last year. Call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to learn more.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

 

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

 

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How Can You Help Your Child Sidestep the Summer Slide? Summer is a welcome break for families, but it can cause problems when it comes to the long-term retention of academic skills and knowledge. Many experts report that summertime regression is a significant problem for students of all ages, with children losing several months’ worth of reading and math skills over break. Here’s the good news: it’s not as hard as you think to minimize the problem. Here are a few ways you can help your child avoid the summer slide:

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Fri, 20 Jul 2018 16:21:36 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/side-step-the-summer-slide https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/side-step-the-summer-slide Raymond Huntington Raymond Huntington Summer is a welcome break for families, but it can cause problems when it comes to the long-term retention of academic skills and knowledge. Many experts report that summertime regression is a significant problem for students of all ages, with children losing several months’ worth of reading and math skills over break. Here’s the good news: it’s not as hard as you think to minimize the problem. Here are a few ways you can help your child avoid the summer slide:

Read every day. A regular reading habit is a valuable part of a good bedtime routine anyway, but best of all, it is one of the easiest ways for your child to keep up those literacy skills. Make frequent visits to the library and encourage your child to get involved in any book clubs or summer reading programs offered. Let your child explore other formats in addition to books. The point is to get him or her reading.

Review past work. It might take a little convincing, but even ten minutes a day spent looking over old worksheets, math problems, or other assignments is time well spent. This will help your child keep fresh on the skills learned last school year and ensure he or she is ready to pick up where the teacher left off when the fall semester begins.

Plan writing activities. Have your child continue to strengthen those writing muscles by embracing fun activities like journaling, creative writing or even blogging. If those things don’t pique your child’s interest, consider weekly themes for inspiration. For example, one week’s theme might be favorite people, and each day children could write about a celebrity or professional athlete they admire, a friend who means a lot to them, or another role model.

Go places. Many families use their children’s summer break as a chance to take vacations. Why not transform those road and plane trips into educational opportunities? You and your child should check out travel guides from the library and do some online research together to learn more about wherever you’re headed. Have your child choose a few cultural attractions to enjoy and share what he or she wants to discover while visiting them.

Catch up or get ahead. Summer is the best time to close any skill gaps and correct any problems that arose during the school year. It’s also a great chance to get ahead if your child is gearing up to take several challenging classes next year or wants to solidify knowledge built during the prior school year.

If you’d like help creating a targeted summer learning program that meets your child’s goals and helps him or her flourish, call Huntington. We’ll help your child retain those important skills he or she learned throughout the school year. By the time next fall comes around, he or she will be ready to hit the ground running and keep building that knowledge base. Call 1-800 CAN LEARN today.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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The College Search Checklist: What Your Teen Should Consider When Evaluating Colleges Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen’s life. While exciting, the process of identifying schools and narrowing the list can be overwhelming to many students. CEO and Co-Founder, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says the best way for parents to help is by reminding their teens that there are several essential components to evaluating colleges. “Too often, teens get their hearts set on one or two things and ignore everything else,” she says. “It’s important to focus on what matters most and not overlook the factors that really make the college experience.” She offers this list of key considerations for teens and parents to keep on hand when embarking on the college search:

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Mon, 12 Nov 2018 07:57:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-your-teen-should-consider-when-evaluating-colleges https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-your-teen-should-consider-when-evaluating-colleges Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen’s life. While exciting, the process of identifying schools and narrowing the list can be overwhelming to many students. CEO and Co-Founder, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says the best way for parents to help is by reminding their teens that there are several essential components to evaluating colleges. “Too often, teens get their hearts set on one or two things and ignore everything else,” she says. “It’s important to focus on what matters most and not overlook the factors that really make the college experience.”

She offers this list of key considerations for teens and parents to keep on hand when embarking on the college search:

Fields of study – Whether teens are certain about a college major or still deciding, it’s a good idea to ensure any college on their short list has a range of enticing options. Keep in mind that changing majors early in college is common, so parents should caution their teens to not paint themselves into a corner. An engineering college is a great option if there’s no chance your teen will end up deciding to switch gears to his or her backup plan, pre-medicine.

Size – Many teens know right away what they’re looking for as far as student population, but if your teen isn’t sure yet, talk about it. Larger universities offer more academic options and the chance to engage in opportunities like undergraduate research. Many also have graduate programs too, if your teen is thinking about taking that path. Smaller schools will have a lower faculty-student ratio and a more intimate classroom and campus feel. There are advantages and disadvantages of both, and it’s important that teens think this through.

Proximity to home – Teens who have their hearts set on moving far away for college need to understand the logistics involved in doing so. Parents and teens should discuss things like how often their teens will be able to visit home (because of costs and time involved) and the value that their teens place on having a support system in their new area.

Cost and financial aid – This is an important consideration, but it’s hard to make an informed decision by looking at a college’s tuition schedule on their website. A true college price tag will take financial aid assistance and scholarships into account, so while it might be tempting to rule out colleges that have a “sticker price” that is out of reach, you and your teen should do a little digging. Talk with each college’s financial aid office to learn more about typical financial aid packages, the best approach to applying for scholarships, and more.

Campus life – Most students go to college to grow both academically and personally, and campus life plays a big part in that transformation. Teens should get a feel for what life is like at a college, either by visiting in person or by talking with current and former students and scouring the colleges’ websites. Does the college offer the kinds of social and student life opportunities they are seeking? Is there a lot going on outside of the classroom (e.g. athletic events and other fun activities)? What is dorm life like and how many students live on campus as freshmen?

“Without a doubt, choosing a college is a major decision, but the process can be made simpler when teens take a systematic approach to comparing and contrasting different schools,” Huntington says. “Our advice at Huntington is to let teens take the reins on this process, as they are the ones who must feel confident in the decision. Offer them a framework for assessing each college, encourage them to take advantage of the knowledge and expertise of their high school guidance counselor, and weigh in when you need to. With this approach, teens are sure to make a smart decision that they will be happy with in the long run.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Helping Your Child Focus Is your child easily distracted? A constant daydreamer? Just plain unfocused? If you’re concerned about your student’s ability to concentrate when it matters most—at school or during homework time—don’t wait to intervene. Luckily, there are many simple things you can do to help your child become a more focused and attentive student who is capable of handling challenging homework and school assignments. Here are six tips to support your child at home:

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Mon, 09 Jul 2018 11:46:25 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping_your_child_focus https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping_your_child_focus Helping Your Child Focus

Is your child easily distracted? A constant daydreamer? Just plain unfocused? If you’re concerned about your student’s ability to concentrate when it matters most—at school or during homework time—don’t wait to intervene. Luckily, there are many simple things you can do to help your child become a more focused and attentive student who is capable of handling challenging homework and school assignments. Here are six tips to support your child at home:

Evaluate the basics: sleep and exercise. Children who do not get sufficient sleep each night may face a variety of problems, including an inability to focus. According to the National Sleep Foundation, adolescents ages 10-17 years old need 8.5-9.25 hours of sleep each night. Children ages 5-10 need 10-11 hours. It’s also important for children to get plenty of exercise, another important factor in good sleep.

Break down tasks into chunks. Many children get overwhelmed with larger projects or a lot of homework, causing them to become sidetracked when diving in. Teach your child to break down assignments into manageable parts and have him or her see each part through to completion. For example, if a student needs to read a book and write a report on it by Friday, write down the necessary steps for Monday through Thursday, and have him or her check them off as completed. Set a timer for each part to keep your child on track.

Encourage organization. Being organized minimizes opportunities for a child to procrastinate or get off task. Help your child make use of a planner to keep track of homework and other obligations and his or her daily schedule. At home, establish a routine with set times for homework, friend time, bedtime and extracurricular activities. It’s important to incorporate downtime into the schedule, too.

Take breaks. Researchers have found that children who take exercise breaks during school are more attentive and on task than those who do not. When studying, have your child take 5- and 10-minute “brain breaks” to move around or take a quick walk up and down the street.

Minimize distractions during homework. Make sure your home has a good study space. If your child studies in the kitchen, for example, make sure he or she isn’t distracted by things like a television, a younger sibling playing noisily or a parent talking on the phone. If he or she studies in a bedroom, be sure all electronics are off.

Work on task completion in day-to-day duties. At home, give your child clear direction on to-dos and make sure he or she completes each task before moving on to another. For example, when you get home from school, tell your child to wash hands and empty and put away his or her lunch box. Those tasks must be completed before moving on to anything else. As your child improves task completion (without frequent reminders), give him or her more complex, multi-step tasks. Consider a chore and rewards chart.

As always, it is important to know your student and adapt to his or her learning style and preferences. Some students might focus better during study time by playing with a small stress ball, standing or pacing around the room, or talking through concepts or problems aloud. Pay attention to your child’s needs and work with his or her teacher to accommodate those needs at home. If you are concerned that your child’s focus issues are medical in nature, talk with his or her doctor. However, if your child needs help with organization, time management, study skills and similar areas, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1 800 CAN LEARN. We can help your child become a more attentive, effective student.

 

 

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Your Teen’s Summer SAT/ACT Exam Prep Calendar School may be out for summer, but if your teen is college bound in a couple of years, this is a perfect time for him or her to study for the SAT or ACT. “It’s difficult for most teens to put in the kind of time they need to during the school year to study effectively for college entrance exams,” says Elieen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center. “However, with school on break and many extracurricular activities on hiatus, summer gives teens the opportunity to focus on exam prep.”

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Fri, 20 Jul 2018 12:12:01 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/your-teens-summer-sat-act-exam-prep-calendar https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/your-teens-summer-sat-act-exam-prep-calendar Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center School may be out for summer, but if your teen is college bound in a couple of years, this is a perfect time for him or her to study for the SAT or ACT. “It’s difficult for most teens to put in the kind of time they need to during the school year to study effectively for college entrance exams,” says Elieen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center. “However, with school on break and many extracurricular activities on hiatus, summer gives teens the opportunity to focus on exam prep.”

To encourage teens to make the most of their studying and stay on track, Huntington offers this two-month study schedule:

Month one:

  • Get familiar with the exam(s) by taking an initial evaluation test.
  • Choose either the SAT or ACT based on the results of the evaluation (and any college preferences).
  • Identify strong and weak areas and develop a targeted study plan.
  • Create a study schedule by exam section and sub-section. Based on the outcome of the initial evaluation test, some sections may require more or less attention.
  • Study a few days a week according to a customized prep schedule.
  • Get familiar with different problem types (multiple choice, student-produced response questions, improving sentence questions, etc.)

Month two:

  • Take a full-length, timed practice test at the beginning of the month.
  • Delve more deeply into the different exam sections, targeting weaker areas.
  • Continue to study a few days a week according to a customized prep schedule.
  • Improve on question types where the lowest practice scores are received.
  • Adjust the study schedule as needed based on weaker sections.
  • Work on exam time management by learning the structure of the exam and building skills such as quickly ruling out obviously incorrect answers.
  • Spend time learning how the exam you are taking is scored and adjust test-taking strategies and pacing accordingly.
  • Take a full-length, timed practice test at the end of the month.

Make sure your teen also registers for the exam early. For both the ACT and the SAT, registration deadlines are approximately four weeks before test dates. Here are the 2018-2019 exam dates:

 

SAT

ACT

August 25, 2018

September 8, 2018

October 6, 2018

October 27, 2018

November 3, 2018

December 8, 2018

December 1, 2018

February 9, 2019*

March 9, 2019

April 13, 2019

May 4, 2019

June 8, 2019

June 1, 2019

July 13, 2019*

 

*No test centers are scheduled in New York for the February and July test dates. No test centers are scheduled in California for the July test date.

If your teen needs help studying for the SAT or ACT, call Huntington. “Huntington’s customized test prep courses first help students identify their strengths and weaknesses so that their studying is precise and not haphazard,” says Huntington. “We also work on test-taking strategies, give tips for staying focused and calm during the exams, and prepare students with what to expect.” To learn more about Huntington’s individualized test prep services, call 1 800 CAN LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

 

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

 

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Five Educational Summer Activities for Elementary School Children Summer is here, a time for children to recharge their batteries and enjoy a much-needed break from the busy school year. While every child deserves this, Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center urges parents to offer a variety of educational activities to ensure their children retain everything they worked so hard to learn all school year. “Sadly, so many children toss aside the backpack on the last day of school and do not touch a book until the first day of the next school year,” says Huntington. “The problem with this is that students can easily lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math, reading and other subjects.” Bottom line: it’s important that children keep those brains active throughout the summer. Here are five suggested activities that will help them do just that:

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Mon, 02 Jul 2018 10:51:28 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-educational-summer-activities-for-elementary-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-educational-summer-activities-for-elementary-school Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer is here, a time for children to recharge their batteries and enjoy a much-needed break from the busy school year. While every child deserves this, Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center urges parents to offer a variety of educational activities to ensure their children retain everything they worked so hard to learn all school year. “Sadly, so many children toss aside the backpack on the last day of school and do not touch a book until the first day of the next school year,” says Huntington. “The problem with this is that students can easily lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math, reading and other subjects.” Bottom line: it’s important that children keep those brains active throughout the summer. Here are five suggested activities that will help them do just that:

  1. State/city “field trips” – Have your child plan a few weekend excursions with the help of Google Maps. If you can take a family road trip, your child can help plan the agenda and map out the route, including drive time needed. If you’re leaning toward a few short staycations closer to home, however, you can still let your child research attractions and events at your local museums, pick out great hikes or camping spots in the area or plan a walking tour of your city (complete with his or her research, of course).
  2. Daily reading sessions – This is one of the easiest ways to help children keep up those essential literacy skills. Check out summer reading programs at the library or book store and make a weekly outing there to refresh the reading material. Consider reading book series as a family. Read together each evening and make it fun by serving up lemonade or hot chocolate. Huntington Learning Center offers a reading adventure program during the summer months, which encourages students to keep reading. Reading Adventure runs May to August and is open to currently enrolled students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students choose books from Huntington’s pre-selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Each student receives a reading “passport” in which to record books as completed and make a few notes of what he or she learned and enjoyed about each book.
  3. Journaling – Like reading, a daily writing habit will go a long way toward helping children minimize regression. If your child isn’t eager to write book summaries, a journal is an open-ended forum in which he or she can write anything from poems to stories to a daily log of summer activities. Start with ten minutes a day, and as the summer goes on, your child might grow to enjoy this practice and want to do it longer.
  4. Taking classes – Are there educational programs available over the summer in your community, such as science, technology, engineering and math camps, art classes, or robotics programs? Maybe your child wants to take up an instrument. Perhaps he or she is interested in a youth creative writing class. Your school or local library are good places to start for seeking suggestions. Huntington Learning Center offers tutoring for students during the summer months especially if the past school year was a challenge. Enrichment sessions are also available for students who enjoy academic adventures to develop new skills.
  5. Researching a hobby or other topic – The freedom of summer offers lots of opportunity for discovery. Encourage your child to check out an autobiography on a favorite athlete, rent a documentary on a topic that intrigues him or her, or look up answers online (with your guidance) to those burning questions he or she usually asks you.

Huntington adds that summer learning doesn’t need to be complicated to be effective. “Children who spend just a little time each day enjoying a book or exploring an interesting topic will reap great benefits and find that transitioning into the next grade is easier,” she says. For additional ideas on how to engage your child in effective but enjoyable summer learning activities, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Tips for Keeping Your Child’s Brain in Shape Over Summer Break Many parents have probably heard the term “regression” before, but what exactly does it mean? Regression is the loss of academic knowledge learned during the school year, also known as the “summer slide.” According to Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center, with a little effort, parents can prevent their children from regressing over summer break. “It is easier than most parents think to help their children engage in regular educational activities,” Huntington says. Need ideas? Here are several tips to help children keep learning this summer:

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Mon, 02 Jul 2018 10:24:30 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/keep-your-childs-brain-in-shape-over-summer https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/keep-your-childs-brain-in-shape-over-summer Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Many parents have probably heard the term “regression” before, but what exactly does it mean? Regression is the loss of academic knowledge learned during the school year, also known as the “summer slide.” According to Co-Founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center, with a little effort, parents can prevent their children from regressing over summer break. “It is easier than most parents think to help their children engage in regular educational activities,” Huntington says. Need ideas? Here are several tips to help children keep learning this summer:

Enjoy summer reading. It’s on every list of top summer learning activities for good reason. Reading is perhaps the easiest way to keep up those literacy skills—and the most fun. Let your child choose the reading material and make it a daily activity. Take regular trips to the library and consider giving small incentives for milestones reached (e.g. each book, every 200 pages, etc.).

Review last year’s assignments. For subjects like math especially, one of the best ways to maintain those math building skills is to review/redo old problems. Before that final school bell rings, ask your child’s teacher for copies of worksheets and other assignments completed during the school year. Sort them into labeled folders for each week of summer and have your child review something every weekday, or at least several assignments each week.

Review last year’s textbooks. If you purchased textbooks for language, math, social studies, and science and they’re yours to keep, don’t throw them into the recycling bin. A quick call to the teacher should give you what you need in terms of the chapters covered this year and what would be best to review over summer break, but if school is out already and you forgot to do so, simply divide the text’s pages evenly and plan to have your child read sections each day.

Embrace the “something learned each day” mantra. Keeping the brain in shape is like keeping the body in shape: daily effort adds up to a lasting difference. For some children, a more flexible approach to summer learning will work better than textbooks and worksheets. Encourage your child to spend 30 minutes a day learning something new and keep a journal about those experiences. This gives him or her the freedom to chase those curiosities while acquiring new knowledge. Provide your child a list of questions to spark ideas, which might include the following:

  • What have I always wanted to know about <a favorite book, author, subject, or city>?
  • How are <a type of vehicle, a type of food, a musical instrument> made?
  • How was <a type of technology or other invention> first created or invented and by whom?
  • Who discovered <constellations, South America, sharks, how to make paper> and how?

Huntington reminds parents that the summer slide is preventable and can be reversed. “What parents don’t always realize is that summer tutoring is the best opportunity for children to overcome learning challenges or get ahead for the next school year,” she says. “With a more relaxed schedule and no pressure of homework and other obligations, there’s time for children to pinpoint the subjects that are troubling them most and make big strides between now and the start of next school year.”

For more suggestions on how to help your child retain everything he or she learned throughout the school year and overcome any problem areas, call 1 800 CAN LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Summertime: An Ideal Time for Test Prep If your teen is preparing to take the SAT or ACT anytime soon, there is no better time for him or her to register for a customized exam prep course now. Summer break is the perfect opportunity for students to focus on studying for the SAT or ACT, because their schedules are far less crowded with school and extracurricular activities. Your teen can work from a targeted schedule to put him or herself in the best position for the upcoming exam.

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Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:28:30 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-an-ideal-time-for-test-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summertime-an-ideal-time-for-test-prep Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Summertime: An Ideal Time for Test Prep

If your teen is preparing to take the SAT or ACT anytime soon, there is no better time for him or her to register for a customized exam prep course now. Summer break is the perfect opportunity for students to focus on studying for the SAT or ACT, because their schedules are far less crowded with school and extracurricular activities. Your teen can work from a targeted schedule to put him or herself in the best position for the upcoming exam.

To get the most out of his or her efforts, here are a few tips for your teen as he or she engages in summertime exam prep:

Register. The registration deadlines for the upcoming exams are as follows:

Exam              Test date                                 Registration deadline

  • ACT              September 8, 2018                            August 10, 2018
  • ACT              October 27, 2018                               September 28, 2018
  • SAT              August  25, 2018                                 July 27, 2018
  • SAT              October 6, 2018                                  September 7, 2018
  • SAT              November 3, 2018                              October 5, 2018
  • PSAT            October 10 & 13, 2018                        Talk with the school PSAT coordinator

Encourage your teen to register now so that he or she has a committed date on the books—and a goal to work toward. That date will be the starting point when developing a study schedule.

Know the exam. For the most effective prep, your teen must be familiar with the exam he or she plans to take (and the differences between the ACT and the SAT). It is worthwhile to investigate the preferred exam at his or her colleges of choice. Most important, your teen should understand the structure and sections of the exam he or she is taking in order to study efficiently and effectively. 

Make a plan and stick to it. Your teen will be far more successful if he or she has a schedule and a detailed plan to follow at each study session. Every session’s work plan should be divided into exam sections and should take into account the student’s strengths and weaknesses so he or she does not waste valuable time on areas where he or she is stronger and gloss over areas where he or she is weak. The best way to assess those strengths and weaknesses is by taking an initial practice exam.

Don’t underestimate the practice exam. No study plan is complete if it does not incorporate practice exams. Your student will get a much better feel for the SAT or ACT’s structure and different question types (and how to answer them) when he or she takes an actual, full-length, timed practice exam.  

Work on speed. Both the SAT and ACT are timed exams with no “fluff” time. Subject-matter knowledge is critical, but your teen must also be able to manage his or her time effectively to earn the best score. That means he or she will need to become comfortable reading and understanding the questions, narrowing down the choices and recognizing wrong answers—all very quickly.

Understandably, it can be overwhelming for teens to know where to begin with SAT or ACT exam prep. If your teen needs help, call Huntington. We help thousands of students every summer prepare for the SAT and ACT, and we know both exams very well. Our highly trained teachers will work with your teen to understand his or her strengths and weaknesses and develop an individualized test prep program to master the skills needed to raise his or her scores.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Great Summer Reading Programs One of the best and simplest ways to prevent your child's reading proficiency levels from declining this summer is to establish a daily reading habit.

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Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:31:03 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-online-summer-reading-programs https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-online-summer-reading-programs Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Great Summer Reading Programs

One of the best and simplest ways to prevent your child’s reading proficiency levels from declining this summer is to establish a daily reading habit. And with the relaxed pace of summer, your child might be happy to hear that he or she is free to choose whatever books sound the most interesting—a welcome change from the school year, which is undoubtedly busy with required school reading.

Want to give your child a nudge in the right direction? Why not enroll him or her in a summer reading program? Summer reading programs offer a fun way for children to keep track of their reading and rewards for completing reading milestones. Huntington Learning Centers offer a summer reading program to all of their students in grades K through twelve. Your local library or bookstore may have a reading program, and there are also a number of excellent online options as well.

Here are a few online summer reading programs for you to explore:

Scholastic’s Summer Challenge ∙ The Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge runs May 7 to September 7, 2018. Once you register your child, you will receive book lists, activities and tips and your child can earn weekly virtual badges and free book excerpts for meeting certain milestones. The program also features a sweepstakes with a range of prizes. www.scholastic.com/summer

Barnes & Noble Summer Reading ∙ Barnes & Noble provides a reading journal in which your child records the books he or she reads and a little about the book. The program runs from May 15, 2018 to September 3, 2018. After finishing eight books, a child can bring the reading journal into a Barnes & Noble store and redeem it for a free book. www.barnesandnoble.com/summerreading

Pizza Hut Book It Summer Program ∙ Pizza Hut’s summer reading program (called Spark Your Greatness) asks children to read books and record them on the program website. Participants are then entered into a sweepstakes for prizes. In addition, the program has activity calendars and games. www.bookitprogram.com/summer

Half Price Books Feed Your Brain Summer Reading Program Half Price Books—the independent new and used bookstore chain in 16 states—has a summer program in which children ages 14 and under are challenged to read for 15 minutes a day in June and July. Once they reach 300 minutes, they can turn in their completed reading log to earn $5 in “bookworm bucks,” redeemable in the Half Price Books marketplace. Top reader awards are given out each month, too. www.hpb.com/fyb

Huntington Learning Centers across the country offer a reading adventure program during the summer months, which encourages students to keep reading.  Reading Adventure runs from May to August and is open to students in all grades who are currently enrolled in a Huntington program. Students choose books from Huntington’s pre-selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Each student receives a reading “passport” in which to record books as completed and make a few notes of what he or she learned and enjoyed about each book.

A summer reading program is a great way to incentivize your child to stick with reading all summer long. These programs all strive to make reading enjoyable, reward progress and encourage children to commit to reading as a hobby of choice. The summer is upon us—get started now, and help your child start off on the right foot for a fun-filled summer of learning and exploration.  

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About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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How to Help Teens Be Successful Students There’s no doubt that success in school requires that students work hard, put forth significant effort, and of course, reach out for help from teachers and parents when they need it. But the best students embrace several other habits and strategies. Here are some of the most important ones that parents can suggest that their teens follow:

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Mon, 02 Jul 2018 10:14:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-teens-be-successful-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-teens-be-successful-students Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington There’s no doubt that success in school requires that students work hard, put forth significant effort, and of course, reach out for help from teachers and parents when they need it. But the best students embrace several other habits and strategies. Here are some of the most important ones that parents can suggest that their teens follow:

Setting goals and making plans – Teens who think about their futures and set academic and career goals for themselves will always be more successful than their wandering counterparts. Parents can talk with their teens about where they want to take their lives and how they can start taking steps in the right direction now. They should also encourage them to welcome big challenges with confidence.

Getting involved – Few teens want school work to be the only thing they have going on in life. Extracurricular activities like sports, music or clubs are important for teens’ mental and social development. Such endeavors allow teens to develop passions and strengthen their connections to school and give them opportunities to form relationships with other students. All of these things have been shown to support academic achievement while having many other benefits.

Speaking up in class – There’s a reason many teachers incentivize teens with participation points that contribute to the overall class grade. Being engaged in class is the simplest form of active learning and helps students retain material more effectively, recognize areas of confusion quicker and take ownership of their educational experience.

Adopting good life habits – Parents should never underestimate the importance that daily practices can have on their teens’ lives. A healthy breakfast before school has long been linked to improved concentration. Sufficient sleep helps teens get through their busy days and stay focused at school and in the evenings when they need to do homework. A consistent home routine minimizes anxiety and helps teens feel more in control.

Planning the study routine – Studying is essential in high school, but so is planning out those study sessions for maximum learning. Teens who lay out a plan for each study session make better use of their time and are better able to keep up with school work than those who approach homework time haphazardly and without any advanced planning. Done correctly, that planning process should involve setting goals for each study session and prioritizing homework to be completed.

Helping your teen develop these kinds of behaviors as students will lay the groundwork for life success as well. Just as important, it will help him or her start off on the right foot at college. Make a few small changes and see what they do for your teen’s school attitude and academic well-being. As you implement other adjustments, you’ll begin to notice the additional benefits and positive impact on your student.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Does Your Child Need Summer Math Tutoring? While summer is typically a time for children to relax and enjoy time off from all-day learning, it's a good idea to take charge of your child's skills during this period.

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Fri, 01 Jun 2018 17:22:41 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-summer-math-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-summer-math-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Does Your Child Need Summer Math Tutoring?

While summer is typically a time for children to relax and enjoy time off from all-day learning, it’s a good idea to take charge of your child’s skills during this period. Summer can be a great time for students to brush up on their math skills, or catch up if there were concepts they didn’t quite grasp during the school year. If your child didn't understand what was being taught, didn't pay attention during math class, or simply wants to get ready for the next school year, summer math tutoring is available to help your child maintain his or her knowledge or get back on track.

Summer math tutoring and home math exercises can prepare your student for the next grade and create a foundation for future success. Some summer math exercises and activities you can play with your child can be found in the U.S. Department of Education's in-depth PDF called Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, "Our increasingly technological world demands strong skills in mathematics, not only in the workforce but also in everyday life, and these demands will only increase over the lifetimes of our children."

This is just one reason why it's important to meet your child's math study needs during the summer.

How do you know if your child needs something more than your attention, the extra time summer offers, and mathematical exercises similar to those in the PDF linked to above? How do you know, for instance, if your child needs extra help like summer math tutoring?

To help answer these questions, below we provide the top reasons why parents enroll their child in math tutoring courses during the summer.

Your child can benefit from summer math tutoring if:

  • Your child has trouble paying attention in school. With friends sitting behind, in front of, and next to your child in math class, it can be difficult for your child to pay attention and learn all of the necessary material. Summer tutoring courses do not have distractions like this and allow your student to give 100% of his or her attention to the math material and designated tutor.
  • Your child has a form of dyscalculia. If your child struggles with a math disability (also known as dyscalculia), enrolling him or her in a summer tutoring class can help your child understand math-related concepts in new ways. Having your child exposed to school teaching and tutoring diversifies your child's learning strategy and may help him or her understand math better.
  • Your child received a C grade or lower. A "C" grade indicates your child did not score well on tests and assignments, which means he or she does not understand the course material. Mathematics is a foundational practice; therefore, one concept needs to be understood before learning another. It's important for your child to understand course material better than a "C" grade indicates.
  • Your child wants to prepare for the future. Your child may understand the material in this year's math course, but it is not guaranteed that he or she will understand the material in next year's course. For this reason, children and their teachers depend on summer math tutoring for future preparation.

If any of these circumstances relate to your child, find a Huntington Learning Center near you today. We offer summer math courses taught by qualified math tutors at hundreds of locations nationwide.

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How to Recognize When Your Student is Struggling with a School Subject It’s perfectly normal for a student to have difficulties from time to time with one or more subjects in school. And as Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says, “Many students who did fine with basic reading, writing and math may experience problems as subjects become more complex.” How can you recognize the warning signs before your student brings home a poor report card or becomes totally discouraged? Huntington offers several red flags to watch for in subjects such as math or science:

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Fri, 11 May 2018 12:11:35 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-recognize-when-your-student-is-struggling-with-a-school-subject https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-recognize-when-your-student-is-struggling-with-a-school-subject Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s perfectly normal for a student to have difficulties from time to time with one or more subjects in school. And as Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says, “Many students who did fine with basic reading, writing and math may experience problems as subjects become more complex.” How can you recognize the warning signs before your student brings home a poor report card or becomes totally discouraged? Huntington offers several red flags to watch for in subjects such as math or science:

  • Your student typically receives good grades, and you’re seeing a sudden dip in one subject in particular—or more than one.
  • Your student seems to struggle to gain traction on homework, or gets stuck easily.
  • Your student has questions about areas covered in class that he or she did not understand—but he or she can’t seem to help him or herself through notes or the textbook.
  • Your student continues to miss the same problem types over and over in math and/or science.
  • Your student continually gets stuck on one part of a problem and struggles to move past it to complete the problem.
  • Word problems are difficult for your student because he or she can’t separate the important and irrelevant information.
  • Math is becoming increasingly difficult for your student to do independently because he or she struggles to understand the directions.
  • Multi-step math problems are difficult for your student.
  • Your student’s homework is sloppy or unreadable.
  • Your student struggles to interpret data provided for problem solving.
  • Despite genuine effort, your student’s grade in a certain difficult subject is suffering.

Huntington Learning Center offers subject tutoring for students in middle school and high school. “We offer one-to-one tutoring in all math and science classes and in other subjects,” Huntington says.  “We work with students who want to improve a grade, those who are struggling to do homework and everyone in between,” And though many students seek help once they begin falling behind, others may be less forthright with their struggles, Huntington reminds parents. “The obvious red flags are poor grades and elevated frustration at homework time, but if you suspect that your student is lost in class and could use individualized help, it’s never too late to get started.” Contact the Huntington Learning Center at 1 800 CAN LEARN to discuss your student’s needs.

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Teaching Your Child to Embrace a Positive Attitude About School If your child has experienced any difficulty in school, then you likely know well the challenge of keeping things positive amid poor grades and dwindling self-esteem. School has any number of anxieties, even for the student who sails through classes seemingly with ease. However, for the student who frequently comes upon academic road blocks, the school experience can instigate negativity, fear and other problems.

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Fri, 11 May 2018 12:21:37 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-teach-your-child-to-embrace-a-positive-attitude-about-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-teach-your-child-to-embrace-a-positive-attitude-about-school Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center If your child has experienced any difficulty in school, then you likely know well the challenge of keeping things positive amid poor grades and dwindling self-esteem. School has any number of anxieties, even for the student who sails through classes seemingly with ease. However, for the student who frequently comes upon academic road blocks, the school experience can instigate negativity, fear and other problems.

The power of positive thinking is undeniable, and learning to embrace optimism can have an enormous impact on your child’s emotional and physical well-being. Here are several ways parents can encourage their child to adopt a positive attitude about school, even when it isn’t all easy.

Take notice of your child’s achievements and strengths. If your child is struggling in one subject, he or she may feel badly about school overall—and that negativity can quickly build upon itself. Make sure you take note of the small successes, such as an improved grade or a sincere effort on studying for a test. Point out traits that you admire or respect in your child, not just those you wish he or she would change.

Teach your child that failure is a part of learning. Your child needs to know that everyone messes up sometimes, and doing so yields valuable lessons. Let your child know that you support him or her no matter what, and that you are there to help him or her when things are difficult. Also remind your child that mistakes are an opportunity to learn and apply that new knowledge in future situations.

Help your child keep things in perspective. It is easy for a child who is struggling with one or more subjects to feel badly about him or herself. However, don’t let your child blow problems out of proportion. An issue he or she is dealing with today may be solved a year from now. A poor test score—or even a slew of them in a row—is not going to ruin your child’s life, and together, you can stop small problems from growing into big ones.

Look forward, not backward. If your child brings home a poor report card or grade, it’s natural for you to want to dissect what happened—and even to point the finger at your child’s failures. Did your child not study enough? Is he or she not paying attention in class?  While reflection is productive, dwelling on mistakes is not. In such a situation, have an open conversation with your child about how to move forward and develop an action plan to overcome problems.

Teach your child to problem solve. Nobody lives a problem-free life. Your child will be happier and more independent if he or she knows how to address and solve problems effectively.  Give your child the opportunity to make decisions at home. Encourage him or her to ask questions and be curious, as thinking critically is one of the components of good problem-solving ability. Teach him or her that sometimes, one’s first attempt at solving a problem isn’t successful. Good problem-solvers keep trying new solutions until they find one that works.  

Optimistic thinking can make all the difference in a child’s school experience, giving him or her the energy and courage to face school problems head on. Have a positive attitude about school problems, and encourage your child to do the same. With confidence and a can-do demeanor, your child will be able to overcome any issue he or she encounters in school—and life.

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Tips for Helping Your Teen Explore Career Options Parents often have ideas of what types of careers their children should consider once they approach college, but they are, of course, quite biased. Although adults have a lifetime of experience to draw from, they really only know their own career journey well. Parents’ intentions might be good when they suggest possible college majors and career paths, but it’s more important that they put their teens in the driver’s seat and guide them from the sidelines.

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Tue, 15 May 2018 14:05:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-helping-your-teen-explore-career-options https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-helping-your-teen-explore-career-options Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Parents often have ideas of what types of careers their children should consider once they approach college, but they are, of course, quite biased. Although adults have a lifetime of experience to draw from, they really only know their own career journey well. Parents’ intentions might be good when they suggest possible college majors and career paths, but it’s more important that they put their teens in the driver’s seat and guide them from the sidelines.

“Understandably, parents want to compel their teens to get serious about their futures as early in high school as possible, but this can be overwhelming and counterproductive for students,” says Eileen Huntington, CEO and Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center. So, what’s the best way to help teens explore the possibilities and discover the best career for them? Huntington offers these tips:

Ask more than just, “What do you want to do?” Sure, some teens have known what they want to do from the time they were in third grade, but for those who haven’t discovered that yet, it’s fruitless and frustrating to be asked the question over and over—they simply don’t know yet. Instead, parents should ask their teens about school and extracurricular experiences that make feel fulfilled and productive. Try questions like, What subjects are you best at? In school and life, when do you feel most successful? and Are there any jobs you’ve heard of that sound interesting to you?

Springboard from the strengths. While teens might recognize that they are skilled at science and math, they might not understand what careers would suit their strengths. This is where a career assessment might be useful, and the school guidance counselor might have recommendations—or parents can search online for options like ACT Profile, a college and career planning platform that helps students identify majors and occupations that might fit their interests and abilities. The College Board’s Big Future Major and Career Search tool is also a great resource for teens who know what they’re good at but aren’t sure what careers best highlight those assets.

Encourage them to talk to real-world professionals. Sure, an internship in college is a great way to get hands-on experience in a field, but high school is a good time to figure out what career options appeal. Teens who are interested in medicine might spend time volunteering in a hospital or talking with a physician in private practice. Those convinced that acting is their calling can reach out to a local theater company and ask to talk to some of the people who work there about their experience. Parents can encourage their teens to check out job shadowing (and similar) opportunities through their guidance counseling offices, or proactively set up conversations and experiences on their own.

 

Nudge them to get involved. Sports are an obvious extracurricular activity in high school, but teens should look beyond athletics for ways to get to know themselves. Many clubs and organizations lend members insights into different academic pursuits and careers. Look for clubs focused on math, science, entrepreneurship, journalism, foreign languages, debate, business, public speaking and art, to name a few possibilities. The hands-on nature of clubs fosters professional development while building responsibility and encouraging teens to think about their life purpose and future.

Huntington reminds parents that most people’s careers are not a straight, narrow path. “While parents want their teens to make the very most of the college investment, the real value in this process is that teens learn to assess their strengths and navigate their careers,” she says. “It’s never too early to begin thinking about one’s career plan, but life is a journey. Teens should explore opportunities, continually evaluate their strong suits, and keep an open mind as they move through their lives.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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7 Note-Taking Strategies for High School Students A lot changes when students transition into high school and one skill that becomes more important than ever is that of note-taking. “In high school, students are expected to become proficient note-takers, and those notes will become essential study tools that they use to review material for quizzes and tests,” says Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Note-taking should augment student learning and help students recall difficult concepts more easily and remember what teachers teach. Our goal when working with students is to share some of the basics that will help them retain what they learn and study smarter.”

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Tue, 25 Sep 2018 10:47:11 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/note-taking-strategies-for-high-school-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/note-taking-strategies-for-high-school-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center

A lot changes when students transition into high school and one skill that becomes more important than ever is that of note-taking. “In high school, students are expected to become proficient note-takers, and those notes will become essential study tools that they use to review material for quizzes and tests,” says Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Note-taking should augment student learning and help students recall difficult concepts more easily and remember what teachers teach. Our goal when working with students is to share some of the basics that will help them retain what they learn and study smarter.”

Huntington shares these seven strategies for effective note-taking with parents and their teens:

  1. Record meaningful facts. The goal of note-taking should be to summarize the most important parts of what a teacher shares during a lecture: dates, names, places, formulas or anything else that is emphasized. It’s good to write lots of notes, but teens should focus on recording points that seem important, recurring themes or other details that are critical to their overall understanding.
  2. Group ideas. Lots of “raw” notes may not make studying any easier for a student. It’s a good idea to leave space on the left- or right-hand side of the notebook for condensing and recapping concepts. During class or afterward, teens can write down any main ideas on the side of their notes, or at a minimum, subtitles of what was discussed.
  3. Think quality over quantity. New high school students tend to think good note-taking means recording everything the teacher says. It’s a common challenge for students: focusing so intently on taking notes that they forget to listen and process information enough to be thoughtful about what they record in their notebooks. Big picture: notes should concentrate on what the teacher wants the class to know. That may very well mean teens’ pencils aren’t moving the entire class period, and that’s perfectly fine.
  4. Follow along in the book if appropriate. When the teacher focuses on a particular chapter or topic, it can be helpful later on to have page numbers to refer to for clarification or more information. Teens should ask at the beginning of the period if the teacher is referencing textbook material.
  5. Date and title notes. It’s a minor thing that can make a huge difference: labeling notes will prove helpful when it comes time to study for a test. Teens should always put the date, class name and topic(s) discussed at the top of their notes.
  6. Highlight the clues. Teachers usually point out information that students need to know and it is a smart idea to call out these cues in notes. Teens should listen for phrases like the most important part, for example, in summary, as a review and the only exception to this is. These should trigger careful note-taking and teens should notate these important points with an asterisk or other symbol.
  7. Say it another way. One of the most important parts of note-taking is not the note-taking itself—it’s the reflection process. Teens should write down complex points in their own words so they are easier to understand later. This helps information “click” and reinforces long-term retention.

Huntington reminds parents that taking notes is not a natural skill—it must be taught and practiced. “Organized students tend to take cleaner notes, of course, but note-taking is meant to solidify knowledge and make studying easier and more effective, and that doesn’t come easily to many students,” she says. Huntington helps students develop their study skills, including their note-taking abilities. For more information, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Kicks Off 2018 Summer Reading Adventure Program The Huntington Learning Center is launching its annual summer reading program this week, called Reading Adventure. Reading Adventure runs May to August and is open to students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students choose books from Huntington’s pre-selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Each student receives a reading “passport” in which to record books as completed and make a few notes of what he or she learned and enjoyed about each book.

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Tue, 15 May 2018 13:58:03 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2018 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2018 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Huntington Learning Center is launching its annual summer reading program this week, called Reading Adventure. Reading Adventure runs May to August and is open to students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students choose books from Huntington’s pre-selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Each student receives a reading “passport” in which to record books as completed and make a few notes of what he or she learned and enjoyed about each book.

Eileen Huntington, CEO and Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center says that summer reading is one of the simplest, most effective ways to keep students learning over summer. “Regression is a common problem over summer break, but we find that a regular reading habit can help prevent students from sliding backward,” she says. “Best of all, this is a great time for children to read what they want to read for the pure enjoyment of it. Our reading lists include many popular titles that are perfect for students of all reading ability.”

Reading Adventure is intended to get children excited to read over summer, but Huntington offers several other suggestions to make literacy a priority during the break:

  • Go to the library regularly. While there, be sure to explore summer reading activities, book clubs and other opportunities to get involved.
  • Choose a family book that you can all read together.
  • Celebrate milestones—a pizza night or ice cream outing for every three books read, for example.
  • Make reading a family affair, spending 30 minutes each night reading on the patio together.
  • Check out books on CD from the library for your summer road trip.
  • Read the newspaper together each morning.
  • Read a few books-turned-movies together, then plan a night to watch the movie versions (think the Harry Potter or The Lightning Thief series, for example).
  • Try books related to your child’s hobbies, such as autobiographies on favorite sports icons or handbooks or guides for the avid gamer.

To learn more about the Huntington Reading Adventure program, contact Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Tips to Help Children Become Better Writers Writing is one of the most important skills a child will acquire as a student—and also one of the most difficult to master.

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Fri, 04 May 2018 16:50:52 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-children-become-better-writers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-children-become-better-writers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center

Writing is one of the most important skills a child will acquire as a student—and also one of the most difficult to master. Why? Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center explains that writing involves a combination of skills. “Good writers are also good readers and have strong critical thinking and analytical skills, not to mention reading comprehension skills,” Huntington says. “It is something that takes lots of practice, which can be a challenge when children struggle with any of the underlying building blocks.”

Luckily, Huntington says there are a number of ways students can build their writing skills from the ground up. Here are a few tips to help students develop and improve their writing skills:

Read more. Many teachers say that the best way to become a better writer is to read more and read widely. There are many reasons for this: reading helps children expand their vocabulary, understand the many different uses of language and methods of storytelling or informative writing, and see grammar rules in action. It helps them appreciate the concept of voice in fiction and develop an understanding of how to share information in a clear, coherent, succinct way in nonfiction.

Brainstorm first. Strong writers often invest as much into the preparation required to write as the writing itself. For an essay or other writing assignment, your child should become adept at the brainstorming process. If given a specific topic, your child’s job is easier, but if not, encourage him or her to think through an approach to the topic before writing. Your child should ask questions such as: What is most interesting about this subject? Who am I speaking to? What facts about this topic might people not already know?

Get organized before writing. When writing anything from a two-page book report to a 15-page research paper to an opinion essay, an outline is a must. This helps writers organize their ideas and present them in the most logical, compelling way. Encourage your child to refer back to their brainstorming notes and come up with the “big idea” of what they’re writing and main three or four points, then confirm that they are answering the questions being asked of them (in an assignment). Even a loose outline will help your child write more clearly and stay on topic when working from a writing prompt or assignment.

Become a better editor. Strong writers know that no article, essay or story comes out perfect the first time. Teach your child to think of writing as a process that involves writing, editing, improving (and repeating if needed). After your child writes a draft, he or she should set it aside, then read with fresh eyes no sooner than a few hours later. At this point, your child should mark up the written piece for grammar and spelling mistakes as well as any areas that are unclear, do not follow the outline, do not make sense or could make his or her points stronger. It can be helpful for you to read your child’s work as well.

Write for fun. For many children, the mechanics of writing make it a frustrating subject—not to mention the fact that so much of what they write is required for school. Encourage your child to keep a journal, or even make it something you do together each evening. A daily journaling habit has numerous benefits for a child’s emotional well-being and stress level, but it is also a great way to think critically through ideas and express opinions and feelings in writing. Writing letters to a friend, grandparent or other family member is another valuable and fun activity.

Like any subject, writing is one where practice makes better. The more your child writes, the more he or she will improve—and perhaps even enjoy it. “Writing well involves using vivid language, organizing one’s thoughts and using good grammar and spelling,” says Last Name. “These are all things students can improve by reading frequently and seeking guidance from their teachers—and of course through plenty of repetition.”

If your child needs help building the skills that writing requires or would simply like some guidance on how to become a better writer, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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6 Tips to Help Children Strengthen Their Writing Skills In today’s competitive school environment, it’s critical that students know how to write effectively. Especially as children approach the higher grades, it is expected that they are not just capable writers, but that they are also able to research and gather evidence, communicate their thoughts and ideas in writing, and make connections between what they read and write.

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Fri, 27 Apr 2018 11:48:37 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/6-tips-to-help-children-strengthen-their-writing-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/6-tips-to-help-children-strengthen-their-writing-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center In today’s competitive school environment, it’s critical that students know how to write effectively. Especially as children approach the higher grades, it is expected that they are not just capable writers, but that they are also able to research and gather evidence, communicate their thoughts and ideas in writing, and make connections between what they read and write.

As children move through school, how can parents help them strengthen those all-important writing skills? Below are some effective writing tips for your children:

  1. Emphasize good organization. Whether children follow a loose or detailed outline, it’s wise to at least make sure an essay or story follows a logical flow from introduction to making its main points to drawing a conclusion. Children who follow a basic structure when writing essays and other assignments will find that their finished products are more cohesive and clear.
  2. Encourage children to break up ideas appropriately. Long, drawn-out paragraphs make for difficult reading. Children can organize their thoughts by breaking ideas into separate paragraphs. Each paragraph needs to have a focus, and when it’s time to venture into a different idea, it’s time for a new paragraph. Before starting a new paragraph, children should include a transition sentence to bridge ideas together.
  3. Teach them how to edit. Every writer will agree that editing is a vital step in the writing process. Children must review each and every sentence they write with a critical eye to identify wordy places and unclear messaging. This involves more than simply replacing a few words here or there. A good edit takes a piece from weak to strong and tightens every sentence so it is meaningful and easy to understand.
  4. Talk about sentence and word variety. Nothing makes a piece of writing more lackluster than using too many sentences with the same structure and length. When writing, children should try to use different sentence starters (as opposed to beginning every sentence with The or It). It’s also a good idea to mix in simple sentences with longer, more complex sentences.
  5. Stress the importance of the final review. Fresh eyes can do wonders for the editing process. Children should make it their practice to write first drafts, set them aside, then return to them for a thorough read-through. The final review needs to include checking for spelling and grammatical errors, and children can ask themselves questions while reviewing like:
    • Does this piece make sense?
    • Is the flow logical?
    • Did I follow the directions?
    • Can another reader easily grasp what I’m trying to articulate/communicate?
  6. Discuss active vs. passive voice. Strong writing uses active voice, wherein the subject of a sentence performs the action (The car hit the tree). Passive voice, on the other hand, is when the subject of the sentence is acted upon (The tree was hit by the car). Passive voice is harder to understand, as the sentences do not flow as easily. It’s best for maturing writers to avoid these types of sentences.

Writing skills are essential in school, and the more parents can do now to help their children improve them, the better off their children will be by the time they get to college. When writing is a source of struggle for a child, Huntington can help. Call 1 800 CAN LEARN to learn more about the Huntington program and how we help children become stronger, more confident writers.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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What Parents Need to Know About AP Classes If you’re the parent of a high school student planning to go to college, you’ve probably heard about Advanced Placement (AP) classes and exams. But what do you need to know about these classes other than they will help your teen stand out to colleges and universities and might allow them to earn college credits? Here are the essentials for parents:

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Mon, 23 Apr 2018 12:37:43 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-parents-need-to-know-about-ap-classes https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-parents-need-to-know-about-ap-classes Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington If you’re the parent of a high school student planning to go to college, you’ve probably heard about Advanced Placement (AP) classes and exams. But what do you need to know about these classes other than they will help your teen stand out to colleges and universities and might allow them to earn college credits? Here are the essentials for parents:

There are seven categories of AP exams. Students can take AP classes/exams in the following areas: AP Capstone (two available), Arts (five available), English (two available), History & Social Science (nine available), Math & Computer Science (five available), Sciences (seven available), and World Languages & Cultures (eight available).

AP scores are a measure of students’ achievement in college-level AP courses. While an AP score shows how well a student performed on an AP exam, it is also a measure of the student’s success in the corresponding class. In other words, a higher score on the AP Biology exam tells colleges that your teen has a good grasp of the subject matter in that class.

One major benefit: college credit. When your teen takes an AP course and scores well on the related AP exam, he or she can earn college credit. The College Board scores these exams on a 5-point scale: 5 (extremely well qualified), 4 (well qualified), 3 (qualified), 2 (possibly qualified), and 1 (no recommendation). Many colleges grant course credits for scores of 3, 4 and 5. This means savings on college tuition.

AP helps students get ahead. All college majors require students to take general education classes like math and English. If your teen earns qualifying scores on AP Exams, he or she could avoid having to take some of those introductory classes. Also, if your teen knows what he or she plans to major in at college, taking AP exams in subjects within that major could mean that he or she can skip those and move directly into upper-level classes. This frees up time in your teen’s schedule to pursue a minor, take electives or just graduate quicker.

The 38 AP exams have some elements in common. Every AP exam has its own requirements, but all AP exams are two to three hours long and usually consist of multiple-choice questions and free-response questions (essay, spoken response, or solving a problem). Most exams are given in the first two weeks of May.

AP is also about building skills. AP classes help prepare students for the next phase of their educational journey. The classes are similar to college classes in that students are expected to dig deeper into problem-solving and analysis, get hands-on with the material, dialog and debate ideas, and push themselves. 

Perhaps most important for parents to keep in mind about taking AP classes is that doing so is a great way for your teen to get ready for college. These classes are challenging and teach students skills often taught in college. And if your teen can earn college credit and/or advanced placement by taking the corresponding exams, all the better.

Learn more about AP exams at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org and be sure to check with the colleges to which your teen plans to apply about their policies on AP credits, as every school is different. If you have questions about your high school’s AP class offerings, reach out to the guidance counselor at your school. For more information about how Huntington helps students prepare for the AP exams, call 1 800 CAN LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018  Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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3 Things Tutors Can Provide For SAT And ACT Prep That Teachers Can't For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to find a tutor for test prep. Some think it would be unheard of to take the test without being prepared by a tutor or qualified teacher, while others seem to think it's an expense that can easily be spared as long as you do well in school. In truth, there are many things tutors can do for students they can't do alone or with the help of a teacher.

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Tue, 03 Apr 2018 16:59:52 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/3-things-test-prep-tutors-can-provide-that-teachers-cannot https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/3-things-test-prep-tutors-can-provide-that-teachers-cannot Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to find a tutor for test prep. Some think it would be unheard of to take the test without being prepared by a tutor or qualified teacher, while others seem to think it's an expense that can easily be spared as long as you do well in school. In truth, there are many things tutors can do for students they can't do alone or with the help of a teacher.

1.   TUTORS CAN PROVIDE DISCIPLINE

It's true that there are many bright students who may have the capability to prepare themselves for the SAT, but that doesn't mean they have the discipline to do so. It's also not safe to assume that teachers will provide SAT-oriented material. Having an SAT coach means that a student is held accountable for studying specified portions of material, and therefore, it gives the student the discipline needed to do so. There's no doubting that the right amount of studying will improve a test score, but some students need the incentive to actually study. 

2.  TUTORS CAN PROVIDE SPECIALIZED HELP

Many students do extremely well in certain subjects but not-so-well in others. For example, some students are proficient in math and science courses, but struggle with writing. If this is the case, it can be helpful to find a tutor who specializes in a certain subject. You can't get all the help you need just from sitting in class, because lesson plans are designed to accommodate everyone. When you find a tutor, you can sit down and explain exactly what you're having trouble with. Specialized help is one of the biggest benefits of hiring a tutor or coach.

3.  TUTORS ARE FAMILIAR WITH THE EXPECTATIONS OF COLLEGES

The benefit of having SAT tutors is that they're familiar with what colleges expect of their applicants. Together, a student and tutor can reach goals that are both attainable and specific to the program that the student is applying to, making it more likely they will get into their top choices and excel in their programs.

Get started with finding a tutor or learn more about Huntington’s SAT prep programs and how they can help you reach your SAT goals.

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Help! 5 Questions to Ask When Choosing Between Math Programs If your child is struggling in school it is natural to search for a math tutoring program that can provide the assistance needed before gaps grow too wide and misunderstanding snowballs out of control. Watching your child struggle with learning math is hard and finding the perfect program can raise a child’s understanding and boost confidence. A carefully designed program will work to fill in gaps in your child’s learning and build on established strengths. You want to choose a program that carefully evaluates your child’s math skills, is aligned with adopted standards, personalizes instruction to the individual child’s needs, and provides ongoing feedback.

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Fri, 30 Mar 2018 14:41:01 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-questions-to-ask-when-choosing-between-math-programs https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-questions-to-ask-when-choosing-between-math-programs Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center If your child is struggling in school it is natural to search for a math tutoring program that can provide the assistance needed before gaps grow too wide and misunderstanding snowballs out of control. Watching your child struggle with learning math is hard and finding the perfect program can raise a child’s understanding and boost confidence. A carefully designed program will work to fill in gaps in your child’s learning and build on established strengths. You want to choose a program that carefully evaluates your child’s math skills, is aligned with adopted standards, personalizes instruction to the individual child’s needs, and provides ongoing feedback.

As you research programs that provide math help it is important to ask questions. Make sure you find the answers to these helpful questions:

  1. What format is the math tutoring program? There are a variety of different formats for programs that provide math help. You can choose a program that is housed in a tutoring center and offers help sessions on a regularly scheduled basis. There are programs available online that provide an interactive, self-directed learning model and are available at any time. You may find that a textbook curriculum is a good fit for your child and can choose a program that utilizes individual instruction in your home by a parent or other adult. As a parent you will know which format is the best for your child and can evaluate how your family’s schedule and work habits will impact the choice you make.
  2. How is my child evaluated? Since no two children are alike, a program designed to provide math help must carefully evaluate the student’s ability before prioritizing necessary skills. This evaluation should be thorough and based on learning standards to identify areas of strength and need. Evaluation also shouldn’t end with the onset of instruction. The program should employ evaluation methods throughout the instructional time, or even school year, to monitor progress and check for understanding. This ongoing evaluation will provide valuable information on how your child progresses at learning math.
  3. What is the curriculum aligned with? A child’s evaluation results are crucial when determining programming and instruction but ensuring that it is aligned with age based or developmental standards is just as important. A program can be aligned with a variety of standards including state and local standards, national Common Core State Standards, developmental standards, or a scope and sequence that carefully spirals instruction and skills. Carefully planned instruction, aligned with a set of standards or as part of a scope and sequence, will help to prevent gaps in your child’s understanding.  
  4. Is the program personalized? Once the evaluation is complete and your child’s strengths and weaknesses are aligned with age based or developmental learning standards, instruction can begin. This instruction should be personalized to the child’s determined needs and built on established strengths. This personalization targets your child’s individual needs and prevents further gaps in your child’s math achievement. An effective program will also employ instructional strategies and activities based on your child’s interests. Research proves that learning is most effective when it is engaging, interactive, and based upon what a child is interested in.
  5. What type of feedback will I receive? As the math instruction continues it is important that you receive feedback on your child’s progress. This feedback will provide you with information that you need on your child’s developing skills, continued areas of need, and the effectiveness of the program. Evaluation data and progress reports will paint a picture of your child’s work in the program.

What insights have you discovered in your search for an effective math help program? What characteristics in a math tutoring program are most important to you?

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Five Tips to Motivate Children with ADHD For parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it can be very challenging to figure out exactly what motivates their students to study and complete homework. CEO & Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that parents should help their children get to know themselves as students and embrace techniques that work for them. “While parents will find it difficult, if not impossible, to change their children’s behavior, modifications to their study habits and learning environment are far more likely to be helpful,” says Huntington. To motivate children to strive toward academic success, she suggests these five tips:

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Tue, 03 Apr 2018 09:42:37 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-tips-to-motivate-children-with-adhd https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-tips-to-motivate-children-with-adhd Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center For parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it can be very challenging to figure out exactly what motivates their students to study and complete homework. CEO & Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that parents should help their children get to know themselves as students and embrace techniques that work for them. “While parents will find it difficult, if not impossible, to change their children’s behavior, modifications to their study habits and learning environment are far more likely to be helpful,” says Huntington. To motivate children to strive toward academic success, she suggests these five tips:

  1. Establish good organizational habits. Nothing will hamper an ADHD child’s ability to succeed like weak organizational skills. At a minimum, children must maintain an orderly desk and backpack and create a reliable system for keeping track of papers and making sure they hand in all work. Parents should keep an eye on their children’s organizational skills and work with them to make adjustments whenever needed.
  2. Follow a schedule. Time management can be hard for the ADHD student. A student planner with all test and project due dates is a must, but more important are the habits of using such a tool. Parents should help their children get used to estimating how long tasks will take and planning their time accordingly. They should also teach their children to pull out the planner at the beginning and ending of every class and record all assignments, due dates and other reminders.
  3. Write it down. Whether an ADHD student has a smartphone or a paper planner, it’s critical that he or she gets into the habit of writing down important things the moment the student hears them. Parents can teach their children to keep a pad of sticky notes on them at all times, make good use of the reminder function on their phone or use some other method. Having a master to-do list (in addition to a more structured schedule in the day planner) is a good starting point when students set out to create a daily action plan.
  4. Break tasks down. Learning to prioritize homework can be difficult for ADHD students. It’s best to divide longer, harder assignments into smaller steps that students can assign themselves and check off one at a time. This type of approach gives students manageable to-dos, which discourages procrastination and is less daunting.
  5. Adopt the right study habits. Parents must help their children recognize the way they study and learn best and stick to those habits. It’s important to remember that an ADHD student’s preferred study methods are likely different than those of his or her parents. This is fine and to be expected. The point is that children need to do what is most effective for them. ADHD students with strong impulsive/hyperactive tendencies might work best when pacing or sitting on a balance ball. Those with mainly inattentive type ADHD likely focus best in a distraction-free room. It’s wise to test out different approaches and pay attention to what does and doesn’t work.

It can be a challenge to find ways to successfully motivate children with ADHD, but Huntington reminds parents that establishing good routines is key. “It takes practice for children with ADHD to stay on top of established habits, but with diligence, these students will be successful,” she says. “With each small accomplishment, they feel good about what they have achieved and motivated to sustain those positive feelings.”

If you are the parent of an ADHD child who needs help motivating to do his or her best work in school or is otherwise struggling, call Huntington at 1 800 CAN-LEARN.  

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board. ACT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc. These entities were not involved in the production of and do not endorse either program.

 

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2 Step-By-Step Guides To Improve Odds And Score Higher Is it possible to be a top student and a terrible test-taker? Many parents and caregivers would answer a resounding "yes" when speaking of their own children. And they may be especially worried in the springtime, when many schools use test results to determine which students will graduate and move on to the next grade. But with careful preparation and strong test-taking skills, all students can take positive steps to improve their test scores. Here are some tips:

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Wed, 28 Mar 2018 13:32:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/step-by-step-guides-on-improving-test-scores https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/step-by-step-guides-on-improving-test-scores Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington Is it possible to be a top student and a terrible test-taker? Many parents and caregivers would answer a resounding "yes" when speaking of their own children. And they may be especially worried in the springtime, when many schools use test results to determine which students will graduate and move on to the next grade. But with careful test prep and strong test-taking skills, all students can take positive steps to improve their test scores. Here are some tips:

GET PREPARED

Step One: Find out in advance about what's going to be tested. The guidance office of your child's school should be able to give you details about state and district "standards" for subject matter knowledge that will be tested in these exams. Reviewing these standards will give you a good idea of the test content, and which skills and knowledge areas should be strengthened before taking the exams. You can also find out more about the standards and tests at the Department of Education Web site for your state.

Step Two: Talk with teachers. Chances are, your children's teachers are already focusing instruction to ensure their students are prepared for these tests. Talking with teachers is another good way to determine how your child is performing on tests results, multiple choice, and grade-level material that's relevant to the tests.

Step Three: When reading, think about the 5 "W"s. Reading comprehension skills are vital for academic success and for higher test scores. Students can strengthen these skills by quizzing themselves with questions about "Who, What, Where, Why and When" as they work through reading passages on the tests, and on homework and classroom reading assignments as well. Who is the passage about? What is happening and why is it important? Where is it taking place? Why is this important, and when is it happening?

Step Four: Become a better writer. Writing skills are also key to success on most statewide tests - and for new versions of the SAT and ACT as well. Writing two types of journals can strengthen these skills. A schoolwork journal can help students summarize what has been read or studied. Through a personal journal - in which students write about whatever interests them - students can become more adept at articulating ideas and feelings.

Step Five: Get help. For 29 years, Huntington Learning Center educators have provided instruction in reading, writing, mathematics and study skills tailored to each student’s learning needs. Students who turn to Huntington gain an advantage not only for test prep but also for continued academic improvement and growth. If your child is struggling, your local Huntington educators can discuss the best approach for building knowledge, skills and confidence. 

Your child's teacher should also be able to tell you about test prep programs that may be available after school or on weekends to boost test scores. If your child's teacher re commends extra help from a tutor, make sure that you work with individuals and organizations that begin with a diagnostic assessment of your child's skills and knowledge. This will enable a qualified tutor to create a personalized program of instruction.

STRENGTHEN TEST-TAKING SKILLS

Step One: Read the directions carefully. 

Students should pay close attention to the directions, and follow them to the letter. If students don't understand the directions, they should ask the teacher before beginning. 

Step Two: Quickly survey the entire test before beginning. 

This process helps students get a good overall idea of the material that will be tested and helps identify which questions will be easiest to answer. 

Step Three: Answer the easier questions first. 

This will help build up points (and confidence!). While answering the easier questions, your child can be subconsciously finding answers for the difficult questions to come. 

Step Four: When it comes to multiple choice, take a logical path to the right one. 

Students should start by eliminating answers they know are wrong, and then carefully consider the others. If your child isn't sure, he or she should make the best choice, since not answering is usually the equivalent of giving a wrong answer. 

Step Five: Save time for review. 

Students should save a few minutes to review answers and to make sure that all questions have been answered. It's also important to proofread for grammar, spelling and careless mistakes. 

The Final Word: Take a healthy approach. 

Most parents recognize the connection between rest, nutrition and everyday academic performance, but these factors are especially important on the day of a big exam. A good night's sleep and a good breakfast will help your child concentrate. Parents should also try to lessen their children's anxiety about these tests. By planning ahead and getting whatever help might be needed, most students will be more relaxed and confident when their skills are put to the test.

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How To Know It's Time To Look For Reading Tutoring Programs We know reading skills are important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified? Don’t all students learn at their own pace? It’s true that every student has his or her academic strengths and weaknesses, and may pick up some skills more quickly than others; however, if your elementary student is reading below grade level or receiving report card marks that indicate under-performance, taking action is imperative.  Ignoring a reading deficiency can set the stage for struggles for the rest of the academic year and beyond.

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Tue, 27 Mar 2018 17:03:03 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-know-when-to-look-for-reading-tutoring-programs https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-know-when-to-look-for-reading-tutoring-programs Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center We know reading skills are important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified? Don’t all students learn at their own pace? It’s true that every student has his or her academic strengths and weaknesses, and may pick up some skills more quickly than others; however, if your elementary student is reading below grade level or receiving report card marks that indicate under-performance, taking action is imperative.  Ignoring a reading deficiency can set the stage for struggles for the rest of the academic year and beyond.

When struggling readers become more inclined to avoid reading out of frustration and lack of confidence they will continue to limit their progress. A negative attitude toward reading can snowball into a lifelong aversion to reading, which can put your student at a significant disadvantage. Poor reading skills are likely to impede on an individual’s chances of scoring well on all areas of standardized tests.

