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ACT

Section Total Minutes Number of Questions Possible Score
English
  • 45
  • 75
  • 1-36
Math
  • 60
  • 60
  • 1-36
Reading
  • 35
  • 40
  • 1-36
Science
  • 35
  • 40
  • 1-36
Writing (optional)
  • 40
  • One essay
  • 2-12

The ACT is 3 hours and 35 minutes in length (3 hours and 35 minutes if the optional writing portion is being taken).

  • 45 Minutes for English
  • 60 Minutes for Math
  • 35 Minutes for Reading
  • 35 Minutes for Science
  • 40 Minutes for Writing (optional)

ACT dates, locations, and registration information can be found by visiting https://services.actstudent.org/OA_HTML/actibeCAcdLogin.jsp.

Many students take the ACT twice, first in their junior year, then again in their senior year. You should consider retesting if you had any issues during your first test, such as an illness or misunderstanding of test directions, or if you don’t feel your initial ACT scores accurately reflect your abilities. If you take the test more than once, you decide which set of scores are sent to colleges or scholarship programs.

Each section of the ACT (English, Math, reading and science, is scored on a scale from 1 to 36. The scores for all four sections are averaged to give the students an overall composite ACT score between 1 and 36.

The optional writing portion of the test receives four separate domain scores (Ideas and Analysis, Development and Support, Organization, and Language Use and Conventions). Each of the four domains is scored on a scale of 2-12.

Beginning September 2016, students who elect to take the writing portion of the test will also receive an overall Writing Score on a 2-12 range - the average of the four domain scores.

The scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers. Each college and university sets its own ACT score requirements for admission into that school. Check with the schools you are interested in applying to in order to determine the ACT score you need to achieve. You can decide which ACT scores are sent to prospective schools.

In general, most ACT multiple-choice scores, including the Composite score, are posted to your online student Web account (through ACT) within two weeks after the test date. If you’ve taken the writing portion of the ACT, you will be notified when that score is available.

Getting Tutoring Help FAQs

Some warning signs: difficulty getting started, sloppy homework, and overall disorganization. Other signs: personality change, diminished self-esteem, or a lack of interest in learning. Learn more on this topic: https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-signs-child-needs-tutoring.

Working with a tutor can be beneficial to your child by: strengthening academic skills, mastering new concepts, preparing for an exam, and building crucial study habits for academic success in school and life.

The initial evaluation gives us the answers. The evaluation is a number of multi-disciplinary assessments to identify academic pain points. It answers where and why your child is struggling.  It allows us to build a roadmap, a personalized learning plan. The plan identifies the total number of hours needed for success. Then together we develop a weekly tutoring schedule. Knowing the total hours and your schedule, we can tell you how long the program will take.

We typically recommend at least twice a week.  During the summer we typically recommend three or more times a week.  In general, your schedule helps determine how quickly your child begins excelling in school.

Because we want to help every child achieve their academic goals and succeed in school, we recommend following the tutoring schedule determined by the evaluation.

Third-party research overwhelmingly supports tutoring as the very best educational option.  See our research and proven results on why tutoring works. Our research plus research done by others says we’re the best.  This includes research done by the Chicago Public Schools, The Los Angeles Unified School District, the Indiana DOE, and others. Policy Studies Associates studied our data and determined students who participated in the Huntington Learning Center program found a positive relationship between tutoring and academic proficiency.  We get great results, because all our tutoring is tailored specifically to your student’s academic needs.

While they may share the same schedule, they don’t share the same personalized lesson plan.  We develop this plan based on your input and the initial evaluation.  We update it based on your child’s progress and performance.  This is true personalization to help guarantee the best outcome for each child.

While we do not assign homework, if your child is being tutored for academic skills, we do assign homework if we are prepping for the SAT, ACT, or a state or standardized exam.

No, when we assign homework, your child should complete it independently.

Absolutely! With your permission we will discuss your child’s academic needs and progress with his or her teachers, school personnel, and other professionals.  In fact, we recommend it as a means to help them understand why your child has become such a different individual – it’s because of the skills, confidence, and motivation he or she is gaining from Huntington tutoring.

Since tutors can be tremendously influential in your child’s life – and the life of everyone in the family – pick with care.  Seek an individual or organization – such as Huntington – that devotes full-time to tutoring students.  Check the recommendations of others.  See website for our glowing recommendations. Talk and meet with the staff to verify their professionalism. While your child is being tutored, meet frequently to get updates.  Ensure the organization is accredited.  Most likely, Huntington is accredited by the same organization that accredits your school. Also read what to look for when finding a tutor.