In addition, reading skills aren’t confined to the elementary student’s reading lesson, nor will they be once your student enters middle school and high school. Mathematics, science, social studies and history all depend on reading skills like textual analysis and expository writing. The truth is that success in reading translates to greater success in all academic subjects.

So how can you provide your struggling reader with adequate help? Turn to a reading tutor. A reading tutor is the most effective way to successfully address a reader’s weakness in phonetics, fluency and comprehension. A reading tutor can conduct in-depth assessment of a reader’s abilities and provide individualized one-on-one instruction. Plus, at a well-respected tutoring service like The Huntington Learning Center, where our proven strategies have warranted success for over thirty-five years, parents are sure to see results quickly and students will gain new confidence in the classroom.

How do parents know when it’s time to seek the help of a reading tutor?

  1. A reading tutor may be necessary if the reading instruction he or she does receive does not fully address their specific needs.
  2. If your elementary student can read with fluency and accuracy, but does not comprehend what he or she is reading, your student is a struggling reader and could benefit from the help of a reading tutor.
  3. A conversation with your child’s teacher is also an easy way to tell if your student is struggling with reading, as is your student’s sudden disinterest in reading, tendency to read aloud memorized words but skip over sight words, or inability to read fluently from diverse passages.
  4. If you observe your student to be a strong reader at home with grade-level reading abilities but his or her grades don’t fully reflect this, the stress of the classroom environment may be hindering your student’s performance. A reading tutor can help build confidence for reading out loud.
  5. Keep in mind that reading tutors are not just for students who are at risk for falling behind; if your elementary student is an advanced reader, a tutoring program could help him or her excel even further with one-on-one instruction delivered at the pace that works best.

These are just some of the many ways parents may be able to identify their student as a struggling reader. For more information on tutoring services or resources, or to arrange for a reading tutor for your young reader, contact the Huntington Learning Center today by visiting our website or calling 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

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3 Ways Parents Can Help Their Child With Algebra Algebra is a challenging subject for many students. Yet algebra is not as difficult as some students 
believe – it may just take more time and attention for some students to learn the basic concepts of algebra 1 and/or algebra 2. Here’s how you can provide algebra help to your child. 

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Mon, 26 Mar 2018 13:49:26 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/3-ways-parents-can-help-their-child-with-algebra https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/3-ways-parents-can-help-their-child-with-algebra Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Algebra is a challenging subject for many students. Yet algebra is not as difficult as some students 
believe – it may just take more time and attention for some students to learn the basic concepts of algebra 1 and/or algebra 2. Here’s how you can provide algebra help to your child. 

  1. Practice Problems - Repetition is the key to understanding algebra properly. Have your student redo word problems that they have had difficulties with on previous quizzes or tests. Then, move on to other algebra problems in their text book that are similar. Some students learn better through practice instead of conceptually.  Make sure to only do algebra problems to which you have the answer key so you can correct your student’s work.
  2. Mobile Apps - Technology might be the key to helping your child understand algebraic equations. Many algebra-based apps are available on sites like iTunes for free. The U.S. Department of Education donated $740,000 to the Center for Algebraic Thinking to create these apps in the hope of aiding struggling students. Apps are an alternative for students to practice once they understand the initial principles. These free apps provide practice problems with the answer keys built in. Check to see if any algebra apps on iTunes can help your student.
  3. Talk with your Child’s Teacher - Chat with the teacher to better understand your child’s progress. As a professional educator, they’ll convey your student’s weak points and possibly offer you tips on how to help them outside of class. Your student might have trouble with word problems, but understand solving quadratic equations. This information will help your strategy – and if you ultimately decide to seek tutoring help, you will be able to speak knowledgably about what areas are causing the most concern for your child.

Overall, if you feel your child is having trouble gaining traction in algebra 1 and/or algebra 2, seek tutoring help. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are able to explain subjects in ways that make the most sense to students. Your child’s education is vital to their future, so intervene early if you see problems. Huntington Learning Center helps students with homework, as well as quiz and test preparation, so your student can build a better future today.

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5 Ways To Build Strong Study Habits At An Early Age It's no secret that good study habits are an integral component to academic success. Understanding effective study habits, ways to stay organized, and strategies for prioritizing work will help students lay a strong foundation for ongoing learning. These crucial skills should be developed at a young age, as early as the toddler years, instead of waiting until high school when the coursework is quite difficult. Young minds are like sponges and seek out things to learn and new activities to explore. Working with your child from a young age to build good study skills will pay off exponentially in future years.

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Fri, 23 Mar 2018 16:08:43 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-ways-to-build-strong-study-habits-at-an-early-age https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-ways-to-build-strong-study-habits-at-an-early-age Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It's no secret that good study habits are an integral component to academic success. Understanding effective study habits, ways to stay organized, and strategies for prioritizing work will help students lay a strong foundation for ongoing learning. These crucial skills should be developed at a young age, as early as the toddler years, instead of waiting until high school when the coursework is quite difficult. Young minds are like sponges and seek out things to learn and new activities to explore. Working with your child from a young age to build good study skills will pay off exponentially in future years.

There are good study techniques you can follow to build study habits regardless of your child's age, including:

  1. Starting young It's never too early to expose children to academic work. There are a variety of academic activities toddlers can participate in, such as read alouds, puzzles, counting, painting, and educational games. The work shouldn't be frustrating or too difficult but should instead build foundational learning skills that will impact future achievement. These activities may seem like play now but they'll certainly contribute to good study skills as your child gets older. 
  2. Building strong homework habits Children often begin receiving homework assignments as early as Kindergarten. Work to devise a routine for completing homework that is consistent and appropriate for your child's age and ability. Homework is a way of life for students but it doesn't have to be dreaded or frustrating. Find a quiet area of your home that can be dedicated to homework and study sessions. Stock the space with materials and ensure appropriate lighting. Set work expectations with your child and make sure that the routine is consistently followed and meets your child's needs. 
  3. Fostering independence As your child gets older it is important to participate in a gradual release of responsibility. Over time you should expect your child to take more responsibility for homework and studying. Check in often with your child about good study habits and ensure the work is being done correctly, mistakes are rectified, and the assignment's objectives are met. 
  4. Helping children identify resources A child has many different resources available if homework seems confusing or overwhelming. Even if you're expecting a child to take responsibility for a majority of the homework and studying responsibilities you should remain a trusted resource. Encourage your child to talk to teachers, counselors, or other students about homework and maintaining strong study skills. Another option is suggesting that they form study groups with their classmates. If you find that you need additional support with developing study skills consider investing in tutoring sessions. Huntington Learning Centers offers tutoring for students that is focused on important study skills such as research, note taking, time management and organization. 
  5. Making it a priority Families are busy. There are work, school, and extra curricular schedules to juggle and family and household priorities to balance. Don't let homework and the development of good study habits take a backseat to other commitments. Make sure that your child's homework and studying remains a priority, even during your family's busiest times. If there is a significant change to your family's routine or schedule find ways to adjust the dedicated study sessions. Keep updated on assignments, exams, and classroom expectations. Find times to talk to your child's teacher about any concerns you have or for additional ways to help your child. 

Huntington Learning Centers has a comprehensive study skills tutoring program designed for students of all ages. Depending on age, grade level, and ability the professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers have a plan for every child. The skills covered in the tutoring sessions apply to a variety of subject areas and will help students as they advance grade levels and tackle tougher courses.

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How To Help Your Child Be A Confident Student And Person It's hard not to jump for joy when your child gets an A on a test or announces that he or she won a spelling bee at school. However, when it comes to your child's development, remember that more important than the positive end result is the road your child travelled to get there. Surely, working for that A took a commitment on your child's part. Give your child a confidence boost by letting him or her know that you're proud of his or her efforts and willingness to stick with the studying. 

It is just as important to praise improvements; if your child brought his or her report card up from straight-Cs to all Bs and one C, congratulate this progress. Avoid insincere or hollow compliments. "Good job, but let's keep shooting for those As," isn't as likely to help your child feel confident and to continue taking steps in the right direction as a comment that focuses on his or her accomplishment, such as, "You've worked hard, and it's paid off. I'm proud of you for making such a big improvement."

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Thu, 22 Mar 2018 15:53:13 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-child-be-a-confident-student-and-person https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-child-be-a-confident-student-and-person Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center PRAISE THE EFFORT, NOT THE OUTCOME.

It's hard not to jump for joy when your child gets an A on a test or announces that he or she won a spelling bee at school. However, when it comes to your child's development, remember that more important than the positive end result is the road your child travelled to get there. Surely, working for that A took a commitment on your child's part. Give your child a confidence boost by letting him or her know that you're proud of his or her efforts and willingness to stick with the studying. 

It is just as important to praise improvements; if your child brought his or her report card up from straight-Cs to all Bs and one C, congratulate this progress. Avoid insincere or hollow compliments. "Good job, but let's keep shooting for those As," isn't as likely to help your child feel confident and to continue taking steps in the right direction as a comment that focuses on his or her accomplishment, such as, "You've worked hard, and it's paid off. I'm proud of you for making such a big improvement."

LET YOUR CHILD MAKE MISTAKES.

A big part of school and life is learning from our mistakes. The more parents provide their children opportunities to learn and practice confidence building exercises, the better. For example, a child who takes up tennis may initially struggle to make his or her racquet connect with the ball. With practice, encouragement and coaching, your child will be more likely to understand what he or she needs to do to hit the ball, clear the net and more. Just as you wouldn't expect your child to be a flawless tennis player after an hour on the court, neither should you or your child expect every math problem or writing assignment to be easy. The key is to help your child learn from past challenges and feel confident in applying that knowledge in the future. 

To encourage independence, avoid interrupting your child during homework time to "show" him or her the right way to do a problem. Instead, let your child take his or her best shot at answering questions. If your child makes a mistake, don't offer the right answer, but rather provide help to get there. In a frustrating moment, consider reminding your child of a time when he or she overcame an obstacle to learn something new. Whenever possible, guide your child toward accomplishments from the sidelines so that he or she can experience the confidence boost and pride that comes with overcoming a challenge all on his or her own.

BE A POSITIVE INFLUENCE.

A child's parents have the greatest potential to make an impact on his or her self-confidence, particularly at a young age. Remember that young children are like sponges: they absorb everything. Because your child emulates you, maintain a positive attitude toward your own activities or work. If your child senses that you have a negative self-image or often feel discouraged in your own life, there's no doubt he or she will be influenced. Are you showing your child that you, too, are willing to persevere even in a difficult situation? 

At the same time, your child needs to know that sometimes, we all try and do not succeed. Your positive attitude is important, but be sure that you don't overcompensate by making your child feel that you rarely have trouble picking up a new concept or activity. If your child is ready to give up on a homework problem or assignment, share with him or her a time when you experienced something similar, either in school, work or otherwise. Be honest about the outcome, and let your child know that it's okay to be stronger in certain areas than others. 

One of the most important qualities you can impart upon your child before sending him or her off to high school and college is the importance of self-confidence. When your child feels confident, he or she will approach school and life with an unafraid and optimistic demeanor. Self-confidence grows upon itself; show your child that you believe in him or her, help guide your child toward small successes and watch your child start to believe in himself or herself, too.

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FAQs About the SAT Subject Tests The SAT is common terminology among college-bound teens and their parents, but not everyone is as familiar with the SAT Subject Tests. What do you need to know about these exams? Here are some of the most frequently asked questions we receive at Huntington to get you up to speed:

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Mon, 26 Mar 2018 10:33:12 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/frequently-asked-questions-about-sat-subject-tests https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/frequently-asked-questions-about-sat-subject-tests Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington The SAT is common terminology among college-bound teens and their parents, but not everyone is as familiar with the SAT Subject Tests. What do you need to know about these exams? Here are some of the most frequently asked questions we receive at Huntington to get you up to speed:

How are the SAT Subject Tests different than the regular SAT?

The SAT Subject Tests are high school-level tests that reflect high school curricula. They indicate a student’s readiness for college-level courses in specific subject areas. The SAT is focused on the skills and knowledge learned in high school and what students need to succeed in college. It has a Reading Test, Writing and Language Test, Math Test and optional Essay Test.

What subjects are tested by the SAT Subject Tests?

There are 20 SAT Subject Tests in five areas: Mathematics (2), Science (3), English (1), History (2) and Languages (12).

How often are these exams given and can you take several at once?

SAT Subject Tests are given six times a year on the same days and at the same test centers as the SAT, but not all 20 tests are offered on every SAT date. The Language and Listening tests are only offered in November. Although students can take up to three Subject Tests on a test date, they cannot take SAT and an SAT Subject Test on the same day.

When should my child take the SAT Subject Test?

After completing the area of study, sign up for the next available test date to take the Subject Test.

Did the SAT Subject Tests change with the recent redesign of the SAT?

No. For now, the College Board says that the SAT Subject Tests are staying the same.

Do colleges require the SAT Subject Tests?

Some do, but not all. SAT Subject Tests show colleges that students are ready for specific programs of study or certain courses or majors. The College Board lists institutions that have indicated that they require, recommend or consider the Subject Tests in admissions. Visit https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat-subject-tests/about/institutions-using. Of course, it’s a good idea to check with a college directly as well.

Why should your teen consider taking any SAT Subject Tests?

The most obvious reason is if the college to which your teen is applying recommends or requires Subject Tests. However, even colleges that don’t require SAT Subject Tests might accept them and use them in admission to get a more complete picture of your teen as an applicant. These tests are a great way for students to showcase their strengths and strongly express an interest in specific programs or majors.

What’s the best way to prepare for the SAT Subject Tests?

These exams are based in high school course work, so the best way to prepare for them is to keep up in school. If your teen is struggling through a particular subject, a Huntington tutoring program will help him or her catch up and get ahead, which is a great foundation. We can also help your teen get familiar with the test and study strategies for success.

Huntington offers one-to-one prep programs for students taking the SAT Subject Tests. If your teen needs help or you have questions about these exams or Huntington’s prep programs, call us at 1 800-CAN LEARN. To learn more about the SAT Subject Tests, visit www.collegeboard.org.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board. ACT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc. These entities were not involved in the production of and do not endorse either program.

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Teaching Kids Leadership Most parents recognize the importance of time management, strong communication, good listening and other study skills, but what about leadership? “Your child doesn’t have to aspire to be the next president of the United States to benefit from the lessons of leadership,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Activities and programs that instill leadership help teach children about perseverance, conflict resolution, building one’s character, goal setting and more.”  Huntington offers parents these tips to help their child develop leadership skills:

 

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Fri, 09 Mar 2018 11:15:49 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching_kids_leadership https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching_kids_leadership Most parents recognize the importance of time management, strong communication, good listening and other study skills, but what about leadership? “Your child doesn’t have to aspire to be the next president of the United States to benefit from the lessons of leadership,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Activities and programs that instill leadership help teach children about perseverance, conflict resolution, building one’s character, goal setting and more.”

Huntington offers parents these tips to help their child develop leadership skills:

Encourage volunteering for a cause your child cares about. What gets your child excited? Animals? The planet? Helping other kids? Encourage your child to make a difference through volunteering, or try doing service learning as a family. Getting involved is a wonderful way for kids to discover a passion, make friends, and share their experiences and excitement with others.

Give your child opportunities to teach others. Whether it is a sibling or a classmate, children who teach their peers often become more engaged in the subject matter. If your student is a good reader, how about reading to younger siblings and teaching them reading basics? Your child will build a sense of pride in sharing his or her knowledge and helping others learn something new.

Check out extracurricular activities. Your child’s school likely has a plethora of clubs and activities with which your child could get involved. Sports are an obvious way to instill in your child the lessons of hard work, teamwork and determination, but if your child isn’t interested in athletics, don’t overlook things like student council, yearbook, drama club, music, math club, science club or a student ambassador program.

Explore leadership programs and camps. Do you live near a college? Check to see what programs they have for rising middle and high school students. Some colleges offer enrichment, college preparatory or other programs for children and teens designed specifically to build leadership aptitudes. How about experiential or other types of leadership camps in your area? You can check with your child’s teachers, guidance counseling office and school district for suggestions or referrals.

Huntington encourages parents to be creative when it comes to leadership development opportunities for their child. “The key is to empower your child to take on new responsibilities, strive for things he or she wants, take risks, and recognize and build his or her strengths. Doing so will help your child become a more engaged and involved student and citizen.”

 

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Helping Your Teen Capitalize on His or Her Strengths Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says, “It’s perfectly natural that by the time a student reaches high school, he or she may have discovered a passion for one or two subjects or hobbies. One of these areas may soon become your teen’s college major or even evolve into a career path one day, so in the high school years, parents should think about how to encourage their teens to make the most of what they’re good at.” Huntington offers tips on how can parents help their teen flourish by nurturing his or her strengths.

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Tue, 06 Mar 2018 12:28:29 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helpingyourteencapitalizeontheirstrength https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helpingyourteencapitalizeontheirstrength Just as you may not want to pursue a career in science if your passion is writing, your teen may have certain activities and school subjects that capture his or her interest. “Every student wants to feel successful, which is why many gravitate toward subjects where they are strongest—and away from those where they are weak,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “It’s perfectly natural that by the time a student reaches high school, he or she may have discovered a passion for one or two subjects or hobbies. One of these areas may soon become your teen’s college major or even evolve into a career path one day, so in the high school years, parents should think about how to encourage their teens to make the most of what they’re good at.”

How can parents help their teen flourish by nurturing his or her strengths? Huntington offers the following tips:

Start with a self-assessment. If your teen seems to feel and perform average at most things, help him or her explore what he or she is good at. Open-ended conversations about areas where your teen feels the most confident are a good place to start, but if your teen struggles to articulate his or her thoughts, try an assessment, such as the Gallup StrengthsFinder (the adult or youth version) or the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

Personality traits can be parlayed into strengths. Your teen isn’t a straight-A student, but is a social butterfly who loves organizing activities and rallying friends and family to get involved. Perhaps your teen has the skills to excel in a school leadership position, such as serving on student council. Or, does his or her high school offer any business management or leadership courses?

Remind your teen that strengths can be useful, even if they’re not favorites. If your teen is great at math but doesn’t love it, becoming a statistician will not likely become his or her future career. However, your teen could use this area of strength to his or her advantage. Your teen’s calculus teacher could serve as an excellent college reference and mentor if he or she nurtures the relationship. If your teen sees him or herself as a budding entrepreneur, having strong math and reasoning skills will definitely be valuable down the road.

Let strengths guide passions. Encourage your teen to seek out opportunities to build upon (and get excited about) his or her areas of strength. Think of volunteer prospects, part-time jobs, school activities and extracurricular activities that will allow your teen to exercise his or her skills in new and different ways. A bookworm might enjoy reading to children at the local library, working in a book store or trying his or her own hand at writing stories.

Huntington reminds parents that just as it is important to work on one’s weaknesses, it is imperative that teens cultivate their strengths, too. “Well-roundedness is valuable and will certainly help your teen perform well academically, but when it comes to identifying a college major and future career path, your teen would be wise to focus on his or her talents,” says Huntington. “Help your teen identify and develop these strengths and you’ll be setting him or her on the path to a fulfilling life.”

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FIVE SIGNS YOUR CHILD NEEDS TUTORING It’s easy to tell that a child needs tutoring when he or she continues to receive one poor report card after the next, but there are a number of other less obvious signs that parents shouldn’t ignore. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that parents can look for clues in a number of places. “Stressful study sessions and bad grades are the tangible evidence of a child’s school struggles, but there are several other indicators to watch for,” says Huntington. “The sooner you recognize school problems, the faster you can help your child overcome any issues and boost his or her confidence.”

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Thu, 08 Mar 2018 17:16:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-signs-child-needs-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-signs-child-needs-tutoring It’s easy to tell that a child needs tutoring when he or she continues to receive one poor report card after the next, but there are a number of other less obvious signs that parents shouldn’t ignore. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that parents can look for clues in a number of places. “Stressful study sessions and bad grades are the tangible evidence of a child’s school struggles, but there are several other indicators to watch for,” says Huntington. “The sooner you recognize school problems, the faster you can help your child overcome any issues and boost his or her confidence.”

Huntington shares these five warning signs that your child may need tutoring help—and questions to answer about your child’s behavior:

  1. Difficulty getting started. Does your child seem unexcited and unmotivated about anything to do with school—especially working on assignments? Does he or she put off homework time every night and frequently spin his or her wheels when working?
  2. Sloppy homework and overall disorganization. Is your child disorganized in most areas of his or her life? Does your child consistently hand in unfinished or messy homework? Does it seem that your child used to care about doing quality work and does not anymore?
  3. Personality change. Have you noticed a dramatic change in your child’s disposition in recent months? Is your child more angry or volatile than ever before? Does he or she seem unhappy—about school and other areas of his or her life such as friends?
  4. Diminished self-esteem. Does your child get down on him or herself easily during homework? Is your child pessimistic about school, his or her abilities, and more? On a day to day basis, does your child appear frustrated with him or herself?
  5. Lack of interest in learning. Is your child totally apathetic about school and anything associated with school? Was your child interested in learning previously and now is not? Does that indifference translate to other areas, such as socializing or being involved in extracurricular activities?

“School can be a bumpy road for students who are struggling, so it is important to take action if you notice your child showing any of these signs,” Huntington says. “Experience has showed us that early tutoring intervention is key to getting students back to where they need to be as quickly as possible.” For questions about how a customized tutoring program could help your child, call the Huntington Learning Center at (201) 261-8400.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month Mon, 12 Mar 2018 11:46:33 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-and-statistics-awareness-month-march-2018 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-and-statistics-awareness-month-march-2018 Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington This month, the Huntington Learning Center is celebrating Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month, an annual event that aims to increase the understanding and appreciation of mathematics and statistics. These two subjects are important drivers of innovation in the technological world, where new methodologies and systems are always becoming more complex.

Eileen Huntington, CEO & Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center says that Huntington is proud to join colleges and universities, high school departments, institutional public information offices, math clubs, student groups and other related groups in the celebration. “Many students turn to Huntington for help with math, and we are always quick to share with them how important math is not just in school, but life,” says Huntington. “Math and statistics play a huge part in many current issues—from the data surge brought on by the digital age to climate change, from economic progress to internet security. In April, we take time to elevate the importance of math to the families we serve and remind them of its practical application.”

Huntington adds that while many parents feel ill-equipped to help their children with math homework, there are many simple ways to encourage children to put math and statistics to use in daily life. She offers these ideas:

  • Have your child join your fantasy football league each year and show him or her how the weekly statistics are calculated.
  • Invite your child to balance your checkbook each week.
  • Have your child help you maintain your family budget if you use a program like QuickBooks or a simple Excel spreadsheet.
  • Whenever you measure anything in the kitchen, have your child get involved in the addition or doubling or halving of a recipe.
  • Together, collect data over a period of time and create an interesting graph or chart. For example, the number of snow days, your family’s wakeup times or your child’s height.
  • Visit the sports page of the newspaper or news website to get familiar with sports statistics and start tracking that data.
  • When you grocery shop, have your child keep a running tally of the bill and compare prices of different products to understand which product is a better deal.
  • Whenever major news breaks about an event or discovery that involves math or statistics, share it with your child.
  • Set up a savings account for your child and give him or her savings goals and a regular chore of calculating interest and keep track of the account balance.

Now in its 32nd year, Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month began in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation to establish National Mathematics Awareness Week. This annual celebration is a collaborative effort of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics.

To learn more about Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month, visit www.mathaware.org.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board. ACT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc. These entities were not involved in the production of and do not endorse either program.

 

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4 Review Techniques to Get You Ready for Any Exam How ready are you for your upcoming exams? Honing your test taking skills will prepare you for exams in your high school courses as well as any achievement exams you will take this year. Focusing now on your test taking skills will pay off in the long run as you approach each exam with confidence in your abilities.

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Fri, 02 Mar 2018 15:30:15 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/4-review-techniques-to-get-you-ready-for-any-exam https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/4-review-techniques-to-get-you-ready-for-any-exam A Comprehensive Review of Test Prep Strategies

How ready are you for your upcoming exams? Honing your test taking skills will prepare you for exams in your high school courses as well as any achievement exams you will take this year. Focusing now on your test taking skills will pay off in the long run as you approach each exam with confidence in your abilities.

The staff at Huntington Learning Centers has helped thousands of students improve their test taking strategies. Some of our favorite strategies include:

  1. Understanding the directions Each exam is different and has its own testing guidelines. It's important to do your research before exam day arrives to ensure you understand these guidelines. Pay attention to what is allowed in the testing center, your time limitations, and what portions of the testing materials you may write in, complete your work, or jot notes.
  2. Using your time wisely Standardized achievement tests all have time limits that must be strictly adhered to. Knowing your time limits is important but you should also focus on using every minute wisely. If a question is posing a particular problem, skip it, answer the questions that you're      more confident in and return to answer it later. You should also check for errors, reread written passages, and scan your math work until time is called.
  3. Finding strategies that work for you No two students are alike and during your preparation you'll find specific test taking strategies that are most effective for you. A good way to discover strategies that work for you is to take several practice exams before testing day. You'll learn about the layout and content of the exam while discovering how you work best. Some students like to jot notes as they read while others prefer to read all of the questions before turning their attention to the corresponding written passage.
  4. Checking for errors Identifying errors is crucial to your success. Several times during the testing session make sure that your response sheet corresponds with the exam questions. This mistake is much easier to solve if you identify your errors early. Double check that you have followed all of the testing guidelines, erased any errant marks, and answered every question.

Huntington Learning Centers provides comprehensive test prep review and test taking strategies for achievement exams. Our tutors are specially trained to provide general strategies and test specific information for a variety of exams, including:

  • SAT: The SAT Exam is an achievement exam that plays an important role in determining college admission and scholarship opportunities. The SAT Exam is offered on seven testing dates each year and most students take the exam during their junior year with the option to retest
    during senior year.
  • ACT: The ACT Exam is an achievement exam that is offered six times each school year and is designed to assess a student's academic achievement and readiness for college. Results from the ACT Exam are typically used to help determine college admission and are accepted by all four year universities and colleges in the United States.
  • PSAT: Most students take the PSAT in October of their junior year in high school. It is similar to the SAT exam and is a good indicator of a student's potential on the SAT. Academic organizations, such as the National Merit Scholarship Program, award scholarships based on PSAT scores.
  • SAT Subject Tests: In recent years the College Board began offering individual subject area tests as part of the SAT exam. These tests are designed for students to display the specific knowledge they have gained during their high school courses. Colleges use the SAT Subject Tests to form admission decisions, determine readiness, and place students in courses.
  • AP Exams: After completing a year-long AP course students have the opportunity to sit for a subject specific AP Exam. These exams cover college level material and are typically taken to highlight a student's knowledge and earn college credit. There are 31 AP Exams offered in the five general subject areas of science, math, history, language, and English.
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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates the National Education Association's Read Across America Day Our tutors strive to make learning fun for students. Huntington offers these tips for parents to help get children excited about reading.

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Thu, 01 Mar 2018 17:42:45 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ —On March 2, 2018, Huntington Learning Center will join millions of teachers and administrators, librarians, higher education faculty, education support professionals, students, and members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate Read Across America Day, which marks the 113th birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as beloved children's author, Dr. Seuss.

"Literacy is the foundation of learning and the most essential building block in a child's education," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Read Across America is one of our favorite national celebrations because not only does it bring attention to the importance of reading as an academic and life skill, it reminds us all that reading is fun. Dr. Seuss's books revolutionized storytelling and continue to show readers of all ages that reading is one of life's great pastimes."

How can parents encourage their children to get excited about reading? Huntington offers these tips:

  • Let your child choose books about subjects that interest him or her.
  • Continue trying new types of books to give your child opportunities to discover that favorite book or author.
  • Select books that your child can read successfully. Choosing books that he or she struggles to read will only prove discouraging.
  • Read aloud to your child, even if they are in middle school.  It is a great way for them to have 1:1 time with you and you can create excitement about the book.
  • Help your reluctant reader find books he or she likes. This may involve some trial and error, but talk with your librarian for ideas and look specifically for book series and lists designed for students who are below-grade-level or reluctant readers.
  • Reward reading. If your child needs a little encouragement, incentivize him or her for reading each day. The more your child reads, the more successful he or she will become—and the more likely he or she will want to read more.
  • Make reading a part of everyday life at home.
  • Have your child see you reading every day.  It shows reading is an important part of your life.
  • Make reading fun, and don't force it. Follow your child's lead when it comes to selecting books, even if it means letting him or her choose a comic book over a novel, or a book that's below his or her ability over one that challenges him or her.

 

For more information about Read Across America Day, visit www.nea.org/readacross

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Read Across America Day Calling all children, parents and others who love to read: March 2, 2017, is Read Across America Day. Huntington Learning Center joins millions of elementary and secondary teachers, administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, librarians, students and others in the education industry as well as members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate this annual literary event, now in its 20th year.

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Thu, 01 Mar 2018 17:37:46 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/readacrossamericamarch2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/readacrossamericamarch2017 Calling all children, parents and others who love to read: March 2, 2017, is Read Across America Day. Huntington Learning Center joins millions of elementary and secondary teachers, administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, librarians, students and others in the education industry as well as members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate this annual literary event, now in its 20th year.

Read Across America Day also marks the birthday of revered children’s author, Theodor Seuss Geisel: the beloved and prolific Dr. Seuss. The celebration’s goal is to inspire children and adults alike to read by offering reading resources and organizing fun events and activities. While March 2 is the official day of celebration, the NEA strives to build a nation of readers all year long—through events, partnerships and a range of reading resources that make reading more enjoyable and accessible for everyone.

Everyone at Huntington loves Read Across America Day because it is a day that we join our community members and celebrate reading for the entertaining and worthwhile escape that it is. A good book can inspire the mind and nurture the soul. We stand behind the NEA’s goal with this annual celebration of one of the world’s most influential authors to help more children discover new knowledge and adventure through books.

Here are several suggestions for parents to encourage their children to read:

  • Visit the library often. The library is free for everyone—take advantage of the books, e-books and other resources that it offers. Most libraries also host many activities for children of all ages. Make visiting the library a weekly tradition.
  • Download a free e-reader app. Open eBooks puts books in the hands of everyone. Learn more about President Obama’s ConnectED initiative to make books available to all children and how to download and use Open eBooks.
  • Have a happy reading hour. When everyone in your household gets into the habit of reading, your child will be more likely to associate it with fun family time. Spend time together at least a few nights a week with books, blankets and mugs of hot chocolate.
  • Engage with other readers. Part of the joy of reading is talking about the stories you’re reading. Websites like Goodreads are a wonderful way for children to engage with peers and share their thoughts about the books they’re enjoying and seek book recommendations. Ask your child’s teacher about book clubs or groups through school, too.
  • Try it all. Magazines, comic books, newspapers and blogs—these are all great ways to engage reluctant readers who are less enthusiastic about books for one reason or another. Remember that reading is reading. If your child isn’t excited about books, there are many other ways to get him or her reading, so keep trying.

To learn more about Read Across America or to get involved, visit www.nea.org/readacross. For more reading tips and ideas, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

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5 Ways to Draw Out Your Child's Creativity When children are very young, they are naturally curious, inventing games, songs and stories, seeking answers to endless questions, and much more. Yet as children become older, some lose some of their creativity. Instead, they look to teachers and parents for direction and approval, concerning themselves with "right" answers instead of appreciating the process by which they come to conclusions.

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Tue, 20 Feb 2018 16:10:46 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-ways-to-draw-out-your-childs-creativity https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-ways-to-draw-out-your-childs-creativity When children are very young, they are naturally curious, inventing games, songs and stories, seeking answers to endless questions, and much more. Yet as children become older, some lose some of their creativity. Instead, they look to teachers and parents for direction and approval, concerning themselves with "right" answers instead of appreciating the process by which they come to conclusions.

However, creative thinking is incredibly valuable and teaches children to enjoy learning for learning's sake, which will generally result in a more successful student. How can you encourage your child to think creatively? Here are 5 ways you can draw out your child's creativity:

  1. Creative Teaching: Expose your child to a variety of creative people. Take your child to open mic night at the coffee shop or to a local art gallery to watch an artist sculpt or paint. If you're a woodworker, gardener or knitter, show your child what you do and invite him or her to participate. Showing your child the many different types of things he or she can do—from art to music, from science to writing—and introducing him or her to people who enjoy and excel at those things will encourage him or her to attempt new undertakings.
  2. Let your child experiment. Whatever the activity, let your child be his or her own guide in their creative process. Let your budding cook make up recipes in the kitchen. Offer tools and supplies, and let your child create whatever he or she can imagine. The more you encourage your child to choose activities and support him or her in developing new interests and skills, the better.
  3. Offer quiet time. From a young age, set aside free time each day for your child to play independently—doing whatever he or she chooses. Better yet, designate quiet time as a family activity. While your child gets out his or her Lego's, why not work on your scrapbook? Giving your child opportunities to explore will also fuel his or her inquisitiveness and help him or her become self-reliant.
  4. Try games or creative thinking activities that teach problem-solving. Games like chess, Battleship and Risk teach creativity and strategy, showing children how to consider multiple scenarios, weigh pros and cons, and debate different ideas. Games like Scrabble can help a child develop their word creativity. Try open-ended games that offer children opportunities to think creatively and use their imaginations. For further reading, here's some advice on how parents can support their 21st century learners.
  5. Ask why. When your child asks you to double-check his or her work, have him or her explain how he or she arrived at the answer, step by step. When your child shares an idea or opinion, ask why. How did he or she develop that opinion? Why does he or she feel differently than you or a friend? Why is this important to him or her?

Fostering creativity in your child leads to many important benefits. Your curious learner is more likely to challenge him or herself, learn from his or her mistakes, question assumptions and think critically. Such skills will help your child grow into an independent student and a lifelong learner.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates 21st Annual Read Across America Day On March 2, 2018, Huntington Learning Center will join millions of teachers and administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, students, and members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate Read Across America Day. This date also marks the birth of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as beloved children’s author, Dr. Seuss.

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Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:14:42 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america-2018 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/read-across-america-2018 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center On March 2, 2018, Huntington Learning Center will join millions of teachers and administrators, higher education faculty, education support professionals, students, and members of the National Education Association (NEA) to celebrate Read Across America Day. This date also marks the birth of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as beloved children’s author, Dr. Seuss.

Now in its 21st year, Read Across America Day is an annual literary event that inspires children and adults to embrace reading as a wonderful pastime. To commemorate the day, the NEA and its partners offer reading resources and organize a range of events and activities. Throughout the year, the NEA also fosters reading by promoting events, partnerships and resources that make reading more accessible and enjoyable for everyone.

“We’re proud to celebrate Read Across America Day and excited to join the members of our community in sharing the importance and joy of reading,” says CEO & Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Dr. Seuss inspired children everywhere with his fun and adventurous stories. On March 2 and all year long, Huntington strives to promote reading as an activity that helps students do better in school as well as something they can enjoy the rest of their lives.”

Huntington offers several suggestions for parents to encourage their children to read:

  • Be a good role model by reading as a family together and making sure your child sees you enjoying reading in your free time.
  • Talk about books at the dinner table. Engage with your child about his or her book and any favorite characters or parts. Part of the fun of reading for children, after all, is sharing thoughts and excitement when something good happens in a story. Be a listening ear.
  • Set aside an area in the home for quiet reading and relaxation. Make sure to have at least one distraction-free zone where your entire family can curl up with your books on a nightly basis.
  • Get involved in reading activities at the library or in your community. The library should have a range of activities and events for your child to enjoy like book clubs and read-a-thons.
  • Make it fun. Set the tone that reading is a special thing that your child can do and not a punishment of any kind. The more you can encourage your child to see reading as a “get to” and not a “have to,” the better.
  • Don’t restrict. As long as your child is reading, don’t be too picky about what. Magazines, comic books, newspapers and blogs are all great for reluctant readers. In other words, don’t give up if your child doesn’t take to classics or books assigned in school. Keep trying different formats and types of reading materials.

Learn more about Read Across America at www.nea.org/readacross. For more reading tips and ideas, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Building Children’s Confidence in School School doesn’t come easy for every child. It can be a challenging experience, and one that requires persistence and patience. Unfortunately, however, when school work becomes overly difficult, many children lose faith in themselves as students. Left uncorrected, this can have a lasting detrimental effect on a child’s performance in school and overall attitude and demeanor. To pave the way for school success, parents should work to build their children’s self-confidence. Confident children do not shy away from hard work and will generally see failure as an opportunity to make changes and try again. How can you develop your child’s confidence? Here are several tips:

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Mon, 26 Feb 2018 13:02:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-build-self-confidence-in-a-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-build-self-confidence-in-a-child Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington School doesn’t come easy for every child. It can be a challenging experience, and one that requires persistence and patience. Unfortunately, however, when school work becomes overly difficult, many children lose faith in themselves as students. Left uncorrected, this can have a lasting detrimental effect on a child’s performance in school and overall attitude and demeanor. To pave the way for school success, parents should work to build their children’s self-confidence. Confident children do not shy away from hard work and will generally see failure as an opportunity to make changes and try again. How can you develop your child’s confidence? Here are several tips:

Be supportive. Children typically trust what their parents say as the truth, so it’s essential that parents regularly let them know that they believe in their abilities. To grow into capable, confident students, children need to feel supported by parents, not controlled. Let your child take the reins on homework and school and be on hand for help.

Work together on goal setting. The process of goal setting helps children take control of their success, resulting in a greater willingness to attempt hard things and increased confidence that their efforts will yield good results. Encourage your child to lay out what he or she wants to achieve and the barriers standing in the way, as well as a plan to work around those obstacles.

Foster independence. Whenever possible, parents should offer their children the chance to make decisions for themselves. Set high but achievable expectations, then put trust in your child to tackle tasks on his or her own—from homework to household chores. This will cultivate your child’s sense of responsibility. Every accomplishment, however small or routine, gives your child the assurance that he or she is capable.

Encourage doing new things. Parents who nudge their children to put themselves out there to try things—from joining a new club to taking challenging classes—are helping them grow and adapt to new situations. Always support your child’s attempts to acquire new skills and learn from challenging endeavors.

While parents cannot simply make their children confident, they can take note of their children’s strengths and encourage them to work hard, take initiative, persevere, and learn from their mistakes. These types of actions inspire children to go for what they want and strive to improve themselves as students and people, taking calculated risks along the way. Confidence, after all, is one of the building blocks for academic achievement. By making your child feel empowered and skilled, you are equipping him or her with the tools for lifelong school and career success.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2018 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc. 

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Encouraging Your Teen to Read “Reading is a wonderful pastime for children of all ages, and one of our goals at Huntington is to help students become the best readers they can be so that reading becomes an activity of choice,” says  Eileen Huntington, CEO and co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Parents can promote reading among teens by teaming up with educators and librarians to find ways to transform teens into lifelong readers. " 

Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to nurture reading as a part of their teen’s life. Huntington offers a few tips to promote reading at home:

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Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:01:32 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/encouraging_your_teen_to_read https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/encouraging_your_teen_to_read Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington Is your teen struggling to pick up a book lately? With a teens busy schedule it becomes hard to find time to read. Finding the right books can be discouraging for a teen as well.  

“Reading is a wonderful pastime for children of all ages, and one of our goals at Huntington is to help students become the best readers they can be so that reading becomes an activity of choice,” says  Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Parents can promote reading among teens by teaming up with educators and librarians to find ways to transform teens into lifelong readers.”

Huntington reminds parents that reading for fun has an ulterior effect: it strengthens this foundational skill for effective learning. “The more students read, the more proficient at it they become, which typically results in stronger school performance overall,” Huntington explains. “We find that children and teens who enjoy reading are also better able to employ reading as a tool for learning new information.”

Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to nurture reading as a part of their teen’s life. Huntington offers a few tips to promote reading at home:

  • Introduce your teen to your favorites. As your teen moves toward young adulthood, he or she might yearn for books with more captivating plots—maybe even some of the books you have enjoyed as an adult. Suggest a favorite or two with appropriate subject matter.
  • Let your teen see you reading. It’s hard to convince a teen that reading is worthwhile if he or she rarely sees you doing it. Incorporate reading into your own daily routine, perhaps at the same time of day that you encourage your teen to read.
  • Try books related to interests. A busy teen might easily brush aside reading for other activities, but you might have luck finding books that are related to his or her budding interests. Check out autobiographies of athletes, musicians or celebrities that your teen admires, or get ideas from your librarian of books related to high-interest topics for teens.
  • Suggest “movie” books. If your teen is a movie buff, there’s a plethora of novels-turned-films that might pique his or her interest. If you learn of a movie coming out that is based on a book, try reading the book together and planning an outing on premiere night.
  • Don’t skip that regular library trip. Even as your teen’s schedule becomes busier, continue to make going to the library once every week or two a regular outing.
  • Create a home library. If you have space for a bookshelf in your teen’s room (or even in your living room or study) put your books on display. This ensures that no matter what, your teen always has access to reading material—and it sends the important message that reading matters to your family and good books should be cherished.
  • Help your teen start a book club. Have your child organize a group of his or her friends getting together monthly or weekly to talk about books.  Teens value the input of their peers.  Discussions about books being read, whether in school or at home, can inspire members of the group to want to dive into that book.

Huntington Learning Center offers individualized tutoring programs in reading, phonics and many other subjects. To learn more about how Huntington helps children and teens become stronger readers and students, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.  

 

 

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Tips to Prepare High School Students for College-Level Reading As students mature, they learn how to study effectively and build those ever-important test-taking strategies for high school. By the time strong students begin thinking about how to study for the SAT or ACT, they’ve acquired many of the subject skills they need to perform well, but a good SAT or ACT score is not a guarantee of college success. As Eileen Huntington, CEO & Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center explains, high-achieving high school students often struggle to adapt to the rigors of college right away—especially when it comes to reading. “College is a whole new ballgame in terms of expectations and workload, and one of the biggest differences is the way students are expected to read and study material,” he/she says. How can students prepare for college-level reading? Huntington offers these tips:

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Mon, 26 Feb 2018 12:53:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-prepare-high-school-students-for-college-level-reading https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-prepare-high-school-students-for-college-level-reading Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center As students mature, they learn how to study effectively and build those ever-important test-taking strategies for high school. By the time strong students begin thinking about how to study for the SAT or ACT, they’ve acquired many of the subject skills they need to perform well, but a good SAT or ACT score is not a guarantee of college success. As Eileen Huntington, CEO & Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center explains, high-achieving high school students often struggle to adapt to the rigors of college right away—especially when it comes to reading. “College is a whole new ballgame in terms of expectations and workload, and one of the biggest differences is the way students are expected to read and study material,” he/she says. How can students prepare for college-level reading? Huntington offers these tips:

Think critically while reading. In college, professors expect students to have a variety of reading strategies in their skillset toolbox. Examples include reading for information, reading to form an opinion, reading to recall facts, and reading to summarize or understand the big picture. It’s essential that high school students strengthen their critical thinking skills while reading so that they can analyze that which they read in different ways.

Expand the vocabulary. The more high school students read, the better. Reading a wide variety of materials—from books to essays to newspapers to blogs—helps students acquire new vocabulary, which will help them in college. It’s also important for students to learn to embrace the dictionary and the thesaurus, which will help them get into the habit of looking up unfamiliar words and different word choices for common words.

Interpret. There’s no place for passive reading in college. Students should strengthen their analytic reading by breaking down complex passages. They must practice figuring out an author’s purpose and drawing their own conclusions. When reading, students need to think deeply about how they feel about texts and how an author’s approach does or does not influence their feelings and opinions.

Read with depth. In college, students are expected to read with depth so that they have a strong understanding of texts and can talk intelligently about them. Students should read to understand and reread if necessary to ensure they are able to share their opinions on the text, predict what might happen next, summarize the main points, and more.

If you are concerned about your teen’s ability to keep up with college-level reading, call Huntington. We can help assess where your teen is falling short and help him or her develop reliable strategies to read complex texts, analyze thoroughly, maximize comprehension and excel in classes.  

 

Huntington also offers an Advanced Study Skills program for students at the high school and college level.   Study skills are key! In order to be successful, students must have the tools necessary to effectively acquire, retrieve, analyze, and communicate information. Huntington will teach students higher-level strategies and concepts that are necessary to study efficiently and effectively.  Your child will focus on a range of study skills while learning how to apply these skills to study independently at home.

 

Call 1 800 CAN LEARN to learn more about how we prepare high school students for college and career success in reading and all subject areas.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Building A Child's Home Library You may have heard the statistic before that owning many books is strongly correlated with higher test scores. That's reason enough to build a home library. So, how do you go about creating a collection of books for your child to choose from when reading? Here are a few tips:

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Wed, 07 Feb 2018 17:26:26 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/building_a_childs_home_library https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/building_a_childs_home_library Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington You may have heard the statistic before that owning many books is strongly correlated with higher test scores. If that's not reason enough to build a home library, here are a few more:
  • Your child will always have access to reading material that he or she enjoys.
  • Your child may get excited about having books of his or her own.
  • Collecting books can become a source of pride (for favorite books read) and excitement (for books to be read). 
  • Your child will get the sense that reading is important to your family.
  • Never again will your child be able to say that he or she has nothing to read.

So, how do you go about creating a collection of books for your child to choose from when reading? Here are a few tips:

Go for quality. Some books possess certain attributes that make them appealing to teachers, children and parents alike. These books are not only well written, they might share important messages or themes, and even change readers' perceptions of various events or topics. Try incorporating a few such books into your child's home library. The American Library Association Children's Book Council periodically releases a list of high-quality books (by age) that your child might want to try: http://www.cbcbooks.org/building-a-home-library.

Pique the interests. What are some of your child's favorite activities, sports or other extracurricular activities? Search for books on these topics, or talk with your local librarian or bookseller for suggestions. If you're unsure, talk with your child. Instead of asking what kinds of books he or she likes, talk about current events, past events, people, subjects or other topics, and take note of what intrigues your child. The Children's Book Council search tool will help you look for books by age, format and genre. http://www.cbcbooks.org/book-search/

Incorporate recommended titles. Seek out recommendations from your child's peers. Each year, the International Literacy Association and the Children's Book Council survey tens of thousands of readers in the U.S. to assemble a list of favorites. Sit down with your child to peruse this list together: http://www.cbcbooks.org/childrens-choices. For teens, Literacy Worldwide's annual Young Adults' Choices list compiles popular reader-selected books. Perhaps some of these titles will grab your child's interest: http://www.literacyworldwide.org/get-resources/reading-lists/young-adults-choices-reading-list.

Give a book allowance. Get your child involved in selecting the contents of his or her home library by establishing a reward system in which your child can earn new reading material. Establish weekly or monthly goals so that as your child finishes books, he or she can pick out new ones during a special monthly outing to the bookstore. Setting up reading as a privilege instead of a have-to will make it seem exciting and fun.

If your child seems more intimidated by reading than excited about it, there may be a reason. Explore the issue with Huntington—we can help uncover the root of the problem and uncover skill gaps that might be holding your child back. Call us at 1-800-CAN LEARN to talk about how we can help your child become a better reader and student.

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How Parents Can Work on Reading Comprehension with their Child Have you noticed that your child is capable of reading, but has trouble recalling what he or she reads, even immediately thereafter? “A few of the basics of good reading are strong decoding ability, recognition of high-frequency and irregular words, and good comprehension,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Without these building blocks, a child will never achieve reading fluency and will likely always struggle with reading.” Luckily, Huntington says there are a number of things parents can do to help their children better comprehend what they read. Here are several tips:

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Thu, 08 Feb 2018 09:53:00 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-parents-can-work-on-reading-comprehension-with-their-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-parents-can-work-on-reading-comprehension-with-their-child Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington Have you noticed that your child is capable of reading, but has trouble recalling what he or she reads, even immediately thereafter? "A few of the basics of good reading are strong decoding ability, recognition of high-frequency and irregular words, and good comprehension," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center. "Without these building blocks, a child will never achieve reading fluency and will likely always struggle with reading." Luckily, Huntington says there are a number of things parents can do to help their children better comprehend what they read. Here are several tips:

Teach your child to question. If your child reads something and doesn't understand it, encourage him or her to think about why. What part is confusing? How can he or she clarify that part? Does re-reading help? Talking through it aloud? Is there information missing that would help him or her understand better?

Use visuals to understand the story. After a chapter in a story, have your child write down three things that happened and the effect or consequence resulting from them. Use flash cards to chart sequences of events—what happened first? And after that? Have your child identify the beginning, middle and ending of a story.

Help your child relate the story to him or herself. Ask your child what he or she thinks about a character's behavior. Has your child ever felt the same way the character feels? How is a situation in the story similar to (or different than) a situation in your child's own life?

Summarize often. Whether reading a textbook or a story, have your child periodically summarize what he or she reads. What's the general idea of the passage? What was the main point or idea of the chapter he or she just read? How would he or she explain it in a few sentences to someone who is unfamiliar with the story?

You can reinforce the comprehension strategies that are taught in the classroom by practicing them with your child at home. "The important thing is to teach your child to think while he or she is reading and to recognize when something doesn't make sense," says Huntington. "Reading comprehension is one of the keys to becoming a good student and will play a significant role throughout the rest of your child's life."

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5 Tips to Write a Great College Application Essay If you’re the parent of a college-bound student, you know well all that goes into the college admissions process. From taking the SAT or ACT to the researching of colleges, there’s a lot to do in a relatively short amount of time. But what about the application essay? “If the college to which your teen is applying requires or strongly recommends that he or she write an essay, there are a number of things your teen can do to put his or her best foot forward,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. Here are five tips:

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Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:53:02 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-writing-a-great-college-application-essay https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-writing-a-great-college-application-essay Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center If you’re the parent of a college-bound student, you know well all that goes into the college admissions process. From taking the SAT or ACT to the researching of colleges, there’s a lot to do in a relatively short amount of time. But what about the application essay? “If the college to which your teen is applying requires or strongly recommends that he or she write an essay, there are a number of things your teen can do to put his or her best foot forward,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. Here are five tips:

  1. Put thought into choosing the right topic. Most colleges' essay prompts are open ended, as admissions officers generally hope that students will give good thought to selecting a topic that shows who they are and what they are capable of. Encourage your teen to be authentic and introspective, to think about what he or she is proud of and passionate about as well as life experiences that have required your teen to work harder, overcome setbacks or change. Remind your teen that the goal isn't to impress the college with a laundry list of achievements, but rather, to present oneself in a way that is different than what the admissions officer would find on a transcript.
  2. Follow the directions. The essay is your teen's chance to engage in thoughtful self-expression, but it isn't the place to ramble about why a college is your teen's dream school or explore tangents about his or her life or feelings. Remind your teen to carefully read and ponder the essay prompt given by the college. Don't disregard any instructions. If there's a word count, stick to it. If specific questions are asked, be sure your teen submits something that answers them.
  3. Create a detailed outline first. Rarely do words flow together to create a compelling essay without sufficient planning. Your teen must spend time creating an outline with a beginning, middle and ending. The outline should include good examples and clearly show how the essay will move from start to finish. Before your teen starts writing, have him or her review and edit the outline if needed. Are there gaps in the story? Is the main takeaway of the essay clear from the outline?
  4. Allow plenty of time for multiple drafts. It's understandable that your teen might be focused on preparing for the SAT or ACT and narrowing down colleges and universities of interest, but it's critical to allow time to craft a well-written essay—and revise it. If an application is due January 1, a sample timeline might be creating the outline by November 1, first draft by November 10, second draft by November 20 and final draft in early December. This allows your teen time to set the essay aside for a couple of weeks and read it with fresh eyes (and proofread and fine-tune if necessary).
  5. Edit like a pro. Speaking of drafts, your teen might question the suggestion that an essay requires rewriting several times. Yes, it's true. A great essay takes writing, revising and revising again. Encourage your teen to do the obvious—proofread for errors and edit wordy or confusing sections—but a great self-editor should ask questions while reviewing as well, such as:

• Does the essay hook the reader from the very start?
• What’s the point of the essay and did I capture it effectively?
• Is any part of the essay too long or too rushed?
• Is there a clear conflict that caused me to change in some specific way or take a new path?
• Did I achieve the desired tone for the essay (moving or humorous, for example)?
• Does the voice sound and feel like me?
• For each and every sentence, could I say it better or more clearly?

The college application essay is the chance to show an admissions officer who your teen is as a student and a person—beyond his or her transcript and test scores. It’s a personal statement that should come from the heart and share with the college to which your teen is applying why he or she would be a great fit as a student there. Your teen should be sincere and articulate and remember that a college’s goal in requesting supplemental essays from applicants is to give them the chance to tell the college something about themselves. This is a powerful opportunity—encourage your teen to put his or her best foot forward.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Six Best Practices for Broadening your Vocabulary It's important for students to be continually building up their vocabularies over time.

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Wed, 24 Jan 2018 09:36:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-best-practices-for-broadening-your-vocabulary https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-best-practices-for-broadening-your-vocabulary Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Six Best Practices for Broadening your Vocabulary

 It's important for students to be continually building up their vocabularies over time. Having a comprehensive vocabulary means you'll have an easier time understanding and responding to standardized test questions; it helps you to write more coherently; it also aids in reading comprehension to help better absorb learning materials. Expanding your vocabulary is something you should never stop doing.

 If you're looking for ways to broaden your verbal horizons, here are a few things you can do:

1. Read More Often

The easiest way to learn new words is through context – by exposing yourself to new words within a sentence or paragraph. As you read books, essays, and even test questions, pay attention to the words you don't know and try to derive their meanings from how they're used. Then, look up their definitions. Gradually start introducing more challenging material into your reading list for best results.

2. Put New Words to Use

When you learn a new word, make a mental note of it, what it means, and how it's used. Then, try using it yourself. Incorporate it into an essay response or simply use it in conversation. This will make it a more natural component of your vocabulary and help to ensure you don't forget its definition. 

3. Make Associations

If you're having trouble remembering what a word means, associate it with something similar. For example, "gargantuan" sounds like "gigantic" and they have essentially the same meaning. You can also rhyme it with words that will help you remember its definition, or even associate it with a proper noun if that helps. Use mnemonics, or memory tricks, to make funny associations that you'll never forget. 

4. Take Advantage of Challenging Situations

Throughout school and work, you're going to be put in a lot of challenging situations. For example, you might have to take a standardized test or write a dissertation. If this is the case, take it as an opportunity to learn new things. Enroll yourself in an SAT/ACT prep course or try to explain what you're writing about to your peers as a form of practice.

5. Play Word Games

Expanding your vocabulary can be fun! Scrabble, Boggle, and crossword puzzles are a great way to learn new words and dredge up old ones that you haven't used in a while. You might have to bring out the dictionary to see if that 20-point word is legitimate, but it's rewarding when it is!

6. Sign up for a 'Word of the Day' E-mail

Many dictionary sites, like Merriam-Webster, will send you a Word of the Day when you subscribe to their e-mail list. Learn something new every day!

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Ways a Tutor Can Help a Student De-Stress about Calculus Just mention the word calculus and you might notice that your high school student will quickly want to change the subject.

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Fri, 02 Feb 2018 16:09:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/ways-a-tutor-can-help-a-student-destress-about-calculus https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/ways-a-tutor-can-help-a-student-destress-about-calculus Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Ways a Tutor Can Help a Student De-Stress about Calculus

 Just mention the word calculus and you might notice that your high school student will quickly want to change the subject. The truth is that pre-calculus and calculus can be quite intimidating for students. Some might find it too difficult, and as the concepts become more complicated, they'll begin to retreat before they even try to understand them. Others might just find math of any kind boring and prefer other subjects. If pre-calculus and calculus are overwhelming for your child, he or she might be a good candidate for calculus help from a tutor. Here are some ways a tutor can help your student see calculus in a new light:

Adapt to a Particular Learning Style: Conceptualizing complex subjects can be difficult when they are being taught to a large group of students. Some students are auditory learners and can learn just by listening to a lecture; others are technical learners and need to practice in order to make sense of a concept. A teacher might not be able to reach each and every single student, and will only know if someone is having trouble after a couple of less-than-stellar quizzes or tests. Using one-on-one communication and lessons tailored to a student’s learning style, a tutor might be able to reach a student in a way that's just not possible in the classroom.

Show Where Calculus Is Used in Everyday Life and Careers: If algebra deals with how numbers relate to each other, it could be said that calculus is defined by the relationships of equations. With that in mind, concepts of pre-calculus and calculus can be used in a variety of careers and everyday life, especially if a student aspires to an engineering or science career. When a tutor points out ways calculus concepts can be used outside of the classroom, it can help to improve a student’s motivation and understanding.

Organization: One-on-one tutoring sessions help create regularity in a student's schedule, enabling them to devote more time to their calculus studies. Pre-calculus and calculus build on concepts and require a strong foundation. A student that falls behind early in their studies will not be able to move on to new concepts. With regular sessions, students can focus on their homework and prepare for tests, so they can stay on top of what is going on in the classroom.

For more information about how a tutor can help your child fret less about calculus, please contact a Huntington representative today!

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HELP YOUR CHILD BUILD A WINNING WAY WITH WORDS Solid reading skills are vital for success on many of the tests your child will take between Kindergarten and high school graduation - including the SAT and ACT. Students therefore need to possess a strong vocabulary and be confident in their ability to discern the meanings of many words. Here are some tips for building word power:

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Fri, 19 Jan 2018 16:03:59 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-build-a-winning-way-with-words https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-build-a-winning-way-with-words Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington 1. Read extensively. Whether your child is enjoying the adventures of Ernest Hemingway or reading books about his or her favorite subject or hobby, viewing words in the context of a narrative builds an intuitive understanding of their meanings. Your son might simply shrug when seeing the words "gargantuan" and "gilded" on a vocabulary test, for example, but he'll probably understand the meaning right away if he's reading a passage that notes "With more than 2,200 passengers, including a dozen millionaires, on board for what was supposed to be the fastest-ever Atlantic crossing, the gargantuan Titanic was the most technologically advanced maritime vessel of the Gilded Age."

2. Learn how to "decode" words. Students can make a well-educated guess about a word's meaning by recognizing certain clues. One of the most effective strategies is to understand the meanings of common prefixes and suffixes. A few examples include:

Un - which generally means "not," as in unacceptable, unusual and unaware
Re - which usually means "again," as in return, remember and reiterate
In, and im - which usually refer to something being "in" or "not," as in ineligible, immutable and implausible
Inter, which commonly means "between," as in interloper, or intervention
Dis - which usually means "apart," as in disassociate, dissension and disagree
Sym and syn, which refer to being "together," as in symmetrical and synergy

Common suffixes - meaning letters at the end of words - will provide clues as well. When you see the letters "less" at the end of a word, the word will often mean something related to "without," as in hopeless, thoughtless and careless. "Ful" refers to being "full," as in hopeful, helpful and thoughtful.

3. Make flashcards of new words. Once your child learns the most common prefixes, suffixes and word roots, he or she can use www.dictionary.com or a regular dictionary along with reading assignments to learn words that incorporate them. Try setting a goal - such as learning five new words a day for five days a week. Once your child finds a new word, he or she should make a flash card, with the word on one side and the definition on the other. Your son or daughter should then keep the flashcards on hand and run through them often to strengthen familiarity with the words. Setting a goal to learn five new words a day for five days a week can boost your child's vocabulary by 200 words in just two months.

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How Does Your Child Learn Best? It doesn't take an education professional to know that when it comes to learning, each person is unique.

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Wed, 17 Jan 2018 10:03:52 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-does-your-child-learn-best https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-does-your-child-learn-best Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Does Your Child Learn Best?

It doesn’t take an education professional to know that when it comes to learning, each person is unique. As a parent, it’s not just helpful to know more about how your child learns—it’s essential. You’ve probably heard before about learning styles, which are often explained through different theories and models. Here are a few well-known types that suggest how students might approach learning tasks:

The VARK model – This commonly cited model examines learning style through the senses:

  • Visual learners learn best through the use of visual aids, diagrams, or other visual tools other than words.
  • Auditory learners process best through listening, reading aloud and talking about ideas.
  • Read/write learners prefer taking in information through the texts which they read.
  • Kinesthetic learners prefer using their hands or body to learn by “doing.”

The Experiential Learning Model – This model considers learning as a cycle that begins with a concrete experience, moves into reflective observation to understand the meaning of things from different viewpoints, abstract conceptualization to analyze a situation, and active experimentation to reinforce learning through action. In short, the cycles are feeling, watching, thinking and doing. 

You can work with your school’s guidance counseling office to arrange for your child to take one or more learning assessments to better understand his or her learning style. However, you can still get a good idea of how your child learns, the types of environments that suit him or her best, and more by asking the right questions and being observant. Start with these topics for discussion with your child:

When does your child seem to absorb information? While reading? While being read to? While talking things through?

How and where does your child prefer to do homework? Is your child most focused when listening to music? In a quiet space? When studying alone, or with siblings?

When does your child seem the most productive? In the morning or at night? Immediately after school or after dinner?

What seems to be the best way for your child to grasp new information? Through reading? Visual aids? By watching someone else do something first?

What are your child’s best subjects? What concepts are easiest and hardest for your child? What does the teacher think? Why does your child prefer certain subjects over others?

What environments get your child most excited about learning? Indoor or outdoor? Smaller classes or larger ones? Classes with frequent group discussions or those where students learn independently?

Getting to know your child as a student is valuable because it will help you work effectively with his or her teacher when issues arise. Just as important, you will be better equipped to nurture your child’s strengths and guide your child toward overcoming weaknesses. If you need help, contact Huntington. We can assess your child’s learning style and preferences and academic strengths and weaknesses and develop a program of instruction to help your child become the best student possible. Call us at 800-CAN-LEARN.   

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Four Things Colleges Are Looking For When college is on the horizon for your high school student, it’s easy to get overwhelmed thinking about the entire process. From researching financial aid to exploring schools to applying, there’s a lot to do in a relatively short period of time. Keeping the big picture in mind is important, says Co-Founder and CEO Elieen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Parents and students can easily get bogged down with the ‘college tasks,’ but forget to focus on what really matters,” she says. “Teens should put most of their effort toward being the best student they can be in order to be attractive candidates for admission to the colleges to which they apply.”

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Wed, 17 Jan 2018 16:22:15 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-colleges-look-for https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-colleges-look-for Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When college is on the horizon for your high school student, it’s easy to get overwhelmed thinking about the entire process. From researching financial aid to exploring schools to applying, there’s a lot to do in a relatively short period of time. Keeping the big picture in mind is important, says Co-Founder and CEO Elieen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “Parents and students can easily get bogged down with the ‘college tasks,’ but forget to focus on what really matters,” she says. “Teens should put most of their effort toward being the best student they can be in order to be attractive candidates for admission to the colleges to which they apply.”

And what exactly are colleges looking for? Here are four of the most important student traits, as detailed in the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) 2017 edition of the State of College Admission report:

Strong grades – No surprise, the NACAC reports that grades, admissions officers’ top decision factor for first-time college students, are extremely important to colleges. This includes both grades in college preparatory classes as well as all other classes. And don’t think that all As are created equal. Your teen’s strength of curriculum matters as well—meaning, admissions officers will look for Advanced Placement classes, honors classes, International Baccalaureate, and other similar classes that give them an idea how your teen might perform at college.

SAT or ACT scores – While a student’s GPA is one important measure of achievement, his or her scores on a standardized college admissions exam are another good way to assess knowledge of the subjects needed for college. These exams also are intended to evaluate readiness for college, measuring students’ ability to apply what they learn in school outside of the classroom.

Writing skills – Not all colleges require an admissions essay, but those that do so are looking to get to know prospective students “off paper” and get a feel for their ability to articulate experiences. Of course, admissions officers are also interested in understanding whether applicants can communicate effectively and organize their thoughts and have a good command of grammar and writing style. Writing, after all, is an invaluable skill at college and something your teen will be expected to do in just about every class.

Passion – Colleges seek to create a rich campus community with a diverse student body. Although the factor, “extracurricular activities” was ranked by the NACAC’s report as being of “considerable importance” by just 7.9 percent of colleges surveyed, “strong essay” came in at 18.9 percent and “student’s demonstrated interest” in the college at 13.7 percent. These latter two factors prove that students who express their interests, passions and poignant experiences effectively and take initiative to show their interest in a college will set themselves apart and increase their chances of admission.

Huntington reminds parents to encourage their teens to check out specific admissions information on each college’s website. “Often, colleges are forthright in sharing what they’re looking for in candidates,” she says. At any school, however, academic performance and strong preparation is of utmost importance. If you have questions about making sure your teen is ready for college and has a strong resume in place, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Get Involved With Your Child’s Education This School Year Researchers and education professionals continue to find that a family’s involvement in their child’s education is not just beneficial, but essential. Parental involvement is closely tied to student achievement, high motivation , self-esteem and more. But how exactly should you get involved, and how much? Are certain activities more beneficial than others? Here are several suggestions on how you can get involved with your child’s education this school year—and make the most of those efforts.

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Wed, 10 Jan 2018 16:30:39 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-involved-with-your-childs-education https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-involved-with-your-childs-education Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Get Involved With Your Child’s Education This School Year

You’ve probably heard before how valuable parental involvement is when it comes to supporting a child’s academic success and well-being. Researchers and education professionals continue to find that a family’s involvement in their child’s education is not just beneficial, but essential. Parental involvement is closely tied to student achievement, high motivation , self-esteem and more.

But how exactly should you get involved, and how much? Are certain activities more beneficial than others? Here are several suggestions on how you can get involved with your child’s education this school year—and make the most of those efforts.

Voice your opinion on school issues. Attend meetings for your school’s Parent Teacher Association and help weigh in on important decisions that impact your child’s education. This is a great way to make changes at your school and a wonderful way to get to know teachers, administrators and other parents.

Spend time at school. Volunteering in the classroom helps out your child’s teacher, but it’s also a great opportunity for you to observe your child’s work habits and behavior. Another idea is to volunteer in the lunchroom or help out during lunchtime activities if your child’s school allows it.  Be sure to stop into the classroom to touch base with your child’s teacher as well.

Foster your child’s learning at home. If your work schedule doesn’t allow you to get to school much, don’t worry. Parental involvement and student achievement studies show that at-home activities such as reading with your child actually have a greater impact on student educational outcomes than involvement such as parental participation in school events. Whenever possible, be on hand to help your child with homework. If your child is older and does homework independently, you can still ask questions about and show interest in school, homework and what your child is learning (and enjoying).

Get to know the teachers in your child’s life. Building a home-school bond is important. Make sure to attend all parent-teacher conferences, but also maintain open lines of communication with the teacher in between. Ask how you can best support your child at home and keep in touch about how those efforts are going.

Work on the basics. A less obvious way of parental involvement is to help your child develop some of the essentials for school success: organization, time management, good study habits and maintaining a schedule. These skills require consistency and practice, and most children need support at home to learn them. Run a structured household that has a predictable school routine and encourage your child to do the same.

 

 

 

 

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5 Important Tips for Studying Smarter Five important Tips for Studying Smarter

If you or your child have an impression that studying should be intense and time consuming to be effective, guess again. Studies show that the most successful students don’t necessarily study harder, but smarter. How can your child learn to embrace strong study habits? Here are a few tips to make the very most of study sessions:

 

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Fri, 05 Jan 2018 12:50:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5_tips_studyingsmarter- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5_tips_studyingsmarter- Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you or your child have an impression that studying should be intense and time consuming to be effective, guess again. Studies show that the most successful students don’t necessarily study harder, but smarter. How can your child learn to embrace strong study habits? Here are a few tips to make the very most of study sessions:

  1. Plan ahead. Cramming is the enemy of the strong student. Encourage your child to plan ahead so that study sessions are spaced over time. Repeated reviewing of material is more effective at helping students recall and remember information. Your child will be more successful if he or she studies once a day for seven days prior to a test as opposed to just one seven-hour study session the day before.
  2. Read the right way. Most classes involve reading, and some might require a lot. Your child can retain what he or she reads by practicing active reading, or reading with purpose. That means previewing a text for information, writing down any questions or ideas before diving in, identifying key terms or information while reading, recalling information and self-checking at natural stopping points along the way (such as the ends of sections or chapters), and reading summaries carefully at the end of each session. Reading in this way helps children absorb things and it also guides them toward improved comprehension and retention.
  3. Practice self-testing. Taking periodic quizzes and tests while studying new material helps students remember information, and particularly by continuing to test information after it has been learned. Children can jot down questions as they read their text or notes to assemble a self-test to take later. Encourage your child to always draw from information that the teacher has noted as important (rather than random or obscure passages in the textbook).
  4. Don’t waste time on futile practices. Certain popular study techniques have actually been found by researchers to be largely ineffective. Highlighting is a tool that many students rely upon to identify important information, but if a student highlights too much or too little or focuses on the wrong information, it can be counterproductive. The use of keyword mnemonics to memorize information is another study trick that has been proven to be unproductive, especially for the level of effort required. Bottom line: your child should embrace study practices that yield results and do away with those that do not.
  5. When in doubt, turn to the teacher. Memorizing notes or chapter summaries is not the best way to learn information and certainly not the best way to review it either. If the teacher doesn’t initiate such a conversation in class, your child should arrange a time to talk with the teacher about what is most important to focus on while preparing for a test.

Studying does not come naturally to every student, and while your child might have good intentions, these strategies will help him or her prepare for tests more efficiently and more effectively. As your child gets closer to high school, he or she will especially appreciate having reliable techniques for learning. If your child could use assistance improving those study skills, call Huntington. We can customize a program that will improve your child’s methods and approach—and result in academic success.

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Helping Your Young Reader Succeed with a Reading Tutor We know reading is important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified?

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Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:30:18 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-young-reader-succeed-with-a-reading-tutor https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-young-reader-succeed-with-a-reading-tutor Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Helping Your Young Reader Succeed with a Reading Tutor

We know reading is important, but exactly why should parents be quick to address reading issues the moment they are identified? Don’t all students learn at their own pace? It’s true that every student has his or her academic strengths and weaknesses, and may pick up some skills more quickly than others; however, if your elementary student is reading below grade level or receiving report card marks that indicate under-performance, taking action is imperative.  Ignoring a reading deficiency can set the stage for struggles for the rest of the academic year and beyond.

When students struggle in reading, they become more inclined to avoid reading out of frustration and lack of confidence, and this will continue to limit their progress. A negative attitude toward reading can snowball into a lifelong aversion to reading, which can put your student at a significant disadvantage. Poor reading skills are likely to impede on an individual’s chances of scoring well on all areas of standardized tests.

In addition, reading skills aren’t confined to the elementary student’s reading lesson, nor will they be once your student enters middle school and high school. Mathematics, science, social studies and history all depend on reading skills like textual analysis and expository writing. The truth is that success in reading translates to greater success in all academic subjects.

So how can you provide your struggling reader with adequate help? Turn to a reading tutor. A reading tutor is the most effective way to successfully address a reader’s weakness in phonetics, fluency and comprehension. A reading tutor can conduct in-depth assessment of a reader’s abilities and provide individualized one-on-one instruction. Plus, at a well-respected tutoring service like The Huntington Learning Center, where our proven strategies have warranted success for over thirty-five years, parents are sure to see results quickly and students will gain new confidence in the classroom.

How do parents know when it’s time to seek the help of a reading tutor?

  1. A reading tutor may be necessary if the reading instruction he or she does receive does not fully address their specific needs.
  2. If your elementary student can read with fluency and accuracy, but does not comprehend what he or she is reading, your student is a struggling reader and could benefit from the help of a reading tutor.
  3. A conversation with your child’s teacher is also an easy way to tell if your student is struggling with reading, as is your student’s sudden disinterest in reading, tendency to read aloud memorized words but skip over sight words, or inability to read fluently from diverse passages.
  4. If you observe your student to be a strong reader at home with grade-level reading abilities but his or her grades don’t fully reflect this, the stress of the classroom environment may be hindering your student’s performance. A reading tutor can help build confidence for reading out loud.
  5. Keep in mind that reading tutors are not just for students who are at risk for falling behind; if your elementary student is an advanced reader, a tutor could help him or her excel even further with one-on-one instruction delivered at the pace that works best.

These are just some of the many ways parents may be able to identify their student as a struggling reader. For more information or resources, or to arrange for a reading tutor for your young reader, contact the Huntington Learning Center today by visiting our website or calling 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

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5 Benefits Of Giving Your Kids Chores For most children, there is a lot to fit into each day: school, homework, sports and other activities, and dinner. If you’ve resisted giving your child additional work to do around the house, you might reconsider. Chores are proven to help children build skills that are valuable in school. Need more convincing? Here are five advantages of having your child do chores:

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Wed, 17 Jan 2018 14:37:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-benefits-of-giving-your-kids-chores https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-benefits-of-giving-your-kids-chores Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington For most children, there is a lot to fit into each day: school, homework, sports and other activities, and dinner. If you’ve resisted giving your child additional work to do around the house, you might reconsider. Chores are proven to help children build skills that are valuable in school. Need more convincing? Here are five advantages of having your child do chores:

  1. They help children learn responsibility. Chores give children a job to complete outside of school and homework—and yes, that’s important. Children who complete chores are being held accountable for their contributions to maintaining the household. This helps them develop self-sufficiency and a sense of accountability, which leads to greater confidence.
  2. Children become better at time management. As children grow older, it’s expected that they will be able to manage an increasing level of responsibility in school. Not only must they keep track of multiple classes with different expectations, they need to become independent outside of school as well to mature into capable young adults. Chores help with this, teaching children to get their “have-tos” finished before they enjoy free time.
  3. They foster good work ethic. As the saying goes, nothing good in life comes easy. As teachers do in school, parents should stress the relationship between their children’s hard work—household chores—and positive results—a clean, orderly home and minimized stress for the family. Encouraging children to pitch in at home increases their feelings of self-worth and satisfaction that come with completing tasks.
  4. Routines like chores promote positive behavior. Without question, children who embrace routines are more organized, efficient and successful. Chores serve as a model for structure, and structure teaches students to take pride in their work, be more responsible, and set and work toward goals.
  5. They promote organization. What child couldn’t use a little help with organization? It’s helpful to busy parents to have their children lighten the burden of household duties, and an added benefit is that certain chores emphasize the importance of good organization. Learning how to maintain a tidy household can easily translate into the building of essential skills like keeping track of assignments, having a place for everything and managing multi-step assignments.

The next time you think it’s easier to do something yourself or that your child shouldn’t be bothered with things like laundry and cleaning dishes, remember: chores are good for your child. Research corroborates this fact: a 20-year study by the University of Minnesota found that doing chores at an early age is the best predictor for growing up into a young adult with a completed education, a career with a clear direction, and healthy personal relationships with family and friends. On top of this, chores teach indispensable life skills. So, invest in your child’s well-being and give your child the chance to develop his or her self-efficacy, prioritization skills, and diligence.

“Involving Children in Household Tasks: Is it Worth the Effort?” Marty Rossman, University of Minnesota, College of Education and Human Development

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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WRITING SKILLS ARE KEY TO ACT AND SAT SUCCESS Virtually everyone who's been to college knows firsthand about the connection between writing well and doing well in courses ranging from business to the humanities. Yet according to a report produced by the National Commission on Writing in America's Schools and Colleges, The Neglected "R": The Need for a Writing Revolution, most fourth-grade students spend less than three hours a week writing. This is approximately 15 percent of the time they spend watching television. The organization also notes that by the first year of college, less than 50 percent of the freshman class is able to "produce papers relatively free of language errors, or to analyze arguments or synthesize information."

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Fri, 02 Feb 2018 11:07:05 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/writing-skills-are-key-to-act-and-sat-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/writing-skills-are-key-to-act-and-sat-success Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington For these reasons and more, it's important to ask your child's teachers for extra help if your child is struggling with this important skill. In the meantime, here are some additional ways to build writing prowess both in and out of school:

Write for practical reasons. Students need meaningful writing tasks that are designed to meet objectives, and writing letters is a good way to learn how to write persuasively. In a letter to return a purchase, for example, simply explaining why you're dissatisfied and why you expect to have your money refunded teaches you how to articulate an objective, reinforce that objective with facts, and reach a desired resolution. This activity also reinforces the value clear writing skills in everyday life.

Write to express feelings. Keeping a diary or journal can be a very effective way to encourage self-expression and strengthen writing skills. Writing about personal feelings, successes and disappointments can also help students resolve conflicts. When people write about things that concern them, they're more apt to strive for "just the right words" to describe how they're feeling.

Learn to argue on paper. This tactic will be especially interesting to parents. The next time your child expresses a point of view or petitions you for a special favor or privilege, pull out a pen and see how well the case can be made on paper. A five-paragraph essay can be a good model, with the first paragraph stating the child's desire or point of view, the next three paragraphs (or sentences) providing supporting evidence for that point of view, and the last paragraph summarizing the key point and supporting evidence. Many teachers find the five-paragraph essay to be a good tool for helping students organize their thoughts, so these skills can have a direct impact on writing proficiency and performance.

Summarize reading assignments. As students reach middle and secondary school, homework assignments tend to require more reading and analyzing. After reading a chapter or an important section of an assignment, students should do a "notes page" summarizing the key facts and restating, in their own words, the most important points to remember. This process enhances retention and further strengthens writing skills as well.

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Different Traits to Look for in a College Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen's life and unsurprisingly, it can be overwhelming for both teens and their parents.

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Thu, 28 Dec 2017 12:33:08 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/different-traits-to-look-for-in-a-college- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/different-traits-to-look-for-in-a-college- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Different Traits to Look for in a College

Choosing a college is one of the most important decisions of your teen’s life—and unsurprisingly, it can be overwhelming for both teens and their parents. You’ve probably received plenty of advice on what to consider when evaluating your teen’s college options: cost, location, major/program choices and size. However, there are other elements to think about as well. Here are several less common topics to explore during your teen’s college search:

Academic focus – Your teen’s certainty about his or her major and career path should definitely influence the college search process. If he or she is positive about pursuing business, narrow the search to include universities with strong business schools. If your teen is deciding between veterinary sciences and marine science, be sure that the colleges he or she is considering offer both programs. Similarly, if the nearby college is an engineering school, he or she shouldn’t waste effort applying if your teen has no interest in engineering.

Teaching vs. research – Clearly, a student’s experience at a top research university would be quite different  than at a liberal arts college. Perhaps your budding scientist wants to study under the most renowned researchers in the country at a large university, even if it means fewer classes actually being taught by those professors. However, your teen shouldn’t rule out the small liberal arts college, which may offer more undergraduate research opportunities than universities that reserve those opportunities for graduate students. The admissions teams at your prospective colleges can help answer questions about their faculty teaching/research expectations—and how that impacts the student experience.

Class size ratios for all classes – It usually isn’t difficult to find out a college’s student-faculty ratio or percentage of classes with 20 or fewer students (check ranking institutions such as U.S. News & World Report if the information isn’t easy to locate on the college website). However, do a little homework on the class size ratio for general education courses, too, since those will make up most of your student’s schedule during the first year of college. A school that boasts an 18:1 student-teacher ratio might also have a high number of required general education classes with class sizes of 200-300 or higher. If learning under this model would be challenging for your teen, he or she should take this under serious consideration.

Retention rate – One measurement that might matter especially to parents is that of the first- to second-year retention rate. In other words, how successful is a college at retaining students? According to the ACT, which conducts research on this topic, universities and colleges with higher retention rates tend to focus on areas such as involvement experiences, personal future building and academic stimulation. U.S. News & World Report publishes retention rates for many colleges.

Selecting a college should be a careful and thoughtful process. Encourage your teen to explore as many facets of his or her top choices as possible. While the ultimate decision may come down to the “gut feel test,” the more your teen knows about a college beforehand, the more informed his or her decision will be.

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GET YOUR CHILD ON TRACK FOR READING SUCCESS Is your child struggling to develop basic reading skills? If so, you're not alone. By the latest estimates, as many as 40 percent of the nation's 4th graders aren't reading at grade level.

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Wed, 27 Dec 2017 16:07:34 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-on-track-for-reading-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-on-track-for-reading-success Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Fortunately, many schools are now emphasizing phonemic awareness in their reading instruction, particularly for young children. Yet parents should still be highly alert for signs that their children are struggling. As noted in Why Kids Can't Read: Challenging the Status Quo in Education, by Phyllis Blaunstein and Reid Lyon, here are some signs that a child may be in trouble:

Great difficulty in understanding that words are made up of individual sounds that can be pulled apart and combined to make words: for example, that batboy can be pulled apart into bat and boy and that the word bat can be broken down still further and sounded out as: b aaaa t;

 Struggling to read and sound-out common, one-syllable words, such as dog, cat, hop, nap.

 Frequently mispronouncing complicated words, leaving out parts of words or confusing the order of the parts of words, saying amulium instead of aluminum, for example;

 Stumbling when reading multi-syllable words, without coming close when trying to sound out the full word;

 Omitting parts of words when reading, so that it sounds as if there's a hole in the word, reading convertible as conible, for example;

 Poor performance on multiple choice tests, and an inability to finish tests on time;

 Disastrous spelling skills.

Signs of Effective Reading Instruction

If your child is experiencing these problems, it's important to look closely at the reading instruction he or she is receiving. Here are the qualities of sound, proven instruction for phonemic awareness:

  1. Children are learning the sounds of language, and teachers are helping them practice with sounds that make up words.
  2. Children are learning how to put sounds together to make up words, and how to break words apart into separate sounds.
  3. Children are learning the letters of the alphabet, and can recognize the names and shapes of letters.
  4. Children's teachers are reading to the class and talking about what the students are reading.
  5. Children are learning phonics - how sounds and letters are related - and practicing phonics by reading books that focus on the letter-sound relationships they're learning.
  6. Children are being asked questions to help them think about the meaning of what they're reading, and are learning the meanings of new words.
  7. Children are learning to expand their vocabulary by using the dictionary, using known words and word parts to figure out words, and using clues from the rest of a sentence to better understand the meaning of words.
  8. Teachers are checking to see if students understand what they're reading by asking questions about the story or the material.
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The Latest News with the ACT If you’ve been paying attention to news coming out of the college entrance exam world in the last several years, you’ve probably noticed that the headlines have largely focused on the redesign of the SAT. So, what about the ACT? Here are some of the latest happenings regarding the ACT college admissions exam and what your teen needs to know:

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Wed, 28 Mar 2018 17:31:32 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/news-about-the-act-2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/news-about-the-act-2017 Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you’ve been paying attention to news coming out of the college entrance exam world in the last several years, you’ve probably noticed that the headlines have largely focused on the redesign of the SAT. So, what about the ACT? Here are some of the latest happenings regarding the ACT college admissions exam and what your teen needs to know:

New test date – Beginning in 2018, students can take the ACT test in the summer (starting with the July 2018 test date). This increases the number of national ACT test dates from six to seven. Because the ACT is offered primarily at local high schools across the country, which are closed during the summer months, the July ACT tests centers will likely be located on college and university campuses. For your teen, this change is significant for several reasons:

  • The July ACT offers an opportunity to use the early part of summer break (assuming students get out of school in June) to study for the July ACT instead of squeezing ACT prep into the school year.
  • The July date means that your test taker can easily take the ACT twice before early-admission college deadlines, which are often in early November.
  • The new date means a wider variety of testing opportunities for college-bound students.

Score report changes – In September 2016, the ACT made several enhancements to its test reports that students receive with their scores. Here’s a summary of what changed:

  • Redesigned paper reports that are more visually engaging and offer more meaningful insights about students’ test results.
  • Reporting categories only (for English, math, reading and science) but no more subject subscores (for algebra/coordinate geometry, for example).
  • Readiness ranges that enable students to see how their performance on reporting categories compares to students who have met college readiness benchmarks for specific subjects.
  • More reporting categories that share information like total number of points possible, total number of points achieved, and percentage of points correct.
  • Additional indicators to guide students toward potential college majors and careers based on information students include during the test registration process.

To stay up on the latest information regarding changes or improvements to the ACT, visit www.act.org. To learn more about how Huntington Learning Center helps students prepare for the ACT, visit our ACT Test Prep page.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Tips for Polishing the College Essay This Holiday Break If your senior is preparing application packages for college next fall, holiday break is a great opportunity to put the finishing touches on some of the more personal elements—like the application essay. The college application essay is easily one of the most important pieces your teen will ever write, and Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center says that students should give it the attention and care it deserves. “Essays that are well written and sincere give admissions officers a glimpse into who an applicant is ‘off paper’,” she says. As teens prepare to send in their applications in the new year, Huntington encourages them to use the downtime of holiday break to polish their application essays. Here are several tips as they do so:

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Wed, 27 Dec 2017 14:45:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-essay-tips-for-holiday-break- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-essay-tips-for-holiday-break- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center If your senior is preparing application packages for college next fall, holiday break is a great opportunity to put the finishing touches on some of the more personal elements—like the application essay. The college application essay is easily one of the most important pieces your teen will ever write, and Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center says that students should give it the attention and care it deserves. “Essays that are well written and sincere give admissions officers a glimpse into who an applicant is ‘off paper’,” she says. As teens prepare to send in their applications in the new year, Huntington encourages them to use the downtime of holiday break to polish their application essays. Here are several tips as they do so:

Make sure the essay addresses the prompt. The essay is your teen’s chance to share something about him or herself that isn’t addressed elsewhere in the application package. Be sure your teen clearly and thoroughly answers the essay prompt and offers supporting information that shows why your teen is a strong candidate for admission.

Evaluate the “unique factor.” Many students have strong academic backgrounds and impressive resumes, but the essay is your teen’s chance to shine. The essay must be thoughtful, personal and genuine. It is the appropriate place for your teen to express who he or she really is. Have your teen read any essay draft through the lens of an admissions officer. What stands out? Does the essay poignantly reflect an experience your teen had or does it sound too generic?

Edit. By now, hopefully your teen already has a working draft of the application essay and a teacher or guidance counselor has offered comments. The break is a good time for your teen to address any suggestions to strengthen the essay and do his or her own self-edit. After each new draft, encourage your teen to set the essay aside for a day, then review to ensure it is honest, vivid and expressive, and that the topic is meaningful and appropriate and paints your teen as someone capable of succeeding at college.

Proofread. Careless errors say a lot to an admissions officer about an applicant. When your teen gets to a final draft that he or she feels good about, it’s important to print and proofread the entire essay a day or two later. Fresh eyes will help ensure your teen doesn’t gloss over words he or she has written and read several times. You can proofread a draft as well, and your teen should consider bringing the final draft to an English teacher as soon as school resumes.

The college application essay could bolster your teen’s overall application package—encourage him or her to work on making it as great as it can be over holiday break. For more information about how to craft a strong application essay and improving your teen’s writing skills, contact Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Tips to Reinvigorate Your Child’s School Attitude Over Holiday Break It’s holiday break, a welcome pause from school and extracurricular responsibilities for your child. While most children look forward to the chance to relax and unwind, Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that holiday break is also a good time to gear up for a great second half of the school year. “If your child has gotten off to a rocky start or just wants to maintain momentum in the spring semester, holiday break is the time to reset and refresh,” Huntington says. How can parents help their children “recharge their mental batteries” and finish the year strong? Here are several tips:

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Wed, 27 Dec 2017 15:06:29 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/refresh-your-childs-school-attitude-over-holiday-break https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/refresh-your-childs-school-attitude-over-holiday-break Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s holiday break, a welcome pause from school and extracurricular responsibilities for your child. While most children look forward to the chance to relax and unwind, Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that holiday break is also a good time to gear up for a great second half of the school year. “If your child has gotten off to a rocky start or just wants to maintain momentum in the spring semester, holiday break is the time to reset and refresh,” Huntington says. How can parents help their children “recharge their mental batteries” and finish the year strong? Here are several tips:

Look back at goals set in the fall. If your child established goals at the start of the school year, revisit them now. Is your child on track to achieve some of the things he or she set out to do at the start of the year? What has gone well and what could go better? Talk about any previously set goals that need adjusting.

Set new goals. A new semester might mean new classes and certainly means new opportunities for your child to develop and learn. Have an open discussion about what your child wants to achieve in the remainder of the school year. Raise a grade? Work on his or her organization? Procrastinate less? Whatever the goals, encourage your child to lay out how he or she intends to work toward them.

Ask, “What have you learned?” Talk about what challenges arose in the fall semester and how your child overcame them, and any other meaningful experiences that had an impact. Remind your child that every failure means your child has learned something important. Where did your child become stronger as a result of overcoming something difficult?

Fine tune any study habits. Many children take a little time to acclimate to a new school year, so now that you’re several months in, consider what your child could use to improve any study or organizational habits like planner maintenance or the morning or homework routine.

This holiday break, make sure your child enjoys time with family and catches up on some relaxation, but don’t forget to take time to reflect on the last few months and set a positive tone for the rest of the year. “The start of a new year is an ideal time for both parents and children to get into a good frame of mind to make necessary adjustments,” she says. “If your child has things he or she wants to fix or just wants to stay on the same upward trajectory, sit down and make a plan together wherein your child takes initiative and you offer your support.” For more tips on how to keep your child on a positive path for the remainder of the year, contact Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Helping Your Child Build a Greater Depth of Understanding in Math You may have heard education experts, researchers or media outlets refer to mathematics curriculum in the United States as being "a mile wide and an inch deep."

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Wed, 20 Dec 2017 12:31:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-build-a-greater-depth-of-understanding-in-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-build-a-greater-depth-of-understanding-in-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Helping Your Child Build a Greater Depth of Understanding in Math

You may have heard education experts, researchers or media outlets refer to mathematics curriculum in the United States as being “a mile wide and an inch deep.” The problem with math education, according to many, is that U.S. math teachers have historically been asked to cover far too many topics in each grade, resulting in students who have only a vague understanding of a lot of areas rather than a deep understanding of fewer, more essential topics. Students are introduced to advanced concepts haphazardly and before they have had an opportunity to master certain basic skills.

Of course, the Common Core State Standards are changing all that. Researchers “have concluded that mathematics education in the United States must become substantially more focused and coherent in order to improve mathematics achievement in this country,” (corestandards.org). As a result, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics will embody these three key shifts:

  • Greater focus on fewer topics
  • Linking topics and thinking across grades
  • More rigorous overall (educators must help students gain a conceptual understanding of key math concepts, procedural skills and fluency, and application in situations that require mathematical knowledge)

How can you help your child learn to apply math and use it as a problem-solving tool? Here are a few tips for parents when helping their child with homework:

  • Have your child talk through math rules. As your child completes homework, periodically have him or her point out to you when a math rule is used and where that rule comes from.
  • Explain the thinking. Even in the simplest math, have your child explain how he or she draws conclusions and why. That cognitive process is becoming more important in math than ever.
  • Try different methods to solve problems. Children should practice using different approaches to solving the same problem and identify similarities among those different methods.
  • Encourage students to visualize math problems. Help your child draw out visual representations of figures or numbers. For example, your child should be able to show what something (a shape, for example) would look like when divided up into fractions.
  • Have your child talk about wrong answers. Just as students should know how to “construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others” (per the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice), it is helpful for children think through incorrect answers and share their conclusions on why a certain answer to a problem is right and another is wrong.
  • Use math in everyday life. Your child should practice writing down mathematical equations and assumptions when trying to solve real-world problems. He or she should use tools to aid understanding whenever it makes sense—tools such as graphs, equations and flowcharts.
  • Pay attention to detail. The new standards expect students to be precise when discussing math and working on math problems. Encourage your child to label his or her work, be neat and explain the symbols used in various mathematical equations. Precision and accuracy is important.

As the Standards for Mathematical Practice state, “students who lack understanding of a topic may rely on procedures too heavily.” Although you may not feel equipped to help your child through probability and statistics homework, you can nurture his or her acquisition of a conceptual understanding of math. Encourage your child to make connections between mathematical ideas and life, use reasoning when working on math, and think critically about how math plays a role in day-to-day life. To learn more about the Common Core State Standards for Math, visit www.corestandards.org.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Huntington Learning Center Suggests Winter Break Learning Activities It's holiday break, and if you are in need of a few ideas to help keep your child entertained and learning these next few weeks, Huntington Learning Center has several suggestions. "Your child deserves a reprieve from school work, but there are many things you can do as a family that will keep your student engaged," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers the following winter break learning activities for inspiration.

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Tue, 19 Dec 2017 15:10:25 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-suggests-winter-break-learning-activities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-suggests-winter-break-learning-activities It's holiday break, and if you are in need of a few ideas to help keep your child entertained and learning these next few weeks, Huntington Learning Center has several suggestions. "Your child deserves a reprieve from school work, but there are many things you can do as a family that will keep your student engaged," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers the following winter break learning activities for inspiration.

Get scientific - Safe and fun science experiments are a great way to pass the long days of holiday break and encourage your student's scientific thinking. Check out the University of Michigan's BioKIDS website for an animal tracks and sign guide and send your child out to explore your local habitat for signs of animals. Browse the Steve Spangler Science or Weird Science Kids websites for educational experiments that your child will enjoy.

Develop a menu - Have your child help you from start to finish with your holiday menu or even weeknight meals during his or her break. Set your child up with a cookbook or send him or her to a recipe website to come up with meal ideas, make a list of ingredients and even create a paper menu for dinner guests. Have your child help you do the shopping and compare prices of different brands in the grocery store.

Make a holiday scrapbook - Bring out your child's inner crafter by having him or her work on a family scrapbook for the year or just the holiday season. Have your child collect photos and mementos (such as plane ticket stubs) from any vacations or other special outings and share his or her finished product on New Year's Eve. Websites such as http://www.mymemories.com and scrapbooksetc.com offer lots of ideas and also have free printable templates and patterns.

Write a family history book - Work together on a family tree. Your child could take the project further and interview grandparents, aunts and uncles to learn more about different family member's experiences growing up—your child may be surprised at how different life as a kid was for a grandparent. Try a "Favorite Family Holiday Memories" book in which your child can record his or her own reflections as well as those of other members of the extended family.

With a little creativity, winter break can be both educational and memorable. Seek out fun activities that will keep your child happily occupied—whether that's creating photo thank-you notes or spending time researching an imaginary travel itinerary to the moon or Antarctica. "Long breaks don't have to feel long," Huntington reminds parents. "Keep a list of ideas handy and encourage your child to use this free time to do things he or she is interested in and doesn't normally have time for."

For more information about Huntington Learning Center, please visit huntingtonhelps.com

About Huntington


Founded in 1977, Huntington is a pioneer and leader in the tutoring industry. For over 35 years, Huntington has provided quality instruction to hundreds of thousands of students. Huntington prides itself on being "Your Tutoring Solution" for students in all grades and subjects. They tutor in academic skills, such as reading, phonics, math and study skills; and in advanced math and science subjects ranging from algebra through calculus and general science through physics. Huntington also prepares students for state and standardized entrance exams, such as high school entrance exams and the SAT and ACT. Learn more about Huntington at huntingtonhelps.com.

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The Art of Prioritization: Helping Children Manage Their Homework Time Effectively When children move into middle school and high school, it becomes more important than ever to manage their time effectively. With multiple subjects and teachers, it can become burdensome to keep track of everything and many children struggle at homework time with where to begin. While a solid time management system is critical, to keep homework time moving along, your child needs to master the art of prioritization. This helps you save time by identifying tasks that deserve immediate attention, those that are important but less pressing, and those that can be considered “long-term” to-dos.

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Tue, 19 Dec 2017 12:28:52 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-children-manage-homework https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-children-manage-homework Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington When children move into middle school and high school, it becomes more important than ever to manage their time effectively. With multiple subjects and teachers, it can become burdensome to keep track of everything and many children struggle at homework time with where to begin. While a solid time management system is critical, to keep homework time moving along, your child needs to master the art of prioritization. This helps you save time by identifying tasks that deserve immediate attention, those that are important but less pressing, and those that can be considered “long-term” to-dos.

How can you help your child become an expert at prioritizing and getting things accomplished more quickly? Here are several tips:

Keep a running master to-do list. Each night, your child should review his or her list of tasks for all classes, separated by subject. This list should contain any to-dos for this week, next week or further out, including nightly homework and upcoming tests, quizzes and projects.

Put due dates next to each task. Make sure your child keeps tabs on what homework is due the following day and what is not due until later in the week or the following week. Every item on the master to-do list should have a due date next to it.

Designate levels of importance. Before diving into homework, your child should rank all tasks. You might encourage him or her to use A, B and C levels of importance. For example, on Monday, a math test, a vocabulary assignment due, and chapter to read by Tuesday would be “A” priorities, whereas assignments due Wednesday would be considered “B” priorities, and anything due Thursday, Friday, or the following week “C” priorities.

Divide up the “A” priorities. Once your child has the “A” list in front of him or her, it’s time to quickly decide in what order things need to be completed. A good rule of thumb is to focus on the most difficult tasks earlier in the evening, but each child is different. If your child prefers to check off easier tasks before digging into the more challenging or time-consuming ones, that’s fine as well. When it comes to “B” priorities, your child should include the top one or two in his or her nightly homework list. A test on Friday, for example, deserves some study time on Tuesday and Wednesday and should be bumped up to an “A” priority on Thursday night.

Embrace the student planner. Prioritizing is meant to help your child use his or her time wisely. It’s an exercise best tackled with a calendar or planner on hand, because most children have more than just school on their plates. For example, if your child has a heavy night of extracurricular activities on Tuesday, he or she should account for that in his list of Monday night homework priorities. Make sure your child blocks out time for activities in the calendar so he or she has an accurate picture of how much time is available for homework and studying each evening.

When your child masters the art of prioritization, you will discover that homework time is smoother and offers fewer opportunities to get sidetracked or stalled on less important tasks. Teach your child to embrace this consistent approach to getting started on homework each night and you will notice him or her taking ownership, staying on top of the multitude of demands that school has, and feeling less stressed overall.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Holiday Break Learning Tips Holiday breaks can be a nice disrupt from the daily routine of school - here are a few learning tips to keep your child's academic skills engaged.

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Wed, 27 Dec 2017 15:25:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaylearningtips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaylearningtips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center
Oradell, NJ December 19, 2017 —Holiday break is a wonderful time for children to enjoy a reprieve from the daily routine of school and homework, and spend time with family and relax. However, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that there are many ways to keep children learning and engaged over break—without forcing school work on them. "This break is a great opportunity to get into a few fun and educational activities as a family," says Huntington. Here are a few ideas to help your child keep learning these next few weeks:

Let your child plan a meal. This can combine time-management, and help with math, reading, writing, and art skills. Provide cookbooks or online cooking sites to help choose simple recipes for the meal. When cooking, put your child in charge of measuring. Ask questions, such as "Is two 1/4 cups the same as 1/2 cup? How can you tell?" Model how to create a shopping list. Try to estimate cooking times and prepare a schedule. Search the newspaper for coupons. Do math estimates while grocery shopping.

Break out the crafts. There's no better time than the holidays to create gifts. Check out your local craft center for classes on card-making, or spend time together at home working with your hands. Clay, paint, drawing materials and more are a great way to exercise those artistic, creative muscles. Take those projects a step further and check out how-to books from the library on new crafts or nonfiction books on different artists.

Hit the library. The library is a must-visit destination over holiday break. Your child can enjoy reading for the fun of it as opposed to reading for school, so let him or her choose a few books to enjoy over break on subjects that are of interest to him or her. Don't forget to check out the library's schedule of classes and events for children, teens and families over the holidays.

Books as holiday gifts. Good gifts over the holidays are books or a gift card from a book store. A gift card allows your child to pick out books they want to read so they are involved in the selection process and will be excited for what they will read.

Explore local museums. Call the local art, history, science or cultural museums to see if they have any special exhibits going on this holiday season. And even if they do not, these next couple of weeks are a great time to make a few family field trips to some of the attractions that your city has to offer. As a follow up to the outing have your child write about the activity.

With a little planning and imagination, you can make this holiday break enjoyable for your child—and help him or her learn a few new things, too. "Take time during the break to encourage your child to explore his or her interests and have fun in the process," says Huntington. "Free time is the best time to refresh one's memory that learning itself is a fun activity."

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Why Tutoring Can be the Key to ACT Success How specialized tutoring can help prepare students for success when planning to take the ACT college readiness assessment.

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Thu, 21 Dec 2017 16:05:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-tutoring-can-be-the-key-to-act-success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/why-tutoring-can-be-the-key-to-act-success Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When School Isn’t Enough: Why Tutoring Can be the Key to ACT Success

We've encountered many parents over the years who have questions about the benefits of the ACT tutoring programs at Huntington Learning Centers. These parents are searching for answers about the effectiveness and impact of exam prep programs. Often, their questions are very similar and indicate that many parents have the same concerns when their children are preparing to take the ACT.

We've gathered some of the most frequently asked questions about ACT tutoring and hope the answers help you determine whether such a program is right for your child. 

Why choose ACT tutoring? The ACT is a high stakes test that assesses your child's ability as a snapshot
in time. Years of hard work preparing for college admissions can be negatively affected by a weak ACT score. Investing in ACT tutoring provides your child with the extra practice, knowledge, and confidence necessary for success on the exam. The content and format of the ACT exam may feel overwhelming if you are working to prepare your child on your own. How do you know exactly what to study? How much emphasis should you place on each content area? What is the best way to prepare for the specific format of the exam? The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Centers are specifically trained to help students prepare for the exam. Through a careful combination of assessment, instruction, and practice your child will gain the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare for the exam. 

What are the benefits of tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers? The main goal of the ACT tutoring programs at Huntington Learning Centers is to prepare students for the rigors of the ACT exam focusing on academic knowledge, test taking skills, and time management skills. Your child will learn from the best and experience a comprehensive and prescriptive tutoring program based on ongoing assessment data. Not only will your child gain the skills and knowledge necessary for success on the ACT exam but you'll likely notice an increase in confidence as well. Your child will be able to confidently look forward to the exam.

What are the differences in tutoring programs? We offer three different tutoring programs and are confident one of these will meet your child's specific needs. The Premier Program is recommended for students that have six to eight weeks to devote to ACT tutoring and is customized to meet your child's individual needs. Ongoing progress monitoring and interim conferencing provide you the assurance that your child is benefiting from the tutoring program. The 28-Hour Program is designed as a five to seven week program that prepares students in all content areas in a limited amount of time. The 10-Hour Program is designed for students with limited time that want targeted practice in a single content area. If you'd like more information about which of these programs is a best fit for your child contact a professional with Huntington Learning Centers.  

How will tutoring complement my child's high school education? Your child is learning a lot in high school and the mastered skills and acquired knowledge will be incredibly beneficial on the ACT exam. Using careful assessments, we determine what your child already knows and what content areas remain a struggle. We'll work to close the gaps and strengthen your child's academic foundation. The tutoring sessions also expose students to the exam's format and teach successful test taking tips. Many of these lessons are also applicable to other exams your child will take during both high school and college. The benefits will continue to pay off over time. 

Huntington Learning Centers are proud to serve local communities by offering high quality tutoring for students preparing for the ACT exam. Will your child be taking the ACT exam this school year? What other questions do you still have about the benefits of ACT tutoring? Let us know on one of our social media pages or share this information with others who may benefit by clicking on one of the social media buttons above.

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Report Card Review: Turning the Year Around Though hard to believe, the school year is nearly halfway over. As the holiday season quickly approaches, your elementary student will soon receive his or her second report card, which serves as an even more revealing indication of academic performance than the first.

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Tue, 12 Dec 2017 17:58:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/report-card-review-turning-the-year-around https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/report-card-review-turning-the-year-around Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Report Card Review: Turning the Year Around

 Though hard to believe, the school year is nearly halfway over. As the holiday season quickly approaches, your elementary student will soon receive his or her second report card, which serves as an even more revealing indication of academic performance than the first. Why? Unlike the first report, which includes assessment of a substantial amount of review material, the second report card demonstrates how well a student is handling new, more challenging concepts.

 While a less-than-stellar midyear report card can be disheartening, with proper remediation a student’s next report card can show significant signs of improvement. So when that second report card arrives with grades that cause concern, turn to a tutoring program. Whether your child needs a math, spelling or reading tutor, a tutoring program with individualized instruction can make a world of difference.

While parents know that tutoring is a highly effective measure to boost academic success, many are often interested in ways they can complement a tutoring program and continue to help turn their student’s academic year around. There are many helpful measures parents can take; consider the following:

Foster Open Dialogue.

As you and your elementary student prepare for a tutoring program, ask your student how he or she feels about school. Open dialogue is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about why your child received a certain grade or what skills and concepts he or she struggles with the most.  A conversation with your child’s teacher can also provide helpful insight to all parties invested in a child’s academic success. Continue to invite input and reflection from your child after each tutoring session as well. 

Embrace Goals.

While learning goals will be established as part of your child’s tutoring program, it helps when parents continue to embrace and discuss these goals outside of a session. Talk with your child about the ways he or she is working to achieve a goal and why the goal is important. Perhaps write out goals to post on the refrigerator or in your child’s room, or make plans to celebrate after each goal is reached. Parents may even write out learning goals of their own to demonstrate that learning is an ongoing process.

Pursue Positivity.

As your student engages in a tutoring program, cultivate an atmosphere of positivity. Ensure your child understands that tutoring is not a punishment, nor should it carry any negative connotation. Explain that tutoring is simply an extra measure to help him or her advance even farther in school. To sustain a student’s confidence and self-esteem, be sure to praise other successes in both academics and beyond.  

Be Engaged at Home.

Ask your child’s reading tutor about ways you can continue to work on certain skills at home, or integrate math into daily conversation. Spell out signs you encounter while in the car or create fun games with math flashcards. Set aside time each day for reading, and ask questions about the stories your child reads. Efforts to keep your child positively engaged in academics at home can benefit both skill and motivation.

 

Visit Huntington Learning Center for more information about our proven tutoring solutions for elementary students struggling in various subjects.

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Great Family Field Trips for Holiday Break Are you looking for new ideas to keep your child entertained and engaged this holiday break? Explore your community for fun and educational outings for the whole family. Here are four fun ways you and your child can spend time together—and learn or experience something new.

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Tue, 05 Dec 2017 17:15:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/family-field-trips-for-holiday-break https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/family-field-trips-for-holiday-break Are you looking for new ideas to keep your child entertained and engaged this holiday break? Explore your community for fun and educational outings for the whole family. Here are four fun ways you and your child can spend time together—and learn or experience something new.

Planetariums or Observatories

Reach out and touch the stars at a planetarium or observatory. These can be hugely entertaining for your budding astrophysicist or rocket scientist, but even a casual visitor will enjoy taking in the wonders of the universe in a totally different way. Many facilities offer opportunities to view the stars through telescopes with a trained astronomer. Pack some blankets and a thermos of hot cocoa for a night of “holiday lights” that your family won’t soon forget. Visit www.go-astronomy.com/planetariums.htm for a list of planetariums and observatories in your state.

Wildlife Parks and Refuges

Wildlife parks and refuges often offer special winter programming that highlights how local plants and animals adapt to winter conditions. Whether you brave the outdoors or opt to enjoy the visitor’s center, one major benefit to visiting these types of attractions in winter is the lack of crowds. Check with your local, state and national parks and wildlife departments for events and programs for families and kids.

Theater, Ballet or Orchestra

December is a prime month for family-friendly holiday performances of all kinds. Take your family to one of the many known seasonal productions and read the story before or after the performance. Other performances such as The Nutcracker are a perennial family favorite, and orchestras often present programs of holiday music that listeners of any age can enjoy. Look for opportunities to meet the performers so that your child can get a backstage glimpse into how these artists do their work.

Factory Tour

A tour of a local business, manufacturing facility or other factory is a great way for your child to see and learn how things work. Check with your state or local chamber of commerce to find out what companies in your area offer tours of their production facilities—retail manufacturers or distributors, food producers or other organizations may offer tours and informational sessions about the steps that go into making their products. Often, these sessions incorporate local history, fun facts, and science and engineering concepts. As an added bonus, these tours are often free.

Use a little creativity to explore the many educational outings available in your area—beyond the standard museums and zoos. Look into visiting your local news station or newspaper. Consider taking a self-guided tour of a nearby college. Check independent movie theatres for educational films or documentaries for your older child. Better yet, try a few different options. Your child will be sure to have a wonderful story or two to tell when someone asks, “What did you do over holiday break?”

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Advice for Effective SAT/ACT Prep It’s that time of year when many college-bound students are taking or re-taking the SAT and ACT. Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that the best way for students to prepare for college entrance exams is through plenty of practice. “It is true that keeping up with school work inherently helps students acquire the knowledge that they need to perform on college entrance exams, but there is no substitute for regular, thorough studying of the types of questions they will see on these tests,” says Huntington.

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Thu, 07 Dec 2017 17:28:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/advice-for-effective-sat-act-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/advice-for-effective-sat-act-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s that time of year when many college-bound students are taking or re-taking the SAT and ACT. Co-Founder Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that the best way for students to prepare for college entrance exams is through plenty of practice. “It is true that keeping up with school work inherently helps students acquire the knowledge that they need to perform on college entrance exams, but there is no substitute for regular, thorough studying of the types of questions they will see on these tests,” says Huntington.

She suggests that parents think about the following as they and their teens develop a summer study schedule that will yield positive results:

Learn the ins and outs of each exam. Teens should get to know the format and details of the exam they decide to take. It’s essential to understand what is expected on the test, the time limit for each section, the number of questions, and other basic information. This can help steer teens toward one exam over the other. Some of the major distinctions that could also impact a test-taker’s decision between the exams:

  • The ACT has a Science Test that tests critical thinking skills (while the SAT does not).
  • The SAT has one more reading passage than the ACT.
  • The SAT has some math questions that must be answered without the use of a calculator (the ACT allows the use of a calculator for all math questions).

Take a diagnostic evaluation. A teen’s very first step to devising an effective SAT/ACT prep plan should be taking an initial test to determine his or her strengths and weaknesses. Study sessions will be far more effective when teens know exactly what to study and where they need to improve. A full-length diagnostic test gives a baseline so that teens can identify areas to focus on (and measure their progress).

Create a schedule. Teens will be more effective in their study approach if they create a schedule with milestones. The schedule should dedicate the appropriate amount of time to each subject and specific section of the exam, targeting weaker areas and considering teens’ strengths. Certainly, a teen’s specific test score goals (possibly driven by his or her target college or university) and the gap between the diagnostic test score and “goal” test score will impact the amount of study time needed.

Cover all the elements. Yes, the SAT and ACT require subject-matter knowledge—this should be the foremost area of focus in a teen’s study plan. However, the best study plan should cover several other areas as well:

  • Practice exams – Teens should take at least two full-length, timed practice tests that simulate the actual test environment.
  • Speed work – There are a lot of questions on the SAT and ACT to answer in a short timeframe. It’s important to work on improving one’s speed without sacrificing accuracy.
  • Stress management – There’s no getting around the fact that the SAT and ACT can cause teens anxiety because of the impact that the exams can have on their future. It’s important that teens learn how to manage any stress and are able to employ relaxation techniques as needed.

Plan ahead for a retake. Many teens take the SAT or ACT a few times to attain their best score. Summer before junior year is a good time to prepare for the SAT or ACT.  In doing so, keep in mind that many colleges have application deadlines as early as January 1.   The SAT is offered seven times per year and includes a summer test in August, and ACT is offered six times per year, with the first test of the school year occurring in September. It’s wise to put the best foot forward by adhering to a study plan and schedule because planning ahead for specific test dates is key.

Huntington invites parents and teens who are unsure where to begin to call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. “We understand that few parents and teens know the best way to study for the SAT or ACT, or how close together those study sessions should be—and those sorts of details,” Huntington says. “We’re adept at assessing students’ abilities, developing targeted programs to help them achieve their goals, and helping students do well on these tests.”

Learn more about Huntington’s premier, 32-hour and 14-hour SAT and ACT prep programs and the Huntington test prep approach at www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Red Flags to Watch for this School Year The school year is now in full swing and it’s natural for both children and their parents to quickly settle into autopilot mode. However, Elieen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center cautions parents to pay attention to any academic warning signs that appear early in the school year. “Many students experience ups and downs, but parents should watch for indicators of larger issues,” says Huntington. “The longer you ignore certain problems, the more likely they are to become worse and more difficult to correct.”

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Fri, 08 Dec 2017 11:20:05 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/red-flags-to-watch-this-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/red-flags-to-watch-this-school-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The school year is now in full swing and it’s natural for both children and their parents to quickly settle into autopilot mode. However, Elieen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center cautions parents to pay attention to any academic warning signs that appear early in the school year. “Many students experience ups and downs, but parents should watch for indicators of larger issues,” says Huntington. “The longer you ignore certain problems, the more likely they are to become worse and more difficult to correct.”

As your child navigates this school year, here are five academic red flags that warrant intervention:

1. Poor grades – Of course, the biggest sign that things aren’t going well at school is your child’s performance. An isolated poor grade shouldn’t cause major concern. However, are you noticing consistently low grades or that your child’s grades are dropping throughout the semester? Don’t just pay attention at report card time. Keep tabs on daily and weekly assignments and projects and take note of any concerning patterns.

2.  Homework taking a long time – Many teachers give a time estimate at the beginning of the school year of how much homework their students should expect each night. How does your child’s work time compare to this ballpark? If your child struggles to do homework independently or consistently takes longer than advised by the teacher to complete assignments, you should investigate. This might be a sign that your child doesn’t understand what is being taught in class or is having trouble focusing or understanding directions.

3.  Change in personality – Mood swings are normal for any child, but keep an eye out for significant changes in your child’s disposition and attitude. Is your typically happy child becoming sullen or angry as the school year marches on? Is your child slowly losing interest in school or even friends or activities he or she used to enjoy? In addition, are you noticing your child’s grades suffering?

4.  Negative self-talk – Frustration with even small challenges could signify that your child has given up on a subject—and him or herself. This is common with children who are lacking “building-block skills” to keep up in the classroom and acquire new knowledge. Does your child seem pessimistic about his or her abilities? Does he or she become easily frustrated during homework time?

5.  Disorganization – Disorganization is a common problem for children, but does your child seem to struggle with it in more than one area? Pay particular attention to how your child keeps track of homework and assignments and maintains his or her backpack, desk and room. Lost homework and sloppy work are signs that your child lacks attention to detail, a challenge that will become more problematic in middle and high school.

Huntington encourages parents to seek help sooner than later when they notice one or more warning signs. “Most school issues don’t go away on their own,” she says. “Poor grades are an obvious sign of difficulties in school, but there are many red flags to which parents should pay attention. Recognizing that something is amiss and taking action quickly could make all the difference.”

If your child appears to be struggling, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to talk about how we can help your child turn things around.    

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How Your College-Bound Teen Can Make it a Productive Holiday Break College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. “The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year,” says Huntington. “For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come.”

To make the most of holiday break, Huntington offers these tips for parents and their college-bound teens:

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Tue, 05 Dec 2017 17:11:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/a-productive-holiday-break https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/a-productive-holiday-break  

How Your College-Bound Teen Can Make it a Productive Holiday Break

College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. “The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year,” says Huntington. “For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come.”

To make the most of holiday break, Huntington offers these tips for parents and their college-bound teens:

Start working on the FAFSA. Seniors planning on enrolling in college for fall 2017 should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon after January 1 as possible. This application is your family’s avenue to receiving federal, state and college financial aid and the sooner you submit it, the better. Get started at www.studentaid.ed.gov.

Register for Advanced Placement exams. Before school lets out, your teen should talk to teachers or the school’s designated Advanced Placement (AP) coordinator about taking any AP exams in the spring. In 2017, AP exams are scheduled for early May, so holiday break is a good time to start thinking about which exams your teen wants to study for and take.

Register for the spring SAT or ACT. For juniors taking the exam for the first time, now is the time to develop a study schedule for the spring SAT or ACT tests. Contact Huntington over the break to learn more about our 14-hour, 32-hour and Premier SAT and ACT prep programs.

Work on college applications. Seniors should use holiday break as a time to get going on college applications, as many colleges have application deadlines as early as January 1. At the very least, your senior should spend time working on some of the time-consuming parts of the application package, such as the essay. It’s also a good idea to write succinct but professional letters to teachers from whom your teen would like letters of recommendation, making sure to include a resume and list of accomplishments in each teacher’s class. When school is back in session in January, your teen can deliver these letters personally.

Visit local colleges. Although colleges are also on break, this might be a good chance for you and your teen to visit any colleges in your area. Walk the campus, stop by the admissions offices, explore the classrooms and reach out ahead of time to see if any tours are offered.

Holiday break is a wonderful time for your teen to recharge his or her batteries after a busy fall semester, but it also presents a chance to get ahead on that college checklist. “At Huntington, we advise students to take advantage of every break they have from school and use that downtime to ensure they’re on top of everything they need to be regarding college,” says Huntington. “During the spring, things pick up significantly when it comes to college—from applying for financial aid to selecting a college. Encourage your teen to use this time effectively, so that he or she will feel more organized and ready to continue moving forward when school resumes in January.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

 

 

 

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SIX TIPS TO MAKE COLLEGE MORE AFFORDABLE! For many students and their parents, the arrival of a college acceptance letter is a time to celebrate the years of hard work that it took to prepare for higher education - and a cause for concern over how much it's going to cost. Year after year, at most colleges and universities across the nation, expenses for tuition, fees, books and lodging have increased, and according to most experts that trend will continue. Fortunately, the total amount of student aid available, including grants, loans, scholarships, work-study programs and other sources has also increased, making college more affordable than many students and families realize. Here are some tips for tracking down the support that will put your child's dreams within reach.

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Thu, 30 Nov 2017 16:16:46 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/take-stock-of-all-options-for-making-college-affordable https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/take-stock-of-all-options-for-making-college-affordable Dr. Raymond J. Huntington Dr. Raymond J. Huntington For many students and their parents, the arrival of a college acceptance letter is a time to celebrate the years of hard work that it took to prepare for higher education - and a cause for concern over how much it's going to cost. Year after year, at most colleges and universities across the nation, expenses for tuition, fees, books and lodging have increased, and according to most experts that trend will continue. Fortunately, the total amount of student aid available, including grants, loans, scholarships, work-study programs and other sources has also increased, making college more affordable than many students and families realize. Here are some tips for tracking down the support that will put your child's dreams within reach.

Step One: Talk with school counselors. Advising students on financial aid options is one of the most important roles of school counselors. They should know about the different types of aid available and guide you and your child through the application process, which can be daunting. Counselors can also provide information on grants and loans from your state government, and those offered by the colleges and universities you're considering.

Step Two: Make sure your child is eligible for most types of available aid. To qualify for financial aid, your child must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. If your son would like to receive federal aid, he'll need to register with the U.S. Selective Service when he turns 18 (Selective Service registration is in fact required for all men aged 18 to 25). All students must also graduate from high school or earn a GED before receiving aid.

Step Three: Order the FAFSA. Most of the available aid comes from the federal government, and to access it you need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You'll use the information from your tax returns to complete the FAFSA, which you can submit by mail or online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA site is a good source of information about all of the federal aid available, and it includes a link to the financial aid offices for most states as well.

Step Four: Understand the full range of federal aid options available. Grant options include The Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, which are offered to students from families in the lowest income brackets. Loan options include the Federal Stafford Loan, which has a variable interest rate, and the Federal Perkins Loan, which has the lowest fixed rate of any federal student loans. You can also consider Federal Work-Study programs, which provide jobs that pay minimum wage or above.

If you show significant financial need, your child might also qualify for a Subsidized Stafford Loan, which does not start accruing interest until after you graduate from college, saving you a considerable sum. If you don't show enough need, your child may be eligible for an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, which isn't based on need. Unsubsidized loans begin accruing interest as soon as the money is disbursed, which means the debt will grow while your child attends college, although interest rates on student loans are generally very low. You can learn more about Stafford Loans at www.staffordloan.com, and about many more loan and grant options at the U.S. Department of Education's Federal Student Aid Web site, located at: studentaid.ed.gov.

Step Five: Pursue the full range of available scholarships. Many scholarships are available to students interested in a particular field of study, which makes them perfect for students who already have careers in mind. Having an athletic or artistic talent can also open the door to scholarships for students who earn special recognition for those talents. Awards are also available for those in underrepresented groups, such as Hispanic and African-American students, and those who will be the first in their family to attend college. Many scholarships are based on academic merit, but others - from businesses, civic and religious groups and corporate and financial organizations - are awarded based on family income or demographic factors. Creating a checklist of your child's talents, interests, and demographic factors will help you both hone in on the various angles you can pursue.

Step Six: Remember the value of high achievement. Many loans and grants are increasingly based more on academic merit than financial need. This is one more reason your child should develop good study skills and get extra help to address any issues that are impacting grades. It's also important to raise the bar as high as possible by taking Advanced Placement, honors or other advanced courses. Good performance in these courses is especially crucial if your child is hoping to receive aid from colleges and universities because it shows decision-makers that he or she is well-qualified for college-level work - and well positioned to ensure the institution's financial investment pays off.

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Tips for Building Your Students' Comprehension Thanks to the introduction of the Common Core State Standards, building students' comprehension in preparation for college and their careers has taken a front seat.

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Tue, 28 Nov 2017 17:17:26 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-building-your-students-comprehension https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-building-your-students-comprehension Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Tips for Building Your Students’ Comprehension

Thanks to the introduction of the Common Core State Standards, building students’ comprehension in preparation for college and their careers has taken a front seat. One of the key shifts called for by the Common Core is to practice with complex texts and their academic language, progressively developing students’ reading comprehension so that they can gain more from what they read. Students are asked to make logical inferences, analyze the structure of texts, evaluate texts’ arguments (and create their own), and much more.

As you know, however, it is challenging to “teach” comprehension. How can you ensure students extract meaning from that which they read? How can you inspire students to think critically as they read, speak and listen, and incorporate knowledge that they possess already into their understanding of new information?

Below are a few techniques to help your students more thoroughly engage with what they learn, derived from a number of tried-and-true comprehension strategies used by teachers across the nation:

The SQ3R method (Survey, Questions, Read, Recite and Review) guides students to ask questions, make predictions and confirm those predictions when reading and is used for successful studying habits.

  • Survey - Look over the headings, pictures, graphs, or tables. Read the introductory paragraph and summary paragraph. Glance over key words or questions that might be highlighted. Ask yourself; "What do I know about this lesson at this point?"
  • Question - Turn the first heading into a question. 
  • Read - Read to the end of the first section to answer the question you have asked.
  • Recite - After reading the first section, look away from the textbook and try to recite briefly the answer to your question. This is reciting from memory. Jot down brief phrases in outline form. Glance over the section again, if you cannot recite the correct information.

Repeat Question, Read, and Recite on each succeeding section heading.

  • Review - Look over your notes or main heading. Check your memory of the context by reciting the major sub-points under each heading.

 

Story Sequencing helps students learn to recall facts in a story in order, thereby helping them organize their ideas and the information that they read. One example of story sequencing is the use of story maps. Story maps are graphic aids that help students identify a story’s characters, plot, problem and solution as well as the story’s beginning, middle and end.

Paragraph Shrinking was developed as part of the Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies program that is used by many teachers to improve students’ reading proficiency (and was created at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development). As students read, have them summarize the main points of each section or paragraph (the who/what, most important thing about the who or what, and the overall main idea).

Paragraph shrinking empowers students to hone their comprehension by encouraging them to monitor their understanding of what they read as they read it. Students can work in small groups or you can work with the class as a whole.

Visualization, or the use of visual imagery, teaches students to think of images as they read, thereby engaging with the text and improving comprehension. You can encourage students to practice this by having them read passages and pause periodically (after coming across descriptive information) to develop a mental image. Students might relate a picture to a story’s plot or characters, or a passage’s main point.

When a student lacks reading skills, he or she suffers in all academic subjects. Students need reading skills to understand their history and science textbooks, test instructions, and literary stories.  Huntington's academic evaluation identifies a student's weak skills. Instructors develop an individualized program that builds these skills before progressing to the next skill level. Huntington Learning Center has been teaching reading comprehension since 1977. Visit www.huntingtonhelps.com for more information on our programs.

As you research ways to help your students improve their comprehension, keep in mind that it might be most effective to try out different strategies and give students the tools to hone the techniques that work best for them.  Just as students all learn differently, they learn to comprehend text in different manners as well.  As referenced above, there are various strategies for building comprehension that you can use with your students. To read up on the College and Career Readiness English Language Arts Standards, within the Common Core State Standards visit www.corestandards.org

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Helping Kids with ADHD Manage Big Emotions Have you noticed that your child or teen with ADHD seems to be “more emotional” than his or her friends or classmates without ADHD? Is he or she happier and more excited when something positive happens, and more sad, irritable, angry when something doesn’t go his or her way? Many kids with ADHD feel their emotions more powerfully than kids without ADHD. At times, the unbridled joy and excitement expressed by a child with ADHD is a gift, and his or her enthusiasm is infectious. The challenge comes when their excitement grows so big that it can’t be contained, and leads to behaviors that are unsafe or are disproportionate to the situation. Conversely, when a child with ADHD is feeling deeply sad, irritable, or angry, he or she can become consumed by the emotion. Your child may struggle to move beyond his or her feelings in the moment, and see the upsetting event within the context of a bigger picture. Even small problems can trigger big emotional reactions that stick around and interfere with friendships, school, or family time.

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Tue, 02 Jan 2018 12:21:29 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-kids-with-adhd-manage-big-emotions https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-kids-with-adhd-manage-big-emotions Dr. Mary Rooney, Ph.D. Dr. Mary Rooney, Ph.D. Have you noticed that your child or teen with ADHD seems to be “more emotional” than his or her friends or classmates without ADHD? Is he or she happier and more excited when something positive happens, and more sad, irritable, angry when something doesn’t go his or her way? Many kids with ADHD feel their emotions more powerfully than kids without ADHD. At times, the unbridled joy and excitement expressed by a child with ADHD is a gift, and his or her enthusiasm is infectious. The challenge comes when their excitement grows so big that it can’t be contained, and leads to behaviors that are unsafe or are disproportionate to the situation. Conversely, when a child with ADHD is feeling deeply sad, irritable, or angry, he or she can become consumed by the emotion. Your child may struggle to move beyond his or her feelings in the moment, and see the upsetting event within the context of a bigger picture. Even small problems can trigger big emotional reactions that stick around and interfere with friendships, school, or family time.

At a young age, all kids have a difficult time managing their emotions. Toddlers are prone to tantrums because the parts of the brain that deal with self-regulation aren’t well developed at this stage. Over the course of development, kids without ADHD naturally develop the capacity to better manage their emotions. For ADHD kids, the capacity and skills for emotion regulation lag behind those of their peers, and many don’t naturally acquire the skills they need to effectively manage their emotions. Fortunately, emotion regulation skills can be taught, and kids with ADHD can gradually learn to become better at managing their emotions.

Teaching kids with ADHD to regulate their emotions involves two phases:

Teach-It Phase

  1. Learning to label emotions and sensations. At a time when your child is calm, teach him or her about emotions. Help your child list out some of the emotions he or she experiences often, and the way that his or her body feels when having these emotional reactions. For example, “When I am angry, my face feels hot and my fists are clenched.” It can be helpful to allow your child to play-act these feelings, so he or she can more realistically recall how his or her body might feel. Let your child know that these physical sensations are the first clue that he or she is about to experience a strong emotion.
  2. Identify calming strategies. Next, help your child think of two calming strategies that he or she can use when feeling overwhelmed with emotion. These should be easy to do, at home or in public. For example, walking away from the situation and taking five deep breaths, closing his or her eyes and thinking of something that makes him or her smile or laugh, or calmly walking away and getting a drink of water. You can also choose one or two at-home activities, like coloring or drawing, or writing down how he or she is feeling.
  3. Read together. Many kids and parents also find it helpful to read books about emotions. There are quite a few great books available for younger kids, like The Way I Feel, by Janan Cain and Listening to My Body, by Gabi Garcia (for kids in preschool – about 4th grade). For girls ages 9 and up, The Feelings Book: The Care and Keeping of Your Emotions, by Dr. Lynda Madison is an excellent resource, and Understanding Myself, by Dr. Mary Lamia can be helpful for both boys and girls in this age range.

Use-It Phase

Once your child has learned to identify his or her emotions, the physical sensations that signal their arrival, and a few calming strategies that he or she can use when his or her feelings become overwhelming, he or she will need reminders to use these tools in the moment – when experiencing powerful feelings. When you notice that your child is having difficulty managing a big emotion:

  1. Help your child label his or her emotion. Calmly ask your child how he or she is feeling. If your child has difficulty with this, label the emotion for him or her, “It seems like you are pretty sad right now.”
  2. Prompt him or her to use a calming strategy. Remind your child of the strategies he or she had selected and practiced, and prompt him or her to use one of the strategies now.
  3. Provide feedback. After your child has used the strategy, give feedback. “You walked away and took a lot of deep breaths. You seem calmer now.”

Learning to manage emotions takes time, and your child will need repetition and practice to learn these skills. So, stay positive. Even if your child doesn’t use his or her calming strategies perfectly, or seems only slightly calmer than he or she was before, recognize the efforts and improvement. It may not seem like it in moment, but these small improvements are actually big steps in the right direction.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates National Parental Involvement Day This month, the Huntington Learning Center of City will celebrate National Parental Involvement Day on November 16, a day that honors the powerful contributions that parents and caregivers provide in support of students’ success. This annual celebration held on the third Thursday in November each year was founded in 1995 by Project Appleseed, a nonprofit educational advocacy organization.

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Thu, 28 Dec 2017 11:32:54 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/national-parental-involvement-day https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/national-parental-involvement-day Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center This month, the Huntington Learning Center of City will celebrate National Parental Involvement Day on November 16, a day that honors the powerful contributions that parents and caregivers provide in support of students’ success. This annual celebration held on the third Thursday in November each year was founded in 1995 by Project Appleseed, a nonprofit educational advocacy organization.

Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center says that the center encourages family involvement every day. “Parents and caregivers can have a tremendous impact on their children’s school experience,” she says. “Some of the simplest activities help the most—like showing an interest in what children are learning at school, helping children prioritize their homework each night and encouraging children to give their school work sincere effort. On National Parental Involvement Day and every day, we express our appreciation to parents who care about their children’s education and want to be a part of it.”

Huntington adds that there are many ways parents can foster their children’s academic success. Here are several suggestions for enhanced parental involvement:

  • Ask teachers about academic milestones for this school year and keep tabs on how your child is progressing toward grade-level standards and checkpoints.
  • Monitor homework time to ensure your child is managing his or her time effectively and working on the most important (i.e. due the soonest) tasks first.
  • Check your child’s homework each night for neatness and obvious errors.
  • Set goals together for the semester, school year and longer term.
  • Ask questions each day about what is going well and what is proving challenging in school.
  • Take advantage of opportunities to meet with teachers and staff at back-to-school nights, open houses and conferences.
  • Read all communications from your child’s teacher and respond in a timely manner when he or she requests information.
  • Make reading a daily habit for the entire family.
  • Ask your child’s teacher(s) if you can volunteer in the classroom or in other ways from home.

Huntington reminds parents that parental involvement is easier than it might sound. “While volunteering in the classroom and for the school’s Parent Teacher Organization are great things, there are lots of ways to support your child,” she says. “Parents should make clear to their children that they believe school is important and encourage them to make it their top priority. Those who communicate this to their children and hold high expectations for them as students will see the positive influence.”

Learn more about National Parental Involvement Day at www.projectappleseed.org. For more information about Huntington Learning Center, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How Parents Can Best Assess the Mid-Year Report Card It is report card time—something many parents and students dread. But they shouldn’t, says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Every parent would love to see a report card full of As and glowing remarks about their child’s love of learning and work ethic, but remind yourself that the report card is a valuable tool,” says Huntington. “Think of it as an opportunity to help your child, to address and overcome any issues together.

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Fri, 10 Nov 2017 17:29:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mid-year-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mid-year-report-card It is report card time—something many parents and students dread. But they shouldn’t, says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. “Every parent would love to see a report card full of As and glowing remarks about their child’s love of learning and work ethic, but remind yourself that the report card is a valuable tool,” says Huntington. “Think of it as an opportunity to help your child, to address and overcome any issues together.

What should parents look for when reviewing the report card? Huntington suggests evaluating your child’s report card for these five things:

Study skills –
“What does your child’s report card indicate about his or her ability to focus, take initiative and manage his or her time?” says Huntington. Developing good study skills is an important part of becoming an effective student. That involves staying organized at home and at school, keeping track of assignments and projects, and learning to prioritize.

Good effort – Being involved in homework will give you a good sense of your child’s effort level, but pay attention to marks and comments on the report card that address this, too. Talk with the teacher about it. Trying hard is important, but if your child’s grades don’t reflect his or her effort, there may be a deeper problem.

Red flags – Red flags are warning signs of potential issues. “We suggest looking beyond the grades, because your child’s attitude about and commitment to learning are just as important,” says Huntington. Do the teacher’s remarks indicate your child is unmotivated or has difficulty listening and staying focused? Does he or she talk too much in class or avoid school work?

Behavioral issues – Is your child’s teacher reporting indifference or apathy on your child’s part? Or is he or she acting out? “Often, struggling students feel worthless and stupid,” says Huntington. “When your child is beyond frustration, beyond trying or caring, his or her behavior may worsen—especially at school.”

Strengths – “Often, there’s so much focus on the bad parts of the report card that we forget to pay attention to the areas where students excel,” Huntington says. “One of the best ways to build children’s self-esteem is to help them find the thing that makes them feel successful. Remember to notice and celebrate your child’s strengths.”

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Six Questions to Ask at Parent-Teacher Conferences It’s time for your first official sit-down of the school year with your child’s teacher. While it’s perfectly fine to go into the parent-teacher conference without a lot of advance preparation, you can make the very most of this discussion by thinking through what you’d like to talk about ahead of time. The parent-teacher conference, after all, is arguably one of the most essential tools you have to guide your child in school. Be sure you collect as much information as possible in order to support your child’s success.

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Tue, 25 Sep 2018 10:49:47 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parent-teacher-conferences https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parent-teacher-conferences

It’s time for your first official sit-down of the school year with your child’s teacher. While it’s perfectly fine to go into the parent-teacher conference without a lot of advance preparation, you can make the very most of this discussion by thinking through what you’d like to talk about ahead of time. The parent-teacher conference, after all, is arguably one of the most essential tools you have to guide your child in school. Be sure you collect as much information as possible in order to support your child’s success.

The teacher will likely have a framework for your discussion that addresses the most important topics. However, be sure to write down your own list of questions as well. As a starting point, here are six questions that cover your child’s holistic school performance: 

Is my child meeting grade-level expectations?
Teachers have state standards against which they measure all students’ performance. Ask how your child is keeping up in class and if there are any areas that need attention.

Why did my child receive this grade? Grades on homework, class work and tests are the most obvious measurement of your child’s daily and weekly progress. Talk with the teacher about any grades that have surprised you to get a better understanding of the components of a grade and where your child is excelling or falling short.

Do you suggest that my child work on anything in particular? While grades tell one part of the story, there are many other aspects of a child’s academic behavior. Ask the teacher about your child’s classroom participation, time management, organization and more.

What is my role at homework time? A common area of confusion for parents is how much or how little they should be helping with homework. Your child’s teacher can offer insight into the appropriate level of parental involvement and what you can do if your child is struggling.

What are my child’s strengths? Don’t forget that parent-teacher conferences are a time to uncover your child’s greatest assets in addition to areas of weakness. Perhaps your child has an outgoing personality and works well in teams. Maybe he or she is a strong public speaker. Talk about what your child is good at, as these areas could present opportunities for extracurricular activities and a possible major in college.

What is the best way for me to support my child at home? As a busy parent, it can feel overwhelming to stay on top of everything school related, but your child’s teacher will appreciate you expressing your desire to help. The teacher might have a few simple suggestions or top priorities to focus on at home that will make it easy for you to take action.
Naturally, every parent-teacher conference will be different, and the teacher might lead the conversation in a particular direction based on how the school year is going so far. However, if your conference doesn’t allow sufficient time for you to discuss everything you’d like to, schedule an additional meeting. The key is to keep the lines of communication with your child’s teacher open and address issues as soon as they arise. Use the parent-teacher conference to talk openly with the teacher. It shouldn’t feel like a one-sided conversation, but rather, a chance for you to share and receive more details on how your child is doing and learn the most important ways you can support his or her education.

If your child is having trouble in school, call Huntington. We can address any problem areas that arise on the report card or in your parent-teacher conference and develop a customized, individualized program that corrects them. Call 1 800 CAN LEARN today to discuss our programs and how we can help your child be the best student possible.

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Help Your Child Strengthen His or Her Weaker Learning Styles When it comes to learning, no two children process information exactly the same. Like adults, children have their own learning preferences and styles and it can take a little trial and error to determine exactly how they learn effectively and retain information. Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center says that while knowing a child’s preferred learning style or styles is valuable information, parents should still help their children improve their lesser-refined styles too. “Not every classroom or subject will fit a child’s tendencies, so even though it is natural for children to gravitate toward certain subjects because the typical class activity fits their learning style best, they shouldn’t just ignore subjects that are a bit more out of their comfort zone.” How can you help your child strengthen any weaker learning styles? Here are a few tips:

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Thu, 28 Dec 2017 11:14:58 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-strengthen-their-learning-styles https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-strengthen-their-learning-styles Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center When it comes to learning, no two children process information exactly the same. Like adults, children have their own learning preferences and styles and it can take a little trial and error to determine exactly how they learn effectively and retain information. Eileen Huntington, Co-founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center says that while knowing a child’s preferred learning style or styles is valuable information, parents should still help their children improve their lesser-refined styles too. “Not every classroom or subject will fit a child’s tendencies, so even though it is natural for children to gravitate toward certain subjects because the typical class activity fits their learning style best, they shouldn’t just ignore subjects that are a bit more out of their comfort zone.” How can you help your child strengthen any weaker learning styles? Here are a few tips:

To become a stronger visual learner, have your child try the following:

  • Use mnemonic techniques for memorizing information.
  • Organize notes logically so that main concepts and ideas are highlighted and it is easy to skim supporting information.
  • Try a variety of visual aids to learn new material, such as graphs and charts—and combine these tools with reading aloud.
  • Pair any of these techniques with his or her stronger learning preferences. For example, if your child generally enjoys reading and talking aloud, he or she could do so while writing things on a whiteboard or in a notebook.

To become a stronger kinesthetic learner, have your child try the following:

  • Study in small groups to talk through ideas.
  • Use flashcards and other “active” tools.
  • Have your child share material with you or a study partner to reinforce learning.
  • Take notes while reading, draw out concepts on a whiteboard or piece of paper, or act things out with you or someone else.
  • Pair any of these techniques with his or her stronger learning preferences. For example, if your child generally needs a quiet place to focus, he or she can still improve those tactile learning strategies by active studying (e.g. highlighting while reading).

To become a stronger auditory learner, have your child try the following:

  • Record information (such as vocabulary words) on a tape recorder and play back while on the go or in the car.
  • Use the “Read Aloud” tool in his or her word processing software to review drafts of what he or she writes.
  • Purchase both the audio and regular version of textbooks and listen to chapters while following along in the text.
  • Read aloud to him or herself.
  • When learning new information, make associations—with music, for example—to remember what he or she learns.
  • Pair any of these techniques with his or her stronger learning preferences. For example, if your child benefits from the use of memory devices and flash cards, he or she could also have a partner read those tools aloud to strengthen the auditory learning aptitudes.

Lastly, Huntington reminds parents that students who are versatile in their learning preferences will be better prepared for the real world. “When children spend time developing their less comfortable learning styles, they’re essentially helping transform themselves into stronger, more agile students,” she says. “The world is fast-moving and children who are able to adapt as the situation requires will be well equipped for lifelong success.”

For more information about how Huntington helps students strengthen their learning styles, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Three Things To Consider When Your Child Gets a Bad Report Card One question that is often asked by parents is what to do when their child receives a bad report card?

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Wed, 07 Feb 2018 15:00:57 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-do-when-your-child-gets-a-bad-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-do-when-your-child-gets-a-bad-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center One question that is often asked by parents is what to do when their child receives a bad report card? There is no concrete way to address this as every situation is different, but we did find some very useful tips in a parenting blog post the New York Times published a few years ago. The blog post featured the question of one parent who asked for advice after her child’s progress report showed grades that were significantly lower than normal. The child was so scared of being punished that she initially hid her report card. Readers of the parenting blog were polled and asked to leave their opinions on what they would do in a similar situation. Here are several key points taken from their comments:

1. It Might Not Be Effort: Effort is not necessarily the problem when a student receives poorer grades than usual. There are so many variables that affect performance. The class size could be larger than normal, affecting the student's ability to get the one-on-one attention he or she needs. It could also be a matter of the time of day the class is held. Considering the environment and other variables might help to determine why your child is struggling.

2. Punishment Only Makes It Worse: Parental pressure was a major cause of concern echoed in reader responses, as they thought back to their own school experiences. Rather than learning the material, many of the readers polled recalled being so obsessed with grades that they didn't care about the subject matter itself. If your child is struggling but trying, it might make more sense to offer encouragement rather than punishing him or her right away. This could help foster confidence in the student and allow him or her to relax, which may help put focus on learning versus stressing about grades. 

3. It All Starts with Communication: Communication was another common theme from reader feedback. It might be advantageous to communicate with your child about interests and current challenges to get a better idea of potential issues. Is your student too focused on extracurricular activities at the moment? Is he or she overwhelmed by a heavier-than-normal workload? You could also speak with your child openly about your own struggles and how you overcame them, so he or she knows that everyone has struggled with school work at times. An open line of communication serves as the best way for a child to ask for help when it's needed.

In the event that you need outside assistance to get your child back on track, we encourage you to contact us today. Our tutors not only are skilled in their subject areas of expertise; they are dedicated to helping students get the best grades possible through proven practices. Whether your child needs specific subject tutoring or ACT test prep to get for ready for college entrance exams, our tutors are up for the challenge. Contact us today to learn more. 

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How to Help Your Child Strengthen His or Her Communication Skills No matter what age your child is, communication is an essential skill. It helps children confirm their understanding of what they are supposed to learn in the classroom, collaborate effectively with other students and people, advocate for themselves, and of course, create clear, effective written work. How can you help your child strengthen those verbal and nonverbal communication skills? Here are several tips:

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Thu, 28 Dec 2017 11:07:14 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-strengthen-communication-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-strengthen-communication-skills Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington No matter what age your child is, communication is an essential skill. It helps children confirm their understanding of what they are supposed to learn in the classroom, collaborate effectively with other students and people, advocate for themselves, and of course, create clear, effective written work. How can you help your child strengthen those verbal and nonverbal communication skills? Here are several tips:

  • Build the listening skills. Listening should be an active process in which your child focuses on whoever is speaking and simultaneously processes what that person says. Teach your child to watch for teachers’ and others’ non-verbal cues as well as their words. It’s also important to confirm understanding periodically. Remember also that listening isn’t just something your child should do in school. Teach him or her to become a good conversationalist by summarizing, responding, making eye contact and using respectful body language.
  • Work on written communication. Speaking and listening are essential components of communication, but the written word will prove powerful throughout your child’s life. Help your child discover ways to practice writing for fun. Blogging, creating short stories or poetry, or keeping a paper or computer journal are great ways to get your child to express him or herself and hone the writing skills.
  • Fuel those curiosities. Young children are highly curious, asking questions about anything and everything. As your child grows older, try to foster that continued interest in learning new things and understanding how things work. When your child learns something new, ask lots of questions. The more your child engages in the learning process by seeking answers to burning questions, sharing what he or she learns, and expressing ideas, the better communicator he or she will become.
  • Invite input. In high school, teachers will begin to expect that your child can engage in collaborative discussions with peers and build on one another’s diverse perspectives. At home, you can help your child improve this skill by inviting him or her to weigh in on conversations and consider not just his or her own perspective on a topic, but that of others. Whenever possible, draw out your child’s inner thinker.
  • Back up those opinions. An extension of critical thinking, the art of debate will serve your child well in school and life. Your child should be able to state an opinion as well as the reasons behind it. In writing class, your child will be asked often to write persuasive arguments or convince a reader of something. You can help your child strengthen this ability by thinking through why he or she believes certain things and by listening carefully to others’ viewpoints to understand why they might feel differently.

Communication skills are essential for children in school and become even more important in their future careers. Talk with the professionals at any college career center or browse open job descriptions on any job website and you’ll discover that strong writing, listening and communication are highly sought-after skills by most companies. As your child matures into a young adult, help him or her nurture the ever-important communication aptitudes. In doing so, you will equip him for success in college and beyond.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Tips to Improve Learning Skills & Academic Success Planning & organization are learning skills that students can implement in order to succeed & reach their potential, learn more about other skills here.

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Tue, 07 Nov 2017 17:29:28 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-improve-learning-skills--academic-success- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-improve-learning-skills--academic-success- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Essential Learning Skills for Academic Success

It is never too late to work on improving your child's learning skills. Focusing on specific learning and academic skills will help prepare your child for future learning and will provide a strong foundation for success. Many of these skills are easy to integrate into daily learning activities and can have a profound effect on your child's academic future.

Consider these learning skills to help prepare your child for a successful school year:

  • Planning ahead Knowing what is on the horizon is essential for academic success. Most teachers will provide a course syllabus or outline that details expectations and a calendar for the term. This is an important document so your child knows what to expect. Work with your child to add course expectations and deadlines to a master calendar. Once your child sees all of the required coursework in one place you can begin to plan ahead for the work load. You may notice that one particular week is full of exams, quizzes, projects, and presentations while the weeks leading up to it are relatively quiet. This knowledge will help your child plan and prepare carefully while ensuring that no deadlines are missed and no requirements sneak up unsuspectingly. 
  • Reviewing what has already been learned Looking ahead to this year's classes is important, but not at the sake of previously mastered learning. In order to properly prepare for the upcoming school year it is vital your child spends time reviewing what has already been learned. Revisiting mastered concepts, skills, and knowledge is a great way to connect with future learning. The professional tutors at Huntington Learning Center are trained to reinforce previously mastered concepts while helping students become proficient with new skills and knowledge. For example, if your child participates in tutoring sessions for trigonometry the tutor will ensure new concepts are mastered while reinforcing what was already learned in the student's algebra classes. 
  • Staying organized Many students struggle simply because of disorganization. It is hard to buckle down and begin studying when you can't find the proper reading material, notes, or a class syllabus. Staying organized provides your child with a system to ensure all classroom texts and materials are readily available and easily accessible. There are no perfect organizational systems, and every student will do things a little differently, but working with your child to become more organized is highly beneficial. You may want to start by providing school supplies with built in organization. Consider a color for every class and buy a binder, folder, and notebook that all match. Some students prefer an all-in-one system that organizes all materials, regardless of the class, together. Check your child's materials on a regular basis to make sure the system you helped devise is still operating smoothly.
  •  Being proactive Don't wait until your child feels overwhelmed by the required classwork to ask for help. Intervening early when your child needs additional assistance is an excellent way to boost both confidence and academic learning. Spend time with your child on a regular basis reviewing classwork and discussing class requirements. This will help your child identify when to ask for help and what, specifically, is causing the most trouble. Being tuned in to these struggles will benefit your child when asking for help. Teachers, and tutors, can be of the greatest assistance when they know where the specific learning breakdown occurred. This information, coupled with careful diagnostic assessment, helps Huntington Learning Center tutors devise a customized tutoring plan. These tutoring plans meet students where they currently are and work to move them forward in both understanding and academic confidence.
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Find Out How Tutor Services Help Students Increase Their Understanding Subject tutoring and test preparation are just a few of the tutor services offered by Huntington Learning Center that prepare students for the school year.

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Wed, 25 Oct 2017 15:31:48 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/find-out-how-tutor-services-help-students-increase-their-understanding https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/find-out-how-tutor-services-help-students-increase-their-understanding Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Get a Jump on the New School Year by Investing in Tutor Services!

There's no better time to choose tutor services than the start of a new school year. Investing in tutoring services can help your child master new concepts, improve study skills, prepare for an upcoming exam, or build a solid foundation of academic skills. Many students benefit from the personalized sessions that aim to increase both understanding and confidence.

Huntington Learning Centers offer tutoring services in:


Subject Tutoring

Your child can benefit from tutor services in a variety of subject areas, primarily in the mathematics and science domains. These tutoring sessions are designed to meet the rigorous demands of school coursework. Students seek subject tutoring for a variety of reasons including difficulty mastering new skills and knowledge, letter grade improvement, and homework help. Regardless of the reason for tutoring, each student is treated as an individual and is presented with a tutoring plan that is customized for specific needs. Perhaps your child is struggling in 8th grade pre-algebra. Before the very first tutoring session your child will be assessed for both strengths and weaknesses. This information is used to create a tutoring plan that addresses weak areas while reinforcing the new learning occurring in the pre-algebra class.


Test Preparation

A child's education is filled with high stakes tests including state achievement tests, college placement tests, and advanced placement exams. What exams will your child be taking this year? Success on these exams is determined by academic preparation and a specific set of test taking skills.  The tutors at Huntington Learning Center can help with both. Tutors review and coach students on each tested academic area and the kinds of questions that will be asked. For example, a portion of the SAT exam assesses a student's vocabulary with cloze items. A cloze question requires students to choose the missing word in a sentence, completing the sentence with proper syntax. Students may choose to complete the sentence with an appropriate word that maintains the sentence's meaning before reading any of the multiple choice answers. Upon reading the answer choices the student can then find a synonym for the initial response. A portion of a tutoring session may be dedicated to specific strategies and then followed by guided practice.

Study Skills

Strong study skills are the foundation to ongoing success in school. A child who lacks sound study habits and proper organizational skills is more likely to struggle to keep pace with academic demands. A new school year is an excellent opportunity to reinforce your child's study skills or learn additional ways to study for the year's upcoming courses. Consider a student that is enrolled in a physics class for the first time. Although he experienced previous success in biology and chemistry he may quickly learn that his study skills need a boost to handle all the new content physics will present. Investing in tutoring sessions to target a different set of study skills more appropriate for physics will allow him to experience success and feel more confident in class.

Academic Skills

Core academic skills, such as reading, writing, vocabulary, and math, are crucial for a student's success during the upcoming school year. If you are concerned with the foundation of your child's academic skills now is a great time to invest in tutoring sessions. These sessions are designed to meet a student's specific needs. Each academic area is broken down into specific skills typically present in various grade levels. For example, an elementary student receiving tutoring in math concepts and computation would focus on basic computation, fractions, and decimals while a high school student would be working on algebra skills and advanced word problems. The developmental sequence of academic skill attainment is used in planning what areas a student should be mastering next.

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Questions to Ask About Your Child’s First Report Card of the Year It’s the start of a brand-new school year, which will be full of new adventure for your child. Soon, you’ll receive his or her first report card—an official status update on how things are going. “Parents should take this first ‘check-up’ of the year as an opportunity to open the lines of communication with their children and their children’s teachers,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. When the first-semester report card comes home, what should you address during those conversations? Here are several questions to ask:

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Mon, 30 Oct 2017 17:20:52 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/your-childs-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/your-childs-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s the start of a brand-new school year, which will be full of new adventure for your child. Soon, you’ll receive his or her first report card—an official status update on how things are going. “Parents should take this first ‘check-up’ of the year as an opportunity to open the lines of communication with their children and their children’s teachers,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. When the first-semester report card comes home, what should you address during those conversations? Here are several questions to ask:

Questions for your child

  1. How has this year gone so far? Give your child a chance to talk about the first couple of months of the school year candidly. How does your child feel about the teacher, each subject and any homework and tests?
  2. What are you proud of? Allow your child to ponder what has gone well this year as a result of his or her efforts. Perhaps there will be one or more classes where the grades were hard earned and a few that came much easier. This insight will help you understand your child’s journey to date and what concerns he or she has that weren’t on your radar.
  3. How do you learn and study best? Before offering your own observations and ideas about how your child learns most effectively, ask for his or her opinion. Be sure to talk about how this year is going and if your child is noticing any changes in his or her most useful study and learning methods.
  4. What do you want to change going forward? Bring this up after reviewing the report card together. If your child received a poor grade, it’s understandable that you might want to lay out a game plan to fix it, but let your child talk first. What does he or she think is the best course of action?

Questions for your child’s teacher

  1. What are my child’s strengths and weaknesses? You have your own thoughts, but it is invaluable to understand the teacher’s ideas about your child’s areas of strength and areas to improve upon. This gives the teacher a chance to talk about your child’s performance compared to grade-level expectations and how he or she is staying on track thus far in the year.
  2. How would you describe my child as a student/learner? The more you know about your child’s learning preferences, tendencies and methods, the better equipped you will be to offer support at home. Ask the teacher what he or she sees in the classroom as far as the environment and types of lessons that seem to “click” with your child the best.
  3. Where would you like to see my child make changes? This question should hopefully open the conversation to your child’s working habits and demeanor in the classroom. Whatever adjustments the teacher brings up, make sure you ask for suggestions on how best to proceed.
  4. What can I do to support your efforts? It’s always helpful to get an understanding from the teacher as early in the year as possible of the role you should play in your child’s education. Ask about tips for approaching homework time, what the appropriate level of involvement is and how you can stay in touch with the teacher for your child’s benefit.

Before any conversation about the report card, Huntington encourages parents to write down their own list of questions, springboarding from the above topics. “All parents have a unique perspective of what their children need to work on, so it’s a good idea to keep that big picture in mind when communicating both with their children and the teachers,” she says. “Parents can keep those conversations focused and constructive by spending time in advance putting any issues or concerns down on paper.”

If the first report card of the year brings up issues that are of serious concern, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. We can develop a customized, one-to-one plan of instruction to help your child address any problems big or small and make this a great school year.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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SAT Help is a Smart Investment for Students Fall is fast approaching and with it comes a new school year for your child.

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:52:08 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-help-is-a-smart-investment-for-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-help-is-a-smart-investment-for-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Help is a Smart Investment for Students

This not an ordinary fall for either you or your child. The SAT looms and you know your child needs all the support they can get to get ready. SAT scores can play a very important role in the college admissions process, but most parents do not know what exactly the SAT entails. What skills does the SAT emphasize? How much geometry and algebra are on the SAT? Does my child need a geometry tutor to be as prepared and confident as possible?

Students often describe preparing for the SAT as one of the most stressful and anxious periods of their teen years; they know that this one test can have a big impact on whether or not they can get into the college of their choice. When students try and prepare for a test that they are not familiar with, stress and anxiety can get worse. Why leave them to navigate the minefield of SAT prep when there are professional experts and respected organizations that specialize in helping students with this specific test? 

Don't leave SAT prep to chance. Don't simply buy your child an SAT prep book and hope that it's enough. Find the professional assistance that is available to you and relieve fears that can damage confidence and scores. When you invest in a professional and reputable tutoring service, you can ensure that your child will get the help they need, both in terms of subject matter and test-taking strategy. This extra assistance will dramatically boost your child’s confidence and allay fears heading into test day.

Through one-on-one instruction, your child can discover his or her strengths and weaknesses and get the help needed to overcome possible deficiencies. If, for instance, geometry is not your child's strong suit, the tutor can provide constructive and tailored lessons on the subject that will enable your child to learn key concepts and even expand upon them. By the time he or she takes the test, your child should be confident in his or her abilities and ready and able to demonstrate new skills.

Beyond understanding and practicing the specific skills demanded during the SAT, the mental edge provided by professional tutoring services cannot be overstated. Study after study reveals that test scores are suppressed by stress and anxiety. Practice with a professional tutor sharpens skills, provides familiarity with the test format, and shows your child how hard work and preparation can influence a more successful outcome.

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PARENTS' GUIDE TO THE FIRST REPORT CARD OF THE YEAR Huntington Learning Center has created a list of tips that parents can use while assessing their child's first report card of the semester.

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Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:34:11 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parents-guide-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ October 17, 2017 — The first marking period of the year does not have to conjure up stress for many children and their parents. “The report card should be viewed as an opportunity to identify any potential trouble areas, address any issues and set goals with your child,” advises Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. As the first academic review of your child’s school performance this year, Huntington suggests that parents keep in mind the following when they receive their child’s fall report card:

The teacher can offer more in-depth information. Grades should be digested with the help of a teacher, who can provide more insight into and specifics about your child’s academic strengths and weaknesses, behavior in the classroom and more. Together, you can identify the areas where your child may need additional support and develop a plan to provide just that—at home and in the classroom.

Poor organization and study skills may hamper a student’s performance. Sometimes a child has the ability to learn and comprehend, but he or she is disorganized and unskilled at managing his or her time. If your child is getting bad grades, talk about his or her homework, study routine and approach. Perhaps a few small changes may help your child become a more effective and efficient student.

Last year was last year. It’s a whole new school year, with more demanding classes and concepts for your child to learn and different teachers who may approach subjects differently. This means that the challenges that confront your child may be completely different this year. Do not be surprised if your child brings home a lower-than-expected grade in a subject that did not cause trouble last year, and remind yourself that no matter what troubles present themselves, you and your child can overcome them together.

Some problems don’t go away on their own. Certain issues need correction sooner rather than later. If your child does not acquire certain “building block” skills in math or reading that are essential for him or her to grasp more difficult and in-depth concepts, for example, he or she will continue to struggle in those subjects. Your child’s teacher can advise whether your child would benefit from tutoring that will help him or her close those skill gaps as quickly as possible.

Huntington reminds parents that perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind when grades are declining is that the action taken is what really counts. “Inevitably, issues will arise throughout your child’s education,” says Huntington. “However, if you stay optimistic and calm and take steps early, you can overcome those issues before they grow into major problems.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Huntington Learning Center Gives Tips for Instilling the Importance of College into Your Child By creating an open dialogue about college early, parents can positively influence their child's study skills to better prepare for college.

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Fri, 29 Sep 2017 12:10:27 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-importance-college https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-importance-college Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Gives Tips for Instilling the Importance of College into Your Child

Oradell, NJ 10/15/17  Parents hear often how important it is to start saving early for their child’s college education, but what about nurturing a lifelong college mindset? “Parents shouldn’t assume that just because their child attends school each day that he or she is thinking about and planning for college,” says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington suggests that parents start the college conversation early. Here are a few additional tips to positively influence your child’s feelings about the importance of college:

Set the expectation. Rather than making college sound like a possibility, talk about college as a definite plan. By doing so, you’ll ingrain in your child’s mind that it will happen—with your support. This is also a good opportunity to impress upon your child the importance of working hard in school in preparation for college-level academics.

Share the reasons that college is important. Starting as early as elementary school, talk candidly with your child about the fact that earning a college education will help him or her get a good job, make more money and have a better life overall. As your child grows older, discuss some of the other benefits of college, such as the ability to explore subjects, grow as a person, try new activities and much more. 

Go see colleges. If there is a college in your town, take your child there sometimes—even if just for picnics or walks on the weekends. Many colleges offer events for the community as well as camps and other programs for children of all ages. Seek out opportunities to expose your child to the college environment. Take your child to visit your alma mater if you have the chance. Point out the places where you lived and took classes and share some of the positive experiences from your time at college.

Talk about the future. Your nine-year-old might not yet have a firm career ambition, but you can still ponder the possibilities and discuss how a college education will help your child make them happen.  Ask your child what he or she wants to become. Give your child opportunities to explore careers through classes, camps, and later, internships and volunteer experiences.

Parents have a tremendous influence on their child’s college aspirations. “You are your child’s greatest influence, so everything you say and do shapes how your child feels about college and its value,” says Huntington. “Make college sound exciting, worthwhile and achievable. Promise that you’ll help your child realize his or her academic aspirations. Then, by the time your child reaches high school, the question won’t be whether or not to attend college, but where to apply.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Tackling the Scholarship Search the Smart Way High school parents know how intense and nerve-wracking the college search process can be—especially when it comes to thinking about the price tag. Here’s the good news: there are many scholarships out there, and even students who aren’t at the top of their class have a chance to win some scholarship money. But how should your teen go about it? Here are a few tips and suggestions to make the scholarship search efficient—and hopefully successful:

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Fri, 09 Feb 2018 17:01:52 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-college-scholarships https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-college-scholarships High school parents know how intense and nerve-wracking the college search process can be—especially when it comes to thinking about the price tag. Here’s the good news: there are many scholarships out there, and even students who aren’t at the top of their class have a chance to win some scholarship money. But how should your teen go about it? Here are a few tips and suggestions to make the scholarship search efficient—and hopefully successful:

Start early. It truly is never too early to start researching scholarship programs—and freshman year is a great time to start getting familiar with what types of scholarships exist, the requirements and who typically wins those scholarships. The guidance counselor can be a great resource, but it’s helpful to start browsing sites like www.scholarships.com, www.fastweb.com and https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/scholarship-search also. Then, by the time your teen is ready to start applying, he or she will already be knowledgeable about the options and expectations.

Search far and wide. Encourage your teen to utilize the aforementioned scholarship search engines, search for scholarships in the local community (foundations, local businesses and churches are good places to start) and make friends with the guidance counselor. It’s worth emphasizing that the guidance counselor’s office probably learns about new scholarships all year long. If they have an online system or database, be sure your teen browses it regularly or registers to receive notifications of new scholarships or scholarship deadlines. Stopping by often to get to know the counselors is a good idea as well so that they are aware of your teen’s interests, target schools and career goals. Once your teen applies for financial aid and submits college applications, the guidance counselor can also help navigate any college-specific scholarships offered by the institutions to which your teen applies.

Narrow things down. The scholarship search can quickly become overwhelming if your teen accumulates a list of hundreds of potential scholarships and doesn’t know where to begin. This is where the importance of paying attention to criteria comes in. Scholarship search engines actually allow your teen to create a profile that narrows the list down to those that are a fit, minimizing time wasted on scholarships for which your teen is not a candidate. Your teen should take the same meticulous screening approach with other scholarships that he or she learns about.

Be disciplined about applying. Most scholarship deadlines are between October and March, so encourage your teen to search in the fall and pay attention to deadlines. If your teen comes up with a list of 25 possible scholarships, he or she should create a spreadsheet with the names, application deadlines and contact information of each, and tackle five or 10 a week (arranging by deadline date). As new possibilities arise, add them to the spreadsheet and keep at it. Files for each scholarship with the details, essays submitted and more will keep your teen organized.

With effort and diligence, your teen can place him or herself in the best position to win scholarships. The reality is that there is a lot of money available and your teen can increase his or her chances of scholarship success by continuing to work hard in school and applying to as many “potential fit” scholarships as possible.

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The Benefits of SAT Prep The college admissions process can be one of the most stressful parts of raising a teenager.

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Thu, 26 Oct 2017 16:35:46 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-benefits-of-sat-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-benefits-of-sat-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Benefits of SAT Prep

The college admissions process can be one of the most stressful parts of raising a teenager. For many parents, it is the culmination of a long process; they hope that those years of decision-making and support will lead to an acceptance letter to a good college, which will pave the way for adulthood, independence, and a worthwhile career.

There are many aspects to the college admissions process, and taking the SAT is routinely cited as a major concern for both teens and parents, for good reason. The test results will be considered heavily when colleges are reviewing applications and could be the deciding factor in your child's acceptance or denial at an institution.

So how does a concerned parent bridge any gaps between their child’s current level of knowledge and the skills that he or she will need to do well on the SAT? One of the most proven methods is to enroll your child in a respected and established SAT prep program. There are many benefits to SAT prep, including the following: 

  • A Higher Score:  In the competitive world of college admissions, even a slight increase in score can be the difference between the desired college acceptance notification and a disappointing rejection letter.
  • Expert Help: Experts on the test know that it's not just your child's knowledge that is being tested, but also his or her understanding and ability to reason. They will be the best able to instruct your child on test-taking strategies that are tailored, both to the test and to your child's particular learning style.
  • Reduced pressure: The combination of practice – which aids familiarity – and expert advice will help to alleviate the pressure that your teen might experience with a test that can have a big impact on his or her future. As your child becomes more familiar with the test, your child’s comfort levels and confidence will rise.
  • Financial Aid: The cost of college has increased enormously over the last decade. Since many colleges provide financial aid based, in part, on an applicant's SAT scores, the investment in a prep program can lead to significant monetary benefits down the road.

The SATs do not have to induce panic in you or your child. By enrolling in a recognized SAT prep program, you can alleviate some of the tension and ensure that your teen is as prepared as possible. Enroll now before the fall SAT season arrives!

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Tips and Tools for Students with ADHD Messy backpack and binder. Disorganized desk. A poor or non-existent organizational system. If your child has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), you’ve likely dealt with one or more of these issues during the school year. It can be incredibly frustrating to see your child operating in such an inefficient, ineffective manner, but there are ways you can help him or her improve those executive functions and develop strategies to stay organized and on task. Here are several tips and tools that will help your ADHD student:

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Mon, 30 Oct 2017 16:23:18 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-and-tools-for-students-with-adhd https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-and-tools-for-students-with-adhd Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington Messy backpack and binder. Disorganized desk. A poor or non-existent organizational system. If your child has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), you’ve likely dealt with one or more of these issues during the school year. It can be incredibly frustrating to see your child operating in such an inefficient, ineffective manner, but there are ways you can help him or her improve those executive functions and develop strategies to stay organized and on task. Here are several tips and tools that will help your ADHD student:

Embrace charts and checklists. A daily assignment chart will help your child keep track of homework and ensure you know what’s expected at home. Try a simple sheet with subjects across the top and days of the week in the left-hand column. Your child should record any homework at the end of each subject or class and keep this chart in one central place, such as a binder. At night, this chart should become your child’s to-do list, which he or she can keep on hand during homework time and check off as tasks are completed. Checklists posted by the door (or wherever your child gets ready for school) with everything needed for the school day are also helpful visual reminders.

Use a day planner. A day planner is a good idea for any student, but especially important for ADHD students who struggle with organization. Help your child learn the basics of referencing the planner frequently and during homework time and using it to plan a schedule for any bigger assignments or projects. Many students use day planners successfully to stay on top of their assignments as well. Whether your child’s planner is simple and used for “high-level” recording of extracurricular reminders, due dates and test dates, or detailed with homework assignments, it’s a useful daily companion.

Master prioritization. Often, children with ADHD lack strong time management skills. A consistent routine helps such children become accustomed to staying on task and setting aside time for both “have-tos” and “want-tos.” Before sitting down to do homework, have your child rank each subject in order of priority. Due dates that are furthest away should be lower on the list than assignments due the next day. Then, have him or her estimate how long each assignment might take and set time limits for each. A stopwatch or timer is an invaluable device for helping your child avoid veering off on tasks.

Create a system. Help your child develop a system for keeping track of handouts, supplies, notebooks and more. Whether that’s a color-coded filing system for each subject, inboxes at home used in conjunction with a binder with subject dividers, or a combination of methods, the key is to embrace the “everything in its place” mantra. Teach your child to always store similar items in the same location and to develop good habits for organizing the backpack and desk at the end of each homework session.

Lastly, your support is critical as your child learns to be an effective student. Keep tabs on homework and project deadlines and keep a family calendar and bulletin board in a central location. Make organization a family practice. Most importantly, remind your child that all his or her efforts will pay off in the long run. With reliable procedures in place and continued practice, your child will learn the routines that help him or her the most.

If your child has ADHD and is struggling to stay organized and keep up with school work, call Huntington. We work with many ADHD students and use proven instructional strategies to help them stay focused and be successful in school.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Read it and Understand: Six Strategies for Improved Reading Comprehension Implementation of reading comprehension strategies is a critical component of understanding any piece of text. Learn about these strategies here.

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Fri, 09 Feb 2018 16:44:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-strategies-for-improved-reading-comprehension https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-strategies-for-improved-reading-comprehension Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Reading comprehension strategies - a technical term for a common problem. It’s happened to every reader. You sit down with a book, magazine, or technical text and begin to read. Several pages in you discover you have no idea what you just read. What you just experienced was a breakdown of reading comprehension; you simply read the words without using any strategies to understand. This is a common struggle for many students. The ability to understand what is being read, and to independently apply specific reading strategies, provides students with deep and meaningful comprehension.

When students are unable to independently use comprehension strategies, reading achievement gaps grow and frustration occurs. It will become harder and harder for these students to understand what they are reading. The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers have developed an intervention method for students struggling with their reading comprehension. These tutoring sessions focus on improving specific reading strategies, including:

    • Making connections Readers deeply understand when they connect what they are reading to their lives, prior knowledge, past experiences, other texts, events, and issues. Each of these connections strengthens a reader’s comprehension and helps provide context for deep understanding. Encouraging a student to examine complex connections between the text and literary themes, world events, and interrelated issues will enhance comprehension even further.
    • Visualizing All readers should form pictures in their heads as they read. These “mind movies” allow the reader to visualize the story as it is happening and deepen text comprehension. Readers should also integrate their senses to clarify visualizations and ask themselves what they can hear, taste, smell, or feel. 
    • Asking questions Asking questions before, during, and after reading deepens comprehension and provides a better understanding of the author’s purpose. Readers should ask questions throughout the reading such as: 
      • “What is the author trying to tell me?”
      • “What will happen next?”
      • “Do I understand what I am reading?"
      • “What do I already know about this topic?”
      • “How is this text like others I’ve already read?”
    • Inferring Reading comprehension isn’t just text deep. Readers must dive into the text and read between the lines to understand the deeper meaning. Drawing meaning from conclusions and questions allows the reader to make inferences based on text clues and background knowledge. Making inferences is a sophisticated comprehension skill and often requires direct and targeted practice.
    • Determining Importance In both fiction and non-fiction texts readers must determine the most important parts. Understanding the most crucial sections of a story’s plot provides the reader with clues about the conflict or character traits. Understanding the most important ideas in informational texts supports the reader’s ability to comprehend complex topics. Readers should use clues such as titles, headings, pictures, and captions to determine importance. 
    • Synthesizing Finishing a piece of text or an entire book isn’t the end. It should be just the beginning! Good readers find ways to use what they’ve learned to create their own ideas. Synthesizing requires readers to create a single understanding by combing prior knowledge and new learning. Readers must also be able to integrate a variety of other reading skills and strategies independently. It is a complex skill and can be developed while reading a variety of texts and participating in engaging discussions.

The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers offer tutoring sessions to students who are struggling with independently utilizing reading comprehension strategies. These sessions are directed by ongoing assessment data and are specifically designed to meet the needs of the individual student. This personalization tailors the tutoring sessions to the student’s specific needs and is highly effective at improving the use of reading strategies and overall comprehension.

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5 Tips to Make it a Great School Year As your child starts the new school year, it’s the best time to set the tone for positivity. As Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says, a bit of “mental preparation” can help children and parents kick things off on a good note. “We tell families all the time that attitude has a major impact on how a child views school,” she says. “Parents who communicate with their children about school and its importance and embrace an optimistic demeanor about how to tackle challenges along the way have a tremendous influence on their children’s outlook as well.”

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Wed, 18 Oct 2017 15:42:30 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center As your child starts the new school year, it’s the best time to set the tone for positivity. As Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says, a bit of “mental preparation” can help children and parents kick things off on a good note. “We tell families all the time that attitude has a major impact on how a child views school,” she says. “Parents who communicate with their children about school and its importance and embrace an optimistic demeanor about how to tackle challenges along the way have a tremendous influence on their children’s outlook as well.”

How can you help your child make this a great school year from the start? Here are five tips:

  1. Talk about failure as a good thing. Many children who have faced school adversity in the past approach each new school year with trepidation—and it’s understandable. However, the best thing parents can do is talk about the fact that each failure yields a new and important lesson. Explain that every mistake or difficult class is an opportunity to grow and learn and apply that knowledge to a future situation.
  2. Keep it in perspective. Reflection is a powerful activity and reminds your child that even the hardest situations will turn out fine. Talk about problems your child has had in the past and how he or she overcame them. Remind your child that if similar issues arise this year, they won’t ruin your child’s life forever. When a poor grade or failed test occurs, teach your child to take a deep breath, calm down and think about how to do better.
  3. Give a refresher on problem-solving. Problems in life are inevitable. Build your child’s independence this year by reminding him or her of the steps to solve problems. Give your child plenty of opportunities to make decisions and deal with the consequences of those decisions—good or bad. Encourage your child to persevere when his or her first attempt at something isn’t successful.
  4. Embrace a growth mindset. Children who believe their intelligence can be developed excel in school and life much more than those who believe it is static. Talk with your child about embracing challenges, even when they prove frustrating. Celebrate forward momentum and progress and remind your child regularly that there’s something new to learn each and every day. The more you can show your child that learning is continuous, the more open he or she will be to soaking up new knowledge.
  5. Set goals. A new school year is the perfect time for children to think about what they want to achieve in the months to come and how they will do so. Talk with your child about what is important to him or her this school year and how you can support those efforts. Then, be sure to revisit those goals every month and at report card time.

Parents can make such a big difference in how their children approach the school year by being confident and enthusiastic from the outset. “Even if your child has had some difficult times in school, you can still start things off with a positive attitude,” Huntington says. “Children are perceptive—if they sense optimism from their parents, it rubs off. Make this school year great by encouraging your child to put the best foot forward and committing to supporting your child however he or she needs it.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How to Find Scholarship Money-Even for the Average Student Are scholarships only for outstanding students and stellar athletes? Definitely not!

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Fri, 09 Feb 2018 17:09:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-find-scholarship-moneyeven-for-the-average-student https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-find-scholarship-moneyeven-for-the-average-student Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Find Scholarship Money—Even for the Average Student

Are scholarships only for outstanding students and stellar athletes? Definitely not!

If you have written off scholarships because your college-bound teen isn’t at the top of the class, think again. There are many scholarships for students with varying skillsets and different backgrounds, but not necessarily the highest GPAs and SAT/ACT test scores. According to sources such as Scholarship America and Scholarships.com, students can receive scholarship support from all kinds of sources—for their creativity, ability to overcome adversity, or efforts in extracurricular and volunteer activities, for example.

Where should your teen look? Here are a few tips and suggestions as you and your teen embark upon the scholarship search:

Start with the guidance counselor. A great place to begin the scholarship search is at the guidance counselor’s office. Many guidance/college counselors maintain a list of local and national scholarships and can quickly tell you what scholarships your teen may or may not be eligible for. In addition, the guidance counselor will have information about different types of scholarships at the colleges and universities in your state or region, as well as directions on how to apply. Keep in mind that guidance counselors may be your best source for information about local scholarships or foundations.  

Tip: Ask the guidance counselor how to stay up to date on new scholarships and deadlines. Many high schools maintain an online database of scholarships.

Look at your state’s Department of Education website. Obviously, all states offer financial aid, but many states offer scholarships or other types of stipends. While the colleges to which your teen applies often handle the application process for such aid, your state’s Department of Education website is a great source of information. For example, in Colorado, the College Opportunity Fund is a stipend available to all students going to college in the state. In Michigan, the Michigan Nursing Scholarship awards scholarships to residents who pursue nursing degrees. The state of New Jersey offers several types of scholarships for state residents pursuing different fields of study.

Tip: To find your state’s department of education website, visit www.ed.gov/about and click on “State Contacts”.   Then, search for scholarships. Colleges’ financial aid departments can also point you in the right direction to learn more about state funds and scholarships.

Ask organizations where you work or volunteer. Employers are an excellent resource for scholarships, especially bigger corporations. Some companies award scholarships to employees or dependents or employees, but many others do not require applicants to have any connection to the company. Check out some of the organizations in your area as well as larger national corporations that might offer scholarships. Examples include U.S. Bank, Microsoft and Walmart.

Tip: Your employer or your teen’s employer (if your teen has a part-time job) are a great place to start.

Consider scholarships for students of certain heritage or background. Many scholarships support specific individuals, such as women or students from underrepresented ethnic backgrounds. Nonprofit organizations such as the Hispanic Scholarship Fund and the United Negro College Fund award funds to thousands of students each year. 

Tip: A scholarship search engine can help you locate scholarships for which you might be eligible based on your personal characteristics.

Check out nontraditional sources of scholarship revenue offered in your state. Programs such as Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship program open doors for students without perfect GPAs. Students with a 3.0 GPA are eligible as well as students who come from home study programs, and they can receive funding toward college degrees and technical certifications or diplomas. Florida’s Bright Futures Scholarship program offers scholarships to students who have achieved at least a 3.0 GPA (for Florida Medallion Scholars, or a 3.5 GPA for Florida Academic Scholars) and completed a minimum number of service hours.

Tip: The scholarships mentioned above are both Lottery scholarship programs, which a number of states also have. Research whether your state offers a similar program that is funded by state lottery revenues or other funding sources, such as tobacco settlements or turnpike revenues.

Use scholarship search engines to aid your search. One of the best ways to round up a list of scholarships for which your teen is qualified is to use a scholarship search engine. These tools help students create a detailed student profile and narrow down a list of scholarships that fit that profile (eliminating any for which they do not meet the criteria).

Tip: Reputable search engines include scholarships.com, scholarshipexperts.com, fastweb.com, and the College Board’s Scholarship Search Tool.

Although there are thousands of scholarships out there, it can be discouraging to see scholarship after scholarship restricted for high achievers with exceptional grades and test scores. Never fear: there are many scholarships for students with other skills, traits and interests. Encourage your teen to put effort into the search and he or she may be surprised by the number of scholarship options available.  Here are a few more tips to help make your child's college journey more affordable.

And of course, don’t forget to enter Huntington’s College Scholarship Sweepstakes. Huntington awards a $500 scholarship each quarter to a college-bound high school student. Simply submit your information via text message on behalf of your student. Learn more at www.huntingtonhelps.com/contest.

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Establishing a Good After-School Routine Ray Huntington offers suggestions for parents who want to help their child establish a successful after-school routine.

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Mon, 19 Mar 2018 11:51:40 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/establishing-good-afterschool-routine https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/establishing-good-afterschool-routine Ray Huntington Ray Huntington When it comes to homework and studying, having a plan helps students maximize their time and get more done. After a long day at school, many children want nothing more than to come home and toss the backpack aside, but Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center says that parents should encourage children to embrace a routine to minimize stress. “Having a set schedule after school sounds rigid, but really, it prevents students from unknowingly wasting their time,” Huntington says. “With a reliable routine, students are more productive overall and they also learn to take ownership of their schedules.”

Huntington offers these suggestions for parents who want to help their child establish a successful after-school routine:

Have your child take the lead. One of the biggest benefits of creating a routine is that it empowers children to take responsibility for their daily to-dos. Sit down together to develop an after-school schedule that your child finds workable and in tune to his or her preferences (of when to study and when to enjoy downtime, for example).

Design with your child in mind. A routine will be more effective if it is created with your child’s input. Think about things like when your child is the most focused and what type of environment works best for your child to study (with siblings or alone? In his or her room or in the kitchen?). Pay attention to what works and stick to it.

Put the routine on display. Like the teacher does in the classroom, set expectations at home each day. Hang the after-school routine in a visible location—consider buying a white board for the kitchen or somewhere similar—and have your child look at it before leaving for school and as soon as he or she gets home. It should be detailed enough to keep your child on task, but flexible to incorporate free time. For example, a student in elementary school could follow a routine such as:

            Empty backpack, prep for homework                         3:30-3:45

            Wash hands, snack                                                      3:45-4:00

            Homework                                                                  4:00-4:30

            Practice piano                                                             4:30-4:45

            Basketball practice                                                      5:00-6:00

            Dinner, cleanup                                                          6:00-7:00

            Reading, any other studying                                        7:00-7:30

            Bedtime prep                                                               7:30-8:00

            Free time                                                                     8:00-8:30

            Lights out                                                                    8:30                                        

 Incorporate organization. At the end of each homework session, your child should take a few minutes to neaten his or her workspace, put away all supplies, check off any completed to-dos and mentally prepare for the next school day. Organization will help your child pick up where he or she left off at the next study session, minimizing ramp-up time and maximizing actual work time.

 As a parent, your job is to help your child acquire the study skills and independence to be an effective learner. “Routines at home teach children to be self-starters, take responsibility for what they have to accomplish and rely on themselves, not others, to make those things happen,” says Huntington. “By encouraging and upholding a routine and system of organization at home, you’re ingraining those essentials into your child, which will benefit him or her over the long term.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Review of Test Prep Techniques That Ensure You Are Ready For Any Exam Strive for academic excellence by using test preparation techniques. Time management is one skill that should be mastered in order to be fully prepared.

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Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:14:16 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/review-of-test-prep-techniques-that-ensure-you-are-ready-for-any-exam https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/review-of-test-prep-techniques-that-ensure-you-are-ready-for-any-exam Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center A Comprehensive Review of Back to School Test Prep Strategies

School is back in session and it's the perfect opportunity to get to work and ensure your test prep review is in great shape. Honing your test taking skills will prepare you for exams in your high school courses as well as any achievement exams you will take this year. Focusing now on your test taking skills will pay off in the long run as you approach each exam with confidence in your abilities.

The staff at Huntington Learning Centers has helped thousands of students improve their test taking strategies. Some of our favorite strategies include:

  • Understanding the directions Each exam is different and has its own testing guidelines. It's important to do your research before exam day arrives to ensure you understand these guidelines. Pay attention to what is allowed in the testing center, your time limitations, and what portions of the testing materials you may write in, complete your work, or jot notes.
  • Using your time wisely Standardized achievement tests all have time limits that must be strictly adhered to. Knowing your time limits is important but you should also focus on using every minute wisely. If a question is posing a particular problem, skip it, answer the questions that you're      more confident in and return to answer it later. You should also check for errors, reread written passages, and scan your math work until time is called.
  • Finding strategies that work for you No two students are alike and during your preparation you'll find specific test taking strategies that are most effective for you. A good way to discover strategies that work for you is to take several practice exams before testing day. You'll learn about the layout and content of the exam while discovering how you work best. Some students like to jot notes as they read while others prefer to read all of the questions before turning their attention to the corresponding written passage.
  • Checking for errors Identifying errors is crucial to your success. Several times during the testing session make sure that your response sheet corresponds with the exam questions. This mistake is much easier to solve if you identify your errors early. Double check that you have followed all of the testing guidelines, erased any errant marks, and answered every question.

Huntington Learning Centers provides comprehensive test prep review and test taking strategies for achievement exams. Our tutors are specially trained to provide general strategies and test specific information for a variety of exams, including:

  • SAT The SAT Exam is an achievement exam that plays an important role in determining college admission and scholarship opportunities. The SAT Exam is offered on seven testing dates each year and most students take the exam during their junior year with the option to retest
    during senior year.
  • ACT  The ACT Exam is an achievement exam that is offered six times each school year and is designed to assess a student's academic achievement and readiness for college. Results from the ACT Exam are typically used to help determine college admission and are accepted by all four year universities and colleges in the United States.
  • PSAT Most students take the PSAT in October of their junior year in high school. It is similar to the SAT exam and is a good indicator of a student's potential on the SAT. Academic organizations, such as the National Merit Scholarship Program, award scholarships based on PSAT scores.
  • SAT Subject Tests In recent years the College Board began offering individual subject area tests as part of the SAT exam. These tests are designed for students to display the specific knowledge they have gained during their high school courses. Colleges use the SAT Subject Tests to form admission decisions, determine readiness, and place students in courses.
  • AP Exams After completing a year-long AP course students have the opportunity to sit for a subject specific AP Exam. These exams cover college level material and are typically taken to highlight a student's knowledge and earn college credit. There are 31 AP Exams offered in the five general subject areas of science, math, history, language, and English.
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Freshman Year Survival Tips Goodbye, middle school; hello, high school! The adventure that is secondary education certainly comes with much excitement and trepidation. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that while starting high school is a big change, there are many things parents can do to help their teens make a successful transition. “This is a time when children become young adults and the school experience reflects that,” she says. “Freshman year sets the stage, so it’s important that parents help their children get off on the right foot.”

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Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:50:30 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/freshman-year-survival-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/freshman-year-survival-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Goodbye, middle school; hello, high school! The adventure that is secondary education certainly comes with much excitement and trepidation. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that while starting high school is a big change, there are many things parents can do to help their teens make a successful transition. “This is a time when children become young adults and the school experience reflects that,” she says. “Freshman year sets the stage, so it’s important that parents help their children get off on the right foot.”

Here are several tips to help your teen ease into freshman year successfully and lay the foundation for a great high school experience:

Commit to good organization. If your teen has previously struggled to stay organized, now is the time to get more serious about this essential skill. Set up routines at home like five-minute sessions at the beginning and ending of homework time to neaten the workspace, organize the backpack and get mentally prepared for the next day. Encourage your child to embrace tools like a planner or homework app, and consider color-coded folders or notebooks for each subject to minimize time spent finding notes and important papers.

Talk about grades. Grades always matter, but in high school they are especially important. This is because students immediately start building their cumulative GPA, which is one of the top factors college admissions officers consider when evaluating applicants. Talk with your teen about why poor decisions lead to poor grades, which are harder to recover from when college is on the horizon in just a few years.

Practice self-advocacy. On that note, because grades have a lasting impact in high school, it’s critical that your teen gets help as soon as he or she encounters trouble in a class. Set the expectation this year that it’s time for your teen to take ownership of the academic experience, which starts with making school the top priority, keeping up with homework and studying, and asking the teacher for help when he or she is confused or struggling to keep up.

Take control of time management. High school is a whole new ballgame with multiple classes, different teacher expectations, extracurricular activities and more. Encourage your teen to strive for balance by scheduling absolutely everything, keeping on top of the daily to-do list and knowing his or her limits. The planner should become your teen’s best friend—encourage him or her to put all test, homework and other important dates on the calendar and plan out time for the most essential tasks every day.

Last but not least, Huntington reminds parents that keeping open lines of communication with their teens is essential. “It’s so important to share with new high school students that there’s nothing to be ashamed of if challenges arise this year or anytime throughout high school,” she says. “Let your teen know that you’re always there for support, no matter what.” Having a solid family support system plus a positive outlook will help your teen survive and thrive as a freshman and for the rest of high school.

To learn more about how to help your teen succeed in high school, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.   

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Strategies for Tackling the SAT As the school year starts, high school juniors nationwide are undoubtedly thinking of the approaching SAT college entrance exam, typically taken in the spring of a student's junior year.

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Thu, 14 Sep 2017 10:15:35 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/strategies-for-tackling-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/strategies-for-tackling-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center As the school year starts, high school juniors nationwide are undoubtedly thinking of the approaching SAT college entrance exam, typically taken in the spring of a student’s junior year. Depending on the institution, the SAT can weigh heavily on admittance and possible scholarship opportunities, so a good score is of utmost importance.

At Huntington, our goal is to help students achieve the best score possible through comprehensive SAT test preparation. Our tutors are experienced in test-taking strategies, problem-solving skills, and proven ways to improve vocabulary.

Additionally, the following outlines some of our SAT prep strategies and helpful hints:

Plan Ahead (and Register Early)

Select a specific test date as far in advance as possible to allow for the most preparation. Don’t forget to set aside some budget for associated purchases like exam preparation books and prep programs. Registering early will also ensure you’re not paying late registration fees.  

Make a Smart Study Plan

Help your student develop a smart study plan that allows for thorough preparation. A smart study plan can include:

  • Planning your roadmap. How long will you review each subject? In what order? By what means?
  • Becoming familiar with the test itself (length, style of questions, scoring system, what you’ll need to bring with you the day of the exam, etc.)
  • Reviewing PSAT scores to identify strengths and weaknesses
  • Completing a full length practice test
  • Engaging in additional reading and writing beyond coursework to improve comprehension and fluency
  • Seeking out a tutor for more specialized preparation

Consider Subject Tests

Students also can elect to take SAT Subject Tests, which test information beyond the standard SAT categories of reading, writing, and math. Subject tests can provide college admission boards a more accurate view of a student’s strengths. For example, if your student excelled in his or her Advanced Placement Biology course and is considering majoring in the subject, a Biology Subject test would help highlight your student’s strength in this area. For a full list of subject tests, click here. Most of these tests are an hour in length and offered in multiple choice formats.

Take it Again

Although your student may be satisfied with his or her SAT score, it doesn’t hurt to take the exam again. Studies show that 55 percent of students improve their scores by taking the exam a second time, usually in the fall of their senior year. In the event that a student does worse on the second exam, he or she can submit their original score to universities.

Huntington Helps

Exam preparation is one of our specialties! With years of experience helping students on college entrance exams, consider utilizing Huntington’s professional and effective SAT preparation programs. Our SAT Preparation programs include a range of highly personalized, custom study plans for your student, including three program options, subject tutoring, and an online resource library.

Start your SAT program now! Contact us at 1.800.CAN.LEARN for the Huntington Advantage.

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4 Homework Tools to Keep Children on Track Homework is a great way to reinforce what children learn in the classroom and provide opportunities to practice skills independently. Unfortunately, it can be a source of stress for many children—especially those who are naturally disorganized and tend to “spin their wheels” at homework time. Luckily, there are lots of aids that will help keep children on task and focused on what they need to accomplish.

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Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:00:52 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-homework-tools-to-keep-children-on-track https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-homework-tools-to-keep-children-on-track Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington Homework is a great way to reinforce what children learn in the classroom and provide opportunities to practice skills independently. Unfortunately, it can be a source of stress for many children—especially those who are naturally disorganized and tend to “spin their wheels” at homework time. Luckily, there are lots of aids that will help keep children on task and focused on what they need to accomplish. Here are some of Huntington’s tried-and-true homework tools for students:

Homework completion chart – Perfect for younger children who do not get a lot of homework but still need a simple way to mark off when they are complete with it, a homework completion chart teaches children good habits like writing down assignments and managing their tasks. Your child can keep this chart on hand during homework and check off subjects as finished. Here’s an example of what this chart might look like:

Week of: February 12

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Math

X

 

 

 

 

Spelling

X

 

 

 

 

Reading

X

 

 

 

 

 

Subject homework checklist – For children who struggle to keep track of multiple subjects, a weekly “by subject” homework checklist is a good way to keep tabs on what they need to do each night and what is coming up. One week’s sheet should list out each subject (math, reading, science, etc.) and have five boxes underneath for the days of the week. One subject would look like this:

Subject: Math

Day

Homework

 

Monday

Workbook p. 12-13

Read Math text p. 25-27

Review today’s notes

 

X

Tuesday

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

Thursday

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

Daily assignments sheet – For those who like having the “big picture,” the daily assignment sheet is an invaluable tool. You can make copies for each day of the week. The idea is to get your child into the habit of recording to-dos at the end of each class and using that as his or her guide at homework time that night. Here’s an example:

Date: Monday, March 10

Subject

Assignment

 

Anything coming up?

English

Read text Chapter 2

Worksheet

 

Test Friday

Report due March 22

Math

Text p. 14-17

 

 

Science

Read text Chapter 3

Review notes from today

 

Quiz Thursday on Chapter 3

History

No homework, but study flash cards

 

Test Thursday

Spanish

Worksheet

 

Paper due March 25

 

Project plan – For times when children have bigger projects to work on over the course of a few weeks, it’s a smart idea to break up the assignment into manageable tasks with deadlines. Encourage your child to create such a project plan as soon as the project is assigned. There are many ways to create a project plan, but here’s one possible structure:

 

Class: Social studies

Assignment or project: Research paper

Task

Start date

Deadline

Done

Select topic

 

October 1

 

Create outline

October 2

October 4

 

Research sources

October 5

October 6

 

Narrow down to best materials

October 7

October 7

 

Revise outline

October 8

October 8

 

Rough draft

October 10

October 12

 

Brainstorm visual aids

October 13

October 13

 

Draft #2

October 14

October 15

 

Choose visual aid and start collecting materials

October 14

October 16

 

Draft #3

October 16

October 17

 

Finalize visual aid

October 17

October 18

 

Finalize report

October 18

October 19

 

Proofread final report

October 20

October 20

 

Turn in paper

 

October 21

 

 

One of the keys to homework success is to stay organized, and charts and checklists help children do just that. In combination with use of the day planner, have your child try a few different methods and tools to discover what helps him or her be the most successful. Embracing such methods will give your child a sense of responsibility and ownership, help him or her stay focused on what he or she must do and when, and put those goals front and center.

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Parents' Guide for Middle School and High School Homework Huntington Learning Center has created a guide for parents to provide homework help for their child while enrolled in middle school and high school.

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Wed, 14 Mar 2018 17:28:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/homework-guide https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/homework-guide Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Updated: March 2018

As your child progresses from middle school into high school and nears college, the expectations will become much greater. It can be challenging for parents to know exactly how to continue to support their child outside of the classroom. While the level of parental homework help in elementary school is much more tangible, your involvement as your child grows and matures into an independent student should evolve accordingly.

For many parents, questions about how to assist older students during homework time abound. Should you be helping with homework? How much? What should that assistance look like? Huntington Learning Center addresses these questions and others:

How much homework is typical for middle school students? High school students?

Ask your child’s teachers what to expect when it comes to the amount of time that homework takes. A good ballpark is an hour of homework in sixth grade, 70 minutes in seventh grade, and 80 minutes in eighth grade. High school homework may vary widely from teacher to teacher, school to school. A recent survey by the University of Phoenix College of Education showed that teachers of high school students assign an average of 3.2 hours of homework per week (which equates 17.5 hours of homework per week for students with five teachers in different subjects).

What should your role be in middle school homework?

Being on hand for support and facilitating good homework practices are important, but too much parental help with homework in middle school can actually be detrimental. The best way that you can help your middle school student during homework time is by monitoring his or her study habits and productivity and helping nurture effective habits. If your child struggles on a regular basis, reach out to the teacher to develop a plan of action and they may also need tutoring help.

What should your role be in high school homework?

In high school, it is critical that students learn to become their own advocates and recognize when they need help—and seek help out when needed. Although you should intervene if you see your teen struggling with homework, in high school, completing homework is your teen’s responsibility. You can offer suggestions for breaking down bigger projects into manageable steps. You can serve as a sounding board as your teen identifies homework where he or she needs clarification with the teacher. And you can help your teen learn strategies for maintaining an organized planner. Under no circumstances should you take the lead on homework or help your child with its completion.

How about Advanced Placement homework?

If your high school student is taking any Advanced Placement classes, the amount of class work and homework may differ from your teen’s other classes.  Advanced placement courses are on the college level and students can receive college credits for the courses at certain colleges if they receive good grades. Expect more homework in Advanced Placement classes.

Why is homework so important?

Homework offers many benefits as students move toward greater independence in school. It helps teachers reinforce what they teach in the classroom, extends student learning, builds students’ problem solving and time management skills as well as their sense of responsibility, and much more.

Homework is an important part of your child’s life as a student. If you’re feeling uncertain about the best way to provide guidance for your child without overstepping your bounds, contact his or her teachers. They can help you understand your role at homework time and the most appropriate ways to support your child’s learning without being directly involved in homework completion. Together, you can help your child become a self-sufficient, independent and successful student.

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School Resources of Which You Should Take Advantage You probably know the importance of building a bridge with your child’s school and maintaining communicative, positive relationships with his or her teacher, but are you taking advantage of the breadth of other school resources available to you? Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center suggests that parents seek assistance and guidance from various individuals throughout their child’s school years.

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Thu, 07 Sep 2017 13:13:54 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/school-resources-you-should-take-advantage-of https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/school-resources-you-should-take-advantage-of You probably know the importance of building a bridge with your child’s school and maintaining communicative, positive relationships with his or her teacher, but are you taking advantage of the breadth of other school resources available to you? Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center suggests that parents seek assistance and guidance from various individuals throughout their child’s school years. “Every school employs support staff members who are there to help students flourish,” says Huntington. Here are a few people whom parents should get to know:

The school psychologist – The school psychologist can support your student’s educational success by collaborating with the teacher and other support staff, such as the interventionist team or special education teachers. The psychologist can assist if your child frequently shows signs of anxiety or struggles with social skills or confidence, among other scenarios. According to the National Association of School Psychologists, these professionals are trained to “link mental health to learning and behavior” and use their expertise to promote academic achievement, supportive learning environments and more.

Technology teacher – In today’s digital age, children quickly become adept at using computers, tablets and smartphones—as well as the internet, social media and more. As your child continues to acquire technology skills, talk with the technology teacher on how best to be supportive. This teacher can help you explore tools available to help build your child’s technological proficiency.

School librarian – According to the School Library Journal, reading and writing test scores are better for students who have access to a school librarian. Not only is the librarian a great resource for students on choosing appropriate and interesting reading material, the library offers students access to technology, research databases (in high school) and of course, an ever-evolving collection of reading material. 

Gifted/talented specialist - If your student has been identified as gifted and talented, you may be referred to this school specialist. This person will work in concert with your child's teacher to create an advanced learning plan to ensure he or she is challenged and engaged in the classroom. The specialist can also give you suggestions on how to nurture your unique learner at home.

Parent resource center staff – Some public schools and districts have parent resource centers, which offer expert-led workshops and support groups for parents. Call your school district to see if they offer such a center dedicated to getting families involved in their children’s academic success.  

Give your child the best education possible by advocating for him or her. Keeping in touch with his or her teacher is always important, but there are a number of other individuals who are there to help, too. Reach out to them when needed, and your child will be the better for it.

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How to Help Your Child Find School-Life Balance This Year The life of a child can be quite busy. School can be demanding enough, but when you add extracurricular activities into the mix, it’s easy to pack the schedule to the point that there’s little—if any—time left. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that overscheduling leads to stress and anxiety. “Parents have good intentions and want their children to have opportunities to explore passions and try new things, but it’s important to keep the big picture in mind too,” she says. “Finding balance between school and life should be the goal.” How can parents help their children do so? Here are several tips:

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Fri, 25 Aug 2017 17:30:37 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-find-school-life-balance https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-your-child-find-school-life-balance Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The life of a child can be quite busy. School can be demanding enough, but when you add extracurricular activities into the mix, it’s easy to pack the schedule to the point that there’s little—if any—time left. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that overscheduling leads to stress and anxiety. “Parents have good intentions and want their children to have opportunities to explore passions and try new things, but it’s important to keep the big picture in mind too,” she says. “Finding balance between school and life should be the goal.” How can parents help their children do so? Here are several tips:

Embrace the art of time management. The key to finding balance in life is carving out time for everything. “We encourage our students to maintain three schedules: a master schedule, weekly schedule and daily schedule,” Huntington explains. “The master schedule includes all classes for a semester and important dates like test and project due dates; the weekly schedule maps out regular, fixed obligations and activities like sleeping, eating, school, study time and extracurricular activities; and the daily schedule is the plan for each day—best created each night for the following day.” Time management is one of the most critical life skills and best learned early to avoid procrastination and wasted time.

Prioritize. If weeknights at your house are a chaotic rush to a variety of places and homework and family dinner consistently take a backseat, spend some time looking at what’s on your daily calendar and talking as a family about whether all of it should stay. You and your child should block out time each day for sleep, school, homework and dinner and work from there. Then, ask the hard questions: what are your child’s top few activities? Which ones offer the greatest benefits? Which cause the most stress?

Identify the time wasters. The nemesis of productivity, time wasters are lurking everywhere. “Have your child write down the things that throw him or her off course the most as well as any ideas on how to counteract or avoid such distractions,” says Huntington. “Common pitfalls include social media, smartphones and television, but don’t forget about things like household activity and noise that might be keeping your child from making the most of his or her time.” It’s also critical that children understand that when they stick to a schedule, they’ll accomplish more—and will have more time for what they want to do.

Make time for what really matters. Nobody can sustain constant productivity with no downtime without feeling the effects. Encourage your child to embrace good habits—studying in blocks of time, taking frequent breaks and getting sufficient sleep—and make time for friends, family and exercise. Neglecting these things will cause a range of problems and may hurt your child’s academic performance and motivation over time.

School-life balance is important for a child’s well-being and happiness. “It’s so important that children learn to juggle multiple priorities and still find time for the ‘want-tos’ in life,” says Huntington. “Parents should teach their children the importance of managing their time effectively and how to embrace good habits now so that they will be well equipped to navigate school and life at every stage.” 

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Making the Most of This School Year A new school year has begun and you and your child want to get things off on the right foot. Whether last year was your child’s best year yet or he or she faced some challenges, it’s always a good idea to take time at the start of the new year to reflect, set goals, and focus. How can you encourage your child to make this year a great one? 

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Tue, 05 Sep 2017 16:54:10 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-the-most-of-this-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-the-most-of-this-school-year Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington A new school year has begun and you and your child want to get things off on the right foot. Whether last year was your child’s best year yet or he or she faced some challenges, it’s always a good idea to take time at the start of the new year to reflect, set goals, and focus. How can you encourage your child to make this year a great one? Here are several tips for parents:

Set the tone for positivity. A positive attitude will help children overcome hard times in school and life. Parents who embrace an optimistic mindset influence their children to do the same. The goal is to help children believe that every challenge or misstep is an opportunity to grow and become better. Talking about admirable role models who have overcome roadblocks to achieve big things reminds children that nobody has a completely smooth path—and they shouldn’t be discouraged if their journey has bumps along the way.

Explore what went right last year. The simple exercise of reflection is powerful, helping children look back on what they learned, where they were most successful, the experiences with teachers and other students that were most memorable and transformative, and more. Parents can take time as they and their children prepare to go back to school to talk about what went right last year, what they would like to change and whether there are any specific adjustments they want to make, such as their study routine.

Talk about what is (and isn’t) in their control. So much in life isn’t in our control, and it’s an important reminder for children to focus on what is. To succeed in school, children must pay attention in class, give every subject their best effort and ask for help when they need it. When bad grades happen, parents should encourage their children to think about what they could have done to prepare more effectively for the assignment or test and make a plan to do better next time. Children who consistently take ownership of their school experience—and assume responsibility for it—are more grounded and motivated.

Commit to daily organization. Staying organized is a challenge for just about everyone. For children who struggle to keep on top of things, now is the time to revisit the homework routine and determine what needs changing. Parents should go over best practices for using the daily planner to keep track of homework and important dates as well as “housekeeping” items like a good process for filing school paperwork and keeping binders and backpacks tidy. Checklists around the house are useful tools to reinforce those daily to-dos.

Set goals. Goal setting is such an important part of the kickoff to a new school year, encouraging a growth mindset and helping children get into the right frame of mind to give school their best effort this year. Over a few nights, parents should sit down with their children to talk about (and write down) academic and personal goals for the year. There is great value in including in this list some of the steps needed to achieve those goals and discussing how Mom and Dad can offer support.

Even a little effort toward helping your child prepare for a new school year will make a big difference. Your child will feel calmer and more prepared, making for a smooth transition from summer break to school mode—and a happier household overall.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Eight Quality Summer Learning Activities For Students Of All Ages Exercise your brain over the summer with these 8 learning activities that will stimulate your mind & have you fully prepared for the new school year.

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Fri, 08 Jun 2018 18:16:23 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-quality-summer-learning-activities-for-students-of-all-ages https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/eight-quality-summer-learning-activities-for-students-of-all-ages Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Escape the Summer Brain Drain!

The summer months are the perfect time for you and your family to embark on a world of learning and to participate in summer learning activities. Learning shouldn't stop when the school year ends; there are a wealth of summer learning activities at your fingertips for your family to explore.

This summer consider:

  1. Mapping the route If your family is taking a road trip challenge your child to map the route ahead of time. Allow online access to sites such as mapquest.com and provide your child the necessary street maps and an atlas.
  2. Beginning a family challenge Many families thrive on competition, does yours? Challenge your family to a reading competition to see how many pages the group can read during the summer months. Set a reasonable goal and keep track of how many pages until the goals is met. Once the group meets the goal it's time to celebrate!
  3. Exploring the animal world If your town has a zoo, animal park, or wildlife preserve you can use these attractions to learn more about the animal world. Ask your child to choose a specific animal to study and begin by checking research books out of the library. Once you've read these books and have learned more about the animal you can take your child to see it up close and personal.
  4. Going somewhere new Challenge your family to think of a place or attraction you've never visited. It could be as simple as taking a hike in a local park or could involve a day of travel. Before you depart discuss what you might see, hear, or feel. Use your visit as a way to learn something new.
  5. Keeping a family blog The world has gone digital and keeping a record of your family's adventures has never been easier. There are several different free blogging sites that allow you to create an online blog. Involve your kids in this endeavor by challenging them to participate in creating and editing blog posts.
  6. Going on a virtual vacation Even if you don't have any vacation plans for this summer you can still send your kids on a trip. Choose a location to "vacation" to and then work to learn as much as possible about your virtual trip. Encourage your child to do online research, check out books from the library, or interview friends or family that have already been.
  7. Going professional The summer months are a great time to explore future careers for your child. Ask your children what careers are most interesting to them and what things they may want to do when they grow up. Help your child research the requirements for these jobs and what level of education is necessary. You could also work to arrange a shadow or mentor program for your child to learn from the professionals. A child that is interested in becoming a fire fighter will learn an amazing amount by simply spending a day at the station.
  8. Seeking reinforcements If you're hoping to use the summer months to better prepare your child for the fall courses at school consider contacting Huntington Learning Centers. We offer tutoring programs that bridge the summer months and provide valuable learning opportunities.

 

The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers are specially trained to help your child make the most of summer vacation. We can work with your child to review previously learned content or to prepare for the upcoming school year. Programs designed especially to boost study habits or improve test taking skills are also available. Participating in tutoring at Huntington Learning Centers is all about finding ways to better prepare all children for future academic challenges.

What has been the best part of your summer so far? What fun summer learning activities has your family participated in?

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5 Things Your Graduating Senior Needs To Know About College High school is drawing to a close and your teen is probably feeling excited, nervous and everything in between. College is on the horizon—everything he or she has worked toward. It is indeed a special time of life, but there is so much coming that your teen may not even realize. Yes, your teen likely knows that college is harder and different than high school. Certainly, he or she knows the impact that college can have on his or her future. But what are some of the things your teen might not realize are coming? 

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 17:18:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-things-your-graduating-senior-needs-to-know-about-college https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-things-your-graduating-senior-needs-to-know-about-college Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington High school is drawing to a close and your teen is probably feeling excited, nervous and everything in between. College is on the horizon—everything he or she has worked toward. It is indeed a special time of life, but there is so much coming that your teen may not even realize. Yes, your teen likely knows that college is harder and different than high school. Certainly, he or she knows the impact that college can have on his or her future. But what are some of the things your teen might not realize are coming? Here are five things for your teen to expect next year when beginning the college journey:

  1. It’s all on them! One of the key differences between high school and college is the expectation that students—nobody else—are responsible for themselves. Professors expect students to listen in class, speak up with questions if they don’t understand something, and keep up with reading and homework. Students are given a lot of freedom, which means they are responsible for keeping on top of it all and reaching out for help if they need it. The consequences include academic probation for grades that fall below a certain GPA and forced withdrawal if students don’t raise those grades quickly enough.
  2. Class sizes vary. Until they are on campus and in a classroom, most students might not fully grasp that the number of students in a college classroom can vary widely. A lot depends on whether a student goes to a large university or smaller college, but even at smaller schools, introductory, general education classes might have upwards of 100 students (and the number could approach 300-400 at a big university). Especially as freshmen, it’s important that students go to class ready to learn and take thorough notes. It’s also a good idea to visit professors during office hours if they need extra help.
  3. Critical thinking skills are essential. The whole goal of college is to help students prepare for successful careers—and nurturing the development of critical thinking skills is a big part of that. Professors in college want students to analyze information as they learn it, make their own inferences, and make connections about what they learn. They also want students to be self-aware about what they understand well and what they are still learning or struggling with.
  4. Now is the time for time management. College offers so many opportunities to socialize, get involved on campus and explore new interests. It’s easy for students to become overwhelmed by the volume of homework and studying in addition to everything else. Time management is critical for college success. Students should plan out their weeks to ensure they have time to meet all of their academic commitments, using some sort of system, whether that’s a planner, smartphone calendar, homework app or some combination of these tools. Good time managers also embrace a solid organizational system (to minimize wasted time and procrastination) and incorporate sufficient sleep and down time into their schedules.
  5. The major matters sooner than later. Teens who go into college without a major declared do have a little time to decide, but many fields of study start steering students toward a certain curriculum as early as sophomore year. Although students shouldn’t feel pressured to “just pick something,” they should take the initiative to discover career interests that would fit their skills and personality. The college career center is a useful resource that every student should visit early and often. They’ll help undecided students explore different fields and majors and get them on the right path sooner than later.

Dr. Raymond Huntington encourages parents to keep the lines of communication open with their college-bound teens in the months leading up to college. “The transition from high school to college is a big one and it’s understandable that teens want to kick back and relax over summer before they leave home and begin their new adventure,” he says. “We always tell parents that this summer is a good opportunity to have those important conversations with their teens about the exciting and vastly different experience that is upon them. Teens who understand that change is coming but eagerly embrace a positive, motivated attitude will experience great success.”

To learn more about how to prepare teens for college-level academics, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates 40th Anniversary with Mayoral Proclamation, Oradell NJ  Oradell, NJ; June 19, 2017 – Huntington Learning Center was honored by Oradell, NJ, Mayor Dianne Didio during an official proclamation at the company’s corporate headquarters on Friday, June 16, 2017. Mayor Didio congratulated Huntington on its 40th anniversary and recognized Huntington’s commitment to children’s educational success through its four-step approach, which includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individualized tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The

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Wed, 21 Jun 2017 12:53:45 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-celebrates-40th-anniversary-with-mayoral-proclamation-oradell-nj https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-center-celebrates-40th-anniversary-with-mayoral-proclamation-oradell-nj Anne Huntington Anne Huntington Oradell, NJ; June 19, 2017 – Huntington Learning Center was honored by Oradell, NJ, Mayor Dianne Didio during an official proclamation at the company’s corporate headquarters on Friday, June 16, 2017. Mayor Didio congratulated Huntington on its 40th anniversary and recognized Huntington’s commitment to children’s educational success through its four-step approach, which includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individualized tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The mayoral staff was joined by Huntington’s co-founders, Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington, Anne Huntington who is the second generation Huntington continuing the company as a family business, along with franchisees, corporate employees and members of the local media.

"Huntington Learning Center is an Oradell-born company that employs more than 100 people here in the Oradell area and nearly 1500 more across the country," says Mayor Didio. "Huntington has a positive economic and social impact on our citizens through its work to help children succeed in school. I congratulate Huntington for 40 incredible years in business and wish the company the very best in the future."

In the 1970s, Eileen Huntington worked as a junior and senior high school teacher and Raymond Huntington, who earned a doctorate in statistics in 1974 from Rutgers University, was a business analyst for AT&T. Eileen recognized a problem in the schools where she worked with too many of her students lacking basic reading and study skills, which caused them problems in all academic areas. The Huntingtons saw a need and created their first learning center in rented office space in the building adjacent to where the Huntington Learning Center’s main offices are today, a building owned by Huntington Learning Centers and called, The Huntington Professional Building.

Since then, the company has helped millions of students from kindergarten to 12th grade, and at all academic levels, learn the skills, confidence and motivation to succeed in and out of the classroom. Huntington now operates nearly 300 centers in 40 states from coast to coast. The company began franchising in 1985. Both the Huntingtons and their daughter, Anne, are actively involved in the business operations.

"We founded this company because of our desire to help children and nothing gives me more joy than the fact that 40 years later, we are continuing to fulfill that promise to the families we serve," says Dr. Ray Huntington, who serves as the company’s Chairman of the Board. "We are honored to celebrate this significant milestone in our company’s history with Mayor Didio and the city of Oradell," says Mrs. Eileen Huntington, who serves as the company’s Chief Executive Officer. "We look forward to building on the foundation of these 40 years to pave way for the next 40 years and beyond helping students achieve results and helping our franchisees achieve success by carrying out our mission to give every student the best education," says Ms. Anne Huntington, who serves as the company’s Vice President.

Learn more about Huntington and its planned 40th-anniversary celebrations throughout 2017 at www.HuntingtonHelps.com.

About Huntington

Huntington is the nation’s tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in phonics, reading, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.HuntingtonHelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.HuntingtonFranchise.com.

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Develop Reading Comprehension Skills Over The Summer With These Tips Reading comprehension can be improved over the summer and visiting the library with family and friends is one of the ways students can make this happen.

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Tue, 26 Jun 2018 10:56:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-reading-comprehension-with-summer-learning https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/improve-reading-comprehension-with-summer-learning Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Four Fun Ways to Boost your Child's Reading Comprehension this Summer!

Summer is here and it is the perfect time to get in some extra reading comprehension practice for your child. You can utilize summer's wide variety of educational opportunities, extra time, and lazy days to get in some valuable reading practice for your child. The best part is that your child won't even think that the family is working on reading. Instead your comprehension-building activities will feel like fun ways to spend a summer day learning with the family.

If you're looking for some ways to increase your child's reading comprehension this summer consider trying these fun activities:

  1. Launch a family study What topics of study intrigue your family? Insects? The Civil War? Dinosaurs? No matter which topic you choose for a family summer study there are many great ways to integrate reading practice. Your family can visit the library to check out books on the topic, read them together, and create a list of questions you still want answered. Take time to extend the reading and learning to real life experiences. Visit a museum or participate in another educational opportunity about your topic to search for answers to the questions your family generated. Ongoing study will prompt your child to ask questions, seek answers, and improve reading skills while participating in a fun family activity.
  2. Visit the library Many public libraries sponsor fun summer activities for children of all ages. You can visit your library to learn more about summer programs and to gather plenty of reading materials. Don't limit your children to books they can easily read themselves; there are a wide range of materials to choose from that you might not normally consider. If your child is an early reader the summer is a perfect time to choose a chapter book to read aloud. Reading a chapter a day will help boost comprehension and expose them to topics, authors, and genres they haven't yet experienced. Graphic novels, comic books, and magazines are also available at the library and are great ways to motivate reluctant readers. Talking about what your child is reading will boost comprehension regardless of the reading material.
  3. Form a book club Finding multiple copies of a single book is a great way to start a family book club. Establish a schedule for the club and make sure all readers are able to experience success. Set a specific reading goal (perhaps a chapter at a time) and then meet as a group to discuss what you read. Encourage input from each book club member, regardless of reading ability. You can shape the book club discussion around your child's reading needs. For example, if your child struggles with making connections between texts you can spend a part of the book club discussion talking about ways the book is like other books they've already read.
  4. Invest in tutoring Even though there are many great ways to improve comprehension for your child at home you may also be interested in receiving professional tutoring services. The tutors at Huntington Learning Centers know how to engage students in activities that are both fun and highly effective. Comprehension and critical thinking skills are woven into tutoring activities that often utilize a student's favorite reading genre. Your child will be learning valuable new comprehension skills while gaining academic confidence and having fun!

Your child's reading comprehension shouldn't suffer during the summer months. The professionals at Huntington Learning Centers are trained to help all their students maintain the knowledge and skills gained in previous years. Our tutoring sessions are customized to meet your child's specific needs and are created using data gathered in ongoing assessments.

What are some other fun ways to boost your child's reading this summer?

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Effective Summer Learning Strategies Your child has worked hard all school year—the last thing you want is for him or her to lose ground over summer. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center advises parents to keep their children learning over summer break to minimize regression and the loss of essential skills for next school year. “Children deserve a break over summer, but there are many simple things parents can do to minimize learning loss and keep their children’s minds sharp while school is out,” says Huntington. She offers several summer learning strategies:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:31:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-summer-learning-strategies https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-summer-learning-strategies Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Your child has worked hard all school year—the last thing you want is for him or her to lose ground over summer. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center advises parents to keep their children learning over summer break to minimize regression and the loss of essential skills for next school year. “Children deserve a break over summer, but there are many simple things parents can do to minimize learning loss and keep their children’s minds sharp while school is out,” says Huntington. She offers several summer learning strategies:

Blend enrichment with recreation. Few children want to sit at a desk all summer with the books open. Summer should be about relaxation and exploration, so try to find ways to combine learning and fun. Field trips and outings to library events and activities are two easy options, but get creative. Pick educational themes for each week of summer and read articles, plan activities and play games within that theme. Take a road trip somewhere historic and do some advance reading and research as a family.

Do a little each day. Even as little as 15-20 minutes of daily academic practice can help children retain what they know in between school years. Check out workbooks that are designed to bridge learning between grades.  Ask your child’s teacher for recommendations for math and reading. Or enroll your child in a flexible, individualized tutoring program at Huntington.

Work on projects. Project-based learning is an excellent way to apply knowledge and skills and keep the mind active over summer. There are many advantages of this student-centered method of learning: students learn to solve problems, explore topics thoroughly and find answers to questions through research. At home, you could pick a theme or topic and have your child come up with a list of things to investigate about that topic. Throughout the summer, encourage him or her to share what he or she learns. Let your child drive the work, but facilitate along the way.

Read for fun. Summer is the perfect time for children to explore books they don’t have the time to enjoy during the school year. Give your child the freedom to read whatever he or she likes this summer, and remember that magazines, blogs, comic books and child-appropriate websites are all fair game. Study after study shows that a daily summer reading habit prevents children from taking a step backward. As long as your child is reading, do not be too picky about the format or subject.

Huntington says that summer is a great time for children to continue learning in a more relaxed, self-directed way. “It’s important for children to recharge their batteries over summer break, but parents should nudge them off the couch and encourage them to explore their imaginations and engage in projects and learning opportunities with peers and siblings. A little structured work each day can make a tremendous difference in preventing brain drain too, and will make the start of next school that much easier.”

Huntington offers summer tutoring programs for all types of students—whether a child has fallen behind in one or more subjects or simply wants to stay up on his or her skills during the school break. Call the City Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com to learn more.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

 

 

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Six Questions to Ask Teens Choosing a College Major The college decision is one of the most exciting and overwhelming that a teen will ever make.  Add to that the selection of a college major and it is no wonder many teens struggle to decide. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center tells parents of high school students that sometime during sophomore year is a good time for teens to start thinking about possible majors. “If a teen’s college search process during the last two or three years of high school is largely focused on where to go but not what to study, he or she is overlooking a big aspect of the college experience,” says Huntington. She suggests that as parents and teens talk about college possibilities, they also talk about field of study possibilities.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:05:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-questions-to-ask-teens-choosing-a-college-major https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-questions-to-ask-teens-choosing-a-college-major Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The college decision is one of the most exciting and overwhelming that a teen will ever make.  Add to that the selection of a college major and it is no wonder many teens struggle to decide. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center tells parents of high school students that sometime during sophomore year is a good time for teens to start thinking about possible majors. “If a teen’s college search process during the last two or three years of high school is largely focused on where to go but not what to study, he or she is overlooking a big aspect of the college experience,” says Huntington. She suggests that as parents and teens talk about college possibilities, they also talk about field of study possibilities. If you need a little help starting the conversation, here are six questions to ask:

“Narrowing down the options” questions

  • What do you find interesting? Encourage your teen to reflect on past jobs, school projects, volunteer projects and classes and think about the most and least enjoyable aspects. Avoid the pressure to probe about passions—perhaps your teen is still in discovery mode. Instead, focus on things that capture his or her attention and fuel inquisitiveness.
  • What are you good at? It’s wise to talk about school subjects, but remember to explore other skills that your teen would consider strengths, such as working on teams, managing people, critical thinking, analyzing details or solving complex problems.
  • Have you researched any possible majors (and if so, what did you learn)? Have your teen do some preliminary research on the fields of study on his or her mind to understand the major and what classes are usually required in that major. The College Majors 101 website is a useful resource for students wanting to learn more about majors, possible careers, and universities’ options for majors. The high school guidance counselor is also a good resource.

Deeper research questions

  • What types of jobs are out there? It’s important to do some initial homework on college majors and the jobs that graduates of those majors often obtain, but once your teen begins focusing on a particular major, it’s good to also research statistics like employment rates and job growth. Check out information on the Center on Education and the Workforce, Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics, and O*NET Online websites for starters as well as the labor market organization websites in your state (find a list here).
  • What matters to you? Family? Travel? Helping people? Working with your hands? Encourage your teen to think about his or her core values and personality while exploring majors and careers and picturing life down the road. Of course, it’s best not to think too far ahead, but a social butterfly who thrives working with others might be unsatisfied working in a laboratory or other independent type job.
  • What type of education is required? As your teen researches careers, it’s important to consider educational requirements and whether he or she is comfortable committing to them. Does a job of interest require advanced education for employment? Does it require additional certifications? Teens who have their sights set on earning a bachelor’s degree for now should make sure that they will be employable with that degree after graduation.

“The more research and thought teens put into choosing college majors, the higher their return on investment,” says Huntington. “Our advice to parents is to talk early and often about careers and majors and incorporate this type of consideration into the college search process.” For more information about how to prepare teens for college-level academics or Huntington’s SAT and ACT prep programs, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Tips for Preventing Summer Slide Many parents have heard the scary-but-true statistic that children who do not read over summer break can lose up to two months of reading achievement. According to Reading Rockets’ review of 13 empirical studies on summer reading loss, over time, this can create a compounded achievement gap of 1.5 years before a child has even reached middle school.

The good news: it’s not hard to curb summer reading loss. With a little effort, you can help your child continue to strengthen that “reading muscle” and prevent the dreaded summer slide so that when the next school year begins, he or she is ready to hit the ground running. Here are five tips to build those literacy skills this summer:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:39:31 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-preventing-summer-slide https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-preventing-summer-slide Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington Many parents have heard the scary-but-true statistic that children who do not read over summer break can lose up to two months of reading achievement. According to Reading Rockets’ review of 13 empirical studies on summer reading loss, over time, this can create a compounded achievement gap of 1.5 years before a child has even reached middle school.

The good news: it’s not hard to curb summer reading loss. With a little effort, you can help your child continue to strengthen that “reading muscle” and prevent the dreaded summer slide so that when the next school year begins, he or she is ready to hit the ground running. Here are five tips to build those literacy skills this summer:

  1. Set a daily minutes goal. Goal-setting gives children ownership of their learning. So, incorporate reading into the summertime daily routine and have your child set a goal of minutes to read each day or week. Make it fun by combining reading time with cookies and milk, or making a pitcher of your child’s favorite summer beverage and reading “al fresco.” Maybe you can start a new family tradition to all read together in a comfortable spot in the house before bedtime. Whatever you do, make sure you send the message that reading is a relaxing, rewarding activity, not a chore that must be checked off a task list.
  2. Keep a “summer memories” journal. Writing and reading are essential, interconnected skills, so it’s valuable to encourage children to write over the summer too. If you have a tough time convincing your child to start penning novellas or essays about summer, a subtler way to hone those writing skills is a summer journal. Have your child jot down the events of each day, record the stops on your family road trip, or write real-time observations of daily life in your home over summer vacation. If your child gets really into it, consider letting him or her create a blog on a free or inexpensive platform like Squarespace or Wix.
  3. Focus on a subject of interest. For some children, a new hobby or interest sparks exploration. So, if your child isn’t eager to read novels, try digging into topics that do get him or her excited, exploring books, websites, blogs, and magazine and newspaper articles on those topics. Fueled by curiosity, your child will end up reading more than he or she would otherwise.
  4. Talk about it. You can enrich your child’s reading time by talking about the books he or she is reading as well as the characters, plot, plot twists, and what your child thinks will happen next. Express interest by asking thoughtful questions that help your child think critically, reflect and improve comprehension.
  5. Share with others. Your child might also want to share what he or she is reading with other kids, which is exactly what young readers do on Scholastic’s Share What You’re Reading Think of it as a book review and recommendations website for children. Your child can share his or her own reviews and check out other children’s reviews as well.

If your child wants to catch up or get ahead this summer, call Huntington. Now is a great time to fill in any gaps in skills so that your child has the reading and writing aptitude to succeed in all subjects. Call 1-800 CAN LEARN today for more information about our literacy skill-building programs and summer reading program, Reading Adventure.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Launches 2017 Summer Reading Adventure Program It’s summer break, which also means it is time for Huntington Learning Center’s annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Students select books from Huntington’s carefully formulated book lists that offer a range of choices by grade level and reading ability. They then record what they read in their “reading passport,” sharing their assessment and opinions about each book. The program is intended to introduce children to high-interest reading material and get them excited about reading.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:07:00 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-reading-adventure-program-2017 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It’s summer break, which also means it is time for Huntington Learning Center’s annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Students select books from Huntington’s carefully formulated book lists that offer a range of choices by grade level and reading ability. They then record what they read in their “reading passport,” sharing their assessment and opinions about each book. The program is intended to introduce children to high-interest reading material and get them excited about reading.

Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center says that reading is one of the easiest ways to minimize regression over the long summer break from school and help children discover the joy of reading. “Our Reading Adventure program fosters a love of learning by helping children discover how much fun reading can be,” she says. “We know from experience that children become stronger readers through regular practice. With its more relaxed pace, summer is a perfect opportunity for parents to help their children develop a daily reading habit. The more they read, the more they will enjoy it—and become better readers.”

Huntington’s Reading Adventure program runs throughout the summer. Huntington says that parents can pick up information and passports for their children at centers beginning as early as June. As parents gear up to make the most of the program this summer, she also offers several tips:

  • Make reading time family time. Spend 20-30 minutes each evening as a family reading in the same room—perhaps with some tasty summer treats and drinks to enjoy.
  • Set goals. Have your child aim to read a certain number of books this summer or make a list of books, topics or authors he or she wants to explore.
  • Hit the library once a week. Regular trips to the library are an effective way to fuel your child’s fire for reading. Don’t forget to check out any summer reading activities going on. Encourage your child to talk to the librarian about book suggestions as well.
  • Pick a book for the whole family to read. Why not make this the summer of the “family book club” and have your child pick a book that you can all read together?
  • Choose a vacation theme book. If you’re going on any trips this summer, explore books that might be an engaging read while on the trip—stories set in the location to where you’re headed, for example.

Learn more about the Reading Adventure program by contacting Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Is Featured On CentralJersey.com Huntington Learning Center is celebrating 40 years of helping students achieve their full potential, and was recently featured on CentralJersey.com. Reas the full article here.

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Wed, 17 May 2017 16:39:59 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-gets-featured-may2017 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/huntington-learning-gets-featured-may2017 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is celebrating 40 years of helping students achieve their full potential, and was recently featured on CentralJersey.com. Reas the full article here.

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How Praise, Intrinsic Motivation, Effort and Student Achievement Go Hand in Hand Any parent who has set foot in a Huntington Learning Center before has likely heard our teachers stress the importance of recognizing children’s efforts, not their achievements. Our years of experience with thousands of children have taught us that it is far more effective to encourage children to work hard on homework and in school than it is to encourage them to strive for high grades and test scores. Our beliefs on this are rooted in research: the right kind of praise inspires motivation, and therefore, achievement. Also, studies show that one of the key dimensions of student motivation is control, a student’s belief that there is a direct link between his or her actions and successful outcomes.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:48:21 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-praise-intrinsic-motivation-effort-and-student-achievement-go-hand-in-hand https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-praise-intrinsic-motivation-effort-and-student-achievement-go-hand-in-hand Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington Any parent who has set foot in a Huntington Learning Center before has likely heard our teachers stress the importance of recognizing children’s efforts, not their achievements. Our years of experience with thousands of children have taught us that it is far more effective to encourage children to work hard on homework and in school than it is to encourage them to strive for high grades and test scores. Our beliefs on this are rooted in research: the right kind of praise inspires motivation, and therefore, achievement. Also, studies show that one of the key dimensions of student motivation is control, a student’s belief that there is a direct link between his or her actions and successful outcomes.

At Huntington, we strive to not only build students’ academic competence and ability, but also nurture the development of their intrinsic motivation: the desire to complete tasks for the self-satisfaction that results from doing so. We know that students who are intrinsically motivated are more likely to take ownership of their success in school and put forth the effort that it requires.

Without a doubt, many children are extrinsically motivated by rewards such as praise from teachers and parents, grades or other factors. This is natural, of course, as not all students find enjoyment in homework. However, there are many ways that you can foster intrinsic motivation, even if you cannot convince your child to love Algebra or writing papers. Here are a few effective strategies to motivate your child, an essential part of helping him or her become a stronger student:

Encourage the child to value hard work. Emphasize the importance of perseverance in all that your child does, and especially in school. Learning is a journey that requires goal setting and constant dedication, and your child needs to know that it isn’t always easy. Teach your child that the way to master a subject, improve in something or overcome challenges is to put in the effort. When it comes to learning, progress is success.

Nurture a child’s inner curiosity. Challenge your child to explore new topics, question assumptions and never take knowledge for granted. Doing so encourages learning for the sake of learning, and it also teaches your child to be more independent as a learner. Congratulate your child when you notice him or her coming up with new ideas and solutions to problems.

Point out the relevance. Continually point out how your child’s school work is relevant in daily life. Especially when he or she doesn’t necessarily enjoy a subject or topic, it’s helpful to share ways that the subject matter is used in the real world or why it is important.

Embrace a growth mindset. A growth mindset is the belief that intelligence isn’t a fixed trait, but rather, one that can be nurtured and developed. Children who have a growth mindset understand that effort is the way to become smarter and recognize that a challenge is an opportunity to learn, not a road block.

When parents hold high, but achievable expectations for children, praise their efforts, encourage them to learn from their mistakes and point out often that such a combination is what leads to learning and improvement, they fuel their children’s intrinsic motivation. Just as important, such actions send the message that learning is continuous and requires persistence. Take note when your child works hard and makes progress. In doing so, you’ll help shape his or her attitude about the effort and diligence that school requires and will foster his or her long-term academic success.  

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Shares Latest SAT Happenings When it comes to the SAT college entrance exam, the last several years have been largely focused on the College Board’s redesign of the test, but Huntington Learning Center is up on the latest news and information. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of the importance of staying up to date. “Last year brought a great deal of change to the SAT, but the College Board is still adjusting processes and other aspects of the SAT,” she says. Huntington shares a few recent announcements that might impact your college-bound student:

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Thu, 29 Mar 2018 08:49:05 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/latest-sat-happenings https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/latest-sat-happenings Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Latest Update: Feb. 16, 2018

When it comes to the SAT college entrance exam, the last several years have been largely focused on the College Board’s redesign of the test, but Huntington Learning Center is up on the latest news and information. Eileen Huntington, CEO and co-founder of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of the importance of staying up to date. “Last year brought a great deal of change to the SAT, but the College Board is still adjusting processes and other aspects of the SAT,” she says. Huntington shares the latest SAT happenings that may impact your college-bound student:

  • Students can now take the SAT in late August. For the first time since the mid-1970s, the College Board is offering an August exam date, based on feedback from students, K-12 and higher education professionals, and test center staff. This date provides students about to begin their senior year with earlier opportunities to take the exam before submitting college applications. Other benefits of an August SAT date:
    • It will be it easier for students to dedicate themselves to an SAT prep program over summer break since school is not in session.
    • A summer date should help minimize problems caused by issues such as delays in score reporting and weather-related test cancellations in late winter.
    • Students heading into senior year will have two opportunities instead of one to take the SAT (August and October) before early admission application deadlines, which are usually in early November.
  • The January exam date has been eliminated. Beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, the January SAT date will no longer be offered. This means that the SAT continues to be offered seven times per year: in August, October, November, December, March, May and June.
  • The process for requesting test accommodations is much simpler. In December 2016, the College Board announced a much simpler request process for testing accommodations for students currently using them at their schools through Individualized Education Programs and 504 Plans.
  • Testing supports are available for English language learners (ELL), effective January 1, 2017. ELL students taking a state-funded SAT during the school day will now have access to testing instructions in several native languages and approved bilingual glossaries. The College Board’s overall goal is to level the playing field for all students.

Following the redesign of the SAT, the number of students taking the new exam in 2016 jumped to 1.36 million (compared to 1.18 million in 2015). This indicates a show of support among students and parents alike, says Huntington. “The College Board has greatly increased its efforts to make the SAT and all of its exams reflect what students are learning in class.” she says. “Huntington is apprised of the latest changes and incorporates any and all adjustments into our prep programs.” For more information about Huntington’s individualized SAT prep programs, contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Forty Years of Helping Students Create Bright Futures As schools across the country struggle to keep up with the demands of an increasingly complex global economy, Huntington’s commitment to our children’s educational success has become more important than ever. A 2015 Program for International Student Assessment study showed that 15-year-old students in the U.S. ranked just 24th out of 72 educational systems in average reading literacy, and only 40th in math literacy. Additional studies show the U.S. lagging behind in other critical areas as well: 17th out of 40 in overall educational performance and 6th out of 49 in fourth grade reading.

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Fri, 24 Mar 2017 10:49:26 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-students-create-bright-futures https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-students-create-bright-futures Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is celebrating its 40th year of helping students unlock their academic potential. Since its founding in 1977 by Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington, the company has helped millions of students of all ages and abilities learn the skills they need to excel in school, improve their study habits and build self-confidence.

As schools across the country struggle to keep up with the demands of an increasingly complex global economy, Huntington’s commitment to our children’s educational success has become more important than ever. A 2015 Program for International Student Assessment study showed that 15-year-old students in the U.S. ranked just 24th out of 72 educational systems in average reading literacy, and only 40th in math literacy. Additional studies show the U.S. lagging behind in other critical areas as well: 17th out of 40 in overall educational performance and 6th out of 49 in fourth grade reading.

This academic gap has created a tremendous need for specialized skills-based tutoring and test prep. Huntington works exclusively with certified tutors to deliver individualized instruction across a wide range of academic areas to students from kindergarten through high school. To help ensure consistent results, the company has designed a proprietary 4-step approach that includes a comprehensive evaluation, personalized learning plan, individual tutoring and regular communication with families and schools. The results have been profound. On average, Huntington students increase two or more grade levels in reading and math over a three-month period. Average SAT scores increase 192 points after a two-and-a-half month program, while ACT scores increase an average of four points.

“When Eileen and I started this company four decades ago, our hope was to help children who were struggling to keep up in school and give them the one-to-one supplemental instruction they needed to boost their confidence and their grades,” says Dr. Huntington. “Today, we are simply astonished by the results we’ve seen.”

The company’s success is grounded in its mission, which is to give every student the best education possible. Huntington is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools as well as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and is one of the nation’s first approved supplemental education services providers under No Child Left Behind. Eileen Huntington, co-founder and CEO, adds, “While we’ve received numerous awards and accolades over the past 40 years, our greatest joy is knowing we have helped millions of students gain the skills, confidence and motivation they need to succeed.”

This commitment to their students has led to tremendous demand and expansion. In 1985, the company began franchising outside of New Jersey and Philadelphia, growing to 148 franchised centers by 2000. Today, it operates nearly 300 centers in 38 states from coast to coast.

“We have so much to celebrate,” says Dr. Huntington. “To have reached 40 years in business is something that makes us incredibly proud — knowing that we have changed so many students’ and parents’ lives.”

Despite this enormous growth, Huntington remains a family owned and operated company. Dr. Raymond and Mrs. Eileen Huntington are proud to welcome the next generation into the business to continue the mission. “We look forward to the next forty-plus years of changing students' lives across America,” adds their daughter, Anne Huntington, who is actively involved in all aspects of the business as head of partnerships and development.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington Learning Center is the premier national tutoring and test prep provider for the K-12 market with locations in 38 states. It was founded in 1977 with the mission to give every student the best education possible, which is what still drives every business decision to this day. The company prides itself on personalized attention and proven results with individualized programs taught by certified teachers at accredited centers. Areas of instruction include phonics, reading, writing, vocabulary, math, science, study skills, executive functioning skills, ACT, SAT, PSAT, high school entrance exams, and state and other standardized exams.

To learn more about Huntington Learning Center and stay updated on scheduled events and activities for its 40th anniversary, visit huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities, visit huntingtonfranchise.com. 

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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5 Tips to Develop a Child’s Leadership Skills No matter what children plan to do in their lives, learning to communicate, make decisions, and work with teams will benefit them tremendously. Huntington Learning Center says such leadership competencies help children build confidence and learn to advocate for themselves in all areas of their lives.

“Leadership skills are important at every age, but especially become valuable when children enter high school and college, where teachers expect that students are able to motivate themselves and others and work well with a wide range of people.”

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Thu, 16 Mar 2017 11:01:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5tipsforleadershipskills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5tipsforleadershipskills No matter what children plan to do in their lives, learning to communicate, make decisions, and work with teams will benefit them tremendously. Huntington Learning Center says such leadership competencies help children build confidence and learn to advocate for themselves in all areas of their lives.

“Leadership skills are important at every age, but especially become valuable when children enter high school and college, where teachers expect that students are able to motivate themselves and others and work well with a wide range of people.”

Huntington offers these five tips to parents to help develop valuable leadership aptitudes:

Embrace goal setting from a young age. All leaders will agree that success doesn’t come easy and generally requires advanced planning and a lot of hard work. Children who learn to set goals and work toward them will be better equipped later on to prioritize numerous tasks and more motivated overall. Teach your child to dream big but also lay out how he or she plans to achieve those dreams.

Encourage your child to go for the things he or she wants. Life sometimes requires taking risks, which can be scary. Talk to your child about the benefits of putting himself or herself out there and trying things, even when afraid or nervous. Although nobody wants to fail, teach your child that failure is an opportunity to grow and learn. 

Talk about the importance of respect. Great leaders are respectful toward others and believe that they will be more successful if they build up those around them. Establish the expectation that your child will always be respectful of family members, teachers, friends, teammates and others. Talk with your child about valuing others’ ideas and strengths and why it is essential to listen well.

Suggest activities that involve working in groups. Extracurricular activities have many benefits, including the lessons they teach about teamwork and collaboration. Get your child involved in activities that offer opportunities to build those skills. Talk about how to be a role model for younger members of any club or team.

Demand perseverance. By the time you send your child off to college, hopefully he or she will be equipped with solid problem-solving skills and an optimistic outlook. You can help by emphasizing the importance of perseverance. Teach your child that effort equals improvement, that progress is always the goal. Remind your child often that the best things in life require persistence and patience.

Remember that their goal shouldn’t just be to raise leaders, but to help strengthen their children as students and people. “Every child can benefit from a little leadership development. Great leaders are tough-minded, self-assured, hard-working and confident. Whether your child grows up to become a CEO or a teacher, nurturing those skills will benefit your child for life.

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Huntington Learning Center is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017 Huntington Learning Center  is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017, an annual event that recognizes the importance of mathematics and its applications and developments in specific areas.

Huntington joins schools, educators, colleges, universities, communities and others to celebrate mathematics as an integral part of everyday life. Math is the building block for many essential careers and plays a central role in some of the world’s greatest innovations.  In the past year alone, we’ve seen technological advancements that are changing the way we live—from smart robots to genetic engineering to artificial intelligence—all of which are examples of math in action. This month, we pay special attention to math’s many applications in solving real-world problems large and small.

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Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:48:08 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathawarenessmonth https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathawarenessmonth Huntington Learning Center  is celebrating Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month in April 2017, an annual event that recognizes the importance of mathematics and its applications and developments in specific areas.

Huntington joins schools, educators, colleges, universities, communities and others to celebrate mathematics as an integral part of everyday life. Math is the building block for many essential careers and plays a central role in some of the world’s greatest innovations.  In the past year alone, we’ve seen technological advancements that are changing the way we live—from smart robots to genetic engineering to artificial intelligence—all of which are examples of math in action. This month, we pay special attention to math’s many applications in solving real-world problems large and small.

Parents can join their efforts this month and year-round by helping their children recognize math’s important uses and put it into practice in their daily lives. Here are some  suggestions:

  1. Have your child estimate the grocery bill as you shop.
  2. Point out careers that require math skills, especially among people your child knows or admires.
  3. Plan a family trip, and have your child calculate drive time or mileage between destinations based on speed limits and distance as well as a trip budget that includes the cost of flights, hotels, gas, meals and other expenditures.
  4. Invite your child to cook with you and calculate all measurements for recipes.
  5. Take your child to the bank every time you go and talk about money—saving it, earning it and how interest compounds in an interest-bearing account.
  6. Take note of the use of statistics in everyday life: in the polls for the recent Presidential election, to deliver accurate weather forecasts, in stock market predictions and more.
  7. Talk about math’s role in some of the most significant discoveries in history: the landing on Mars and the invention of photography, for example.


Mathematics Awareness Month began in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation to establish National Mathematics Awareness Week. This annual celebration is a collaborative effort of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics. In 2017, the name of the holiday was changed to Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month.

To learn more about Mathematics and Statistical Awareness Month, visit www.mathaware.org

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4 Tips for Helping Middle School Students Increase Academic Independence If you’re the parent of a new or soon-to-be middle schooler, brace yourself for some major changes. Middle school is more intense and has a heavier workload, with most middle school curriculums including five core subjects and two electives. Children are expected to do more, question more, and think more critically.

Above all, middle school demands that children function as independent students. But how can you encourage your child to engage in the activities that promote greater independence?

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Fri, 27 Apr 2018 11:42:00 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-middle-school-students-increase-academic-independence https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-middle-school-students-increase-academic-independence Dr. Ray Huntington Dr. Ray Huntington If you’re the parent of a new or soon-to-be middle schooler, brace yourself for some major changes. Middle school is more intense and has a heavier workload, with most middle school curriculums including five core subjects and two electives. Children are expected to do more, question more, and think more critically.

Above all, middle school demands that children function as independent students. But how can you encourage your child to engage in the activities that promote greater independence? Here are four tips that will encourage independent learning and significantly benefit your child:

  1. Establish a good routine. Middle school is a time when children must take ownership of their academic responsibilities, and there’s no better way to encourage this than to promote a solid nightly homework routine. At the beginning of middle school, parents should help children establish good habits: laying out a homework plan at the start of each study session, studying in a place that fosters their productivity, and embracing an organizational system that works for them. It’s fine to keep tabs on this to make sure children are staying on top of everything, but it’s essential that parents put their children in the driver’s seat.
  2. Promote goal-setting. Setting goals is a powerful exercise that encourages children to think about school more intentionally and narrow their focus on what they want to achieve (and how they will do so). Parents and their children should spend time setting goals at the start of each new semester and writing down the obstacles and to-dos to overcome them. It’s also helpful to get children thinking about what each goal really means to them personally by dividing them into short term and long term. For example, your child’s goals for math class might be to stay up to date on all homework assigned (short term), develop and follow a weekly study plan (short term), and improve his or her attitude about math in middle school (long term).
  3. Encourage self-monitoring. In simple terms, self-monitoring is a strategy that helps students check their own work for mistakes or areas that need improvement. As students become more independent, they should be able to uncover clues when reading for information or recognize when something—a series of steps in a math problem, for example—doesn’t make sense or seem right. Self-monitoring strategies can strengthen this ability. When children do homework for each of their classes, parents can encourage them to ask these types of questions along the way:
    • Are all steps in the directions clear to me?
    • Does this make sense so far? If not, what part is confusing me?
    • Do I recognize this problem as a similar type of problem that I’ve done before?
    • How confident do I feel about what I just read?
    • I got that problem wrong the first time—what can I do to get it right next time?
    • How would I restate what I just read in another way?
  4. Step up the planner usage. Many children start using planners in elementary school, but middle school is when this becomes essential. With seven or eight classes to keep track of, children must stay organized, and it’s hard to do without some sort of organizational system and a planner. Explore whether your child’s school has a class or program dedicated to helping students create a binder system for all classes and use planners effectively. At a minimum, make sure your child has a weekly planner and is keeping track of:
    • Test and quiz dates
    • Homework assignments each day (and upcoming deadlines)
    • Other important dates for school (such as parent-teacher conferences)

Middle school is a major time of transition in large part due to the elevated expectations for students. Help your child be successful by nudging him or her toward increased independence—and follow the lead of his or her teachers, who have this goal top of mind as well. Lay the foundation now and by the time your child reaches high school, he or she will be ready to face any challenge with confidence.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

©2017 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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Evaluating Your Children's Mid-Year Report Card Huntington Learning Center offers tips to help children overcome issues with academic skills they have by evaluating their mid-year report card.

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Tue, 24 Jan 2017 11:24:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/evaluating-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/evaluating-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Evaluating Your Child’s Mid-Year Report Card

 Holiday break is behind us and it’s a brand new year—which also means those mid-year report cards are just around the corner. “Many students and parents dread report cards, but they shouldn’t,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “A child’s report card contains lots of useful information about his or her skill proficiency, academic development, and strengths and weaknesses. Using that knowledge, parents can help their child overcome school problems and be the best student possible.” Huntington offers parents a few tips to address different report card scenarios: 

Issue: My child’s report card says he needs to work on study skills.

If your child struggles to get focused at homework time (or during class), is overly disorganized or has trouble prioritizing and managing his or her time, talk with him or her about what might help. Try a planner or notebook to record and check off homework assignments and other obligations. Make organization a part of the homework routine—setting up, keeping the desk neat and filing away graded homework. Ask your child what study strategies seem to work for him or her best—a quiet room? Taking an after-school break before diving into homework?

Issue: My child’s grades do not reflect her efforts.

If your child spends a lot of time on homework but his or her grades are still suffering, there may be other issues at play. He or she may be missing basic skills or may not understand the concepts covered in class (and struggles to tackle them at home). Visit with your child’s teacher to get an approximate idea of how much time should be spent on homework each evening and how you can best support your child. 

Issue: My child’s grades were mostly fine, but he received a failing grade in one subject.

It is common for children to do better in certain subjects than others, but a failing grade in any subject is a red flag that your child may not be comprehending class material, completing assignments or putting forth the effort required. Schedule a meeting with the teacher to discuss the reasons behind the low mark and get ideas to help your child bring up the grade by the end of the year. 

Issue: My child’s report card is full of bad grades and she doesn’t seem to care.

Your child may care more than you think. Many children who struggle in school have low self-esteem and assume their parents are disappointed in them. They stop trying because they would rather get a low grade than experience continued frustration. Resist the urge to punish your child for failing and instead let him or her know that you want to help. Communicate openly about what your child thinks will help him or her improve. Involve your child in the plan of action to encourage him or her to take ownership and responsibility.

There’s a lot to be learned from your child’s report card, but Huntington reminds parents to keep it in perspective. “Report cards and the grades they contain certainly do not measure how smart your child is or the likelihood of his or her success in life, so don’t panic if your child’s report card indicates that he or she needs help,” says Huntington. “Investigate these issues with your child’s teacher and together, you can help your child raise his or her self-esteem, do better in school and be a happier person overall.”

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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How Your College-Bound Teen Can Make it a Productive Holiday Break College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year. For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come. 

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Tue, 20 Dec 2016 16:42:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/productive-holiday-break-for-your-college-bound-teen https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/productive-holiday-break-for-your-college-bound-teen College is an essential step toward lifelong success, but getting there doesn’t happen on its own. Huntington Learning Center says that too often, college-related deadlines have a way of sneaking up on students—but holiday break is a great time to revisit the college to-do list. The spring semester of the school year tends to fly by for high school students, especially those finishing up their senior year. For those with college on the horizon, it’s important to pay attention to all of the necessary deadlines and tasks. These next few weeks offer a perfect opportunity to get things in order and plan ahead for the months to come. 

Start working on the FAFSA. Seniors planning on enrolling in college for fall 2017 should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon after January 1 as possible. This application is your family’s avenue to receiving federal, state and college financial aid and the sooner you submit it, the better. Get started at www.studentaid.ed.gov.

Register for Advanced Placement exams. Before school lets out, your teen should talk to teachers or the school’s designated Advanced Placement (AP) coordinator about taking any AP exams in the spring. In 2017, AP exams are scheduled for early May, so holiday break is a good time to start thinking about which exams your teen wants to study for and take.

Register for the spring SAT or ACT. For juniors taking the exam for the first time, now is the time to develop a study schedule for the February 11 or May 6 SAT and March 11 or April 8 ACT. Contact Huntington over the break to learn more about our 14-hour, 32-hour and Premier SAT and ACT prep programs.

Work on college applications. Seniors should use holiday break as a time to get going on college applications, as many colleges have application deadlines as early as January 1. At the very least, your senior should spend time working on some of the time-consuming parts of the application package, such as the essay. It’s also a good idea to write succinct but professional letters to teachers from whom your teen would like letters of recommendation, making sure to include a resume and list of accomplishments in each teacher’s class. When school is back in session in January, your teen can deliver these letters personally.

Visit local colleges. Although colleges are also on break, this might be a good chance for you and your teen to visit any colleges in your area. Walk the campus, stop by the admissions offices, explore the classrooms and reach out ahead of time to see if any tours are offered.

Holiday break is a wonderful time for your teen to recharge his or her batteries after a busy fall semester, but it also presents a chance to get ahead on that college checklist. At Huntington, we advise students to take advantage of every break they have from school and use that downtime to ensure they’re on top of everything they need to be regarding college. During the spring, things pick up significantly when it comes to college—from applying for financial aid to selecting a college. Encourage your teen to use this time effectively, so that he or she will feel more organized and ready to continue moving forward when school resumes in January.”

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Huntington Learning Center Suggests Educational Activities for Holiday Break Students absolutely deserve a breather from school work and studying over the holidays, and there are many benefits to embracing this time as a chance to relax and recharge. However, Huntington reminds parents how easy it is to keep children engaged and having fun during break. There are so many great ways to keep the mind active while spending time together as a family. And best of all, including a few educational activities in your holiday break schedule can keep your child’s brain active, minimizing regression that can take place even during a short break from school.

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Tue, 20 Dec 2016 16:41:28 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaybreakeducational-activities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/holidaybreakeducational-activities Students absolutely deserve a breather from school work and studying over the holidays, and there are many benefits to embracing this time as a chance to relax and recharge. However, Huntington reminds parents how easy it is to keep children engaged and having fun during break. There are so many great ways to keep the mind active while spending time together as a family. And best of all, including a few educational activities in your holiday break schedule can keep your child’s brain active, minimizing regression that can take place even during a short break from school. 

Library visits – An easy and highly beneficial educational outing for holiday break is a family trip to the library—and you can go as often as you like. Most libraries offer a range of activities during holiday breaks that might pique your child’s interest. At a minimum, however, you and your child can pick up some reading material to enjoy during the lazy days that school is out. Make reading a daily activity for the whole family.

Museum outings – If you have a favorite art, cultural, science or other museum or have wanted to visit one for the first time, holiday break is an ideal time to do so. Be sure to view the website ahead of time to see if there are any special exhibits or events. And take your child’s lead—perhaps he or she would enjoy art over science or a fireman’s museum over the baseball museum.

Documentary or film – If your child was fascinated during his or her class’s unit on Egypt or loves learning about nature and weather, check out the selection of films and documentaries at your library (or through Netflix if you’re a subscriber). An at-home movie afternoon is certainly fun, but you could also make it a day outing. Browse the showings at your local science museum—maybe you’ll discover an exciting option at a nearby IMAX theater or planetarium.

Musical performances or theater – This time of year generally means lots of cultural events and activities if your family is interested in music, theater or dance. If The Nutcracker doesn’t grab your child’s interest, check out the local high school or college for plays or other performances, nearby jazz or other music clubs, or even your local coffee shop to see what types of entertainment might be on the holiday calendar.

Holiday break is a great chance for your child to unwind and do the things he or she wants to do, but it is also a perfect time to enrich the mind and explore different topics. This is a rare opportunity free of school obligations when parents and their children can delve into some interests and enjoy learning something new together. Get out and expand your horizons. Offer your child ideas and then let his or her curiosities guide you.

 

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Engaging Your Child in the Learning Process If you’ve ever tried to motivate your child to study or do homework, you probably know that it’s much easier to be successful when you get your child’s input and buy-in. Research shows that students who are more engaged in the learning process, after all, are more attentive and focused, and generally more motivated to learn increasingly challenging topics. Although your child’s teacher plays a big role, there are many ways you can encourage your child to become more connected and interested in what he or she learns.

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Mon, 28 Aug 2017 14:49:26 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/engage_learning_process https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/engage_learning_process If you’ve ever tried to motivate your child to study or do homework, you probably know that it’s much easier to be successful when you get your child’s input and buy-in. Research shows that students who are more engaged in the learning process, after all, are more attentive and focused, and generally more motivated to learn increasingly challenging topics. Although your child’s teacher plays a big role, there are many ways you can encourage your child to become more connected and interested in what he or she learns. Here are several tips on how to do just that:

Frequently start conversations about school topics. You can strengthen your child’s critical thinking, communication, and other related skills by asking thoughtful questions about school, your child’s opinion on an issue, the books your child reads and more. Skip the yes/no questions and instead focus on those that encourage inquisition and thinking from different perspectives. Asking about the “why” and not just the “how” will strengthen your child’s ability to formulate ideas and foster the active learning process. It will also send the message that learning for the sake of learning is worthwhile.

Talk about alternatives. Teachers usually encourage students to learn multiple methods to solving problems or answering questions and give them the freedom to choose the one they understand and like the best. You can reinforce your child’s understanding of a subject by talking through alternate viewpoints or ways of solving a problem. If your child is working on a multiplication problem, for example, ask about other ways to get to the same answer and why your child chose a certain approach. Explaining different strategies to you will strengthen your child’s understanding and build his or her confidence—activities that lead to enhanced engagement.

Take a supporting role. One of the simplest ways to increase your child’s level of engagement is to put him or her in the driver’s seat—always. Set ground rules at home that make it clear that you are available for guidance, not answers, and that school is your child’s job. That means attempting things before asking for help and being resourceful about finding answers to questions. Your child is responsible for school work and all associated duties. Make sure you send that message with your actions as well as your words.

Emphasize learning, not grades. Grades are important, but more important is the effort that your child puts into school. Take note of your child’s persistence and hard work more than achievements such as grades—and remind your child that learning isn’t always easy. Also, instill in your child the belief that the ultimate goal of school and homework is to acquire knowledge.

Children sometimes find school to be difficult, frustrating or even boring, but there are many ways to encourage them to take ownership of school. Embrace these strategies for strengthening your child’s academic engagement, and good things will happen. In the end, you’ll help your child take an active role as a learner—a trait that will serve him or her well in college and long after.

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Five Soft Skills Every Child Needs for Success Parents hear often that their children need a solid foundation of academic knowledge to flourish in college and beyond. However, there are many other attributes that help children lead successful, fulfilling lives. When it comes to life and career, most people can attest that technical skills only get one so far. “We tell parents regularly that while academic aptitude matters, there are a number of personal characteristics that will set their children apart and help them do well in life.”

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Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:27:54 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fivesoftskills_for_success https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/fivesoftskills_for_success Parents hear often that their children need a solid foundation of academic knowledge to flourish in college and beyond. However, there are many other attributes that help children lead successful, fulfilling lives. When it comes to life and career, most people can attest that technical skills only get one so far. “We tell parents regularly that while academic aptitude matters, there are a number of personal characteristics that will set their children apart and help them do well in life.”

Successful students and people possess these five “soft” skills and encourages parents to nurture them in their children whenever possible:

Communication skills – Verbal and nonverbal communication skills are frequently touted as the most important skills in any career. Parents should encourage their children to express their ideas and opinions clearly when writing or speaking, but it’s also crucial to build careful, attentive listening skills as well.

Empathy – Empathy is one component of emotional intelligence and something that helps people develop strong interpersonal connections—a key to success in life. Parents can help their children learn to recognize how their actions and words impact and influence others, both positively and negatively. The ability to understand others’ feelings is critical for building good relationships—with friends as well as teachers, classmates, coworkers and bosses.

Perseverance – Most parents have recited the age-old adage, “If at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again,” to their children before. Without question, life is full of challenges. One of the most important skills children can acquire is that of perseverance. Parents can facilitate the development of this trait by teaching their children to set goals and lay out smaller steps toward achieving those goals and by always talking about challenges as opportunities for learning and growth.

Teamwork – Students who are able to work effectively with all types of people have a leg up in college and the working world. Luckily for parents, today’s teachers often have their students collaborate on a variety of projects. At home, parents can offer their children opportunities to contribute and debate ideas and work with their siblings to complete tasks.

Problem-solvingChildren who take a proactive approach to solving problems and overcoming roadblocks have a big advantage. When facing problems large and small, children should try out different solutions. Parents can support this by encouraging their children to talk about what worked and didn’t work with each attempted solution and helping them think through alternatives.

Soft skills don’t come naturally to everyone, but with effort and practice, parents can foster their children’s development of these personal traits. Soft skills are important throughout school, but they become essential in one’s career .  Parents who consistently and patiently work with their children to help them become adaptable, hard-working problem-solvers with the critical thinking skills to navigate any issue are preparing them for life success.

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Tips for Reviewing Your Child's First Report Card Your child has gotten back into the swing of the school routine, and now it's time for an academic check-up. "Think of the first report card as a great opportunity to communicate with your child about school," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. "It is the first true academic checkup of the year, and a good time to talk about how things are going."

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Tue, 25 Oct 2016 10:26:49 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-reviewing-your-childs-first-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-for-reviewing-your-childs-first-report-card Your child has gotten back into the swing of the school routine, and now it's time for an academic check-up. "Think of the first report card as a great opportunity to communicate with your child about school," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. "It is the first true academic checkup of the year, and a good time to talk about how things are going."

Huntington offers parents the following tips when assessing their child's first semester report card:

Jot down questions to ask the teacher. Go through the report card carefully and identify areas you'd like to discuss with the teacher. What concerns you most about your child's report card? What grades or comments surprise you? What does the teacher think you should work on at home? Be sure to ask the teacher about your child's attitude and behavior, too.

Take note of irregularities and patterns. If something on your child's report card is inconsistent with what you know about your child, it is probably worth investigating. For example, it might surprise you to see a poor grade in math if your child did well in math last year. There could be many factors at play, such as the pace of the class, basic skills missed that are now hindering your child's performance, or other issues.

Pay attention to study skills. Some smart students are hampered by disorganization and poor study skills. Does your child's report card indicate that he or she is struggling with things such as time management, focus or overall organization? If so, it may be time to intervene by helping him or her develop a homework routine and an organizational system to keep track of paperwork coming home. Talk with his or her teacher for ideas.

Go to the source. After you've taken time to review the report card, sit down with your child and get his or her perspective. What parts of school is he or she struggling with most? Let your child know that you want to help, and ask him or her how you can best do so.

Huntington advises parents not to let the first report card of the year cause stress - even if grades are lower than expected. "The report card gives you detailed information about your child's academic progress, and should be used to support your child's learning," Huntington says. "Use this invaluable tool to assess your child's first semester, identify any issues and make a plan to address them together. Don't wait to seek tutoring help if your child's skills aren't where they should be. Your child will benefit - and hopefully the next report card will reflect those efforts." For more information, please contact Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit http://huntingtonhelps.com.

 

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How Parents Can Support Their 21st Century Learners How Parents Can Support Their 21st Century Learners

This generation of learners is quite different than the one that came before them. Parents are aware that their children learn differently than they did in school, but they don't always know exactly why. What should you know about your child as a student? Below is some valuable insight into what 21st century learners are all about and how you can support your child at home:

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Tue, 18 Oct 2016 15:10:23 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/support_digital_learners https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/support_digital_learners Today's students are digital natives and members of the so-called Generation "Z." They have grown up with the internet and technology, and social media tools such as Instagram and Snapchat are a part of their daily lives. This generation of learners is quite different than the one that came before them. Parents are aware that their children learn differently than they did in school, but they don't always know exactly why. What should you know about your child as a student? Below is some valuable insight into what 21st century learners are all about and how you can support your child at home:

Technology is integrated into their lives. Children today spend a great deal of time online, whether that's at school or through smartphone devices. They are skilled multi-taskers who need to be engaged with a variety of teaching techniques in the classroom. You can expect that your child will become an efficient and adept researcher as he or she grows older too.

Problem solving is active. Children today have grown up in a dynamic, globalized world, and thus, are used to thinking on their toes. When it comes to school, this translates into creativity and deeper thinking. You can foster your child's learning by encouraging him or her to brainstorm solutions and think through potential ways to improve those solutions.

They are being taught essential 21st century skills. In today's information-based economy, education researchers have identified the skills that the future generation needs to achieve success in their careers. Those skills include problem-solving in the face of uncertainty, critical thinking and leadership. Your child is certainly media and technology savvy, but he or she is also entering a rapidly changing workforce that requires flexibility and creativity. Nurture those assets whenever possible.

They move quickly. The classroom today is largely a student-centered learning environment. Students prefer active learning and projects that engage them in material. They are often self-starters and very capable of managing ambiguity, yet they seek to understand the relevance of what they learn as well. As you guide your child, keep these tendencies in mind.

They are used to working in teams. Thanks to the social networks in which today's children frequently interact, students are highly collaborative and used to learning alongside their peers. Encourage your child to share what he or she learns with you and others. Doing so helps your child remember and retain, and reinforces the approach of his or her teacher.

Your job as a parent is to support your child's educational journey and guide him or her toward independence and success—a job that is much easier to do when you have a good understanding of what your child is learning at school and how he or she learns best. If you need help, call Huntington, we understand the unique traits of students today and have adapted our learning programs to fit their needs and help them flourish. Whether your child is struggling in school or wants to build skills or get ahead, Huntington can help. Call 1 800 CAN LEARN today to learn more.

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Partnering with your Child's Teacher for a Successful School Year Most teachers will tell any parent that parental participation is vital to their child's success in school. As your child starts a brand new school year, take time to get acquainted with the person (or persons) that will play a large part in your child's learning experience-your child's teacher.

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Thu, 15 Sep 2016 17:34:22 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/partnering-with-your-childs-teacher-for-a-successful-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/partnering-with-your-childs-teacher-for-a-successful-school-year How can you effectively collaborate with your child's teacher? By fostering positive and productive communication throughout the year. Just as it is important to talk with your child about school, communicating with his or her teacher is crucial as well. Read on for a few pointers on how to develop a positive parent-teacher relationship and make the most out of it all year long.

Go to parent-teacher conferences.
Take advantage of parent-teacher conferences, which offer regular opportunities for you to talk with your child's teacher face to face. To get the most out of these meetings, jot down any issues you'd like to discuss before you go. If your child is struggling with school or homework, ask his or her teacher lots of questions, such as:

  • Does my child seem focused during class?
  • Does my child come prepared for class
  • Does my child complete all homework and classroom assignments
  • Does my child get along with his or her peers?
  • What are my child's best subjects? What subjects does my child struggle with?
  • Does my child participate in class?
  • Does my child pay attention in class?
  • Has my child had absences from school that I may not be aware of?
  • What tests will my child take this school year? What do these tests measure?

Of course, your child's teacher may have a few questions for you as well. If your child is experiencing problems at home, with friends or in other areas of his or her life, be sure to share this with your child's teacher. Together, the two of you can brainstorm ways to lessen the impact of outside factors on your child's school performance.

Keep interactions positive and collaborative.
Not every parent-teacher relationship will be perfect. Topics such as homework, tests and learning environment may rouse disagreement between you and your child's teacher, particularly if your child is struggling to keep up or has difficulty completing assignments. However, it's best to approach your child's teacher with a cooperative attitude, avoiding assigning blame or criticizing. First, attempt to understand the situation. Remember that your child's teacher also has your child's best interests in mind.

Ask teachers what you can do to help your child at home.
Whether at parent-teacher conferences or in a separate meeting or discussion, be sure to ask your child's teacher for suggestions on how to help your child get the most out of homework and improve his or her study habits. Your child's teacher will likely have several helpful suggestions and be more than willing to help you devise an action plan to enhance your child's learning at home.

Be mindful of a teacher's schedule.
Keep in mind when calling your child's teacher or requesting meetings that he or she likely interacts with many other students' parents on a regular basis as well. Ask your child's teacher what is the best way for the two of you to communicate. Some teachers may suggest using email to stay in touch when quick questions arise, saving in-person meetings for bigger issues.

In the end, you and your child's teacher have the same goal: to provide your child the best education possible. Do your part to make it a great year by keeping the lines of communication open. Huntington is here to help every step of the way. If your child needs additional help, turn to us. We can address areas where your child may be struggling and tailor a program based on his or her learning needs.

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Helping Your Child Become Faster and More Efficient by Embracing Routine and Structure For a busy parents with limited time, it's frustrating when your child seems to have no sense of urgency and no motivation to get things done. If you're having a hard time getting your child to move faster—here are a few tips to help him or her become speedier and more organized in school and life.

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Fri, 09 Feb 2018 16:39:21 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-become-faster-and-more-efficient-by-embracing-routine-and-structure https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/helping-your-child-become-faster-and-more-efficient-by-embracing-routine-and-structure Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Help your child be faster and more efficient this school year!

For a busy parents with limited time, it's frustrating when your child seems to have no sense of urgency and no motivation to get things done. If you're having a hard time getting your child to move faster—here are a few tips to help him or her become speedier and more organized in school and life.

Give your child checklists. Some children do much better when they have a visual to-do list that they can check off step by step. Create a checklist for any daily routine that seems to spark your child’s inner procrastinator. For a younger child, draw or write out the steps and laminate the checklist. For the morning checklist, for example, your child can check off each step with a dry erase marker—from getting dressed to making a lunch to checking that all homework and other items are in placed into his or her backpack before heading out the door. Older children might do well with smartphone reminders and alarms.  

Plan ahead—and get your child to do the same. Whenever possible, do things ahead of time. If your child has basketball practice shortly after school, have him or her get out the gym bag, clothes and gear the night before, so that all he or she needs to do after school is change clothes and grab a quick snack. If the morning routine is difficult for your child, have him or her lay out his or outfit and get his or her backpack ready to go at night rather than in the morning.

Set time limits for each and every task. Some children are relatively organized, but slower than they need to be. If this is your child, set small goals for each task. For example, if a homework worksheet should take your child 10 minutes to complete, set a timer for 15. If he or she dawdles or gets distracted while getting ready for school, set a goal of getting to the breakfast table by a specific time. Then, set another goal of having his or her shoes on and backpack ready 10 minutes before departure time.

Keep an organized house and have your child do the same. Good organization and efficiency go hand in hand. When your child is disorganized, it’s too easy for him or her to lose things and overlook important dates, obligations and homework assignments—and these problems are only exacerbated by his or her tendency to move and work slowly. Encourage your child to embrace a reliable organizational system at his or her desk, in his or her room and anywhere else. This leads to less wasted time and minimized stress.

Have a frank conversation. Sometimes, the logical approach can work wonders. Talk with your child about all of the things that need to be accomplished each day by your child and by you. Explain that it is difficult to finish those tasks when he or she wastes 25 minutes on something that should take two, and that you want his or her help in keeping the household chaos to a minimum. Let your child know that the more efficient he or she is with time, the more time he or she will have to do fun things like play games or hang out with friends.

Build in extra time. The reality is that some children may just do things slower—from eating dinner to showering to completing school work. Do your best to establish and stick to routines whenever possible, but also be realistic about your expectations. Your child may simply be hard wired to move more slowly than you would prefer. Build a little extra time into your daily routines to accommodate and avoid the stress of constant scolding and nagging.

With effort, patience and practice, you can help you child become responsible and efficient with his or her time. Remember: all children are different, so while he or she may not do things exactly as you like, you can help him or her become a self-starter and an organized student and person. Those skills will stay with your child—and benefit him or her—for the rest of his or her life. 

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Regression: What it is and How to Avoid it This Summer Dr. Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center urges parents to engage their children in learning activities to avoid summer regression. Put simply, summer regression is the loss of academic knowledge gained throughout the school year. “Learning loss or the ‘summer slide’ among students over summer break is a very real problem that we see often,” says Huntington, adding that most students can lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math and reading achievement during this period. He offers several ways for parents to help minimize summer regression.

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Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:53:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-regression-in-the-summer https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-avoid-regression-in-the-summer Dr. Raymond Huntington Dr. Raymond Huntington It’s summer vacation, and your child is probably happy to spend his or her days lounging and recuperating from the hectic school year. A break is well deserved, but Dr. Ray Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center urges parents to engage their children in learning activities to avoid summer regression. Put simply, summer regression is the loss of academic knowledge gained throughout the school year. “Learning loss or the ‘summer slide’ among students over summer break is a very real problem that we see often,” says Huntington, adding that most students can lose several months of grade-level equivalency in math and reading achievement during this period. He offers several ways for parents to help minimize summer regression:

Read daily. A daily reading habit is one of the easiest ways for children to keep their brains in shape over summer and deter any loss of reading ability. Incorporate reading into the summer routine. Check out book clubs or summer reading programs offered at your local library or book store. Visit the library every week. Start a series as a family and read a book together.

Write often. Writing frequently will help your child keep up important literacy skills such as self-expression and vocabulary acquisition. While you might have trouble convincing your child to write essays or book reports this summer, creative writing or journal writing still has many benefits. It encourages creativity, problem solving and experimentation with various types of storytelling, and also improves communication skills.

Plan educational visits. Don’t forget that visits to your local history, science, art and other museums are fun learning opportunities. If you’re taking any vacations, incorporate a family field trip to an interesting monument, historical site or museum in the area you’re visiting. Before you go, check out books from the library about the place or topic that you can read together. Use the plane or car ride home as a chance to reflect on the visit, what your child learned, and what he or she wants to learn more about.

Set aside daily learning time. If your child does best with a learning routine, consider purchasing grade-specific workbooks that your child can work on throughout the summer. The goal of these programs is to help students practice and maintain skills they acquired all year and prevent them from losing those concepts due to inactivity. Your school or teacher might have recommendations, but books such as Summer Bridge, ThinkStretch and Summer Fit are worth consideration. Just 15 minutes a day can make a huge difference.

Enroll in a summer learning program. Whether your child struggled this school year and needs to catch up or you want to help your child build new skills and confidence, an individualized summer tutoring program is a great solution. Huntington can help your child maintain skills, improve habits and prepare for a smooth transition into the next grade.

“Parents can help their child minimize regression this summer by investing a small amount of time into learning activities,” says Huntington. For ideas on how best to engage your child, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How to Make Reading Part of the Summer Routine Summer is an ideal time to incorporate reading into the daily schedule—and the perfect opportunity to get children to enjoy this ageless pastime. “The key to making reading a daily habit is to make it enjoyable, and there are so many ways to do that during summer,” says Huntington. “Make it fun. Let your child choose the books. Make reading a fun family tradition. When you do things like this, you’ll start to see your child choosing to read over other activities, and his or her reading skills will improve greatly as well.”

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:56:15 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-make-summer-reading-routine-for-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-make-summer-reading-routine-for-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Many children look forward to summer as a time to unwind, relax and enjoy—and reading for fun can definitely enhance the summer. “The school year is busy and most students read plenty, but not necessarily the books or materials of their choosing,” says Eileen Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center. “Summer reading can be so much fun because children can read whatever they choose, take their time and explore topics they find interesting.”

It’s easier than you think to make reading a part of your summer routine, says Huntington. Here of a few tips:

Do some research. Teachers and education professionals know well that you’ll have far better luck getting children to choose to read if they find books that interest them. So, do a little homework on books that might appeal to your child. What topic, sport or activity is your child into right now? If you need help, ask your librarian for recommendations. Websites like goodreads.com are also helpful for searching genres (even getting as specific as children’s classics, juvenile, young adult fiction, realistic young adult, teen and young adult contemporary, for example) and reading reviews.

Make it family time. Set aside 20 or 30 minutes each evening for the entire family to get out their books and read together. Make reading time a treat by setting out a tray of summer snacks and a pitcher of ice cold lemonade. If you have a shady spot in the backyard, transform it into your summer reading spot with a few lounge chairs or hammocks. The more you can treat reading like a fun, “want-to” activity, the more your child will embrace it and look forward to it.

Sign up for summer reading programs. Summer reading programs do a great job of rewarding readers for achieving milestones and building a sense of community among readers. Huntington Learning Center’s Reading Adventure Program runs all summer long and has children choose books from a pre-selected book list with many high-interest, popular books. Students record their reading in a reading “passport” and get recognized for meeting their goals. Don’t forget to check out summer reading programs at your local library and bookstores as well.

Visit the library. Librarians are the biggest proponents of summer reading and you’ll find lots of ideas to get your child inspired at your local library. Look into summer book clubs, summer reading programs, reading activities for teens and family reading programs. At a minimum, stopping by the library regularly is a great way to keep reading top of mind and set and meet goals. For every book that your child completes, why not reward him or her with a stop at the ice cream shop on the way home?

Summer is an ideal time to incorporate reading into the daily schedule—and the perfect opportunity to get children to enjoy this ageless pastime. “The key to making reading a daily habit is to make it enjoyable, and there are so many ways to do that during summer,” says Huntington. “Make it fun. Let your child choose the books. Make reading a fun family tradition. When you do things like this, you’ll start to see your child choosing to read over other activities, and his or her reading skills will improve greatly as well.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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How to Help a Child with ADHD Improve Focus and Task Completion For students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), simple tasks such as getting ready for school and finishing a homework assignment can be a stressful battle. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center offers a few strategies for parents to keep ADHD students focused and on task.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:42:29 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-adhd-child-improve-focus-and-task-completion https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/help-adhd-child-improve-focus-and-task-completion Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center For students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), simple tasks such as getting ready for school and finishing a homework assignment can be a stressful battle. Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center reminds parents of children with ADHD that approaching these issues with patience and consistency can make a tremendous difference. “Your primary goal is to help  your child be successful in spite of some of the challenges he or she faces with time management and attention,” says Huntington. She offers a few strategies for parents to keep ADHD students focused and on task:

Focus on the positive. Negative attention and threats can exacerbate a problematic situation with an ADHD child. Instead, point out the things that your child is doing right and reward effort and positive behavior rather than solely focus on your child’s failures.

Use checklists for daily tasks and routines. Relying on checklists for multistep tasks can make a big difference for ADHD children, who tend to lose focus even during simple daily routines. For example, an after school checklist might include steps like empty backpack folders, hand Mom and Dad important papers, bring homework folder and pencils to desk and grab snack. Put tasks in order or even assign lengths of time. Use checklists for other routines as well, such as homework sessions and chores.

Use timers. It’s common for ADHD children to lose track of time or take a long time to complete uncomplicated tasks. Give your child a timer to use along with his or her daily checklist. Break down big tasks into smaller ones and assign time limits for each. For example, if your child can comfortably complete homework in 45 minutes, break down each subject even further: 15 minutes for math, 10 minutes for writing and 20 minutes for reading.

Use focus-enhancing tools. Some settings and tools can promote concentration and keep children relaxed and focused. Does your child need a little background noise or music to concentrate? Does he or she prefer sitting on an exercise ball instead of a desk chair? Some ADHD students think best when fidgeting or playing with silly putty or another fidget/sensory toy or tool. Others are most successful when their workspace is clear and uncluttered. Pay attention to how your child works and talk about what could help.

Boost your child’s confidence. Children who struggle to get things done and stay focused often struggle with diminished confidence. Help your child recognize that which makes him or her special and always compliment his or her efforts and progress, no matter how small.

Students with an ADHD diagnosis have to work hard to stay on task and focused. If you need help supporting your child’s needs, call Huntington. Our ADHD instructional strategies and customized programs can help your child boost his or her skills and do better in school.

Call 1 800 CAN LEARN today.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.   

©2016 Huntington Mark, LLC. Huntington Learning Center®, the three-leaf logo, and 1 800 CAN LEARN® are registered trademarks of Huntington Mark, LLC. Each franchised Huntington Learning Center is operated under a franchise agreement with Huntington Learning Centers, Inc.

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The Importance of Routine and Organization You’ve probably heard before that students who embrace regular routines are more successful, organized and effective. Studies prove this to be true as well. Here is what some of the research says about the positive impact that routines at home can have on children’s school performance—drawing on studies recently completed:

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 13:13:42 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the_importance_of_routine_and_organization https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the_importance_of_routine_and_organization Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center You’ve probably heard before that students who embrace regular routines are more successful, organized and effective. Studies prove this to be true as well. Here is what some of the research says about the positive impact that routines at home can have on children’s school performance—drawing on studies recently completed:

  • Reading routines help students develop early literacy skills and set the stage for continued enjoyment of reading into the school years.
  • Family routines provide children with a model for structure.
  • Family routines during the early childhood years get students involved in activities that contribute to vocabulary development and social skills building as well as academic achievement later on.
  • A study showed that families with a stable, high level of commitment in rituals at home have children with higher scores on standard tests of academic achievement than children of families with a low level or decline in routine.
  • In a study of children with divorced parents, regular bedtime predicted academic performance two years after the initial assessment.
  • An early literacy study said that book-reading routines promote future academic success.

At Huntington Learning Center, our experience echoes these findings—we see every day that students are more organized and capable of achieving their goals when they know what to expect at home and in the classroom. Routines help children build independence, teaching them to set small goals and complete tasks. Through our work with thousands of children, we have found that:

  • Structure and routines teach children responsibility and inspire them to take pride in and ownership of their work.
  • Children who embrace routines and organization tend to do better in school.
  • Routines teach children about self-discipline and working toward goals.
  • Children who are empowered by parents and teachers to take primary responsibility for their daily tasks build the confidence to try new things without fear of failure.
  • Consistency in the daily and homework routine helps children make the most of their time, leaving more time for hobbies, activities and socializing.
  • Routines reduce anxiety about the unknown and help children feel safer in the classroom.
  • At home, routines reinforce what teachers do in the classroom and help children understand that being organized saves time, minimizes stress and reduces unnecessary chaos.
  • In the classroom, routines minimize disruptions and wasted time, making transitions from activity to activity smoother and easier.

Most parents know from experience that routines are a good thing, but the great news is that educational researchers and teachers alike agree. Continue to work on creating and upholding reliable routines for homework, study time and daily tasks and you’ll notice that your child is a more organized, efficient and happy student.

Huntington Learning Center drew from the article, “Family Routines and Rituals” in Infants & Young Children, Vol. 20, No. 4, for this article.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Coming March 2016: the Redesigned SAT The long-anticipated redesigned SAT is almost here, and if your high school student is planning to take this exam for the first time next spring, he or she will definitely be impacted.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:48:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/coming-march-2016-the-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/coming-march-2016-the-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Coming March 2016: the Redesigned SAT

The long-anticipated redesigned SAT is almost here, and if your high school student is planning to take this exam for the first time next spring, he or she will definitely be impacted. Huntington Learning Center is your resource for all things SAT. Here is a high-level view of what to expect from the redesigned SAT, to be debuted in March 2016:

Greater focus on the skills needed for college and workforce success – The redesigned SAT is focused on the skills, knowledge and understandings that predict student success in college and the workforce. The College Board says the most essential skills students need are the ability to:

  • Read, analyze, and use reasoning to comprehend challenging literary and informational texts, including texts on science and history/social studies topics, to expand their knowledge and understanding.
  • Revise and edit extended texts across a range of academic and career-related subjects demonstrating an understanding of grammar and punctuation conventions as well as proper development and organization for the most effective expression of ideas.
  • Show command of a focused, but powerful set of knowledge, skills, and understanding in math, and apply that ability to solve problems situated in science, social studies, and career-related contexts.
  • Make careful and considered use of evidence as students read and write.
  • Demonstrate reading, writing, and math skills in analyzing data, including data represented graphically in tables, charts, and other formats.
  • Reveal an understanding of relevant words in context and how word choice shapes meaning and tone.

Optional essay – The Essay Test on the SAT will now be optional. Students must engage in and demonstrate the deep critical thinking and analysis (and of course, writing skills) learned throughout high school.

New Reading Test, Writing and Language Test, and Essay Test – The College Board made six major changes to these tests, summarized as follows:

  1. Incorporated texts spanning a range of difficulty into the exams.
  2. Changed the tests to assess whether students are able to analyze source texts and use textual evidence effectively to support claims and points.
  3. Incorporated informational graphics, such as tables, graphs and charts.
  4. Shifted the focus away from obscure vocabulary, with more emphasis placed on word meanings and the impact of word choice.
  5. Focused the redesigned tests on language that is associated with clear and effective communication.
  6. Adjusted the test to incorporate texts in a range of subject areas (including U.S. and world literature, science, history/social studies, the humanities, and careers).

New Math Test – The College Board made these changes to the Math Test:

  1. Focused the exam on the math knowledge, skills, and understandings that are most strongly linked to readiness for and success in college.
  2. Emphasized problem solving and data analysis.
  3. Included both calculator and no-calculator sections.

For more specific details on the redesigned SAT, call Huntington. We can help you and your teen understand how the redesigned SAT will differ, how your teen needs to adjust his or her study approach, and much more.

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Start the School Year Off the Right Way With These Study Tips Utilizing the proper study tips can be the difference between average and extraordinary grades. Read the tips found here in order to reach your potential.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:59:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/start-the-school-year-off-the-right-way-with-these-study-tips https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/start-the-school-year-off-the-right-way-with-these-study-tips Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Start the School Year Off the Right Way With These Study Tips

The new school year is here! Start the year off right - develop a study schedule, organize your materials, and take a few moments to reflect on what you can do to make this year the best yet.  

Stay a step ahead Don’t wait until you are behind to adjust your study skills. Starting the school year off the right way will provide you the opportunity to maximize your learning and stay ahead of your studies.

Attend to your learning Good attendance is necessary for school success. Arrive at your classes early, make sure your materials are ready, and prepare for the day’s learning. Being ready before the school day and the individual class begins will help you acquire the most new knowledge.

Review your study habits Think about your previous years’ study habits and determine what worked best for you. Talk to your teachers about any concerns you may have and how this year’s courses will impact your individual study habits. If you have laboratory based courses, such as chemistry, biology, or physics, seek additional time in the lab to review your learning with course materials on hand.

Identify your strengths and weaknesses Understanding what your strongest academic areas are, and identifying the areas you struggle with the most, will help you plan your studying and maximize your learning. Huntington Learning Center can help. Each customized tutoring plan we create is based on the individual student’s strengths and weaknesses. Your tutoring plan will reflect your needs and is crafted based on your individual assessment data.

Find What You Need Each student is different and what works best for you is personal. Some students choose to study in large chunks of time and others prefer to spread their studying out over time. You may study best at home in your bedroom but your friend may do better in a secluded corner of the public library. Determining your ideal conditions for studying will aid your preparation.  

Choose the perfect spot It is important to determine the perfect spot for you to study. All of these study tips will be irrelevant if your study location is insufficient. Where are you most comfortable? Which study spot has the least amount of distractions? Where do you complete your best work?

Set a weekly schedule Take the time to create a master study schedule you can stick to each week. Be careful to schedule plenty of time around family, athletic, and extra-curricular activities. Consider building in extra time in case unforeseen circumstances or commitmen ts arise. 

Know when you need help If your school work is quickly becoming overwhelming and you are struggling to keep up it may be time to ask for help. The professional tutors with Huntington Learning Centers will administer assessments to determine your current strengths and weaknesses. Your progress will be carefully monitored to determine areas of continued need and the tutoring plan will be updated as you master new learning.

Stay in Touch It is important to stay on top of both coursework and your individual performance. Knowing when you need additional support, and asking for help, is best done as soon as difficulties arise. If you wait too long to seek assistance you will likely be wasting precious study time. 

Review expectations Don't just read the syllabus and stick it in a folder. Your course expectations should be reviewed often to ensure you haven't missed any important dates or information. Compare the expectations periodically with your master calendar to make sure you haven't overlooked anything.

Connect with others There may be other students in your class who are searching for a peer to connect with. Having another student in the class to study with, compare notes, and bounce ideas off of is a great way to stay connected with the academic work.

Communicate with teachers and tutors Do your part to communicate with your teachers and tutors. When you are feeling confused ask for help. When something seems frustrating or overwhelming let them know. Utilize your teacher's office hours or review sessions and spend time during tutoring sessions to share your concerns or problems. 

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Get Your Child Ready For School The start of the school year causes a mixed reaction among elementary school-aged children.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:50:50 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/get-your-child-ready-for-school Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Get Your Child Ready for School

The start of the school year causes a mixed reaction among elementary school-aged children. Some are excited to see their friends and begin learning again. Others feel the summer went by in a blink and mourn the loss of the warm weather, playing outside all day and lack of homework. After a long summer of limited learning, students might need extra help preparing for the upcoming school year. 

How can you help your child get ready for school?

  • Slowly adjust your child back into the typical school schedule. In the last weeks before school begins, it is highly beneficial if parents simulate their child’s daily school routine. Practice the morning process of waking up earlier, getting dressed and eating breakfast within your “school schedule.” Therefore, when school begins your child will be well adjusted and able to focus on their day of learning.

     

    Set the time and place for homework. Whether it is the kitchen table or their own desk, creating a designated place, and a time, for homework makes it a habit. If possible, be available for your student while he or she is doing homework so you can help with any potential problems.
     
  • Talk with your child’s teachers. During elementary school, it is vital to check in with your child’s teachers. Understand the type of homework, tests and projects your student will be assigned so you can help and aren’t surprised by bigger projects that are on the horizon. Keep track of when your child’s assignments are due so that you can instill time management skills.
     
  • Find exceptional tutoring services. To ensure your child’s success, turn to tutoring services. Provide your student with professional help so he or she can succeed during the upcoming school year. With the help of a learning center, students will remain on track with what is being taught in their classrooms. Do not wait for your student to show signs of struggling with the subject matter. By introducing tutoring services early in your child’s life, you will instill the first of many valuable lessons – always ask for help when needed!
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Common Core and Critical Thinking: Helping Students Hone This Important Skill We help students hone the common core curriculum and the critical thinking behind science, math, and reading skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:48:48 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-core-and-critical-thinking-helping-students-hone-this-important-skill- https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/common-core-and-critical-thinking-helping-students-hone-this-important-skill- Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Common Core and Critical Thinking: Helping Students Hone This Important Skill

The Common Core State Standards are intended to help students prepare for college and the working world, wherein they must think critically and apply the skills they learn in the classroom to a variety of real-world scenarios. The “buzz” about the standards is that they go much deeper into all math and English-language arts areas and emphasize comprehension and building understanding more so than rote memorization. The standards are meant to strengthen students’ ability to think, analyze, comprehend, defend and support one’s ideas, and much more. According to the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, the Common Core State Standards weave such aptitudes throughout the standards. Here are a few examples:

Reading

Reading comprehension is top of mind at all levels. As students read a variety of texts—both literature and nonfiction—they will be expected to make logical inferences, express their insights, explore ideas, and think about topics from many different viewpoints, among other objectives.

Speaking and listening

Through speaking and listening (and through media), students must assess and offer complex information and ideas. The classroom will focus on smaller group discussions as well as one-on-one discussions as a way to encourage students to think critically, work together to develop ideas and answer questions, and more.

Writing

Students are expected to write thoughtful, logical arguments, express their opinions, reason, and conduct focused and in-depth research.

Media and Technology

A huge part of 21st-century learning is knowing how to use, critically analyze and produce media and technology. Technology and media are woven throughout the standards—from teaching students to present ideas and knowledge in various media formats to using technology to develop mathematical models that link classroom math to everyday decision making.

Mathematics

High school students will be expected to apply mathematical ways of thinking to real-world issues and challenges and think and reason their way through math problems. The elementary and middle school standards help prepare students for this type of thinking.

There are many things you can do to help your student build his or her critical thinking skills, thereby equipping him or her for the curricular changes resulting from Common Core. Here are a few simple ideas to help your student engage in critical thinking each and every day.

  • Ask your student questions that confirm his or her understanding of the texts that he or she reads.
  • Encourage your child to analyze what he reads—whether that’s newspaper or magazine articles or fiction stories and books. Ask questions about the main idea of the story such as what the author’s purpose is (to entertain or persuade, for example), whether a piece is opinion or fact and how he or she can tell, and what clues he or she can identify about a story’s plot, main message or takeaway.
  • Ask your child how he or she feels about texts and readings and why. Why does he or enjoy a story or not? Why does he or she think a certain event or point is the most important in a passage or story? Why does he or she like certain characters?
  • When using measurement in math homework, encourage your child to think about how and where measurements are used in life.
  • As your child completes math problems, have him or her explain how he or she reached an answer and why he or she thinks that approach makes sense.
  • When using graphs in homework, encourage your child to carefully interpret data, think about how graphs make it easier to represent data (versus communicating data in a different way), and consider how he or she might collect and show data in a different way.
  • In math word problems, have your child talk you through the information provided and explain how he or she will use such information to solve problems (as well as what information might be missing).
  • Encourage your child to notice patterns in the real world.
  • Have your child point out the use of fractions in everyday use.

Critical thinking is an important life skill that is now becoming a focal point in math and English-language arts curriculum. Talk with your child’s teacher about how you can support his or her development of such higher order thinking abilities. Also, throughout your child’s daily life, encourage him or her to think, reflect, make decisions and develop opinions.

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How to Prepare Your Student to Go Back to School If your child could use a little help getting back into the school swing of things, there are a number of simple things you can do to make the transition easier.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:13:07 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-prepare-your-student-to-go-back-to-school https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-prepare-your-student-to-go-back-to-school If your child could use a little help getting back into the school swing of things, there are a number of simple things you can do to make the transition easier. "Take steps these final few weeks of summer to help your student prepare mentally and otherwise for a new school year," advises Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers these tips to ready children for the first day and week of school:

Call up friends. If your child hasn't seen classmates from last year all summer, now is a great time to arrange a few activities with school friends. If you know students who will be in your child's class, encourage your child to reach out to them, too.

Make a school visit. Stop by the school at least once to let your child walk around and check out his or her new classroom, if possible. If your child has an opportunity to meet staff members and his or her new teacher (at back-to-school night or in another way), take advantage.

Go over the routine. If your summer routine has been relaxed, now is the time to remind your child how a typical school day will go. If needed, start enforcing a reasonable bedtime a few weeks before school starts. Hang a family schedule and/or calendar in a visible place.

Get the home organized. Keep hooks near the entry door to your home where your child can keep the backpack, jacket and other school gear. Have him or her organize his or her desk or homework area. Take your child shopping to restock school and organizational supplies for the home and the classroom. Don't forget to buy a new planner for him or her to use to stay on top of all obligations and assignments.

Do some refresher work. The final few weeks of summer, incorporate a little school work into your child's daily schedule, using workbooks or worksheets from last year to brush up on math, reading and other basics. To practice writing, have your child keep a daily journal on the things he or she did this summer. As you bump up bedtime, include reading in the nightly routine-letting your child choose books from the library.

Sit down to talk about goals. Goal setting can be a powerful tool. Talk with your child about the things that he or she would like to accomplish or change this school year-academic or otherwise. If your child had any difficulties last year, let him or her know that you are there to help and want to maintain open communication about school.

When it comes to preparing for back to school, a little can go a long way. "Back to school preparation is largely about getting in the right mindset," says Huntington. "Help your child prepare by talking positively about this coming school year and the good things to come. Remind your child of the best parts of school, and also let him or her know that you're always there to help problem solve when issues arise."



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Tips to Make it a Great School Year Oradell, N.J. If it seems that your student isn't ready to get back into the school routine, there are several ways to help him or her ease into school mode.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:17:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-make-it-a-great-school-year If it seems that your student isn't ready to get back into the school routine, there are several ways to help him or her ease into school mode.

"It's natural for children to be anxious or sad about the end of summer break, but you can help smooth the transition back to school by being positive and reminding your child of the fun parts about a new school year," says Eileen Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center. Huntington offers these tips to make it a great school year:

View this year as a new opportunity. If your child had any school issues or other problems last year, encourage him or her to think of this new school year as a chance to start anew. Remind your child of the best parts of the previous school year—a friendship made, a favorite extracurricular activity discovered or a goal achieved. An optimistic outlook can go a long way.

Don't wait to address problems. If academics were a problem last year, it is unlikely that the problem went away. Weak skills may still exist and should be addressed. Any change in your child's demeanor or problems arising with certain subjects, investigate immediately. By report card time your child may have fallen far behind, so arrange a time to speak to the teacher right away if you have concerns or see your child struggling with homework or suddenly displaying serious frustration and anger.

Establish open communication. Good communication and parental involvement are both key to student success. So, if you weren't as involved last year as you would have liked, make it a priority now. And remember that being involved isn't as complicated as it sounds. Talk with your child about school. Stay in touch with his or her teacher. Keep apprised of what your student is learning and do your part to make homework and studying a priority.

Get organized. This goes for you and your child. Set up a homework area. Prepare an organizational system for paperwork that comes home—both for you and for your child—and teach your child to use this system so as not to lose track of things. If your family works best on a schedule, sit down with your child to discuss a nightly routine that you can all stick to. The idea of going back to school may cause some stress for your student, but preparation and a positive attitude can help ease your child's woes. Remind your child that a new school year holds many exciting opportunities—and that together, you can overcome any challenges that arise.

 

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Creating Independent Students Afterschool tutoring promotes independent study skills and more so students quickly become self-reliant.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:49:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/creating-independent-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/creating-independent-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Creating Independent Students

Whether you teach elementary school or high school, one of your key goals is to help your students become independent, capable learners. In fact, nurturing independence in students is an underpinning of the Common Core State Standards, which state that students who are college and career ready are self-directed learners overall.

Just as it is essential for your students to comprehend the content that you teach, it is critical that they become more focused and able to think on their own as they mature as learners. Students need to learn how to develop their ideas, solve problems, seek out resources on their own, and much more.

How can you foster such academic independence? Here are a few exercises to incorporate into your lessons that will build essential self-starter competencies:

Encourage students to learn from their mistakes. Making mistakes is how students learn, but it is critical that you teach your students to not only recognize their mistakes, but also figure out  potential solutions. How? Walk students step by step through solutions to common mistakes, and invite their input so that they comprehend where they went wrong and how to fix it. Always encourage your students to ask questions. Most importantly, let your students know that mistakes are opportunities to confirm understanding of how a problem or process works.

Set goals. At the beginning of each year, have students set a number of short- and long-term goals—several that are related to your class and several broader life or academic goals. In class or as homework, have students write down the roadblocks standing in the way of their goals and the necessary steps to overcome them. Throughout the year, revisit goals and have students track their progress. The goal-setting process is rich with valuable lessons about working diligently toward the things one wants, taking ownership of one’s life and education, beating challenges and more.

Strive for intrinsic motivation. While it is tempting to motivate students with extrinsic rewards such as constant praise, prizes or bribes, students who are inspired to learn because they want to—intrinsically motivated—are far better off in the long run. So, what can you do to help? Challenge your students. Set the bar high and give them the tools and support to reach it. Urge students to ask questions and think through solutions, and congratulate them for their efforts and progress, not just their grades. The more you can do to encourage students to learn for learning’s sake, the more independent they will be.

Establish clear rules and procedures. Students of all ages flourish when they know what is expected of them throughout the school day. Equipped with a consistent routine upon which they can rely, your students can be more independent when completing tasks, working on bigger projects and transitioning between activities. This will translate to independence at home, too. Students who know how to function independently and successfully in the classroom are more likely to complete their homework without reminders from parents.

Focus on organizational skills. As students move into middle and high school, the art of organization is more critical than ever. Expect students to keep their desks and backpacks tidy and organized. They should have a designated place for everything, from papers to books, so it is quick and easy to get out materials and get to work when you ask them to. A related and equally important concept is time management. Teach your students to keep track of their homework and assignments in a planner or smartphone app. Consider incorporating into each class a few minutes of administration time (during which students can write down assignments and other information, organize their desks and notes, and more).

Students must learn to be self-starters and independent thinkers in order to succeed in college and beyond. You can build this aptitude by giving your students opportunities to think, make decisions and learn from their mistakes. Provide your students ample guidance and support and the result will be engaged students who are confident in themselves and their abilities.

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How to Use Technology to Keep Your Child Learning All Summer In today's digital world, technology tools are at our fingertips 'and our children's, too.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:14:31 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-use-technology-to-keep-your-child-learning-all-summer https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-use-technology-to-keep-your-child-learning-all-summer Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Use Technology to Keep Your Child Learning All Summer

In today’s digital world, technology tools are at our fingertips—and our children’s, too. If your family has a tablet, computer, smartphone or all of the above, your child has access to all kinds of great learning programs. This summer break, you can offer your child opportunities to learn on the go, while beating the heat inside, during a family road trip, or just about anywhere you can access the internet.

Here are a few great activities for your child to enjoy this summer from the comfort of his or her mobile device, tablet or computer:

Build a website. These days, building a website doesn’t require computer programming skills, but rather, creativity and a willingness to learn. There are lots of website builders out there that offer customizable templates. Your child’s summer learning project could be to create a website—the budding artist or photographer could showcase his or her work, or the foodie could create a recipe blog. What about a family blog to which each member of the family contributes posts a few times a week, sharing your summer’s adventures?

Download learning apps to practice skills. While reviewing homework and assignments from the prior year is an excellent way to keep your child fresh, if you didn’t save your child’s work, there are other great alternatives to deter summer learning loss. Check out Reading Rockets for some of the best apps for vocabulary, writing and spelling practice and reading comprehension. Common Sense Media (free) ranks all kinds of apps, including math apps with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, geometry and logic games and practice tools. Before the school year ends, also ask your child’s teacher for recommendations.

Learn to program. For imaginative and mathematically or technically inclined students, websites like Scratch (www.scratch.mit.edu) are excellent learning tools. Created for children ages 8 to 16 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Scratch is a “programming language and an online community where children can program and share interactive media such as stories, games and animation.” Other websites to check out include www.alice.org, a 3D programming environment that makes it easier for students to learn object-oriented programming, and Hackety.com which teaches students the Ruby programming language.  For beginners, check out apps such as Lightbot Jr. ($2.99) coding puzzle (and later, Lightbot) and Cato’s Hike ($4.99).

Download a podcast (or five). Whether your family is planning a few road trips this summer or your child enjoys audio learning, podcasts can be great fun for children of all ages. Your child can download and listen to podcasts on any mobile device or computer. What interests your child? Try searching the iTunes store for podcasts on various topics (www.apple.com/itunes/podcasts). Also, check out these great podcasts: Bookwink (which reviews books for kids ages 8 to 14/ Grades 3-8), Global Wonders (which introduces children to different world cultures), Reading Rockets Meet the Author (which interviews top children’s book authors and illustrators) and Brains On! (a science podcast).

Think about what your child is into. The great news about the world we live in today is that there are so many mobile technologies that if your child has an interest, there may very well be an app or other technology program to teach or fuel that interest. Is your child curious about learning a new language? Check out one of the many foreign language learning apps out there such as Little Pim. Is your child a hands-on learner who enjoys creating? Don’t miss DIY, an app that has children complete skill-based, hands-on challenges.

Technology has changed education forever—and has provided today’s students some incredible learning opportunities. This summer break, explore the many programs available to your child and incorporate a few such tools into your learning repertoire. Not only will you encourage your child to keep learning this summer, you will also be emulating 21st century classroom teaching.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

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7 Tips to Find the Best College Fit from Huntington Learning Center Tue, 15 Sep 2015 14:41:50 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Choosing a college can be difficult for many high school students. With so many factors to consider, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages teens to go about the process systematically. "Narrowing down colleges can be overwhelming, but by thinking through priorities and goals, teens can make the process easier and make a well-informed decision." Huntington offers seven tips for parents helping their teens choose their college carefully.

  1. Write down the five most important factors in a college. Some teens might have their hearts set on a small college, a big university or a college that's close to home. Other teens might already have specific majors in mind or be looking into certain academic programs, such as an honors or leadership program. Have your teen think about five (or more) things he or she is looking for in a college. This list may change over time, but the exercise is worthwhile.
     
  2. Talk about the future. Talk openly with your teen about his or her ideas for a major and career. Is your teen still figuring things out or clear on his or her path? Students who seem certain about their direction might want to consider colleges based on the availability of academic programs in their area of interest. Those who are still unsure might be wise to choose colleges with plenty of options and a great career center that can help them decide.
     
  3. Discuss cost and scholarships. Whether you have a college fund set aside for your teen or he or she will be funding some of the cost, it's important to discuss the cost of college and start exploring financial aid options. Keep in mind that the tuition and fees listed on a college's website aren't likely the net price you'll pay. Loans and financial aid are available to most students and parents, and depending on your financial situation, your teen may qualify for grants or work-study as well. Arrange a meeting with your teen's high school guidance counselor early in the search process to talk through scholarship options and your teen's chances of receiving some merit-based assistance. The earlier the better, so even if your teen is just starting high school, start familiarizing yourself now with financial aid options.
  4. Start searching for colleges. The in-state colleges and universities are obvious options, but encourage your teen to search far and wide. Tools such as Peterson's, the College Board's College Search, and College Navigator help you research schools based on just about any criteria you can think of: college type, size, fields of study, average percentage of financial need met, setting, sports and activities offered, and more.
     
  5. Go back to your teen's "five most important factors" list. Once your teen has spent time researching colleges online and with the help of the school guidance counselor, return to that list of important factors. What colleges do not meet most of those criteria? If your teen's list included small college, warmer climate, affordable/scholarship opportunities, strong engineering program and study abroad opportunities, peruse your teen's list of colleges to see if any can be ruled out. If your teen found the perfect private liberal arts college in Florida, but it doesn't offer engineering as a major, cross it off the list. If a school seems too expensive, perhaps you can keep it on the list while you explore financial aid and scholarship options that would lower the net cost to your family.
     
  6. Plan a visit. It can be immensely helpful to spend time on college campuses to get a feel for student life and the community. If possible, plan a trip when college is in session to a few schools that are high on your teen's list. Take a tour, check out the dorms, sit in on a class and even talk with a few students or faculty members.
     
  7. Ask around. It can be helpful to get the perspective of a few alumni or current students of a college to understand what it's like to be a student there, pros and cons, information about classes and more. If you know any family friends or relatives who have attended a college, perhaps they would be willing to share their insight and experience. If you're exploring a college where you don't have any contacts, the college's admissions office may be able to connect you with a student.
     

Huntington adds that choosing a college is a very personal decision. "Students should come up with their priority list, research their options and, most importantly, consider how their top few contenders each make them feel," Huntington says. "In the end, teens must choose a college that seems to be the best fit on paper and the place where they'll be the happiest."

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7 Tips to Find the Best College Fit from Huntington Learning Center Tue, 15 Sep 2015 14:41:50 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/seven-tips-college-fit Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Choosing a college can be difficult for many high school students. With so many factors to consider, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages teens to go about the process systematically. "Narrowing down colleges can be overwhelming, but by thinking through priorities and goals, teens can make the process easier and make a well-informed decision." Huntington offers seven tips for parents helping their teens choose their college carefully.

  1. Write down the five most important factors in a college. Some teens might have their hearts set on a small college, a big university or a college that's close to home. Other teens might already have specific majors in mind or be looking into certain academic programs, such as an honors or leadership program. Have your teen think about five (or more) things he or she is looking for in a college. This list may change over time, but the exercise is worthwhile.
     
  2. Talk about the future. Talk openly with your teen about his or her ideas for a major and career. Is your teen still figuring things out or clear on his or her path? Students who seem certain about their direction might want to consider colleges based on the availability of academic programs in their area of interest. Those who are still unsure might be wise to choose colleges with plenty of options and a great career center that can help them decide.
     
  3. Discuss cost and scholarships. Whether you have a college fund set aside for your teen or he or she will be funding some of the cost, it's important to discuss the cost of college and start exploring financial aid options. Keep in mind that the tuition and fees listed on a college's website aren't likely the net price you'll pay. Loans and financial aid are available to most students and parents, and depending on your financial situation, your teen may qualify for grants or work-study as well. Arrange a meeting with your teen's high school guidance counselor early in the search process to talk through scholarship options and your teen's chances of receiving some merit-based assistance. The earlier the better, so even if your teen is just starting high school, start familiarizing yourself now with financial aid options.
  4. Start searching for colleges. The in-state colleges and universities are obvious options, but encourage your teen to search far and wide. Tools such as Peterson's, the College Board's College Search, and College Navigator help you research schools based on just about any criteria you can think of: college type, size, fields of study, average percentage of financial need met, setting, sports and activities offered, and more.
     
  5. Go back to your teen's "five most important factors" list. Once your teen has spent time researching colleges online and with the help of the school guidance counselor, return to that list of important factors. What colleges do not meet most of those criteria? If your teen's list included small college, warmer climate, affordable/scholarship opportunities, strong engineering program and study abroad opportunities, peruse your teen's list of colleges to see if any can be ruled out. If your teen found the perfect private liberal arts college in Florida, but it doesn't offer engineering as a major, cross it off the list. If a school seems too expensive, perhaps you can keep it on the list while you explore financial aid and scholarship options that would lower the net cost to your family.
     
  6. Plan a visit. It can be immensely helpful to spend time on college campuses to get a feel for student life and the community. If possible, plan a trip when college is in session to a few schools that are high on your teen's list. Take a tour, check out the dorms, sit in on a class and even talk with a few students or faculty members.
     
  7. Ask around. It can be helpful to get the perspective of a few alumni or current students of a college to understand what it's like to be a student there, pros and cons, information about classes and more. If you know any family friends or relatives who have attended a college, perhaps they would be willing to share their insight and experience. If you're exploring a college where you don't have any contacts, the college's admissions office may be able to connect you with a student.
     

Huntington adds that choosing a college is a very personal decision. "Students should come up with their priority list, research their options and, most importantly, consider how their top few contenders each make them feel," Huntington says. "In the end, teens must choose a college that seems to be the best fit on paper and the place where they'll be the happiest."

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Huntington Learning Center's 2016 Summer Reading Adventure Program Kicks Off Summer Reading Adventure Program Kicks Off

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Mon, 06 Jun 2016 19:44:34 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/reading-adventure2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/reading-adventure2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center is gearing up to launch its annual summer reading program, Reading Adventure. Participating students choose books from Huntington’s carefully selected book lists, which offer a variety of high-interest choices by grade level and reading ability. Students receive a reading "passport" in which they record each book they read and write a journal entry about it.

"Summer reading is so important, not only because it helps prevent regression that is common during summer vacation, but because it’s a great opportunity to get children excited about reading," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Our reading lists include highly appealing books that engage even struggling and non-readers. The goal is to encourage students to read for fun and continue reading in their free time simply for the enjoyment of it. The more they read, the better they will become at reading—and the more they’ll actually choose to read."

The Reading Adventure program runs throughout the summer. At the end of the summer, the Huntington Learning Center will host a party to celebrate each student’s reading achievements and acknowledge each student’s participation.

"Studies show that reading during summer break is one of the best ways for students to maintain their reading skills and be prepared for the coming school year," says Huntington. "Our Reading Adventure program is all about the joy, imagination and adventure of reading. Children get to immerse themselves in great stories and books and explore their interests."

To learn more about Huntington’s Reading Adventure program, visit a Huntington location near you.

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How to Respond to a Child's Negativity If any of these outbursts sound familiar, it's understandable that you might feel concern about what is causing your child such anger and frustration and what you can do to change it.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:13:37 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-respond-to-a-childs-negativity https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-respond-to-a-childs-negativity Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Respond to a Child’s Negativity

School is the worst! I hate learning! I’m stupid! I hate homework!

If any of these outbursts sound familiar, it’s understandable that you might feel concern about what is causing your child such anger and frustration and what you can do to change it. Unfortunately, there may come a time in your child’s school life that he or she feels upset or negative about school. If you are struggling with how to respond—or you share your child’s frustration—here are a few considerations on what might actually be going on and tips on how best to handle the situation. 

Your child has never felt the pride that comes with achievement. Children who acquire negative attitudes about school might never have experienced true school success. Gaps in their skills have made it difficult to understand homework and solve problems independently, always leaving them feeling inadequate and behind. If this sounds like your child, a conversation with the teacher is definitely in order. There is likely a mismatch in the type of work that is expected of your child and his or her abilities. An individualized tutoring program with Huntington can help your child gain the abilities to complete work successfully, thereby boosting the self-esteem and confidence.

Pinpointing the problem is essential. If your child seems generally exasperated by school, it may be difficult to have productive conversations about what subjects are the most stressful—and frankly, your child may simply not be able to offer you the insight you need. So, rather than grill your child for details on what is most difficult, have your child evaluated so that you can gain specific information about his areas of deficiency, study skills and more. Huntington can perform a diagnostic evaluation of your child’s strengths and weaknesses as well as a plan of instruction to help your child. With more accurate information about the problems your child is facing, you can develop a plan together to help your child overcome them.

Your understanding goes a long way. While your desire to smother your child’s cynicism with unbridled optimism is understandable, doing so might exacerbate your child even more. Instead, talk openly about how your child is feeling and the fact that school problems are not insurmountable. Empathize with your child’s fear and anger. Explain that you are committed to helping your child not just earn better grades, but feel better about him or herself. Most of all, remember that your child’s problems, however big they seem, can be addressed.

Problem solving is a tool every child needs. For many children who struggle in school and don’t know what to do about it, acting out, giving up and being negative are resultant behaviors. Certainly, it is expected that a child experiencing repeated difficulties with math homework feels great frustration. However, the child who can move past that frustration, to identify specific problems and lay out a plan to address them will successfully avoid the “negative bottleneck” that prevents so many students from achieving their goals.

 While academic knowledge and good study habits are certainly essential for school success, so are traits such as resilience, perseverance in the face of difficulty and a good attitude. Help your child learn to understand that negativity only makes problems feel worse. Identifying issues and creating manageable steps to tackle each one is a far more constructive approach that will help your child feel less overwhelmed.

Of course, if school is the culprit of your child’s pessimistic attitude, don’t wait to investigate. Huntington can help you understand what is at the root of the problem and develop a plan to turn things around. Call us at 1-800-CAN LEARN to discuss how to give your child a whole new outlook on school and life.

 

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Teaching Your Child to be a Strong, Effective Communicator Communication: it's one of the most valuable skills a person can have throughout life.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:07:12 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-your-child-to-be-a-strong-effective-communicator https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-your-child-to-be-a-strong-effective-communicator Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Teaching Your Child to be a Strong, Effective Communicator

Communication: it’s one of the most valuable skills a person can have throughout life. Effective communicators are better able to develop and maintain relationships with others, express what they know, ask questions in the classroom, at work and elsewhere, and advocate for themselves and others. And while you communicate each day with your child, are you teaching him or her to become a good communicator with others?

Keep in mind that communicating is much more than just listening and speaking. Here are a few of the most important abilities and traits that strong communicators have:

  • Actively engaged in learning
  • Attentive
  • Observant
  • Clear and concise messaging
  • Convincing when expressing an opinion
  • Thorough when explaining something detailed or specific

How can you help your child build good communication skills? Here are a few tips and suggested activities:

Ask why. Children are born curious, and as a parent, it’s your job to nurture that curiosity. One way to do so is to encourage your child to express his or her opinions and ideas. Whether your child is talking about the solution to a math problem or a favorite football team’s defensive lineup, encourage sharing thoughts and opinions. Don’t stop at what your child thinks and why; ask your child how he or she knows something. 

Encourage your child to keep a journal. Journaling is an excellent way for children to hone the art of expressing themselves. Many children have school journals in which their teachers have them record observations or reactions to certain writing prompts, but a personal journal is a great way for children to put their ideas and feelings in writing, think critically about why they feel the way they do about things, build writing skills and much more.

Get your child involved in extracurricular activities that build communication skills. Activities such as debate team (or similar programs for younger children) are great opportunities for students to form opinions, develop arguments to support those opinions and express them to others. Similarly, student council helps children build leadership and both oral and written communication skills.

Model good communication. The primary way that your child will learn how to communicate is by observing you. So, be present when your child speaks to you. When interacting with others while in your child’s presence, speak clearly and honestly, always saying what you mean in the most unambiguous manner possible. Talk frequently with your child about how to engage others in conversation, how to listen actively and how to get and keep someone’s attention (and how not to).

Work together on good listening. Listening well is a critical part of being an effective communicator. Your child needs to understand that listening involves more than just hearing someone speak; it means focusing on the person speaking while simultaneously processing information. It means watching for non-verbal cues as well as listening to words being spoken. It means confirming understanding after a speaker is finished speaking.

Encourage your child to think about others’ feelings and reactions. People who are self-aware and able to recognize how their actions and words impact others—in other words, those with high emotional intelligence—are generally well equipped to communicate effectively. Some of the building blocks for emotional intelligence include awareness of one’s own (and others’) strengths and weaknesses, perseverance, independence, and assertiveness when joining discussions or expressing ideas. Whenever possible, help your child practice these skills.

Remember: communication is not inherent, but rather, a skill that must be strengthened over time. Work with your child on developing strong communication skills and you will help him or her build skills for lifelong success. No matter what your child does in life, knowing how to communicate with all different types of people will serve him or her well.

 

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Five Tips to Create Your Children's Summer Learning Schedule Five Tips to Create Your Child's Summer Learning Schedule

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Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:19:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-summer-schedule https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-summer-schedule Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center It's summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. 

"There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child's summer schedule," says Huntington. "Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning. 

Huntington offers parents five tips to developing a summer schedule that will guide their children all summer long: 

Tip #1:

First, take a break. Before you get out the calendar and schedule each week with educational activities, plan to take a week or two off completely. Enjoy some family time, head to the pool and allow your child to truly decompress from the school year. It's fine to talk about ideas for summer learning opportunities, but be sure to let your child enjoy some down time. 

Tip #2:

Set aside time for daily reading. Summer is a wonderful time for children to explore their curiosities through reading. Load up on books that interest your child. Be flexible about the type of materials your child chooses, but make it a summer rule that your child reads for 30 minutes a day. Incorporate a weekly library trip into your summer schedule. 

Tip #3:

Pick weekly themes. Engage your child in learning by choosing weekly themes. What kinds of themes? Anything! Africa, the seasons, the zoo, mystery, inventors or insects, to name a few. Weekly learning themes work best for younger children, but you can certainly adapt them for older, more independent students as well. Each week, plan a simple outing, a craft, a writing activity and a math assignment. 

Tip #4:

Review last year's work. Studies show that many students' math skills take a nose dive during summer break. One of the easiest ways to stay fresh on the math skills is to review some of the previous year's assignments or tests. If you haven't saved paperwork throughout the year, ask your child's teacher for copies of assignments covered throughout the year. If you purchased a math book, review sections each week together. 

Tip #5:

Set goals and milestones. Sit down at the beginning of summer and talk with your child about his or her goals. Perhaps your child just wants to learn to enjoy reading. Maybe your child could improve in math. Choose an area of focus (or several) and discuss where your child would like to be by summer's end. For reading, lean on the help of a summer reading program put on by your school, library or local bookstore.

Summertime is a perfect opportunity for your child to explore some interests while keeping the mind active. "You can make an enormous difference by developing a simple summer learning schedule with tasks and goals for each week," says Huntington. 

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SAT Spotlight- Current Vs. Redesigned SAT The College Board will roll out a totally redesigned SAT in spring 2016. What exactly is changing?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:53:11 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-spotlight-current-vs-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-spotlight-current-vs-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Spotlight

Current Vs. Redesigned SAT

The College Board will roll out a totally redesigned SAT in spring 2016. What exactly is changing? Here’s a side-by-side comparison:

 

Current SAT

Redesigned SAT

Total Testing Time

 

3 hours and 45 minutes

3 hours without essay

3 hours 50 minutes with essay (optional)

Components

  1. Critical Reading
  2. Writing
  3. Mathematics
  4. Essay (required)
  5. Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
  • Reading Test
  • Writing and Language Test
  1. Math (calculator and No calculator)
  2. Essay (optional)

Section Length

 

Reading

Writing

Essay

Math

 

Total

 

 

67 questions

49 questions

1 question

54 questions

 

171 questions

 

52 questions

44 questions

1 question

57 questions

 

154 questions with Essay

Important Features

Emphasis on general reasoning skills

Emphasis on vocabulary, often in limited contexts

Complex scoring (a point for a correct answer and a deduction for an incorrect answer; blank responses have no impact on scores)

Emphasis on reasoning. Clearer, stronger focus on the knowledge, skills and understandings most important for college and career readiness

Greater emphasis on the meaning of words in extended contexts and on how word choice shapes meaning, tone and impact

Rights-only scoring (a point for a correct answer but no deduction for an incorrect answer; blank responses have no impact on scores)

Essay

  • Required and given at the beginning of the SAT
  • 25 minutes
  • Tests writing skills; students take a position on a presented issue
  • Optional and given at the end of the SAT (colleges determine whether they will require the essay)
  • 50 minutes
  • Tests reading, analysis and writing skills; students produce a written analysis of a provided source text
 

Score Reporting

  • Scale range: 600 to 2400

200 to 800 for Critical Reading

200 to 800 for Mathematics

200 to 800 for Writing

  • Essay results scaled to multiple-choice Writing
  • Scale range: 400 to 1600

200 to 800 for Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

200 to 800 for Math

2 to 8 on each of three traits for Essay

  • Essay results reported separately

Subscore Reporting

None

Subscores for every test, providing insight for students, parents, admission officers, educators, and counselors

 

 

 

 

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Five Tips to Create Your Child’s Summer Learning Schedule It’s summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. “There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child’s summer schedule,” says Huntington. “Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning.

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Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:40:58 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-your-childs-summer-learning-schedule https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-your-childs-summer-learning-schedule Eileen Huntington Eileen Huntington It’s summer break, which means relaxing, recharging and plenty of fun for students. Even though your child is probably eager to toss the backpack into a closet until September, Elieen Huntington, Co-Founder of Huntington Learning Center encourages parents to develop a summer learning schedule that will deter regression (learning loss), and maintain a schedule. “There are many advantages to incorporating a little structure into your child’s summer schedule,” says Huntington. “Children who continue to exercise their brains have a far easier time going back to school in the fall, plus, keeping the mind active during break can remind children about the fun of learning.

Huntington offers parents five tips to developing a summer schedule that will guide their children all summer long:

Tip #1: First, take a break. Before you get out the calendar and schedule each week with educational activities, plan to take a week or two off completely. Enjoy some family time, head to the pool and allow your child to truly decompress from the school year. It’s fine to talk about ideas for summer learning opportunities, but be sure to let your child enjoy some down time. 

Tip #2: Set aside time for daily reading. Summer is a wonderful time for children to explore their curiosities through reading. Load up on books that interest your child. Be flexible about the type of materials your child chooses, but make it a summer rule that your child reads for 30 minutes a day. Incorporate a weekly library trip into your summer schedule.

Tip #3: Pick weekly themes. Engage your child in learning by choosing weekly themes. What kinds of themes? Anything! Africa, the seasons, the zoo, mystery, inventors or insects, to name a few. Weekly learning themes work best for younger children, but you can certainly adapt them for older, more independent students as well. Each week, plan a simple outing, a craft, a writing activity and a math assignment.

Tip #4: Review last year’s work. Studies show that many students’ math skills take a nose dive during summer break. One of the easiest ways to stay fresh on the math skills is to review some of the previous year’s assignments or tests. If you haven’t saved paperwork throughout the year, ask your child’s teacher for copies of assignments covered throughout the year. If you purchased a math book, review sections each week together.

Tip #5: Set goals and milestones. Sit down at the beginning of summer and talk with your child about his or her goals. Perhaps your child just wants to learn to enjoy reading. Maybe your child could improve in math. Choose an area of focus (or several) and discuss where your child would like to be by summer’s end.  For reading, lean on the help of a summer reading program put on by your school, library or local bookstore.

Summertime is a perfect opportunity for your child to explore some interests while keeping the mind active. “You can make an enormous difference by developing a simple summer learning schedule with tasks and goals for each week,” says Huntington. For more information, call Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.   

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Test Taking Tips for High School Students If your teen struggles with test taking, he or she isn't alone.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:10:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tips-for-high-school-students https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/test-taking-tips-for-high-school-students Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Test Taking Tips for High School Students 

If your teen struggles with test taking, he or she isn’t alone. For many students, tests are highly stressful, causing fear for even those who study diligently in advance. Luckily, there are a number of test taking strategies and tips that will help your teen boost his or her chances for exam success, whether taking a standardized exam or a pop quiz in English class.

Adopt a positive and realistic outlook. Before your teen ever cracks a book to study, be sure you explain this: no test is a completely accurate measure of a student’s knowledge and no test is worth excessive anxiety. Remind your teen frequently—and especially before a test day—that all you and the teacher expect is sincere effort, not perfection. Putting things into perspective will help ease those worries and allow your teen to simply demonstrate his or her knowledge.

 Adopt a few go-to stress management techniques. Teens who experience test anxiety should arm themselves with a few trusted relaxation practices and stress busters. For many students, taking a few moments to close their eyes and think and visualize positive things works wonders. For others, stretching and deep breathing can slow down a racing heart and bring oxygen into the blood flow, creating a calming effect. Talk with your teen’s teacher about effective techniques to calm oneself and stay focused and optimistic during a test.

 Jot down the “can’t forgets” right away. When beginning a test, your teen should take a minute to write down (on a piece of scrap paper, if provided, or in the margin of the exam) any formulas, key facts or other important information that he or she might need to refer to during the test.

 Calculate a time budget. Encourage your teen at the start of the test to perform a quick calculation on how much time to spend on each question. If given 60 minutes to complete a test with 45 multiple choice questions, your teen should average around one minute 20 seconds per question. So, this means your teen must pace him or herself and check the clock a few times throughout the exam. Managing one’s time well is an essential part of being a good test taker.

 Save the hardest for last. Every exam will have a few brain busters that trip up your teen, and getting hung up on these mid-exam can cause unneeded anxiety. Instead of spinning the wheels on a challenging question for more than your teen’s budgeted time, encourage him or her to skip and circle such problems. Your teen can revisit those questions at the end of the exam—as long as he or she leaves sufficient time to work on them.

 Leave some review time.  Ideally, your teen will be able to go over the exam one final time before the test ends to review all answers and re-read any confusing questions where your teen wasn’t certain about the answer. At that time, your teen should also review the test for any glaring errors such as leaving their name off the test or any unanswered questions.

 Test taking isn’t easy for many students, but there are few signs to watch for that may indicate your teen has more than a case of pre-exam nerves:

 Consistently panics about exams and studying for them.

  • Studies for long periods of time, but exam scores don’t reflect the effort.
  • Consistently underperforms on exams for which the student studied or claims to have studied.

 Whether your teen struggles on tests occasionally or always, or would simply like help becoming a better test taker (and better at preparing for tests), Huntington can help. Our highly trained tutors can work with your teen to develop the confidence and test taking skills and strategies he or she needs to make high school—and college—a success.

 

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Where to Look for High School Internship Opportunities What's a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:28:21 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/where-to-look-for-high-school-internship-opportunities https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/where-to-look-for-high-school-internship-opportunities Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Where to Look for High School Internship Opportunities

What’s a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility? An internship! Internships help students learn more about industries or fields of interest, meet professionals to whom they can turn as mentors in the future and most importantly, gain real world experience.

Here are five tips on where to start as you and your high school student look for internship opportunities:

Start at the guidance counselor’s office – The high school guidance counselor’s office is a great place to begin the search for internships, as it may have a current listing of opportunities and programs available in the area for students.

Check out organizations’ headquarters – Headquarters of large corporations often have summer internship programs for high school students. If you have relatives in a major metropolitan area with whom your teen could stay for a summer, consider exploring companies outside of your hometown. In Menlo Park, California, Facebook offers a summer high school internship program. In Washington, D.C., there are internship programs at organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the Library of Congress, to name a few. In San Francisco, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has a high school internship program for students interested in the field of transportation.

Explore companies and organizations in your area. What companies are in your town or city? Look at their websites to see if they list internships. If companies that interest your teen don’t seem to have anything formal in place, they still might consider hiring a hard working student who wants to learn their business. If your teen is interested in a particular field or type of company, encourage him or her to send out cover letters and resumes to a top 10 list of organizations. Many companies respond positively to students who take such initiative, and even if they don’t have a posted position, they might create one for an eager student who takes initiative.

Check out colleges. Community colleges and four-year colleges and universities are great places to look for internships. Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences has a number of different summer internship programs for high school students. Pennsylvania State University offers many different summer programs. The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio’s summer program exposes high school students interested in health careers to medical and biomedical research. Rutgers University’s New Jersey Medical School has a high school intern research exposure program. Explore the colleges in your state for programs for high school students.

Look for volunteer opportunities. If your teen strikes out in his or her search for internships, an alternate route could be to volunteer. Many organizations that don’t have the budget to pay interns might still be willing to take on an unpaid intern or volunteer for a few hours a week. A company may have your teen start out shadowing some of its employees, but the exposure to the industry and individuals’ roles within it will be valuable no matter what.

With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships can help high school students set themselves apart from their peers. Not only that, students can try out careers of interest, gain great experience and increase their professionalism. With some effort, your teen can find a great internship that will build their resume and help him or her gain new skills.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Five Places to Look for High School Internship Opportunities With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships are a great way for high school students to distinguish themselves from their peers.

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Fri, 09 Feb 2018 12:59:47 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-places-to-look-for-internships https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-places-to-look-for-internships Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Updated: Feb 2018

What's a great way for your teen to gain valuable experience, explore college majors and careers, strengthen their resume and develop responsibility? An internship! Internships help students learn more about industries or fields of interest, meet professionals to whom they can turn as mentors in the future and most importantly, gain real world experience. Here are five tips on where to start as you and your high school student look for internship opportunities:

1. Start at the guidance counselor's office – The high school guidance counselor's office is a great place to begin the search for internships, as it may have a current listing of opportunities and programs available in the area for students.

2. Check out organizations' headquarters – Headquarters of large corporations often have summer internship programs for high school students. If you have relatives in a major metropolitan area with whom your teen could stay for a summer, consider exploring companies outside of your hometown. In Menlo Park, California, Facebook offers a summer high school internship program. In Washington, D.C., there are internship programs at organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the Library of Congress, to name a few. In San Francisco, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has a high school internship program for students interested in the field of transportation.

3. Explore companies and organizations in your area. What companies are in your town or city? Look at their websites to see if they list internships. If companies that interest your teen don't seem to have anything formal in place, they still might consider hiring a hard working student who wants to learn their business. If your teen is interested in a particular field or type of company, encourage him or her to send out cover letters and resumes to a top 10 list of organizations. Many companies respond positively to students who take such initiative, and even if they don't have a posted position, they might create one for an eager student who takes initiative.

4. Check out colleges. Community colleges and four-year colleges and universities are great places to look for internships. Stanford's School of Earth Sciences has a number of different summer internship programs for high school students. Pennsylvania State University offers many different summer programs. The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio's summer program exposes high school students interested in health careers to medical and biomedical research. Rutgers University's New Jersey Medical School has a high school intern research exposure program. Explore the colleges in your state for programs for high school students.

5. Look for volunteer opportunities. If your teen strikes out in his or her search for internships, an alternate route could be to volunteer. Many organizations that don't have the budget to pay interns might still be willing to take on an unpaid intern or volunteer for a few hours a week. A company may have your teen start out shadowing some of its employees, but the exposure to the industry and individuals' roles within it will be valuable no matter what.

With college admissions becoming more competitive, internships can help high school students set themselves apart from their peers. Not only that, students can try out careers of interest, gain great experience and increase their professionalism. With some effort, your teen can find a great internship that will build their resume and help him or her gain new skills.

 

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Huntington Learning Center Honors Local Educators on National Teacher Day Wed, 17 Jun 2015 12:11:07 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/National-Teacher-Day-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/National-Teacher-Day-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center On May 5, 2015, Huntington Learning Center of is joining thousands of schools, students and communities to celebrate National Teacher Day, honoring educators and the important role they play in community.

Eileen Huntington of the Huntington Learning Center says there are many ways for schools and community members to celebrate their local teachers and show their appreciation, including the following (as suggested by the National Education Association [NEA], which sponsors the annual celebration):

  • Work with your local school to sponsor an essay contest on "A Teacher to Remember."
  • Hang congratulatory signs in your business or school recognizing teachers and their important work.
  • Invite a local newspaper reporter or TV news personality to spend a day as a classroom observer, and encourage him or her to publish or air his or her observations on a day in the life of a teacher.
  • Buy books portraying teachers as mentors and give them as gifts to the great teachers you know.
  • Host an event such as a luncheon or an ice cream social honoring teachers at your local schools.
  • Make National Teacher Day a community service day that can bring everyone together in your area to work on a single project.
  • Invite teachers to a before-school coffee and pastries celebration at a local business or in the school cafeteria.

"Every year on National Teacher Day, we honor the individuals who shape our children's futures and motivate them to achieve academic success and reach their potential," said Huntington. "It is a day near and dear to our hearts at Huntington, and we encourage everyone in our community to recognize the great teachers they know—today and always."

Huntington applauded the Huntington Learning Center teachers. "Our teachers are here because they're passionate about helping children do better in school—many of them working here in the evenings after their regular teaching or other jobs, said Huntington. "We are so grateful not only to our own teachers at Huntington, but to teachers everywhere who dedicate their lives to helping children learn."

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Huntington Awards Family $3,000 Prize When a family refers another student to Huntington Learning Centers, they receive a $50 gift card in addition to being entered to win a $3,000 prize!

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 13:32:03 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/awards-prize https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/awards-prize Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center, one of the leading tutoring centers in America, awarded a family $3,000 during its February referral sweepstakes. Huntington rolled out a new personal referral program called We Love Referrals. When a family refers another student to Huntington, that family is entered into a $3,000 prize drawing. Additionally, every family receives a $50 Visa Gift Card for the referral, and the student referred receives $100 off an Academic Evaluation. The referral sweepstakes took place during the month of February, and a winner was randomly selected on March 3, 2015.
 

The Cocco family, from Allamuchy, NJ, was chosen as the February referral sweepstakes winner. Sean Cocco attended the Ledgewood, NJ learning center. As a second grader, Sean was struggling in school, and his family chose Huntington to help him progress throughout the year. Now as a third grader, he is doing extremely well with his academics.

Heather Carroll, Center Director at the Ledgewood center, said the family was ecstatic to come into the center to receive the award. She also explained, "They know that coming to Huntington made a huge difference for Sean in school. He's currently doing really well and his homework has gotten much better." After seeing Sean's results at Huntington, and accepting the generous gift, the Cocco's are happy they chose Huntington Learning Center.


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Five Great Extracurricular Activities for the Analytical Child Parents know that extracurricular activities offer a wide range of benefits for children.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:58:10 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-extracurricular-activities-for-the-analytical-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-great-extracurricular-activities-for-the-analytical-child Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Five Great Extracurricular Activities for the Analytical Child

Parents know that extracurricular activities offer a wide range of benefits for children. They teach them to work with their peers, manage their time, set goals and work toward them, and so much more.

If your child is a “thinker” who enjoys activities that stretch the mind and develop those all-important critical thinking skills, you’re in luck. There are many extracurricular activities that will nurture your child’s intellect. Here are a few great activities for children who like to stretch their minds:

Chess:

It probably comes as no surprise to learn that chess is an excellent activity for students who enjoy mental stimulation. Chess strengthens one’s creative and critical thinking ability, memory, concentration, mental precision and academic endurance. Many studies report that chess helps strengthen certain areas of the brain as well. If your child appreciates logical thinking and strategy, chess is a wonderful lifelong activity.

Debate:

Is your child constantly negotiating fewer chores and developing convincing arguments for additional screen time? Is he or she the type to take nothing at face value? If so, your school’s debate team or club might be the perfect activity. In debate, students compete in formal contests of argumentation. Individual students develop arguments on specific topics and deliver those arguments in front of a panel of judges. Each team takes a position on the topic presented (pro or con) and then the teams present their statements and supporting points, either individually or as a team. Debate builds students’ public speaking abilities as well as their research skills, critical thinking and much more.

Model United Nations Club:

For students interested in government, law or even business, a Model United Nations (UN) Club might be a great fit. The United Nations Association describes Model UN as “a simulation of the UN General Assembly and other multilateral bodies.” Students play the role of ambassadors from UN member states and debate current issues by preparing speeches, drafting resolutions, and negotiating with allies and adversaries. Students compete at Model UN conferences, which are offered throughout the country and around the world.

Lego clubs:

Are an excellent opportunity for students interested in engineering as well as those who enjoy designing and building things and learning how things work. Lego programs provide tools that develop lateral and three dimensional thinking in a fun environment.  Not only do Legos improve literacy as kids work with instructions, it boosts motor development, and enhances communication and critical thinking. Many schools and libraries sponsor Lego based activities.  FIRST Lego League are competitions for children ages 9 to 14 years old and are geared to inspire interest and participation in science and technology using Lego based products.

 

Literature Club:

Does your student like to read and/or talk about what he or she reads? Check out the school book club or literary club. Some schools’ literary clubs focus on reading and discussing books, while others also invite budding writers to submit their works for reading and critiquing. For those who enjoy thoughtful discourse about the books that they read, literature clubs are a good way to improve communication, reading and writing skills and learn to develop and support opinions.

Many extracurricular activities teach your child valuable skills such as how to persevere in the face of challenges and think through problems with multiple possible solutions. Encourage your child to find activities that suit his or her interests and strengths and offer opportunities for growth. Your child will undoubtedly reap many academic and non-academic benefits.

About Huntington Learning Center:

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Mathematics Awareness Month To celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month, Huntington Learning Center has created fun ways parents can help their child practice math on a daily basis.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:41:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-awareness2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/mathematics-awareness2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center joins schools, colleges, universities, student groups, and other related associations and interest groups to celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month this April. Mathematics Awareness Month began in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation for National Mathematics Awareness Week. The annual celebration is a collaboration of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics.

The theme of this year's Mathematics Awareness Month is "Math drives Careers." Innovation is an increasingly important factor in the growth of world economies. The advances in mathematical sciences have become drivers of innovation as new systems and methodologies have become more complex. As mathematics drives innovation, it also drives careers.

"Any career path you choose involves mathematics in some form," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "From the basic concepts to the most advanced theories, math is part of our daily lives at home and at our workplace. This year's theme for Mathematics Awareness Month increases an understanding of careers available to those who study mathematical sciences. We're proud to celebrate Mathematics Awareness Month and continue to promote all math skills that can prepare students for so many different careers."

Even at a young age, parents can help their children learn the importance of math in their daily lives and in their future careers. Huntington offers a few ideas for parents to help their child practice math on a daily basis and possibly towards a future career:

  1. Have your child help you make a recipe and put him or her in charge of all measuring. Ask questions along the way—is two 1/4 cups the same as a half cup? How can you tell?
  2. Measure each family member's height and/or weight on a monthly basis and calculate any change in percentages from month to month. Create a graph to track results.
  3. Ask your child to estimate the grocery bill while you shop.
  4. Let your child plan a family road trip, estimating how long it will take to drive to each destination based on the speed limits and distance. Have him or her calculate the trip cost based on the cost of hotels, meals and other expenditures.
  5. Teach your child how to save their money, and talk about the effect of compound interest.
  6. Play games that use math, such as Yahtzee, Monopoly, UNO and dice games.
  7. Play games that foster critical thinking and problem-solving skills, such as Sudoku and chess.

To learn more about Mathematics Awareness Month, visit www.mathaware.org.

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Huntington Learning Center Announces Educator of the Year Recipient Lita Gottesman won this year's "Educator of the Year" for superior tutoring services. Lita has been with Huntington Learning Center for over 12 years!

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Tue, 12 Jan 2016 13:32:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/educator-of-the-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/educator-of-the-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ March 11, 2015 —Huntington Learning Center, one of the leading tutoring centers in America, awarded Lita Gottesman the 2014 Educator of the Year award last month. Huntington Learning Center announced the prestigious award at its annual Company Center Convention held at the Teaneck Marriott at Glen Pointe. The convention was a time to honor staff members and their dedicated work.


Lita is one of the most requested teachers at Huntington’s Eastchester, NY center. She believes it is important to follow the curriculum and help every student reach his or her fullest potential. For example, Lita has converted students from the special education classrooms into regular education classrooms. Her willingness to work and assist in any situation is what makes Lita such an inspiration to students.

Huntington has been fortunate enough to have Lita as a teacher for 12 years. One Huntington parent explained: “My son would not even pick up a book. He could barely read in the fourth grade! After working with Lita these past two months, he cannot put the books down!” With a Bachelors of Arts in education, along with a double major in political science and history, teaching has always been a huge part of her life. Lita has been in the education profession since 1958.

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Huntington Learning Center to Launch Test Prep Program Designed Specifically for the Redesigned SAT With the upcoming redesigned SAT, Huntington has launched a test prep program specifically designed to help students prepare for this new exam.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:46:41 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center to Launch Test Prep Program Designed Specifically for the Redesigned SAT 

New Personalized Program Available This Summer to Help Students Get a Jumpstart on Exam Preparation

 Oradell, NJ (March 5, 2015) – The SAT, perhaps the most anxiety-producing rite of passage in a high school student’s life, is getting a major overhaul that will radically change how students prepare. In response, Huntington Learning Center, a tutoring and test prep company that places curricular knowledge at the center of test prep, has announced that it will launch a new test prep program devoted to the redesigned SAT® – a change the College Board announced a year ago today.

The redesigned test, which officially takes effect March 2016, will impact the nearly 2 million students who take the college entrance exam each year. The new test will place greater emphasis on college and career readiness and skills such as reasoning, data analysis and critical thinking. Its focus on evidence-based responses means that students will need to master root academic concepts and not merely employ a set of superficial strategies to “beat” the test. Helping students build core knowledge is critical to their success on the redesigned SAT and a strength of Huntington Learning Center.

“A college entrance exam is one of the most important tests that a person will take in his or her lifetime, because it impacts college admissions, scholarship dollars and future opportunities. We take that milestone very seriously,” said Dr. Raymond Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center, with his wife, Eileen Huntington. “We are a learning center first, which means that we are steeped in the knowledge of high school curricula, and we know what is being tested inside and out. We work with our students to ensure that on test day, they do too. Every student has the ability to learn, and we believe that learning is the most powerful form of test prep, making us ideally suited to help students adjust to the new format.”

Huntington undertook a multi-part process to develop its new SAT program, which will be available in its 260 centers beginning this summer. Its team of experts dissected and analyzed the new test’s blueprint to uncover key changes and has created a rigorous curriculum to address them. For example, the team has developed sets of practice math problems covering topics ranging from algebra to data analytics, as well as sample nonfiction reading passages with accompanying questions. Huntington is also creating proprietary instruction to support the SAT’s new specifications.

Students seeking test prep at Huntington receive an initial diagnostic assessment that pinpoints exactly which areas the student excels at or lags behind in – down to the skill level. For example, the assessment can reveal if a student struggles with multiplying fractions or reading critically. Each student receives a 13-page analysis, which informs how his personalized, 1:1 test prep program will be designed and delivered and which foundational knowledge needs strengthening. The student is re-assessed throughout his program to determine progress.

Huntington also offers supplementary digital programs – including a series of instructional videos, homework assignments and practice tests – that students can complete at home to reinforce their work in the Huntington center.

 “Many of the students who come to our centers tell us that they are anxious about the SAT and feel overwhelmed by test prep options, which is even more apparent with the redesign,” said Beverly Collins, Senior Vice President, Educational Support Services for Huntington Learning Center. “At Huntington, we give each student a personalized roadmap that spells out exactly what they need to do, how and when. We work with them hand in hand and show them that, if they work hard, they will deepen their knowledge, boost their confidence and improve their score.”

Huntington decided to launch its new SAT program this summer to provide ample support for the students planning to take the redesigned PSAT, a primer for the SAT, in October and the redesigned SAT next March. The PSAT, which is primarily taken by high school sophomores and juniors, is important for students wishing to compete for recognition and scholarships through the National Merit Scholarship Program.

For some students and their parents, the uncertainty of the new design may lead them to take an alternative to the SAT. Huntington also has deep expertise helping students with the ACT®, another college entrance exam that is widely accepted by colleges and universities across the nation and has actually outpaced the SAT in popularity. The ACT format will not be changing, and Huntington will continue to provide test prep programs for this exam as well.

Huntington Learning Center has provided SAT and ACT support to over 100,000 students since the company’s inception in 1977. On average, Huntington’s test prep students increase 192 points on the SAT and 4.2 points on the ACT in just over two months.  

For more information about the redesigned SAT, including key dates and considerations, visit www.huntingtonhelps.com/program/sat-redesigned and download a free copy of “Huntington’s Guide to the Understanding the Redesigned SAT.” 

About Huntington

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Tips to Help Students Embrace Positive School Habits What’s the difference between a child who is a productive student and one who struggles to stay organized and get things done? “Good habits,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “It’s simple but true: good school habits can make all the difference in a child’s academic success,” says Huntington. “If you teach your child from an early age to acquire positive habits, you will equip him or her with the tools to flourish.”

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Fri, 28 Jul 2017 16:15:27 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-students-embrace-positive-habits https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-help-students-embrace-positive-habits Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What’s the difference between a child who is a productive student and one who struggles to stay organized and get things done? “Good habits,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “It’s simple but true: good school habits can make all the difference in a child’s academic success,” says Huntington. “If you teach your child from an early age to acquire positive habits, you will equip him or her with the tools to flourish.”

Huntington offer several suggestions for parents to help their children develop better habits.

Establish routines that work. Children benefit from structure and routine in many ways. A reliable routine helps children learn to be responsible, take ownership of their to-do lists and feel confident in approaching new and familiar tasks. Top 3 tips for children: Plan ahead to avoid procrastination, break large tasks into smaller steps, and create a homework chart or tracking system (and review each night).

Get organized. Good organization helps children use their time wisely and feel and act more independent. On the other hand, a child who has difficulty staying on top of multiple priorities—from school assignments to extracurricular activities—wastes time and likely suffers from unneeded stress. Top 3 tips for children: Develop a homework organizational system and stick to it, create and maintain a neat, stocked study area, and put things away—from pencils to backpacks—in the same place every time.

Focus on study skills. There are obvious study pitfalls that your child should avoid to be an effective student, such as cramming and procrastinating. You can help your child make the most of study time by encouraging organization, time management and tried-and-true study techniques. Top 3 tips for children: Set ground rules to improve concentration (i.e. sufficient sleep and food and no TV or electronics during study sessions), develop a nightly plan to keep study sessions on track, and develop long-term study schedules for concepts that require repeated review or multi-step projects.

Take note of when your child is at his or her best. Finally, pay attention to what works for your child—keeping in mind that all children learn differently. Is your child most productive doing homework immediately after school or after activities and dinner? When studying, does your child do better independently or with a study partner? Does your child prefer a planner notebook or a planner app? Top 3 tips for children: Try out different study approaches and organizational systems, ask teachers for suggestions for effective study strategies, and stick to habits that yield positive results.

Helping your child develop and hone good habits in all aspects of his or her academic life will benefit your child in the long run. “Talk with your child about the habits that yield positive results and those that do not,” says Huntington. “Then, establish effective habits that help your child achieve his or her best. In time, your child will be a more successful student.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

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Making Learning Easier There is no magic bullet to ensure that your child will be an excellent student who never experiences problems or challenges.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:36:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-learning-easier https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/making-learning-easier Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Making Learning Easier

5 Tips to Give Your Student an Advantage

There is no magic bullet to ensure that your child will be an excellent student who never experiences problems or challenges. However, there are a few things you can do to help your child stay focused and work more efficiently, thereby setting him or her up for success during homework time and in the classroom:

Establish routines and rules. Clear procedures create a home environment conducive to maximum learning, eliminating wasted time and encouraging children to work more efficiently. On the other hand, lack of structure can result in a child feeling unorganized and overwhelmed. Just as your child’s teacher does in the classroom, establish and maintain clear routines for study time at home. Once you have established and communicated those rules, hold your child to them. The less time spent on getting settled into homework, organizing or finding one’s things, the more time can be spent on learning.

Read, read, read. Simply put, a child who is a capable, confident reader will find school to be easier overall. Reading is essential in every subject, and teachers will increasingly expect your child to offer opinions on and insight into the things he or she reads. Make books, literature and reading a frequent family activity. Incorporate reading into your daily lives, and encourage your child to read for fun, both aloud and independently.

Work on basic skills.  If your child is struggling with basic concepts and this is causing problems in class and during homework, it may be time to investigate. Consider having your child assessed to get more details on what academic skills he or she may be lacking.

Encourage thinking. No matter what subject your child studies, critical thinking is an important skill that you can and should hone from an early age. Encourage your child to analyze, question and express opinions on books, articles, news and more. When reading stories, discuss the characters and main messages and have your child share his or her thoughts and ideas. Even with subjects like math and science, teach your child to think through problems and talk about the practical application of math and science concepts. The more your child develops such essential higher order thinking abilities, the more capable your child will be as a student.

Foster good study habits. Many children who are otherwise capable students are hampered by disorganization and poor study skills. Teach your child the basics, such as maintaining a neat workspace and backpack, embracing a system for tracking homework and projects (and their due dates), and making all study and homework sessions efficient. Ask for suggestions from your child’s teacher as well.

Finally, one of the most important things parents can do to benefit their children is talk about school. It sounds simple, and it is—but study after study proves the positive effects of parental involvement on students’ long-term educational outcomes. A small amount of effort today will help your child build a strong foundation for school and life success. 

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Preparing your student for standardized testing Huntington has created a list of helpful ways parents can support there child before, during and after their child takes standardized exams.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 10:50:15 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-testing-prep https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/standardized-testing-prep Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ February 4, 2015 —Currently, in the United States, standardized testing plays a major role in public schools. Your child could take more than one standardized test during a school year and teachers may spend classroom time preparing students for upcoming tests. On a daily basis, parents can support their child before, during and after these tests in various ways that will help their child be more prepared on test day.

Before the test-As a parent you need to be prepared before the test. Most schools will send home information in advance of the test about testing schedules and preparation plans. That includes, what the test is, what it will measure, and how the results will be analyzed and used. Check with your school to see if standardized tests results are used for placement in classes for the following school year. Here are steps you can take to prepare your child:

  • Help your child with subjects that are difficult. Workbooks target test prep by offering practice exercises and questions similar to the ones on the test.
  • Put your child’s mind at ease if you think they might have any anxiety. Standardized testing is a reality that children are forced to deal with. Practice relaxation tips to use during the test.
  • Talk with your child’s teacher if you have concerns. Difficulty with standardized tests could be the symptom of a problem. Huntington Learning Centers offer academic evaluations that helps identify the areas causing a child trouble and can help to prepare for standardized tests.


On test day-
"It is imperative that your child gets a good night’s rest the night before and eats a healthy breakfast.  This ensures your child can work to their maximum potential," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center.  Huntington suggest the following test taking tactics. Here is a list of test taking strategies students can use to answer questions:

  • Read the question first. Read the entire question first to make sure you understand what it’s asking. With reading passage questions, read the questions first to guide reading.
  • Look for key words. Identify key words in the question, such as compare, except, and author’s intent, that will guide you towards choosing the correct answer.
  • Read every answer choice before choosing the correct answer. After reading the question, stop and think about the answer before reading all the possible answers. Then eliminate the unlikely answer choices and identify the correct answer.
  • Answer the easier questions first. Answer the questions you know, skip the challenging ones, and then they go back and answer the skipped questions.
  • Make smart guesses. When you don’t know the answer to a question, make an educated guess, unless there’s a penalty for guessing. Educated guesses are made by eliminating the incorrect choices; apply what you know on the particular topic, and then picking the best answer choice that remains. 
  • Stick with your first answer. Don’t second-guess yourself; the first answer is probably right. Unless you are certain that the first answer was wrong, don’t change any answers.
  • Pace yourself. Budget time wisely so you can finish the test.  Don’t spend too much time on any one question.
  • Check your work carefully. Check that you’ve answered every question.


After the test -
Assessments vary from test to test, but the test scores should include information that helps you interpret the results. Talk with your child's teacher if you have any questions about the test results. Usually, the results are made available to both parents and teachers. Remember that standardized tests cannot measure the sum total of your child’s progress. It is only one assessment tool designed to measure a certain set of skills.

Lower than expected test results on standardized tests might indicate your child is struggling. It’s better to get help sooner rather than later. Huntington’s highly trained tutors work with your child individually, at his or her own pace, to master each skill before moving on to more difficult tasks and more advanced learning.

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Teacher Tip: Four Great Common Core Resources for Teachers As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:06:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-great-common-core-resources-for-teachers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/four-great-common-core-resources-for-teachers As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

As your school navigates the significant changes resulting from the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, you may need help. Here are four great resources to help you make the transition.

EduCore: www.educore.ascd.org - This collaboration between the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ACSD) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation offers resources, tools, professional development resources and more for teachers who are implementing Common Core.

Achieve the Core: www.achievethecore.org - Achieve the Core was developed by Student Achievement Partners, which is composed of authors of the Common Core State Standards. On their website, you can find free curricular tools, professional development materials, Common Core-aligned writing samples and lessons, and much more.

National Education Association (NEA) Common Core State Standards Toolkit: www.nea.org - This NEA publication offers all kinds of helpful curriculum and instruction resources, a list of resources by state, professional development modules and much more.

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Huntington Teamed up with Toys for Tots for 3rd Consecutive Year As the leading provider of tutoring and test prep, Huntington has teamed up with Toys For Tots to help give back to the community!

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:47:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/toys-tots-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/toys-tots-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Teamed up with Toys for Tots for 3rd Consecutive Year

Oradell, NJ -- January 2015-- Huntington employees participated in the 2014 Toys for Tots Holiday Campaign.  Huntington has a long standing tradition of giving back to the community and participation in the Toys for Tots program is an exciting way to get everyone involved.  Huntington collected boxes of unwrapped toys and books over the last few weeks of 2014 which were donated to the Toys for Tots organization.   

The mission at Huntington, a leading provider of tutoring and test prep services to students in kindergarten through twelfth grade, is to give every student the best education possible.  By teaming up with Toys for Tots, a program run by the US Marine Corps Reserve, Huntington’s is able to expand the mission and give back even more, by putting smiles on the faces of those in need during the holidays.  Through the generosity of Huntington employees, the holiday season was a little brighter for many children 

About Huntington

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

 

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Grade by Grade Parent Guide for Elementary Homework Huntington Learning Center has developed a homework help guide that parents can use as their child moves through elementary school.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 14:55:18 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/grade-by-grade https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/grade-by-grade Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Grade by Grade Parent Guide for Elementary Homework

Homework is an essential part of learning, helping reinforce what is taught in the classroom. However, many parents are unsure exactly what their role in homework should be and how much homework to expect in each grade. While there is no widespread rule that applies to students and parents everywhere, here is a general guide as your child moves through elementary and middle school.

Kindergarten – Homework in kindergarten is minimal and focused primarily on teaching students to follow directions, work independently and develop reading building blocks (such as letter sounds and combinations and sight words) and basic math skills.  Your role: Let your child take the lead on any homework assignments, but be on hand for help. Read with your child every night.

First Grade – Practice worksheets reinforce concepts taught in the classroom and may come home nightly or weekly so your child can complete at a comfortable pace. The National Parent Teacher Association recommends no more than 20 minutes of homework per night in first grade, but most elementary teachers encourage nightly reading of 15-30 minutes in addition to other homework. Your role: Have your child attempt homework independently, but be available for questions and help. Continue to read to your child and have your child read to you, practicing reading strategies taught in class.

Second Grade – By second grade, the goal is for your child to become a proficient reader. The teacher may provide a specific reading book for your child to read to you each night. Spelling will remain a focus, and you should continue to read together as well. Math worksheets will come home and may take 10-20 minutes to complete, focusing on explaining math concepts. Your role: Continue to help your child build independence as a reader and a student overall.

Third Grade – By third grade, your third-grader should be capable of maintaining the homework routine without reminders from you. Nightly math homework should take 15-25 minutes and moves into multiplication, division and early geometry (in addition to multi-digit addition and subtraction). Other homework, such as science or social studies projects, may take additional time. Your child should read for at least 20 minutes each night, both independently to him or herself and aloud. You may notice that reading expands into much more nonfiction and other texts. Reading to your child is still incredibly valuable. Your role: Continue to help your child build independence. Be supportive, but put your child in charge of completing homework.

Fourth Grade – In fourth grade, many teachers transition into communicating primarily with students about homework and assignments. Teachers elevate the focus on time management and organizational skills. Your child must keep track of homework each day. Nightly math homework becomes more complex (covering geometric figures, introduction to decimals, fractions and percentages, and more) and should take 20-30 minutes, and other homework and projects will take additional time. Your child should read for at least 20 minutes each night.  Your role: Continue to build independence and encourage your child’s responsibility in keeping track of homework assigned and upcoming projects. Be available for support.

Fifth Grade – Fifth grade homework is meant to prepare students for middle school. Students are expected to do math (decimals, fractions, percentages, ratios and much more), maintain a planner/organizational system, study for quizzes and read every night. Projects give fifth-grade students an opportunity to research, plan and complete bigger tasks that take several nights or weeks. Your role: Uphold a consistent homework routine, check your child’s planner to ensure its proper and effective use, and be available for homework questions.

Homework is a great way for you to stay apprised of what your child is learning in school, and it is also a big part of your child’s life as a student. If you are unsure about the extent of your role at homework time, talk to your child’s teacher. When homework is a family priority, your child benefits and becomes a more responsible, independent and successful student.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.  

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Catholic Schools Week America’s youth are shaped by their education, and Huntington is pleased to join Catholic schools in giving elementary and secondary students the best education possible

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:22:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/catholic-schools-week-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/catholic-schools-week-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Celebrates Catholic Schools Week

Oradell, NJ, January 26, 2015 – Huntington Learning Center is proud to support Catholic Schools Week 2015 (Jan. 25 through Jan. 31), a celebration of Catholic schools in America as an important part of U.S. education due to their traditionally high academic standards and graduation rates. 2015 marks the 41st year of Catholic Schools Week, which became an annual event in 1974.

“America’s youth are shaped by their education, and Huntington is pleased to join Catholic schools in giving elementary and secondary students the best education possible,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “We applaud all schools that uphold high educational standards and integrate values-based teaching into their curricula.”

The 2015 theme of Catholic Schools Week is “Catholic Schools: Faith, Academics, Service,” which highlights the three distinctions of Catholic schools. “Huntington Learning Center is a part of many communities across our nation, and we recognize that Catholic schools play an important role in our educational system,” says Huntington. “We’re proud to partner with Catholic and other schools of excellence to help students reach their potential and give them the foundation to become good citizens.”

Huntington supports a variety of national events focused on education, including Read Across America, Math Awareness Month and American Education Week.

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Classroom Management Strategies for Every Teacher Classroom management & homework help Strategies that every teacher can use to help boost their students' academic skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:47:44 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/classroom-management-strategies-for-every-teacher https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/classroom-management-strategies-for-every-teacher Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Classroom Management Strategies for Every Teacher

People become teachers because they care about children and their futures and because they are passionate about helping students achieve their potential. However, teaching is a not an easy job—and one of the most challenging aspects for many teachers is figuring out how to effectively manage the classroom.

If you ever have trouble keeping your students on task or have been thrown off course by troublesome students, you may need ideas to better manage your classroom and redirect the focus to student learning. Here are a number of battle-tested strategies that teachers can put to work in any classroom, as shared in David Adamson’s Classroom Management: 24 Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Know:

  • Use social cues – One of the best ways to communicate with students about appropriate behavior is to state a desired behavior that you want to see in class. Attribute the behavior to a specific student and affirm the behavior as a great example for the other students. What to say: “Thanks to table 3 for having their eyes on me.” “I see that John has started working on the assignment; thank you, John.”
  • Establish time limits – Plan out your day carefully, which will help you keep your students engaged. Share your expectations of time limits and schedule. What to say: “I’ll give you about five minutes for this task.” “Everyone needs to be in their seats in 30 seconds, please.”
  • Manage your transitions – Transitions from task to task can be challenging and time consuming, with students getting distracted or misbehaving. However, if you plan for transitions and explain carefully what you want students to do and how much time they have to do it, you can minimize that wandering or waiting time. What to do: Be prepared, get students’ attention, explain what you want students to do, confirm their understanding, give a signal to begin, give a time limit and start the next activity.
  • Show respect – The classroom environment cannot be productive without respect—between you and your students and among the students themselves. You cannot demand respect; however, you can exhibit respectful behavior toward students, thereby influencing how they respond to you. What to do: Be polite, avoid sarcasm, be on time and ready to teach and maintain a dignified student environment.
  • Keep a brisk pace – Students today are used to fast-paced interaction. You can minimize behavioral problems by picking up the pace of a lesson, introducing interesting activities and having extra activities on hand to fill gaps of time. What to do: Plan ahead, pose questions that invite critical thinking, and try different mediums for reinforcement of lessons.
  • Intervene in the moment – When needed, give simple reminders to bring unfocused or disruptive students back on task. What to do: Communicate nonverbally with a look or facial expression, change your tone of voice or move closer to the misbehaving student.

Teaching is an important and rewarding career with many wonderful aspects to it, but it certainly has its challenges as well. Managing classroom behavior and expectations is an essential part of the job that allows you to maintain control of your classroom and keep the focus on learning.

For many more strategies for classroom management that will help you improve student behavior and achievement, read Classroom Management: 24 Strategies Every Teacher Needs to Know.

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Teacher Tip: When to Refer Students for Tutoring Help When a student is having difficulty in school, intervening sooner than later can make a world of difference.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:06:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teacher-tip-when-to-refer-students-for-tutoring-help https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teacher-tip-when-to-refer-students-for-tutoring-help Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Teacher Tip: When to Refer Students for Tutoring Help

When a student is having difficulty in school, intervening sooner than later can make a world of difference. Here are a few signs that a student may need one-to-one, personalized tutoring:

The student is just getting by. Some struggling students fly under the radar because they’re not failing and they’re not overly troublesome, yet they frequently miss important concepts and have a hard time keeping up. Students like this are often slow to finish work and constantly seem overwhelmed.

The student has become despondent or angry. If the student is unusually moody or unhappy—on top of being disengaged in class—it may be time to investigate what’s going on. This is especially concerning if the student previously had an optimistic disposition.

The student is highly disorganized. No student is perfect when it comes to keeping things neat and orderly, but if you have a student whose disorganization interferes with learning on a regular basis, some targeted attention to study skills improvement could help. 

The student just doesn’t care. Often, students who are apathetic about school feel that they are past the point of help. Their self-esteem has taken a nose dive, and their school problems seem insurmountable. 

The student who fails despite lots of studying. If the student who seems to complete homework and participates during class performs poorly on tests and quizzes, it could be that the student is struggling to understand concepts independently.

The student who doesn’t complete assignments. Clearly, a student who stops doing homework or reading assignments altogether may have grown apathetic due to repeated struggles to understand what you are teaching.

If you have a student who is showing one or more of these signs, call Huntington at 1-800-CAN LEARN. We’ll share more with you about our supplemental education services and how best to help your student. 

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Preparing for the Redesigned SAT In March of 2014, College Board officials announced plans to significantly alter the format and content of the SAT, one of the most widely taken college entrance exams in the nation.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:44:27 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/preparing-for-the-redesigned-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/preparing-for-the-redesigned-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Preparing for the Redesigned SAT

In March of 2014, College Board officials announced plans to significantly alter the format and content of the SAT, one of the most widely taken college entrance exams in the nation. The reason? According to College Board, the Redesigned SAT will focus less on tricks and strategies and more on the work students see in high school. The changes will be a better assessment of the academic skills needed for college readiness.  

The Redesigned SAT will be administered for the first time in March 2016, so for students planning to take the SAT in 2016 or later, knowing about the changes to the test can help them to be better prepared.

A Few Key Changes to the Redesigned SAT

Time and Layout

The current SAT takes 3 hours and 45 minutes to complete, but the Redesigned SAT will be 3 hours in length. One reason for this time difference is that the Essay will no longer be required on the Redesigned SAT. Students who choose to take the optional essay will receive an additional 50 minutes, resulting in the overall test length of 3 hours and 50 minutes. Before deciding whether or not to complete the essay, it is in a student’s best interest to research admissions requirements for their college choices, since college requirements will vary.

The Redesigned SAT will have fewer sections than the current SAT. The current SAT has 10 sections (3 Critical Reading, 3 Math, 3 Writing, and 1 experimental). The Redesigned SAT will have only 4 sections (Reading, Writing and Language, Math (calculator allowed), and Math (no calculator allowed). Even though there will be fewer sections, this does not mean the test will be easier. This new format will challenge students to manage their time carefully to ensure they complete numerous questions within lengthy sections in the allotted time.

Scoring -Changing the rules

The rules of scoring are changing significantly on the Redesigned SAT, and these changes can strongly influence a student’s test-taking strategy. On the current SAT, students gain points for correct answers, but there is a penalty for incorrect answers (1/4 point lost for each wrong answer). Students neither gain nor lose points if an answer is left blank. The Redesigned SAT will offer a more straight-forward scoring approach, allowing students to gain points for correct answers, but not penalizing students for incorrect responses.  So how does this influence a student’s test-taking strategy? On the current SAT, students avoid lowering their score by omitting answers if they are less than certain their answer is right. With no fear of penalty on the Redesigned SAT, students should answer every question.

Scoring-Setting goals

The more questions that a student gets correct, the higher their score will be. 1600 is the new 2400, and by that we mean that the highest possible score on the Redesigned SAT will be a 1600 instead of the highest possible score on the current SAT which is a 2400. These changes are occurring as a result of the change in test format and sections. Students need to understand scoring potential on the test in order to set goals for themselves when testing.

Content and Area of Focus

The College Board created the Redesigned SAT to develop a more accurate assessment of the academic skills needed in our fast-paced, highly challenging educational system. The Redesigned SAT will more closely resemble the work encountered in the classroom. The Reading section will test the ability to develop a strong understanding of passages.  The Writing and Language section will challenge students to identify correct grammar and usage while determining if passages are developed properly. Math skills will be tested with a calculator and without a calculator, assessing skills in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and problem solving and data analysis questions.

Another change coming will be the addition of questions related to history/social studies and science. Students will find these types of questions in each section of the Redesigned SAT. A student’s performance on these types of questions can help high schools and colleges determine which courses the student is best suited for.

Preparation is Key

Understanding how the test is changing is a good place to start. To learn more about the Redesigned SAT, click here. The next step is to work with an SAT expert who can offer guidance and test-taking strategies specific to your needs. By working with an SAT expert, students can ensure they are fully prepared on test day.

At Huntington, whether you are preparing for the current SAT or the Redesigned SAT, we can help. To learn more about our prep programs, click here, or call us at 1 800 CAN LEARN to speak with an educational consultant.

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The 8 Key Changes to the SAT In spring 2016, the College Board will introduce a completely redesigned SAT, which will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need for college and career readiness.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:10:55 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-8-key-changes-to-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-8-key-changes-to-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The 8 Key Changes to the SAT

In spring 2016, the College Board will introduce a completely redesigned SAT, which will focus on the knowledge and skills that students need for college and career readiness. Here are the eight major changes your students can expect to see on the new SAT:

  1. Relevant words in context – Obscure vocabulary memorization will soon be a thing of the past. Although vocabulary is still an important part of the SAT, the redesigned SAT will focus on relevant vocabulary in context—words that students will use throughout college and their careers.
  2. Command of evidence – In the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Essay sections, students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to interpret, synthesize and use evidence found in many different sources.
  3. Essay analyzing a source – The optional Essay section will have students read a passage and explain how the author builds a persuasive argument. Students may analyze areas such as the author’s use of evidence, reasoning and stylistic elements.
  4. Focus on math that matters most – The Math section will focus on three essential types of math: problem solving and data analysis, the heart of algebra, and passport to advanced math.These areas of math are used in a wide range of majors and careers.
  5. Problems grounded in real-world contexts – The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math sections will require students to answer questions that are grounded in real-world issues directly related to college and career contexts.
  6. Analysis in science and in history/social studies – The redesigned SAT will have students apply their reading, writing, language and math skills to answer questions in science, history and social studies, both in the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section and the Math section.
  7. Founding documents and great global conversation – Students will encounter a passage from one of the U.S. founding documents (such as the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and the Federalist Papers) and must answer thought-provoking questions about such passages.
  8. No penalty for wrong answers – The redesigned SAT will move to a “rights-only” scoring system, removing any penalty for wrong answers.

Learn more about the specific changes to the SAT at www.collegeboard.org.

Questions? Huntington can help. We are in the forefront in preparing for the SAT and can help you and your student stay informed.

Students can take the ACT as an alternative to the SAT during this period of transition. The ACT is accepted by all 4 year colleges and universities in the United States.  More than 1.84 million 2014 graduates—a record 57 percent of the national graduating class—took the ACT.

Learn more about Huntington’s test prep services at www.huntingtonhelps.com.

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Kick off a Great New Year Happy New Year from Huntington Learning Center!

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:30:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/kick-off-a-great-new-year https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/kick-off-a-great-new-year Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Kick off a Great New Year

Happy New Year from Huntington Learning Center!

Looking to make 2015 the best year yet for your child? Here are a few suggestions to motivate and inspire your child to work hard, maintain a great attitude and finish the school year strong:

Set goals. Start the New Year off right by encouraging your child to ponder what he or she wants to accomplish this year. If this is an unfamiliar exercise, a simple way to start is to have your child make two lists: problems that your child is facing currently and things to change or achieve. As an example, your child’s first list might include the problem, I’m getting poor grades in math, while the second list might include, I want to tell interesting stories/become a stronger writer. Talk through each item and lay out next steps. For problems, discuss what your child must do to correct them and/or whether your child needs to seek help. For goals, talk about short-term and long-term objectives within each goal, obstacles to achieving those smaller milestones and steps to overcome each obstacle.

Revisit the routine. A consistent homework and school routine is the key to your student’s academic success. If yours could use some improvement, now is the time to make adjustments. Determine the best time of day for your child to do homework—for some, that’s right after school; for others, after dinner is best—and try to stick to it. During each study or homework session, be sure your child has a list of to-dos, prioritized by due date and required effort. Finally, talk with your child about good study habits. Is your child organized and making the most of every homework session?

Keep the lines of communication open. Whether the school year is going well so far or your child is struggling, the start of a new year presents a great opportunity to talk openly about how you can help your child when issues arise. If your child is having problems in one or more subjects, discuss a plan of action. Reiterate your role of support for this last half of the school year and in the 2015-16 school year. Strong communication between you and your child (and between you and the teacher) can make an enormous difference in your child’s school experience.

Look forward. What does the coming 12 months hold for your child? A major transition into middle or high school? The college search and application process, including prepping for the ACT or SAT? Is your child hoping to start a new activity this year that might impact his or her schedule? Whatever the case, urge your child to think ahead and picture where he or she wants to be one year from now. For many students, such visualization of the future is an effective motivator—and particularly useful with the goal-setting process.

As you ring in the New Year, take the time to talk about one of the most important parts of your child’s life: his or her education. Children can benefit immensely from the process of thinking through  ways to better themselves as students and people. Encourage your child to reflect on goals, strengths and areas of improvement, and ask how you can assist. Together, you can make this a positive and productive year.  

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How Tutoring Can Help Your Chemistry Student How can you help your student succeed in chemistry?

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:16:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-tutoring-can-help-your-chemistry-student https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-tutoring-can-help-your-chemistry-student Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Tutoring Can Help Your Chemistry Student

If your student attends a high school with a required chemistry course, or if your student elected to take chemistry and finds himself or herself struggling to master concepts of nomenclature and stoichiometry, it’s time to take initiative with a plan to get your student the chemistry help he or she needs for success in the classroom and beyond.

But first, why is success in a high school chemistry class so important? The fundamentals of chemistry are required for many college majors, including health sciences, bioengineering, and biology, and basic level chemistry is highly suggested for an even larger number of majors. Many colleges see chemistry courses as integral to an education, based on chemistry’s role in our daily lives and its relevance to a wide variety of careers. Even if your student goes on to major in English or Theater, a basic understanding of chemistry will be relevant throughout his or her life. For example, did you know that chemistry fundamentals can be applied to anything from using laundry detergent to working as a hairdresser?

In addition, while a chemistry course will likely be required during a student’s freshman or sophomore year for applicable majors, the challenge of adjusting to the pace of university-level lectures, reading requirements and lab procedures can be made substantially easier with prior knowledge of basic chemistry, mastered in a high school course.

How can you help your student succeed in chemistry?

Seek out chemistry help through a professional tutoring service. In addition to discussing your student’s challenges in the course in an open, positive conversation and contacting their teacher for additional insight or supplementary resources, the Huntington Learning Center’s structured tutoring program, specifically designed for chemistry help, tackles every aspect of a student’s chemistry struggles with individual tutoring from highly-qualified instructors.

Most students perform poorly in chemistry for reasons a professional tutoring service can help address or redirect. According to studies, the most common reasons for failure in chemistry courses are procrastination in homework and test preparation, lack of comprehension of reading materials, inadequate math preparation (basic algebra is a must), relying on others to do assignments (or do the thinking for them), and simple fear of failure. At Huntington, our chemistry tutoring program addresses each of these barriers to success.

With a structured tutoring schedule, your student will now have allotted time to work on current assignments in a comfortable, yet focused environment. Our tutors will explain reading materials in further detail and provide a space for students to ask clarifying questions, which they may be reluctant to do in class. Further, we can help bring your student up to speed with the math essentials for the course, and at Huntington, your student will engage in his or her own critical thinking, without relying on lab partners or other classmates to help them understand the work.

 Finally, we pride ourselves on creating a positive atmosphere of support and encouragement. If fear of failure and anxiety are your student’s greatest concerns with chemistry, we can help your student become more confident and assured of his or her abilities in no time. What’s more, your student’s improved test scores and comprehension in class will be sure to improve his or her overall attitude towards the subject.

Let the Huntington Learning Center be your student’s solution for chemistry help this school year. Visit us online to learn more about our services for chemistry help, or call today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak with a friendly educational representative. 

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Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center, Profiled In Entrepreneur Magazine's January 2015 Franchise 500 Issue Huntington Learning Center is proud to announce that Entrepreneur Magazine has named Eileen Huntington as one of three "Women to Watch" in 2015.

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Wed, 02 Mar 2016 16:15:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/entrepreneur-2015 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/entrepreneur-2015 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder and CEO of Huntington Learning Center, Profiled In Entrepreneur Magazine’s January 2015 Franchise 500 Issue

Oradell, New Jersey – December 29, 2014 – Huntington Learning Center announces its co-founder and CEO, Eileen Huntington, named by Entrepreneur magazine, as one of three “Women to Watch” in 2015.

The Entrepreneur profile documents Huntington Learning Center’s rise to the top of the tutoring and test prep industry, and delves into Eileen’s leadership style of “positivity and high expectations.” Under Eileen’s leadership, Huntington Learning Center has climbed ten spots on Entrepreneur’s annual Franchise 500 rankings due to the company’s financial strength and stability, growth rate, system size, years in business and low startup costs. This is the eighth year ranked as a Franchise 500 company.

 Eileen and Ray Huntington opened the first Huntington Learning Center in 1977 when, as Eileen tells Entrepreneur “at the time, there was no real tutoring industry … there was no model to follow … what do we have to lose?” That grit and entrepreneurial spirit are the reasons why she is franchising’s woman to watch.

Today, Eileen, Ray and the entire Huntington team lead the #1 producing tutoring franchise, producing 50% more in revenue than their closest competitor. Huntington’s financial results are a direct result of student performance. In just three months, on average, Huntington’s tutoring students increase 1.2 grade levels in reading and 1 grade level in math. On average, Huntington’s test prep students increase 192 points on the SAT and 4.2 points on the ACT in just 2 ½ months. 

Huntington began franchising in 1985 and now has over 260 locations across the United States. In 2013, the company changed its franchise model to lower its initial franchise fees. Now, individuals looking to take control of their lives and own their own business can become a franchisee for a total upfront investment of less than $100K. Huntington offers financing options, great flexibility, with part-time startup, and tremendous training and support. 

Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Eileen shares with Entrepreneur, “We’re working with children. When a child calls up and says, ‘I got on the honor roll for the first time,’ you are just over the moon for that.’” This sums up what Huntington does; it changes lives and helps students achieve their academic goals. 

Fittingly, Entrepreneur rated the “children’s businesses” category as the fourth largest sector in its rankings. According to the magazine, “From companies that offer preschoolers a head start to tutoring services that help high-schoolers boost SAT scores, franchises are earning high marks by supplementing the traditional education system.”

Huntington has been named a Top 20 Children’s Services and Education Franchise in Opportunity World magazine, an AllStar Franchise by AllBusiness, a Top 100 Franchise by the World Franchising Network and a Top 50 Franchise for Minorities by the National Minority Franchising Initiative. Huntington is nationally accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

Read the full 2015 Franchise 500 ranking at http://www.entrepreneur.com/franchise500/index.html.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington Learning Center is a tutoring and test prep leader with certified teachers providing individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry and other sciences. Huntington preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. The skills, confidence, and motivation developed by Huntington helps students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

Press Contact
Laura Gehringer
Director of Marketing and Advertising Huntington Learning Centers,
Inc. 496 Kinderkamack Road Oradell, NJ 07649
Phone: 201 957 9431
Email: gehringerl@hlcmail.com

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Barrington Huntington Learning Center Announces Winner of Huntington's College Scholarship Sweepstakes Congratulations to Bella McCloskey for winning a $500 college tuition scholarship! Bella started with Huntington when she needed ACT test prep help.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 15:52:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-sweepstakes-3 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/college-sweepstakes-3 Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Barrington, IL, 12/22/14 – The Barrington Huntington Learning Center announced the winner of its College Scholarship Sweepstakes. Bella McCloskey of Tower Lakes, IL, received a $500 scholarship toward future college tuition and fees. McCloskey is currently a junior at Barrington High School and loves physics and ceramics. Bella has been visiting colleges and universities west of Chicago as she prefers to attend a college in a state with warmer weather.

“She was excited to find out that she had won the scholarship.  She forgot that her entry was submitted when she signed up for the ACT prep program. Winning was a big surprise,” said McCloskey’s parents.

“Huntington is a proud supporter of high school students who strive to attend college, and we are excited to assist this student with her college tuition,” said Beth Meier of the Barrington Huntington Learning Center. In addition to the Barrington center, Huntington Learning Centers across the country participated in Huntington’s College Scholarship Sweepstakes.

High school students aged 14 and older were eligible to enter, as were parents, grandparents and friends of high school students attending college after graduation. Entries were submitted via text message.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible. Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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The Importance of Setting Math Goals Elementary and middle school grades are critical years for a student's math development, as it is during this time students learn the fundamentals so imperative for success in upper level math courses.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 14:37:06 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-importance-of-setting-math-goals https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-importance-of-setting-math-goals Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Importance of Setting Math Goals

 Elementary and middle school grades are critical years for a student’s math development, as it is during this time students learn the fundamentals so imperative for success in upper level math courses. The significance of these years explains why so many parents seek extra math help for their young students via a tutoring program, regarded as the most common and effective means of strengthening areas of weakness in math. But did you know? Effective math tutoring programs can achieve even greater results when defined by specific goals and strategies that are also recognized and implemented at home.

Why Do Math Goals Matter?

Research demonstrates that learning plans are most effective when students feel as if they have a stake in their own education, and understand where they’re going and how they will get there. Allowing a student to write out, discuss and follow through with his or her goal math goals is a great way to contribute a sense of personal ownership to the learning process. Goals will be an integral part of your student’s math tutoring experience, but can be integrated into home life as well. Here’s how parents can help:

Encourage your student to talk about their math goals and discuss ways they can continue to reach these goals after each tutoring session and throughout the week. Active discussion about goals in a relaxed, positive manner can help cultivate persistence and motivation. 

  • Display your student’s math goals in a frequently viewed space in the home, such as your child’s bedroom wall, in his or her planner or on the refrigerator. Communicate that this display isn’t to remind your child that his or her goals are “chores”, but rather that they serve as friendly, uplifting reminders that future accomplishments are on the horizon.
  • Talk with your student about his or her math goals in terms of specifics. As your child’s tutoring math goals will be tailored to strengthening specific skills, conversation about goals should involve more than general questions like, “Do you think you’re getting better?” or “Is math a little easier for you now?” Show you’re “truly in the know” when it comes to math goals by asking about the details. Specific questions typically yield more insightful answers. A parent’s demonstration of genuine interest in math goals can also help redirect focus from the pressure to simply earn an “A,” and instead communicate that attaining beneficial skills is what matters most.  
  • Continue to talk about the how aspect of your child’s math goals. Even if the how is simply attending his or her weekly tutoring session, it’s valuable to emphasize that goals can only be attained through a student’s course of action. Sometimes students aren’t sure what steps are needed to achieve a goal or how they are making gains from week to week, yet their full understanding and participation is critical.  
  • Plan a celebration. When a goal is met, celebrate! Math is a challenging subject, and any student that commits time and effort to reaching math goals deserves recognition. Promoting positive feedback also helps motivate students to continue to work towards their remaining math goals. 

Interested in math tutoring for your elementary or middle school student? At Huntington Learning Center, we can help. Visit us online or call today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN.

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Teaching Students to Write Well To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events. They learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and they begin to adapt the form and content of their writing to accomplish a particular task and purpose.

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Mon, 25 Jan 2016 11:59:30 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-students-to-write-well https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/teaching-students-to-write-well

Teaching Students to Write Well

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students need to learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions, demonstrating understanding of the subjects they are studying, and conveying real and imagined experiences and events. They learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and they begin to adapt the form and content of their writing to accomplish a particular task and purpose. They develop the capacity to build knowledge on a subject through research projects and to respond analytically to literary and informational sources. To meet these goals, students must devote significant time and effort to writing, producing numerous pieces over short and extended time frames throughout the year.

Common Core State Standards

One of the biggest changes put forth by the Common Core State Standards is an elevated focus on writing and overall literacy.  More than ever before, students are now expected to:

  • Write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning and relevant evidence.
  • Write arguments and opinion pieces from the earliest grades.
  • Conduct focused and in-depth research for written analyses and presentations.

Specifically, the standards state that students must build their writing abilities in three areas: argument/opinion writing, informative/explanatory writing, and narrative writing. Student Achievement Partners, a nonprofit organization founded by three lead writers of the Common Core State Standards, offers a variety of resources for teachers to get familiar with the Common Core State Standards and understand how to put them into action.

As you have your students work on more rigorous and in-depth writing assignments, here are a few key points to keep in mind about different types of writing, as derived from writing samples provided on Student Achievement Partners’ website, www.achievethecore.org:

Argument/opinion writing – Students are provided (and read) texts and a writing prompt that asks them to form an opinion or claim about a focusing question.

  • For students in the early elementary grades, opinion writing should offer a brief introduction, state the opinion, provide one or a few reasons for the opinion expressed, and provide a simple concluding statement.
  • As students progress through elementary school, their opinion essays should become more robust and should have an introduction, clear statement of an opinion, evidence from the text to support that opinion and explain the student’s thinking, several paragraphs and a conclusion.
  • Middle school students’ opinion writing should introduce a claim, acknowledge competing claims and rebut them with credible evidence and reasoning, organize reasoning and evidence logically, support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence, and provide a concluding section that supports the initial argument presented.
  • In early high school, students’ argument/opinion writing must introduce a precise claim with context and distinguish that claim from alternate claims, establish a formal style and objective tone, develop the claim with supporting evidence and reasoning, develop counterclaims fairly, and provide a concluding statement.

Informative/explanatory writing – Students are given a set of texts (or a video and a text, if younger) and a writing prompt that requests them to convey complex ideas and information.

  • For students early in elementary school, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, supply facts about it and end with a reflective concluding sentence.
  • As students approach the later elementary school years, informative/explanatory writing should introduce a topic, provide a general observation and focus, use precise language to explain the topic, develop the topic with details, facts and examples, link ideas using words and phrases, and structure the essay to make it easy to follow.
  • In middle school, informative/explanatory writing must introduce the topic, name the work about which the student is writing (and the synopsis of the story), offer relevant facts and details, give examples from the text, clarify the relationship among the ideas presented, give examples, establish a formal style and use precise language.
  • In high school, students must give context to set the stage for an essay, use precise language to delve into the complexity of the topic, transition smoothly to clarify relationships among ideas and concepts, organize complex ideas and information to make connections, develop the topic with facts and details, establish a formal style and objective tone, and analyze ideas and information to make connections. 

Narrative writing – Students write from a writing prompt and stimulating idea to develop narrative about experiences or events.

  • In early elementary school, students must use temporal words or phrases (once, every week) to signal event order, recount sequenced events and include some details.
  • Later in elementary school, students write narratives by first orienting the reader and introducing a narrator, using a variety of transitional words to maintain sequence, use narrative techniques to develop events and show characters’ response, use concrete details to convey experiences and provide a conclusion.
  • In middle school, students engage and orient the reader by establishing context for narrative and introducing main characters, use dialogue to develop characters and events, use transitional clauses, use dialogue to develop character, use precise words and phrases and descriptive details, use description and reflection to build toward an outcome, and provide a conclusion. 
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Effective Ways to Improve Your Student's Study Skills A student's success in school isn't just based on how well he or she can understand material; rather, academic success also depends on the effectiveness of a student's study skills.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:56:23 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-ways-to-improve-your-students-study-skills https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/effective-ways-to-improve-your-students-study-skills Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Effective Ways to Improve Your Student’s Study Skills 

A student’s success in school isn’t just based on how well he or she can understand material; rather, academic success also depends on the effectiveness of a student’s study skills.  These important skills include adequately preparing and reviewing material for tests, staying organized and exercising proper study habits. When these skills are weak or lacking in a student, that student is prevented from reaching his or her academic potential. While study skills are often seen as crucial for managing academics at the high school level, they can also foster or impede the success of elementary and middle school students, and developing proper study skills at a young age can pave the way for beneficial habits for the duration of a student’s academic career.

The good news is that improving a student’s study skills can be achieved relatively easily when parents are able to identify which skills their students are struggling with, and consistently implement the following strategies. 

Organizing Materials 


If your child struggles to keep track of his or her handouts and homework assignments, a binder can help contribute much needed organization to his or her daily routine. Together with your child, select a sturdy, sizeable binder (nothing too large) that will be divided into clearly labeled sections for notes, homework, handouts, tests and quizzes. For elementary students, a single binder will likely work well, while middle school students should have an individual binder dedicated to each subject area. Coordinating binders, folders and notebooks by color according to each class can also help middle school students more effectively organize their materials and lessen the chance of accidentally bringing home the wrong materials.

 

The Planner

Planners have long served as a tried-and-true approach to improving student study skills, and for good reason.  Planning is a foundational skill students need for success in both academics and the real world, and by actively writing down responsibilities on a daily basis, students also strengthen their time management skills. There are now so many planner layouts and formats geared toward all age levels that your student can easily find a planner that best suits his or her individual preferences. However, a planner should always have ample space for students to record all of their homework assignments and extra-curricular commitments on a daily basis. Keep in mind that the key to successful use of a planner is consistent use and active parent review.

An Optimal Study Environment

Students need quiet, private environments to efficiently complete homework or best prepare for upcoming tests, which is why parents should encourage their child to utilize a space in the home that is well-lit and free of distracting noises, passersbys or unnecessary technology. While your child may not have any qualms about working at the kitchen table or in front of the TV, the reality is that they’ll achieve far greater focus and comprehension when they have a space of their own.  Establishing a specific study time each week night for students can be another helpful strategy for improving study skills. For middle school students, limit access to cell phones or laptops during homework time, and for elementary students, it’s not a bad idea to check in often to note progress and offer assistance if needed.  

Study Skills Tutoring

Professional tutoring is another effective option for improving a student’s study skills that will complement strategies implemented at home and at school. Study skills tutoring programs, like those offered from the Huntington Learning Center, are available to elementary, middle school, and high school students. While study skills tutoring will always be individualized to meet a student’s specific needs, our program for elementary students often focuses on improving dictionary skills, outlining, general communication and referencing skills. For middle school students, our program frequently targets time management skills, test-taking strategies, note-taking tips and general study strategies. For high school students our program focuses on advanced study skills, such as self-quizzing, test anxiety management, and research paper writing.

Learn more about how you can help your student improve his or her study skills, or enroll in one of our proven-effective study skills programs by contacting the Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. 

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What to Expect from Exceptional Calculus Tutoring Calculus may well be one of the most challenging subjects a high school student will encounter.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:26:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-from-exceptional-calculus-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-from-exceptional-calculus-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What to Expect from Exceptional Calculus Tutoring

Calculus may well be one of the most challenging subjects a high school student will encounter. An extension of Algebra and Geometry, the subject of calculus expands into the complex mathematical concepts of things like parametric equations and applications of derivatives. We know that proficiency in calculus is critically important in a number of college majors and professions, which is why so many high school calculus students seek out calculus tutoring. But what should you expect from calculus tutoring designed to truly deliver improved academic performance? 

Individual Instruction

Calculus tutoring should be anything but a communal endeavor. Your needs are specific to you alone, which means you can expect a calculus tutoring experience to be one-on-one with a highly-qualified tutoring professional. Your tutoring will be tailored to your specific learning style, and will afford you the platform to freely ask questions as they arise.

Active Engagement

Calculus simply can’t be mastered with the passive absorption of knowledge; calculus depends on critical thinking, which is why you should expect your calculus tutoring experience to actively engage you in deep critical thinking that requires an explanation of reasoning. Dialogue can also help foster confidence and increase a student’s willingness to participate in class, which is also crucial for optimal learning.

Manageable Goals

Every great calculus tutor helps students set specific, measurable and timely goals. With exceptional calculus tutoring, you’ll always know where you’re going and how you’re getting there. A tutor’s job involves much more than simply securing a good grade at the end of the term, he or she is responsible for helping you master specific skills and concepts within a given time frame, and celebrating when those goals are achieved.

Preparation for Upcoming Exams

An effective calculus tutoring program should not be a wholly independent from the schedule of your high school calculus class. While the focus of calculus tutoring expands beyond daily management of homework, it should concentrate on upcoming quizzes and exams as needed. Though your tutoring program may primarily devote your efforts to specific calculus skills, when the time comes for an exam on transcendental functions, that should be top priority.

Let Huntington Learning Center provide exceptional calculus tutoring for you or your student! Schedule an appointment online, call us as 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit our subject tutoring page for more specific information about our services.

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Parental Involvement Day Founded in 1995, National Parent Involvement Day honors and highlights the contributions that parents provide to support their child's success.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:56:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parental-involvement-day https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/parental-involvement-day Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Oradell, NJ — On November 20, 2014, the Huntington Learning Center will celebrate National Parental Involvement Day. Founded in 1995 by Project Appleseed, a nonprofit educational advocacy organization based in St. Louis, Missouri, National Parental Involvement Day honors and underscores the powerful contributions that parents and caregivers provide to support their students' success.

"Studies continue to show that parental involvement is one of the most consistent predictors of a child's academic achievement," says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. "Huntington is pleased to celebrate National Parental Involvement Day and promote to parents and our greater community the importance of being involved in our children's education and holding high expectations for our students."

The Huntington Learning Center will host a number of activities that encourage parents to be a part of their children's school and academic experience. In addition, Huntington offers free workshops for parents throughout the year on topics such as homework help, summer learning, SAT/PSAT/ACT exam prep and preparing students for a successful school year.

Huntington also offers parents a number of ideas to get involved in their child's education:

  1. Read together every night for at least 20 minutes.
  2. Talk about school at home every day. Keep the lines of communication open about school issues.
  3. Get to know your child's teacher by attending parent-teacher conferences, volunteering in the classroom and through regular communication.
  4. Encourage your child to ask his or her teacher questions about class expectations and together set goals for your child to achieve those goals.
  5. Talk with your child's teacher about how you can best support your child at home.
  6. Help your child with homework each night by being on hand for questions and checking his or her work.
  7. Teach your child to develop a trusted organizational system for keeping track of assignments and homework.
  8. Attend school events as a family and get to know the teachers and other staff at your child's school.
  9. Visit your child's classroom as a guest speaker and share more on a subject about which you are knowledgeable. For example, for an upcoming science day, a parent who is an engineer could offer some real-world career information and insight.
  10. Create a family homework center, complete with a homework calendar. Spend time each evening discussing your child's to-dos and bigger projects on the horizon, and have him or her keep all important dates on the calendar so you can help keep things on track.

To learn more about National Parent Involvement Day, visit www.projectappleseed.org. For more information about Huntington Learning Center and its upcoming events, contact Laura Gehringer at Huntington Learning Center 201-975-9431, gehringerl@hlcmail.com or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

Lastly, Huntington reminds parents to make school a household priority. "Your role as a parent is to create and uphold a home environment that is conducive to learning and education," Huntington says. "Project Appleseed says that when parents are involved in children's learning in school and at home, schools work better and students flourish—and this is absolutely true. On National Parental Involvement Day and always, we encourage parents to seek ways to join their children's schools in giving students the best education possible."

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington's mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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The First Report Card: Solving Math Struggles Early It's report card season, which means by now your child has likely received or will soon receive his or her first report card of the year.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 14:35:58 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-first-report-card-solving-math-struggles-early https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-first-report-card-solving-math-struggles-early Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The First Report Card: Solving Math Struggles Early

It’s report card season, which means by now your child has likely received or will soon receive his or her first report card of the year. Though only an initial assessment of a student’s achievement in class, the first report card can serve as a crucial tool for parents, as they can help identify weaknesses in a student’s skills and abilities. When this is the case, it’s time to initiate a plan to provide your student the extra help he or she will need for a more successful school year.

When reviewing your child’s report card this fall, pay particular attention to his or her grades in math. Many students in the United States struggle with math; in fact, yearly polls reveal that math is the subject students say they find most challenging.  Yet, adequate math skills remain essential building blocks for math and science courses throughout high school and into college, and are even critical in daily life.  Because math is a sequential subject and depends upon the gradual accumulation of concepts and skills, when a student falls behind, it’s particularly difficult to catch up. There’s simply no way to progress to algebra without a strong foundation in multiplication and division. What’s more, this subject also depends on patience, practice and abstract thinking, and its concepts can be difficult for students to connect to the real world. It’s therefore easy to see why so many students face frustration, discouragement and the possibility of failure when they fall behind in math.

The key to success in math for the remainder of the school year and beyond lies in addressing issues the moment they arise, and taking appropriate action. Consider the following when determining if your student needs help in math:

  • Interpret their report card. While a grade gives a general idea of whether or not a student needs help in math, it’s important to interpret the grade in the context of how you know your student has performed in the past. Has your straight A student suddenly earned a B+ in Algebra II? A B+ is a good grade by any measure, but for your student, it could be the first sign that extra support is needed.
  • Assess changes in your student’s attitude towards math. If you sense your student is less excited about math than he or she was previously, or if it takes more encouragement than usual to get your student to complete homework assignments, your student may be struggling to stay afloat.
  • Consult your student’s math teacher. This can be particularly helpful if you’re having trouble determining if your student’s report card reflects the need for additional help. For example, for a student with a history of average performance, it may be difficult to know if that C in math on his or her first report card is a sign of future failure; discussion with a teacher can shed light on whether the cause of a grade is truly lack of comprehension or other factors, like a failure to regularly turn in assignments. 

Once you’ve determined your student needs help, create a plan that involves a math tutoring service. Structured, individualized tutoring that targets key skills can not only elevate a student’s grade, but improve his or her overall comprehension and confidence with the subject. Math tutoring is the best course of action for a student struggling in math because it offers the key components for success likely absent from an at-home study plan: clear objectives, accountability, a professional instructor, and structured lessons. There’s no question that with a subject as essential as math, your student deserves the benefit of personalized math tutoring.

The Huntington Learning Center offers math tutoring programs that focus on key math skills for elementary school, middle school and high school students. With our academic evaluation of your student’s skills and weaknesses, the Huntington Learning Center provides individualized, goal-oriented tutoring that can strengthen skills and raise grades. Learn more about our exceptional math tutoring services by calling 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak to an educational consultant or by visiting us online

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Huntington Learning Center Celebrates American Education Week Huntington hosts activities throughout the year to support Education Week and promote education on topics such as homework help and exam prep.

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Fri, 22 Jan 2016 15:40:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/americaneducationweek https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/americaneducationweek Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center  

 
Oradell, NJ November 3, 2014 —During the week of November 17, 2014, the Huntington Learning Center will celebrate American Education Week, which recognizes public education and honors those who work to ensure every child in our country receives a quality education. The celebration kicks off on Monday, November 17, and is followed by daily events: 
  • Parents Day: Tuesday, November 18
  • Education Support Professionals Day: Wednesday, November 19
  • Educator for a Day: Thursday, November 20
  • Substitute Educators Day: Friday, November 21
American Education Week was founded in 1921 by the National Education Association and the American Legion as a national effort to raise public awareness of the importance of education.

“Education is one of the essentials for success, and we are thrilled to come together with peer organizations, teachers, students and others this week to celebrate its importance,” says Eileen Huntington of Huntington Learning Center. “We encourage everyone in our community to get involved in education and support our children as they pursue their educational goals.”

The Huntington Learning Center hosts activities throughout the year to promote education, including free workshops on topics such as homework help, summer learning, SAT/PSAT/ACT exam prep and preparing students for a successful school year. “Our message to families and others in our local community is that today’s children are tomorrow’s leaders, and it is absolutely essential that we equip them with the tools and confidence to succeed,” says Huntington. “Huntington salutes our nation’s teachers and education professionals for striving to do just that. We encourage everyone to recognize their good work during this important annual event.”

To learn more about American Education Week, visit www.nea.org. For more information about Huntington Learning Center and its upcoming events, contact Laura Gehringer at Huntington Learning Center -201-975-9431, gehringerl@hlcmail.com or visit www.huntingtonhelps.com.

About Huntington Learning Center

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader. Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams. Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards. Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.

Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com.
For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.
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How to Deal with a Bad Report Card During your child's elementary school career you may be faced with a less-than-stellar report card.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:07:32 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-deal-with-a-bad-report-card https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-deal-with-a-bad-report-card Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Deal with a Bad Report Card

During your child’s elementary school career you may be faced with a less-than-stellar report card. Although bad grades are upsetting, as a parent, the best thing you can do is to remain calm and take the opportunity to demonstrate to your child how to overcome difficulties. Speak to your child about his or her grades, but try to do so while maintaining a positive attitude. Let your child know that when he or she falls, you will be there to catch him or her, and help him or her get back on track with his or her school work.

Here are some tips for parents dealing with a child’s disappointing report card:

  • Commend the positive. Find something on your child’s report card to praise. Your child is most likely aware he or she was not doing well. Your first comment should not be negative. Set the precedent that your child can come to you with problems and you will help your child address them, instead of berating your child for poor performance.
  • Discuss the bad grades rationally. Alert your child to the fact that your expectations were not met. Once you know that your student understands that he or she has underperformed, discuss potential reasons behind the grades. These causes could be forgetting to do or hand in homework, or lack of focus in the classroom. Pinpoint the problem areas so that you can form a game plan together.
  • Strategize how to do better next time. Set goals for the next report card and strategize how your child can achieve them. Brainstorm ways to help your child. Perhaps your child requires more homework help, or a quieter environment. Would changing seats in the classroom help? Sometimes small changes can produce the desired results.
  • Talk with your child’s teacher. Teachers are with your child during the school day, and should be able to provide more insight into your child’s academic difficulties.
  • Provide the necessary resources for your student to succeed. Whether you sit with your child while he or she completes homework assignments, or seek the help of a learning center, it is imperative to find a way to get your child back on the road to success. For example, a professional reading tutor specializes in teaching children who are struggling with comprehension or word recognition. By utilizing the skills of an expert in the subject with which your child is having problems, you may be able to accelerate progress and help get your student caught up and thriving again.

A bad report card does not have to be a catastrophe; it may just be a small road bump in your child’s education. Your child should understand that failure is not necessarily to be feared, and can be a learning experience. Remain calm and give your child the necessary resources to get back on track if they stumble at some point in their schooling. 

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Trigonometry Tutoring: Helping Your Student Navigate Mid-Fall Challenges Mid-fall is a critical time of the school year for high school students: they experience homework overload, are faced with demanding group projects, and must prepare for numerous quizzes and exams.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:18:53 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/trigonometry-tutoring-helping-your-student-navigate-midfall-challenges https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/trigonometry-tutoring-helping-your-student-navigate-midfall-challenges Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Trigonometry Tutoring: Helping Your Student Navigate Mid-Fall Challenges

Mid-fall is a critical time of the school year for high school students: they experience homework overload, are faced with demanding group projects, and must prepare for numerous quizzes and exams. Teens involved in extra-curricular activities such as student government or sports may also dedicate a significant amount of time after school to these endeavors, further cutting into homework and study time.

For junior and senior high school students, mid-fall can also bring with it the challenge of advanced coursework, which tends to accelerate as the year progresses. Trigonometry, is one such course that can prove problematic. Many students struggle to master the complex skills of this subject, such as inverse functions, trigonometric identities, polar equations, and graphing. As trigonometry is a building block in the field of mathematics and knowledge of the subject is often expected of incoming college freshmen, your student’s success in this course is about more than just a letter grade. 

The significance of trigonometry can also extend beyond college, as many career paths require mastery of this branch of mathematics. Fields demanding proficiency in trigonometry include architecture, navigation, engineering, digital imagery, astronomy, aircraft design, flight projection, and many more. In addition, an understanding of trigonometry is required before a student can take calculus, a mathematics course that is a pre-requisite for numerous college majors such as biology, environmental science, physics, marketing, and business administration, among others. With so many majors and careers requiring higher-level math skills, there’s a good chance your student’s trigonometry course will directly affect his or her future.

Furthermore, poor performance in a course like trigonometry can damage your teen’s confidence. Many high school students must work hard at trigonometry to be successful; don’t let your student feel as though he or she is alone in this struggle. Lack of confidence in one subject can develop into to a lack of confidence in others, as well as deter a student from pursuing a mathematics-heavy career path.

Trigonometry matters, so don’t wait until your student’s report card is issued to determine if he or she needs help with this critical subject. Addressing any issues early in the school year affords you time to get help for your student and improve his or her understanding and grade. Speak to your student about class progress, help with homework assignments when possible, and reach out to his or her teacher for more insight. In addition, determine if your student needs help focusing by assessing the impact of his or her extra-curricular commitments and study habits. Recognizing whether your student needs help understanding the material or is simply stretched too thin and requires more study time will help you determine how to get your child back on track.

The Huntington Learning Center offers effective one-to-one trigonometry tutoring to help your student tackle daily assignments, master necessary skills and concepts, prepare for quizzes, and improve his or her grades. For information on trigonometry tutoring and all of our services, contact The Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN, schedule a consultation online, or visit one of our centers.

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Being an Advocate for Your Child Huntington Learning Center provides children with tutoring in math, reading, writing, study skills, and related areas.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:43:45 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/being-an-advocate-for-your-child https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/being-an-advocate-for-your-child Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Being an Advocate for Your Child

One of the top recommendations you will receive as a parent from every teacher that your child has throughout his or her education is to stay involved. When your child is younger, staying involved means helping your child with homework, encouraging him or her to become more organized and a strong time manager, and generally keeping him or her on track. As your child becomes more independent, your duties will become less hands on. Your child will take the lead on his or her education while you step into a support role.

While your parent role will certainly evolve over time, there is one aspect that should always be important: you must always advocate for your child as a student. How can you best support your child? Here are several tips:

Make sure your child’s needs are being met. There may come times in your child’s educational career when he or she needs additional help or support. Your child might struggle in a subject and require one-on-one help outside the classroom. Perhaps your child will encounter anxiety problems that require the expertise of the school guidance counselor. Or maybe you’ll notice that your child might benefit from an instructional approach that is different than the one preferred by his or her teacher and will want to discuss how best to help your child flourish. Whatever the situation, if you ever sense that your child’s needs are not being met in the classroom, talk with his or her teacher. He or she will likely welcome your ideas and insight.

Establish a working relationship with the teacher. It goes without saying that your child’s teacher should be your first point of contact at school and you should reach out early in the school year to lay the foundation for a positive, cooperative, mutually respectful partnership. Let the teacher know that you are always available should he or she have questions about your child’s needs or school performance. Make clear your intentions of helpful collaboration for the benefit of your child.

Identify and nurture your child’s strengths. Help your child take notice of his or her strengths and build upon them. Reach out to his or her teacher and ask for suggestions on how to give your child opportunities to build on those strengths through academic enrichment opportunities or extracurricular activities. He or she may have suggestions as simple as giving your child additional fun projects that he or she may enjoy.

Educate yourself about your child. Get to know your child as a student and do your own homework on how he or she learns. Once you better understand your child’s learning preferences and styles, personality, strengths and weaknesses, you can do a little research on the most effective role for you as a parent. Your child’s teacher will certainly have insight as well. The better you understand your child as a student, the more you can help him or her flourish—and the better you can support him or her when challenges arise.

Let your child know that you are always there for support. Often, children fear that their parents will be upset about school problems, but it is important for your child to understand that part of your job as a parent is being available for support when he or she needs it. If he or she is struggling and doesn’t know how to turn things around, explain that you want him or her to come to you for guidance—no matter the circumstances. Together, you can come up with a plan to tackle big problems.

Ask questions. Many parents assume that their presence as a classroom volunteer or PTA parent is the best way to show their child that school is important. However, making school a priority at home and asking questions about your child’s school work and learning have an even greater impact on student educational outcomes.  Although it may seem like a subtle form of advocacy, your attitude toward your child’s education is highly influential. Ask your child about school and about his or her favorite subjects as well as those that cause him or her the most stress.

Being an advocate for your child is about supporting his or her learning, working effectively with his or her teachers and other school staff, and letting your child know that he or she is supported. Remember that one of the most important things you can do as your child’s advocate is to be a good influence—teach your child to advocate for him or herself, too. In doing so you will arm your child with the confidence to speak up when he or she needs help and communicate with teachers and peers to his or her benefit.

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Major Building Blocks for Early Readers If your child is an early elementary school student, you likely know how critical these first few years are in his or her reading development.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:34:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/major-building-blocks-for-early-readers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/major-building-blocks-for-early-readers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Major Building Blocks for Early Readers

How to Support Your Young Reader at Home

If your child is an early elementary school student, you likely know how critical these first few years are in his or her reading development. According to the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the International Reading Association, learning to read and write isn’t an automatic—parents and teachers must expose young children to books and experiences in drawing, pretend play and symbolic activities and guide their instruction in learning to recognize letters and sounds in order for them to become literate. Also, the spectrum of literacy development is wide. Some children may acquire skills at different times than others, and the best teachers try different approaches and techniques based on the knowledge that students have.

As your child navigates preschool through the early elementary grades, he or she will acquire a range of literacy skills that will help him or her become a capable reader. Here are a few of those building blocks and tips for how you can best support your reader’s learning (as researched in depth by the National Reading Panel, a collaborative jointly established by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development):

Phonemic awareness – Put simply, the smallest units (or sounds) of spoken language are called phonemes. As your child learns more about language, he or she must understand that words are composed of different sounds (/t/ /a/ /p/ in tap and /p/ /I/ in pie, for example), that some words make the same sounds (bag, band and bet all start with the /b/ sound) and often, sounds are formed from multiple letters. Songs and games are a great way to help children understand the various sounds that words make. Give your child a word (row) and have him or her add sounds to the beginning and end of the word to form new words (such as grow when /g/ is added to the beginning, or rows when /s/ is added to the end).

Phonics – Phonics instruction includes the teaching of letter sounds, the relationships between letters and sounds, and decoding words. One of the more effective approaches to helping students learn phonics is encouraging them to spell words out based on how they sound. Your child will learn different categories of phonics, such as consonant blends (bl, br, sl, scr), short vowels (cat, dot), long vowels (stay, road, tie) and consonant digraphs (sh, ph, gh). As your child begins to understand the sounds associated with these different letters and letter groups, he or she can use that knowledge to sound out new words.

Fluency – The goal for all students is to get them to read fluently—with accuracy, speed and good expression. Without a doubt, practice makes perfect. Read aloud with your child every day. Take turns being the reader and allowing your child to read aloud and offer constructive feedback when your child reads. 

Vocabulary – At a young age, children must learn high-frequency words that are common in written and oral language. Often, these sight words are not easy to decode, and therefore, it is important that newer readers can recognize them on sight. Over time, children must also learn words that are commonly used but unlikely to be known. Reading, writing and talking are the best ways to help children expand their vocabulary.

Reading comprehension – These days, there is great emphasis on the importance of reading comprehension—and it has long been known that reading comprehension is essential in the acquisition of literacy skills. A form of active thinking, comprehension involves inferring information that the author does not say explicitly, interpreting ideas and thinking through texts’ meaning. There are many reading comprehension strategies that you can try at home: summarizing passages while reading a story (and having your child do the same), asking questions about the story, thinking through the plot, structure, problem and setting of a story, and pausing to confirm understanding while reading challenging or intricate passages.       

It is easy to take for granted that a child will learn to read, but there are many pieces that must fall into place for it to happen. While you may not know exactly how to teach phonemic awareness or the best reading comprehension strategies for your child, your role as supporter is still critically important. As your child’s teacher sends home reading exercises and assignments, invest the time to work on them with your child, knowing that the end result will be your child becoming a proficient reader and a stronger student. 

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How to Help Your Student Face the ACT with Confidence By today's academic standards, a strong ACT score can be just as important as a high school diploma.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:12:20 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-student-face-the-act-with-confidence https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-your-student-face-the-act-with-confidence Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Help Your Student Face the ACT with Confidence

By today’s academic standards, a strong ACT score can be just as important as a high school diploma. This rigorous exam, traditionally completed by high school students in the spring of their junior year, can determine college acceptance and eligibility for merit-based scholarships. The ACT tests students’ knowledge of Math, Science, English and Reading, includes an optional writing portion, and is scored on a 36-point scale. Unfortunately, the Washington Post reports that ACT scores reached their lowest national average of the past five years in 2013, with a composite average of 20.9. Worse yet, only twenty-six percent of tested students met all four of the ACT’s subject benchmarks.

While the specific cause of low performance is purported to be the result of many varying factors, the competition for college acceptance remains stringent. Acceptance standards are high, and a noncompetitive ACT score could spell the difference between attending the college of a student’s dreams and attending another university. The only strategy proven to increase a student’s chances of scoring high on an ACT exam is proper preparation. But what does this look like, and how can it be achieved?

The Huntington Learning Center offers its top tips for successful ACT preparation.

Get Familiar with Key Strategies

Sometimes simply knowing how to take a test can be almost as helpful as knowing the material. For example, in the ACT reading section, your student will both save time and increase his or her chances of selecting the right answer if he or she reads questions before reading the corresponding passages. This strategy allows students to know exactly what they’re looking for while they read, a proven tactic to enhance comprehension. It’s also important to know that students should answer every question on the exam, as there is no penalty for guessing.  General test-taking strategies such as utilizing process of elimination for challenging multiple choice questions, memorizing the directions for each section beforehand, and always creating an outline for the writing portion of the exam, can also significantly improve your student’s chances for success.

Take Practice Tests

Encourage your student to take a full-length practice ACT exam, which can be found online, in test preparation books or from a tutoring service. Have your student take a diagnostic practice test before studying as a means to measure progress, and for an accurate score, always complete under similar test conditions (for instance, timing each section). Practice tests provide students an opportunity to determine pacing, identify potential weaknesses, and reduce test anxiety. Encourage your student to take as many practice exams as time allows. 

Use a Tutoring Service

Instruction from the classroom may simply not be enough when it comes to thoroughly preparing for the ACT exam. Students need extra reviews to strengthen skills in certain subjects, and even if your student does well in school, supplemental studying is still both necessary and worthwhile. This is where an ACT tutoring program can help. With an ACT tutoring program, your student will receive one-to-one instruction tailored to his or her learning style, gain valuable test-taking strategies, develop stronger time management skills, and acquire thorough preparation in every aspect of the exam. There are even opportunities for full-length, proctored exams. In today’s world of college admissions, in which a one-point increase in an ACT score can sometimes equal thousands in merit-based scholarships, there’s no denying the value of adequate preparation.

Help your student excel on the ACT exam this year with ACT tutoring from the Huntington Learning Center. The Huntington Learning Center offers three tutoring programs of varying lengths that offer proven test-taking strategies, highly-trained tutors, options for coursework and flexible scheduling.  Contact the Huntington Learning Center today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit us online to learn more about our services.

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What Can You Do to Help Your Child Improve His or Her Study Habits? With a new school year underway, it's a great time to examine some tactics parents can use to help their child study more effectively.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:24:43 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-can-you-do-to-help-your-child-improve-his-or-her-study-habits https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-can-you-do-to-help-your-child-improve-his-or-her-study-habits Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center What Can You Do to Help Your Child Improve His or Her Study Habits?

With a new school year underway, it’s a great time to examine some tactics parents can use to help their child study more effectively. There's no question that successful academic performance is dependent on work outside of the classroom; however, with so many distractions facing today’s students, it can be very difficult for them to establish good study habits at home. Luckily, there are strategies parents can employ to facilitate the right environment:

Get on your Child's Team: A positive atmosphere will go a long way in facilitating the right environment for your child’s studies. If your child has any questions, you should be there to offer constructive advice or tips that he or she can use to solve the problem. Additionally, good effort should be followed by words of encouragement and praise.

Create Rewards: A reward can serve as great motivation to get your child excited about studying. Something as simple as having study time before he or she can watch television or go outside to play can be just the incentive necessary to encourage your child to complete his or her studies and homework in a timely manner. Over time, the improved grades and self-confidence may serve as their own rewards.

Set up a Study Spot: There are so many distractions in the home, including video games, television, Facebook, siblings, friends and more. It is a good idea to identify a spot in your home where your child can study and be free of these and other distractions. This might take some trial and error. Additionally, a specific daily study time (like right before or right after dinner) is a good idea to establish routine.

Speak with your Child's Teacher: If your child isn't doing well in a particular subject, talk to his or her teacher. The teacher might be able to offer study tips, areas requiring more focus and other strategies to help your child make the most out of his or her study time.

Sometimes these strategies are not enough. If you feel your child needs extra help with their studies, we encourage you to contact us today. Our tutors not only are skilled in their subject areas of expertise; they are dedicated to helping students get the best grades possible.

Whether your child needs ACT test prep to get for ready for college or specific subject tutoring to establish good study habits, our tutors are up for the challenge. Let us help you help your child achieve their best grades through one-on-one instruction and tips, contact The Huntington Learning Center at 1-800-CAN-LEARN. 

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How Can Parents Unfamiliar with the Common Core Help their Children at Home? The Common Core State Standards were developed by an independent coalition of education professionals to prepare students for a 21st century global workforce.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:03:40 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-can-parents-unfamiliar-with-the-common-core-help-their-children-at-home https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-can-parents-unfamiliar-with-the-common-core-help-their-children-at-home Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How Can Parents Unfamiliar with the Common Core Help their Children at Home?

The Common Core State Standards were developed by an independent coalition of education professionals to prepare students for a 21st century global workforce. The standards outline the skills that students should acquire at each grade level, and are specific to reading and math. The objective of Common Core State Standards is to create greater consistency among school districts, so that any two students in a grade level should have the same basic foundation for success.

Parents will have a significant role in helping their children meet those standards, which has created some anxiety because many parents feel the standards are more rigorous. According to a Gallup Poll conducted in April 2014, 35 percent of parents had a positive impression of the new standards and 28 percent of parents had a negative one. The remaining 37 percent didn't know what the Common Core State Standards were.

Because the Common Core State Standards are relatively new to everyone involved – students, parents, and teachers – there will be a learning curve. Parents must take an active approach in order to help their children with homework and learning skills at home. Here are several tips that will help parents to get started:

Review the Standards for Your Child's Grade Level: There are a number of different resources that provide easy-to-follow guides on the math and reading standards. The Common Core website is a good place to gain information. Here you will find the standards, links to each state's educational website, FAQs, a history of the standards, and more. The PTA website is another good resource for standards basics, and has several short guides specifically for parents who want to help their children at home.

Be Prepared:  A key element of the Common Core State Standards is analysis. Students are not expected to simply know an answer; they should also be able to explain how they came to it. Some parents who are new to the Common Core State Standards may need to take extra time to review what their children are learning in order to help them succeed.

Seek Help when Necessary: A common misconception is that the standards are the curriculum. The standards are only goals, and how those goals are reached is determined at the local level. Therefore, parents should speak with their children's teachers in order to learn more about what is going on in the classroom and ways that they can help at home. In addition, extra help can be obtained through tutoring. A Huntington Learning Center tutor can develop a personalized lesson plan and monitor success through ongoing assessments to ensure that your child is making a smooth transition to the standards.

For more information on the Common Core State Standards, please contact us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit a Huntington Learning Center near you. 

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Getting a Student to Understand Geometry As parents, you know Geometry can be quite complex and sometimes your child can get lost when trying to remember terms like congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, and theorems, just to name a few.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:53:17 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-student-to-understand-geometry https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-student-to-understand-geometry Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Getting a Student to Understand Geometry

As parents, you know Geometry can be quite complex and sometimes your child can get lost when trying to remember terms like congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, and theorems, just to name a few. It's easy for him or her to confuse one of these terms with another or simply have problems grasping the concepts.

While it's true that every student has strengths and weaknesses, he or she will need to be able to shine in all subjects in order to do well in school. The good news is that, if you notice that your child is struggling with Geometry, there are things that you can do to help:

Spend extra time on difficult-to-grasp material

Geometry is about figuring out the position, shape, and size of forms and using the information to solve problems. Learning the basic principles of this discipline, however, involves a great deal more memorization and repetition than many other types of mathematics. If your child can't sort out which rules apply to a given situation, you're already fighting a losing battle.

By taking extra time to go over the concepts and to then ensure that your student understands how to use them in a problem-solving capacity, you will keep him or her from falling behind the rest of the class. Find extra problems for him or her to solve and test their skills!

Missing a day can hurt – hire a tutor!

Inevitably, your child will get sick or have a doctor's appointment and miss a day of class. While you may not think that's a big concern (it was just one day, after all), a lost day can actually have a big impact on your child's understanding of the subject matter.

Geometry concepts are built upon each other throughout the year, so if your student misses a key lesson he or she may fall behind. Unfortunately, many teachers just won't have the time to really review the material as fully as your child might need in order to truly grasp what that they missed. This leaves your child responsible for catching up, which could be problematic if he or she is having trouble comprehending the subject already. If this happens, a geometry tutor can get your child back up to speed and bridge the gap of that missed material.

The moment you recognize that your child struggling is the moment you can step in and help him or her to succeed. By taking some extra time to go over the key concepts of geometry with your child and hiring a tutor when they are falling behind, you can ensure that he or she gets the assistance that they need.

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Year-by-Year College Application Checklist The start of a new fall semester takes on a different meaning for parents with college-bound students.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 16:08:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/yearbyyear-college-application-checklist https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/yearbyyear-college-application-checklist Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The start of a new fall semester takes on a different meaning for parents with college-bound students. Juniors and seniors in particular have a great deal to think about—from doing college research to scheduling the SAT or ACT, from staying focused on keeping grades up to filling out college applications. As your teen makes his or her college plans, this four-year checklist will help you both stay on track.

FRESHMAN YEAR

September

  • To get off on the right foot, your teen should meet with the guidance counselor, who can help him or her register for an appropriate college-preparatory course schedule.
  • Consider registering for ACT Aspire, the ACT’s new student readiness assessment system. Learn more at www.discoveractaspire.org.

October

  • Attend college fairs in the area (many are held in October and November). The National Association for College Admission Counseling website has a robust fall lineup of college fairs around the country—visit www.nacacnet.org for dates and locations. Your teen can also check with the guidance counseling office for local or regional college fairs.

November

  • Research pre-college programs or classes. Many colleges, such as Northwestern University, Villanova University, Babson College and the University of Dallas, to name a few, offer enrichment programs for high school students. Some community colleges, too, offer high school students opportunities to take college classes as early as freshman year.

December/January

  • Stay on the right track by seeking help if your teen’s first semester report card is not up to expectations. If needed, talk with a guidance counselor or Huntington Learning Center about supplemental education services that would help your teen correct learning gaps and build skills and knowledge.

February/March

  • Start discussing possible college majors with your teen. With summer coming up, encourage your teen to think about opportunities to explore different careers, such as unpaid or paid internships, classes or even informal job shadowing with an adult family member or friend.

April

  • Start exploring financial aid options for college—it’s never too early!

SOPHOMORE YEAR

September/October

  • Register for the ACT’s new student readiness assessment system, ACT Aspire. Learn more at www.discoveractaspire.org.
  • Register for the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), a practice SAT for sophomores and juniors that also gives your teen a chance to be considered for National Merit Scholar programs. Talk with the guidance counselor to get PSAT dates and visit www.collegeboard.com/psat to learn more.
  • Attend any college fairs in the area.
  • Encourage your teen to meet any college representatives that come to school.
  • Start researching scholarships, both online and through the guidance counseling office.

November

  • Research pre-college programs in areas of interest to your teen.
  • Explore dual-enrollment programs at colleges or community colleges in your area. These programs offer high school students the opportunity to earn high school and college credit at the same time 

December/January

  • Continue to explore financial aid options.
  • Evaluate academic progress and encourage your teen to stay in touch with the guidance counselor.

February/March/April

  • Investigate summer tutoring programs to help your teen overcome school problems, raise grades or even enrich his or her studies.
  • Consider visiting colleges over spring break.

May

  • Begin exploring summer SAT/ACT preparatory programs.

JUNIOR YEAR

September

  • Have your teen start the year with a meeting with the guidance counselor to ensure he or she is taking the right courses and aware of all college-related deadlines in the next two years.
  • Have your teen sign up for the PSAT/NMSQT scheduled for October 16 & 19, 2014. Talk with a guidance counselor to register (online registration is not available). Learn more at www.collegeboard.com.

October

  • Attend fall college fairs at school or in the area.
  • Have your teen begin to narrow down the list of target colleges. Your teen should develop an “A” list of his or her first choices and a “B” list of backup schools.
  • Consider visiting colleges over fall or holiday break. Call the admissions office to ask about tours.

November

  • Contact the financial aid offices at colleges of interest to begin to explore your family’s financial aid options: loans, grants, scholarships and work-study.

February

  • Talk with the high school Advanced Placement (AP) coordinator if your teen plans to take AP exams in early May. Learn more at www.collegeboard.com/ap.
  • Have your teen explore scholarships with the help of the guidance counselor to ensure he or she meets all application deadlines. 

March/April

  • Consider visiting colleges over spring break. Call the admissions office to ask about tours.
  • Your teen should take the SAT (www.collegeboard.com) or ACT (www.act.org) in the spring. The anticipated SAT is March 14-15, May 2-3 and June 6-7, 2015. The anticipated ACT is April 18 and June 13, 2015

May

  • Talk with the guidance counselor to learn more about SAT Subject Tests and whether the colleges in which your teen is interested require or recommend them. Learn more at www.collegeboard.com.
  • Schedule visits to colleges this summer.
  • Consider registering your teen for a summer SAT or ACT exam preparation program to help your teen raise his or her SAT or ACT score.
  • Have your teen request letters of recommendation from teachers, coaches and others, especially if applying to early decision/early action programs.

SENIOR YEAR

September

  • If applying to early decision or early action programs with October or November deadlines, have your teen begin the college application process.
  • Encourage your teen to begin working on application essays.

October

  • If needed, your senior should retake the ACT or SAT to improve his or her score. 

November

  • Pay attention to application deadlines. Many colleges require freshman applicants to complete and turn in all paperwork as early as January 1.

January

Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1. This application will be used to determine your teen’s eligibility for federal aid. It will also be used by states and colleges to calculate your teen’s financial aid packages. Learn more at www.fafsa.ed.gov

February

  • Seniors enrolled in Advanced Placement classes should register for AP exams in May.

March/April

  • Keep an eye out for your teen’s Student Aid Report (SAR), which will arrive between four and six weeks after you submitted the FAFSA. Schools listed on the FAFSA will also receive a copy and will use that to develop your teen’s financial aid package of scholarships, grants, loans and work-study.
  • Keep an eye out for college acceptance letters. Colleges should notify accepted students by April 1.

May

  • Make a decision and have your teen submit his or her acceptance of admission to the school that he or she will attend! Many colleges require students to confirm their enrollment by May 1.
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Six Tips to Keep Your Child Safe Online Cyberbullying...online predators...identity theft. For many parents, the World Wide Web is a source of fear and anxiety.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:57:16 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-tips-to-keep-your-child-safe-online https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/six-tips-to-keep-your-child-safe-online Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Six Tips to Keep Your Child Safe Online

Cyberbullying…online predators…identity theft. For many parents, the World Wide Web is a source of fear and anxiety. Yet, in today’s Information Age—and with children who are digital natives—avoidance of digital technologies, social media and cyberspace in general simply isn’t possible or practical.

Here’s the good news: the Internet offers many advantages to students of all ages. It is easier than ever to research any topic or interest, share information, and make connections with people around the world. While the benefits of having so much information at one’s fingertips are many, there are risks and dangers as well, especially for children.  

Here are six tips to keep your child safe online and help him or her learn to use the Internet safely and appropriately:

Tip #1: Set limits. Establish house rules about online time. Perhaps you allow 20 minutes immediately after school while your child unwinds from the day and has a snack. Keep a screen-free house once homework time begins and try to maintain a consistent schedule for homework, dinner and bedtime. If your child has a mobile phone, set rules about when the phone gets turned off each night.

Tip #2: Keep the computer in a visible location. It’s easier to monitor the amount of time your child spends on the computer and the type of content that he or she views if you have it in the kitchen or family room and not his or her bedroom.

Tip #3: Be aware of what your child does online. Just as your parents wanted to know where you went and who you spent time with when you were growing up, you should know who your child interacts with online and what types of websites and tools he or she visits and uses. Make it a rule that your child only chat with, instant message, email or talk on Facebook with friends that he or she knows in person.

Tip #4: Use safety settings. Set up parental controls on any computers, tablets or other devices in your home. These controls can help you limit Internet access, messaging, email and other online communication capability as well as the time your child spends on the computer. You also can personalize individual settings for children of different ages. In addition, you can buy Internet filter software such as McAfee Safe Eyes or Net Nanny.

Tip #5 Talk about privacy. Your child needs to understand from an early age that some people on the Internet might pretend to be people who they are not. Talk about the importance of interacting online only with people he or she knows in real life, and never with strangers. Stress to your child that he or she should never share personal information such as his or her full name, address, phone number or password information with anyone online, no matter who they claim to be.

Tip #6: Talk about social media etiquette. Children need to understand what constitutes bullying online: harassment, repeated cruelty or rumor spreading via Facebook or other social media outlets, for example. The rules for treating others with respect and kindness are the same online. If your child ever becomes the target of a bully online via threats or harassment, he or she needs to know that there are ways to remove him or herself from the situation, such as blocking the person and reporting such incidents to a school official.

Perhaps the most important way to mitigate the risks of going online is to communicate frequently with your child. Talk about the risks of giving out information online, spending too much time online and visiting unsafe websites. Make your child aware of the instantaneous nature of spreading information in an era of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. Discuss how social media impacts how he or she feels about friendships and him or herself. As with all aspects of parenting, keeping your child safe online requires maintaining an open and honest dialogue. 

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What to Expect When Moving from Elementary to Middle School and Middle to High School Whether your child is “graduating” from elementary school to middle school or from middle school to high school, the transition is a major one.  Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that any time a student changes schools can be overwhelming—and particularly when the expectations of the student are higher in his or her new environment. “It’s critical for students to successfully navigate these leaping off points,” says Huntington.

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Fri, 28 Jul 2017 16:07:13 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-when-moving-through-school-transitions https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/what-to-expect-when-moving-through-school-transitions Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Whether your child is “graduating” from elementary school to middle school or from middle school to high school, the transition is a major one.  Eileen Huntington, Co-founder of the Huntington Learning Center reminds parents that any time a student changes schools can be overwhelming—and particularly when the expectations of the student are higher in his or her new environment. “It’s critical for students to successfully navigate these leaping off points,” says Huntington. She offers several tips for parents whose children are making such a transition:

From elementary to middle school

Stay organized. If your child is disorganized, it will rear its ugly head when he or she moves into middle school. Students in middle school must get used to taking classes from up to eight different teachers for the first time—and keeping track of assignments, projects and homework for each of those classes. Arm your child with a simple, but effective homework organizational system, such as a notebook in which to record assignments for each class each day. Hang a calendar in a central place in the home where your child can record upcoming assignment and test due dates so you can help him or her stay on track. 

Hand over the reins. In elementary school, many parents stay closely involved in their child’s homework, but middle school is a whole new ballgame in terms of accountability. Your child must learn to take ownership of his or her academic life. Talk with his or her teachers about how to build and foster independence while still guiding your child toward school success. 

Focus on time management. Encourage your child to get into the nightly habit of reviewing to-dos, updating his or her homework notebook or planner with assignments and due dates, and tidying up the desk. Work together to develop an efficient nightly homework routine that includes prioritizing homework based on its due dates and making a to-do list for every study session.

Emphasize the importance of balance. In middle school, many students become busier than ever, with an increased homework load, more time-intensive activities and a more active social schedule. Help your student adapt by teaching him or her to develop a daily routine that puts homework and school first and schedules in time for everything else thereafter. Your child must learn the importance of being efficient with one’s time so that he or she can accomplish all of his or her have-tos and still have time for the want-tos as well.

From middle school to high school

Continue to encourage good organization. High school students must be capable of keeping track of multiple classes along with other responsibilities such as extracurricular activities. Help your teen establish a trusted organizational system for the backpack, locker, and study space. Research helpful organizational apps for the iPhone (such as myHomework or iStudiez Pro) that can aid your teen’s organizational skills.

Transfer responsibility to your teen. When your teen transitions into high school, the responsibility becomes much greater than in middle school (and the workload becomes larger). Teach your teen to communicate regularly with teachers, develop a trusted study plan and seek help right away when he or she needs it.

Keep focused on college. The college search and application process starts sooner than you think, so encourage your teen to pay a visit to the guidance or college counselor sometime during their late freshman or sophomore year. It’s also critical that he or she stay focused on keeping up the grades. While extracurricular activities, sports and volunteer work are great resume-builders, it is more important that your teen stays dedicated to his or her academics. Be sure he or she understands that a cumulative grade point average means that every class matters, and again, asking for help as soon as he or she needs it is important.

Start talking careers. High school is the start of your teen’s adulthood, and as he or she gets closer to college, it’s important to start thinking carefully about what he or she wants to study in college and what types of careers may suit his or her personality and strengths. Seek out opportunities to build upon those aptitudes and encourage your student to investigate internships, volunteer experiences and similar opportunities early in high school that will help prepare him or her to make those big choices in a few years.

“School is an evolution from grade to grade and from primary to secondary school,” says Huntington. “You can help prepare your child for each major milestone by gradually shifting more responsibility to your child, maintaining good communication between you and teaching your child to adopt effective study skills. More than anything, be there for your child as he or she makes his or her way through these big life changes. Listen, offer a good support system and be your child’s biggest cheerleader.”

About Huntington

Huntington is the tutoring and test prep leader.  Its certified tutors provide individualized instruction in reading, phonics, writing, study skills, elementary and middle school math, Algebra through Calculus, Chemistry, and other sciences. It preps for the SAT and ACT, as well as state and standardized exams.  Huntington programs develop the skills, confidence, and motivation to help students succeed and meet the needs of Common Core State Standards.  Founded in 1977, Huntington’s mission is to give every student the best education possible.  Learn how Huntington can help at www.huntingtonhelps.com. For franchise opportunities please visit www.huntingtonfranchise.com.

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Summer is the Best Time to Prepare for the SATs Summer break is here, which means that high school students aren't interacting in the classroom or engaging in problem-solving activities in a formal setting.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:03:09 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-is-the-best-time-to-prepare-for-the-sats https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/summer-is-the-best-time-to-prepare-for-the-sats Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer is the Best Time to Prepare for the SATs

Summer break is here, which means that high school students aren’t interacting in the classroom or engaging in problem-solving activities in a formal setting. The bad news about this is that students may not retain important information they learned during the academic year or may continue to struggle with certain subjects. If they have to take the SAT in the fall, this lapse in education is doubly problematic.

The SAT is among the most demanding tests a student will take during their high school career. With math, critical reading and writing on the test, students must demonstrate proficiency in many areas in order to score well.

Many high school students are encouraged to take the SAT because it is one of the most widely used college entrance exams, but are they really prepared for it? The good news is that there are many things parents can do to help their children get ready to take the test, including encouraging them to keep up with their studies during the summer.

Why spend time during the summer studying for the SAT? Aside from keeping the mind active, studying for the SATs during the summer gives students some major advantages.

Perfecting the Test-Taking Process

First of all, summer study can prepare students for the test-taking process itself. While that sounds unnecessary, it's a well-known fact that the SAT contains questions that are meant to engage critical thinking and can confuse those who are not paying attention with nearly correct, but false answers. Trying out sample questions and getting a feel for the types of problems that will be included on the test can help students prepare more effectively and avoid surprises on the day of the test.

Creating a Base of Knowledge

Achieving a high score on the SAT is not merely reliant on cramming and memorizing boring facts; it's actually heavily dependent on having a strong base of knowledge in a field of study. For instance, knowing the meaning of a word won't matter very much if a person can't use it correctly in a sentence or identify it by context. And memorizing theorems in geometry won't do students a bit of good if they can't solve problems using them.

Studying during the summer allows students more time to brush up on the subjects they know and learn the things that they don't. Summer is also a great time to hire a tutor and achieve some real progress before the busy school year.

Balancing the Test, Applications, and Classwork

Balancing college application deadlines and studying for the test can put a lot of pressure on students during the fall and winter months. If students don't study for the SAT test during the summer, they only have a month or so left to do so before the first fall tests – scheduled for October and November.  Early fall will also be crammed with other schoolwork and any extra-curricular activities that they take part in, not to mention any college applications that they are filling out. Sure, students could wait and take the SAT later in the year, but this might put a limit on the number of options they have when applying to colleges. 

By preparing for the test over the summer, students will keep their brains sharp so that they won't have to cram as much at the last minute or hurt their chances on their applications. All of this preparation can lead to better SAT scores, acceptances to better schools and, down the line, perhaps better jobs.

Taking the time to prepare for the SAT during the summer allows students to heave a big sigh of relief when it's time to take the actual test. Having a summer study plan will create a structured routine that students and their parents can feel confident about when it counts. 

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Study Tips for The ACT Exam There is no better time to begin studying for the ACT than during the summer break.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 13:02:07 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-tips-for-the-act-exam https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/study-tips-for-the-act-exam Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Study Tips for The ACT Exam

There is no better time to begin studying for the ACT than during the summer break. While many high school students enjoy the time out of the classroom, summer offers a vast amount of time to set aside for college prep. Taking a college entrance exam is crucial to gain admittance, and being prepared to take the ACT can assure a better chance of your child getting into a school of his or her choice.

ACT origins. The ACT is widely used in the heartland of America and the southern states. It has gained popularity, and the ACT is now accepted at any college that takes the SAT entrance exam. However, don’t be misled; parents should be aware that the exam is just as demanding and provoking as the SAT. Your child will be required to use the skills they learned in school to answer questions and put in their best effort.

ACT: Prep for success. The ACT is broken into four different sections that include math, English, reading and science reasoning. What sets the ACT apart from other college entrance exams is the format of the test, and the fact that the scoring system is based on a total of 36 total points. The test is geared towards mathematics, with more of a straight-forward structure than the SAT. It also includes questions based on science content assimilated during school. Another key difference in the ACT is that your child may skip a question if they are truly stumped and not be penalized.

The reading section tests your child’s ability to understand what is directly being stated, and the ability to grasp statements with implied meanings. He or she will be asked to read several passages, and use referring and reasoning skills to determine main ideas. Students must also identify the meaning of context-dependent words, phrases and statements. Each passage is accompanied with a set of multiple-choice test questions.

Know Test Time Limits: Each section of the exam has a time frame: the English section is 45 minutes, math has a limit of an hour, and both science reasoning and reading are 35 minutes each. Students should be aware of the time limits so they can budget their time while taking the exam and not get too hung up on a single question.

Don’t forget a calculator. Students may bring an approved calculator, a number two pencil and a watch to the test. A watch is helpful as some test rooms do not have clocks, and cellphones are not allowed in testing centers.

During the test. Instruct your student to start with the easy questions first. Time is valuable and getting hung up on a tough problem can waste critical time. He or she should have two erasers on hand to fully remove pencil marks from the answer sheet, since tests are graded by a machine and any leftover smudges could cause a grading error.

The ACT also includes an optional writing task. For students planning on completing the writing portion of the exam, taking a few minutes to create a quick outline can help them organize their ideas prior to beginning the assignment. It will make the actual writing go more smoothly and will help ensure the end result is clear and concise. 

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Huntington Learning Center Offers Tips to Beat Summertime Regression Summer vacation is a welcome reprieve from the busy days of the school year, but for many parents, it can bring up concerns about their children losing skills and falling behind. Luckily, there are a number of things parents can do to help students retain knowledge while they’re not in school. “Summer learning activities do not have to be rigorous or mimic classroom learning to be effective,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “With a little planning and creativity, parents can offer their children a variety of fun learning experiences that will help them stay fresh.” Huntington offers these ideas to avoid summertime learning loss:

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Fri, 16 Jun 2017 12:08:19 -0400 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-beat-summertime-regression https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/tips-to-beat-summertime-regression Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Summer vacation is a welcome reprieve from the busy days of the school year, but for many parents, it can bring up concerns about their children losing skills and falling behind. Luckily, there are a number of things parents can do to help students retain knowledge while they’re not in school. “Summer learning activities do not have to be rigorous or mimic classroom learning to be effective,” says Eileen Huntington, Co-Founder of the Huntington Learning Center. “With a little planning and creativity, parents can offer their children a variety of fun learning experiences that will help them stay fresh.” Huntington offers these ideas to avoid summertime learning loss:

Review last year. Review assignments your child worked on throughout the school year and make a nightly, 15-minute homework session a part of your summer routine. Activities such as flash cards, times tables and spelling word practice are great to do each night to retain concepts and skills from the previous year.

Read, read, read. This summer, help your child learn to love reading for fun. Go to the library every week and let your child pick out books, magazines or other reading materials. As a family, set aside 30 minutes after dinner each night for everyone to settle down with your books. Explore your library’s programs for kids, too.

And write, write, write. Summer is a perfect time to develop a regular writing habit. If your child struggles with writing, make it fun. Keep a family journal of everything you’ve done this summer. Write letters to the grandparents every week. Have your child help you make lists. And if your child is the creative type, encourage him or her to write stories or poems and even submit them to print or online magazines that publish children’s work.

Bridge the gap. Consider investing in workbooks specifically designed to bridge learning between grades.  There are a wide variety of workbooks available that can be purchased online or at bookstores.  Most of the workbooks provide pages of activities for each week of summer, including skill activities in reading, writing, math, language arts, science and geography.

Check out camps and classes. Your local rec center, art museum, history museum, nature and science museum, cultural center and zoo are all great places to look for classes, camps or other programs for children on summer break. You could also check out day or overnight educational camps in your area or around the country.

“The reality is that many students lose some of what they learn each grade during the months they are not in school,” Huntington says. “But with a small amount of effort, you can help your child stay sharp, retain knowledge and be better prepared for the next grade.”

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Prevent Summer Learning Loss All students experience summer learning loss when they do not engage in educational activities over the long break.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:45:01 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prevent-summer-learning-loss https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/prevent-summer-learning-loss Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Prevent Summer Learning Loss

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Getting a Child to Appreciate Math For some students, math skills come easily, as do the aptitudes needed to be a successful math student: analyzing patterns, thinking logically and critically, and solving problems.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:51:50 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-child-to-appreciate-math https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/getting-a-child-to-appreciate-math Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Getting a Child to Appreciate Math

For some students, math skills come easily, as do the aptitudes needed to be a successful math student: analyzing patterns, thinking logically and critically, and solving problems. However, for others, math concepts are difficult to grasp and the more complex they become, the more students want to give up altogether.

If your child isn’t one of the fortunate students for which math “clicks” effortlessly, it may not be possible for you to convince him or her to like math. However, you can encourage your child to appreciate math for the practical and useful life skill that it is. Here are a few tips on how to help your student appreciate math and its importance.

Point out math in everyday life. You don’t have to look too hard to find math in day-to-day life—from weather forecasting to telling time to using cell phones and computers. From the time your child is old enough to understand the basic concepts of math, highlight math being used everywhere you go.

Call attention to math in various careers. Certainly, it’s easier to see why professionals in accounting, engineering and science need math. However, the reality is that math is a skill required by many jobs. For business owners and entrepreneurs, math is an essential part of the company’s purchasing, budgeting, finance and other functions. Those working in real estate or sales likely have monthly sales targets to meet in order to earn carefully calculated bonuses. Landscapers or architects use math skills to create scaled drawings and to calculate and order the right amount of supplies.

Use money. Your child might not enjoy worksheets of math problems, but there’s a good chance he or she is interested in money—or at least interested in earning money. Help your child open his or her first bank account and teach him or her how to maintain the savings register. Together, calculate how much interest he or she could earn each month based on the account’s interest rate. Put together a spreadsheet that gives your child a weekly savings goal to save up for that iPad.

Discuss your own relationship with math. Does your child see you using math? Be sure to explain how and where you use math in your daily life. If you maintain the family budget, have your child help you with this task so he or she gets a sense of how your family keeps track of your income, expenses, savings and more. Show your child how you use math in cooking and when comparison shopping.

Your child might never feel enthusiastic about math, but with some effort on your part, you can impart in him or her an appreciation for the importance of the subject. Look around and you will find a multitude of opportunities to show your child math in use—from complex math to everyday math.

Keep in mind that math is a subject that requires students to continually build skills. If your child struggles with basic concepts, more complex math will only prove frustrating. If your child is struggling, call Huntington. We can design a customized program to help your child overcome any problems with math and get back on the road to school success.

Helping Your Child Learn Math by Eileen and Raymond Huntington offers tips, strategies and activities to help your child learn math at home and on the go. 

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Implementing Differentiated Instruction Into Your Lesson Plan In order to truly implement the philosophy of differentiated instruction, it is important to get a grasp on the theory and to understand why some teachers and tutors deem it necessary.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:27:08 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/implementing-differentiated-instruction-into-your-lesson-plan https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/implementing-differentiated-instruction-into-your-lesson-plan Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Implementing Differentiated Instruction Into Your Lesson Plan

In order to truly implement the philosophy of differentiated instruction, it is important to get a grasp on the theory and to understand why some teachers and tutors deem it necessary. Differentiated instruction bases your lessons around the very idea that each student is different and as such, they retain and learn information in different ways. Rather than have each lesson exactly the same, which can cause some children to fall further and further behind, differentiated instruction works to meet each of them on some level of their own learning abilities. Many tutors in math, English, and other subjects use differentiated instruction in their teaching process. Whether you're a tutor, teacher, or parent, using various aspects from this method can help you teach a variety of different students.                        

Pre-Assessment and Assessment

As said, differentiated instruction puts a focus on the differences in abilities and learning styles of your students. This can sometimes be a little more taxing on the teacher when it comes to evaluating student progress and gearing each lesson to a student’s sensibilities. For pre-assessment, you’re tasked, as an instructor, to see the prior knowledge that your students are going into a lesson with.  This can help you decide where to begin and where to focus most on. During the assessment process, you will be able to monitor your students’ progress through each lesson through a variety of means, whether they be quizzes, projects, group activities, or reading assignments. 

Content in a Differentiated Instruction Class

The key aspect of differentiated instruction is how it affects what kind of content you teach in class.  Similar to balanced literacy, another teaching theory, differentiated instruction looks to vary the types of mediums that relay information to your students. For example, while your standard classroom may have the students learn directly from a textbook, differentiated instruction may have your students read passages from a novel, poems, or simply watch a relevant movie or film strip. The idea is that effective teaching stimulates a variety of senses and the children will have an easier time absorbing things if given a variety of applications.

Product in a Differentiated Instruction Class

When it comes to differentiated instruction, the product is where your students can truly express what they learn in a variety of interesting ways. Rather than a simple exam or report to show what they’ve learned, students are given the opportunity to express themselves in clever ways. For example, they may choose to write songs on the subject that they just learned or create their own magazine with a variety of articles on the subject at hand. In this way, differentiated instruction allows the students to showcase their knowledge in a way that appeals to them. This is a bit more useful than a simple exam, as it makes the students go a step further and apply their knowledge into a useful and everyday application.

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8 Facts to Know about SAT Changes As you may or may not have heard, the College Board recently announced that substantial changes will be made to the SAT, effective spring 2016.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:41:35 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/8-facts-to-know-about-sat-changes https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/8-facts-to-know-about-sat-changes Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center 8 Facts to Know about SAT Changes

As you may or may not have heard, the College Board recently announced that substantial changes will be made to the SAT, effective spring 2016. These changes are meant to better accommodate what students will need to know in post-high-school life, for both college and their future careers. The new test will shift the focus to analytic thinking and will be more aligned with what is learned in the classroom.

This is a big point of interest for students in junior high and early high school, as the rules they are currently familiar with are now changing. Here are the new rules parents and students will most need to know.

The test is reverting to the old scoring scale. While the current SAT is scored on a 2400-point scale, the College Board has decided to return to the 1600-point scale that was used in 2004 and earlier. The essay score will be separate from the math, reading, and writing sections of the test.

Essay will be optional. Speaking of the essay being scored separately, students will now be given the option to forgo this section altogether.

There will not be point deductions for wrong answers. Formerly, students were encouraged to leave answers blank if they didn't know the answer, since wrong responses resulted in ¼ of a point being subtracted from their scores. On the new test, students are encouraged to use their deductive reasoning skills to choose the most logical answer with no penalty for guessing incorrectly.

Vocabulary will be more 'real world.' It's currently not uncommon to see antiquated vocabulary sprinkled throughout the reading and writing sections of the exam. Archaic words will no longer be prominent in the test, giving way to more useful and modern, though still challenging, vocabulary.

The focus on the math section will be narrower. There will be a smaller range of subjects on the math portion which will emphasize equations, functions, ratios, and other types of math that may be applicable to everyday life.

The use of calculators will only be permitted on specified parts of the test. Relevant mathematic formulas will still be supplied to students at the beginning of the test, but don't ditch your algebra tutor just yet. In keeping with the shifted focus on the math portion, calculators will only be allowed for use during certain parts of the test.

The reading and writing section will look for evidence-supported answers. In order to get high scores on the reading and writing sections, students will need to provide ample supporting facts in order to demonstrate their interpreting and analyzing skills. Each passage that students must read will be accompanied by a question asking them to select a quote from the text that best supports their response to the preceding question.

For the reading section, texts will be chosen more wisely. Rather than choosing passages from old, classic novels and short stories, the excerpts will be taken from multidisciplinary texts such as the Declaration of Independence and other widely-read documents.

What are your thoughts on the new SAT tests? How should students adapt their study habits?

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How to Help a Poor Speller For some children, learning to spell is incredibly frustrating and something that never seems to get easier or less confusing.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:10:24 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-a-poor-speller https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/how-to-help-a-poor-speller Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center How to Help a Poor Speller

For some children, learning to spell is incredibly frustrating—and something that never seems to get easier or less confusing. The bad news is that spelling troubles are unlikely to go away on their own. The good news is that there are many things parents can do to help their children become better spellers, and as a result, better students. Here are several tips to help your child improve his or her spelling ability:

Encourage mastery of the sight words. You probably recall the words sent home by your child’s kindergarten and first grade teachers that you were instructed to have your child memorize by sight. Sight words—also known as Dolch words—are the most frequently used words in the English language. Many sight words have irregular spellings and it is critical that students memorize them and know how to spell them.

Make sure your student understands the different sounds that letter combinations make. Reading fluency is achieved through a series of “building block” skills, including understanding that words are composed of letters and word units and that letters (and letter combinations) make individual sounds. Your child should be able to sound out:

  • Individual letters (consonants and vowels)
  • Blends (such as pl or sm)
  • Digraphs (two letters that make one sound, such as sh or ng)
  • Diphthongs (two vowels that form as one syllable, such as au or ai)

Help your child recognize word families. Once your child masters train, give him or her a list of other words that share the same ain ending, such as chain and brain. Guide your child as he or she plays with letter combinations to understand word patterns.

Help your child memorize common spelling rules. Scholastic offers a helpful printable chart that summarizes spelling rules for ei vs. ie words, compound words, plurals, possessives, prefixes and suffixes. Once your child memorizes these basics, he or she will be able to apply them consistently and catch his or her spelling mistakes more easily.

Practice, practice, practice. Provided a student has a basic understanding of word structure, letter sounds, common spelling rules and relationships between words, repetition is critical to master spelling. As your child studies his or her new weekly spelling words, try the look, visualize, write, check approach. If your child gets tripped up with the same words over and over, practice them in the same way you would if they were brand new spelling words.

Spelling takes continued practice—and even adults can struggle with it throughout their lives. Frequent reading and repeated exposure to the spoken and written word are the best ways for students to acquire strong spelling skills. And when problems arise, early intervention is critical (as with all literacy skills). The sooner you can spot and correct spelling difficulties, the easier it will be for your child to become a good speller.

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SAT Prep: Tutors vs. Teachers For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to hire a tutor.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:52:33 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tutors-vs-teachers https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/sat-prep-tutors-vs-teachers Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center SAT Prep: Tutors vs. Teachers

For students about to take the SAT as well as their parents, it can be a point of debate whether or not to hire a tutor. Some think it would be unheard of to take the test without being prepared by a tutor or coach, while others seem to think it's an expense that can easily be spared as long as you do well in school. In truth, there are many things tutors can do for students they can't do alone or with the help of a teacher.

Tutors can Provide Discipline

It's true that there are many bright students who may have the capability to prepare themselves for the SAT, but that doesn't mean they have the discipline to do so. It's also not safe to assume that teachers will provide SAT-oriented material. Having an SAT coach means that a student is held accountable for studying specified portions of material, and therefore, it gives the student the discipline needed to do so. There's no doubting that the right amount of studying will improve a test score, but some students need the incentive to actually study. 

Tutors can Provide Specialized Help

Many students do extremely well in certain subjects but not-so-well in others. For example, some students are proficient in math and science courses, but struggle with writing. If this is the case, it can be helpful to get an SAT tutor who specializes in a certain subject. You can't get all the algebra help you need just from sitting in class, because lesson plans are designed to accommodate everyone. With a tutor, you can sit down and explain exactly what you're having trouble with. Specialized help is one of the biggest benefits of hiring a tutor or coach.

Tutors are Familiar with the Expectations of Colleges

The benefit of having SAT tutors is that they're familiar with what colleges expect of their applicants. Together, a student and tutor can goals that are both attainable and specific to the program that the student is applying to, making it more likely they will get into their top choices and excel in their programs.

 

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Five Tips for the Night Before the SAT With many SAT testing dates approaching, there are a lot of tips circulating for doing well on the test.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:59:38 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-the-night-before-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/five-tips-for-the-night-before-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Five Tips for the Night Before the SAT 

With many SAT testing dates approaching, there are a lot of tips circulating for doing well on the test. "Take practice tests," "Review X, Y, and Z," and, of course, "Process of elimination!" are all great tips, but some things that factor into SAT success don't involve studying. Giving it your all largely involves being in the right state of mind – and getting into that "zone" starts the night before exam day. Here are a few things you can do to get into test-taking mode once you're within 24 hours of starting time.

Get Exercise

The day before the big test, go for a jog, play some Frisbee with your dog, or enjoy a game of pickup basketball with your friends. Exercise is great for two things: relieving stress and getting high-quality sleep, two things that are very important before taking the exam. Just make sure not to work out too late, as the adrenaline can keep you awake. 

Get Organized

Make sure to put your calculator, new batteries, your photo ID, and two #2 pencils in a pouch together so you're not fumbling around looking for them as you're about to walk out the door. It might also be a good idea to put a filling snack, like a protein bar, in the bag too in case you get a grumbling stomach on the way there. 

Set your Alarm…Early

Getting up early probably isn't your ideal scenario, but you want to give yourself time to fully wake up before taking the test. Being groggy is distracting and will affect your performance. Reap the benefits of getting up early by doing a brain teaser, such as a Sudoku puzzle or a crossword, before going to the exam. This will help to jump-start your brain and get you into test-taking mode.

Eat Well

Eating a big breakfast will give you the energy and brainpower you need to stay focused. Don't go overboard with something too greasy and filling – otherwise, you'll feel lethargic. Instead, try some fruit, yogurt, and granola, or just snack on two eggs with toast. 

Stop Studying!

Cramming the night before and the morning of the exam sounds like it would be a good idea, but those last few minutes aren't going to give you the information you need to significantly improve your test scores. As a matter of fact, studying for the SAT too close to the day of the test can, in fact, stress you out. Try some light reading or brain games instead.

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Does Your Child Need Tutoring? Tutoring helps students in different situations.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 10:55:36 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-tutoring https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/does-your-child-need-tutoring Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center Does Your Child Need Tutoring?

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The Student's Guide to the SAT Getting stressed out before taking a big test such as the SAT is normal.

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Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:14:04 -0500 https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-students-guide-to-the-sat https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/the-students-guide-to-the-sat Huntington Learning Center Huntington Learning Center The Student's Guide to the SAT

Getting stressed out before taking a big test such as the SAT is normal. Unfortunately, stress can be one of the biggest distractions from doing well on a test, no matter how many hours you've spent pouring over practice exams and brushing up on math equations. Not only can stress cause you to lose sleep and affect your attention, it can also make your time spent studying less effective.

Luckily, there are proven ways to minimize stress and maximize your performance. Here are a few ways to avoid anxiety, both during the study-heavy weeks leading up to the test and during the exam itself:

Do What You Need to Do to Stay Positive

Having a negative attitude toward a test you have to take isn't going to help your performance. Focusing on positive outcomes instead of negatives can be very motivating. Remind yourself that if you do well on the SAT, you might get into your dream school or receive good scholarships. At the very least, once the test is over, you can look forward to whatever your future holds. Yoga, meditation, listening to upbeat music, and exercising can all help boost your mood so that you're optimistic while studying, not stressed.

Don't Overwork Yourself

You may be tempted to pull all-nighters and avoid going out to dinner with the family so you can get in as much study time as possible, but this can be just as detrimental to your performance as not studying at all. Studying is important, but so is relaxation, so do your best to strike a balance. Make a schedule and set aside blocks of time dedicated to reviewing