Huntington's Tutoring Services FAQs

After the academic evaluation (which identifies academic strengths and weaknesses), we discuss its results with you during an initial conference.  During our meeting, we schedule tutoring sessions and discuss payment.  We have competitive hourly rates and offer flexible payment options.

Yes! We have about 300 Huntington Learning Centers conveniently located across the country.

We tutor all grades, kindergarten through grade 12, plus adults, in study skills, reading, phonics, spelling, vocabulary, elementary through advanced math, and science, and more. We prep for the SAT, ACT, GED, ASVAB, PARCC, HSPT, ISEE, state exams, and more.

Yes!  We tutor ADHD students in all areas.  Although we don’t diagnose disabilities, we can help students with disabilities make great progress.

Our unique approach to tutoring includes: highly reliable assessments that evaluate strengths and weaknesses, tailored tutoring programs that are unique to each child’s learning style, and communication with parents. When this approach, we give your child the best opportunity at results. See our proven results.

Progress!  Our students make great progress in a short period of time.  For example, second graders threatened with retention can make so much progress that they avoid retention and, in fact, excel in third grade.  Middle schoolers facing an increase in more complex assignments can strengthen their foundational skills that will help them in high school and beyond. High schoolers who need help with specific subjects – or improved study skills – can begin excelling in class.  When prepping for the SAT or ACT, expect outstanding improvements, where we average 248 points and 5.9 points, respectively.

No contract! You can stop anytime!

About Huntington Tutors

Our tutors have degrees from four-year colleges, plus either state or Huntington certification. Centers are accredited by either Middle States Association or Western Association of Schools and Colleges – the same organizations that accredit the vast majority of U.S. schools.

Of course, if you wish!  However, we have found that the best way to communicate tutoring needs is to meet with our Center Director or other full-time staff.  Here’s the reason:  the tutor knows a limited amount of information – which items the student is using and her or his performance on them.  The staff know this same information – in great detail – plus all of the information you and your child’s teachers and others shared with them.  They are in the best position to make improvements to the tutoring program and to discuss how you and school personnel can help your child.

This depends on your and the tutor’s schedule.  We can help guide you in selecting a schedule to insure your child has the same tutor.  However, because of our systems and procedures, each tutor knows your child’s complete tutoring history and is equally capable of providing outstanding experiences and improvements.

Getting ACT Help FAQs

The ACT scores required for admission vary from college to college.  Contact them for their requirements.  You also can visit with our Center Director to discuss this important topic.

Learn more about national ACT scores.

The ACT is 3 hours and 35 minutes, plus 40 minutes with the optional writing portion. Here is the breakdown: 45 minutes for English; 60 minutes for math; 35 minutes for reading; and 35 minutes for science.

The ACT is offered 7 times a year, in the following months: February, April, June, July, September, October, and December. It is best to start prepping as early as possible. If you have any questions on the right time to start, find a local center near you and speak with one of our specialists.

The ACT has four sections:  English, math, reading, and science.  Each section is scored on a scale of 1 to 36. These scores are averaged to produce an overall composite score of 1 and 36.

The optional writing portion has four separate domain scores:  Ideas and Analysis, Development and Support, Organization, and Language Use and Conventions. Each domain is scored on a scale of 2-12.  These scores are averaged to produce an overall composite score of 2-12 range.

Scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

Each college sets its own ACT admission requirements. Check with your prospective colleges to determine the score you need to achieve. You decide which ACT scores are sent to prospective colleges.

As many times as you want, although most take it once or twice.  First take it in the spring of your junior year and, if needed, again in the fall of your senior year. Consider retesting if you had any issues during your first test, such as an illness or misunderstanding of test directions, or if you feel your initial scores don’t reflect your abilities. If you take the test more than once, you decide which set of scores are sent to colleges.

Most scores are posted to your online student Web account (through ACT) within two weeks after the test date. If you’ve taken the writing portion, you will be notified when that score is available.

Getting SAT help FAQs

The SAT scores required for admission vary from college to college.  Contact them for their requirements.  You also can visit with our Center Director to discuss this important topic. Find a location near you.

Begin as early as possible!  There’s a lot riding on this test, so your child needs as much help as possible.  First determine the goal score your child wants (or needs) to attain.  Then take a practice exam to determine how close he or she comes to this goal. You can find practice exams in various publications.  Alternatively, we can administer a practice exam.  If your child needs to improve that score, then get the best prep course available – that’s us!

Learn more about the benefits of SAT tutoring.

The SAT is offered 7 times a year, in the following months: March, May, June, August, October, November, and December. It is best to start prepping as early as possible. If you have any questions on the right time to start, find a local center near you and speak with one of our specialists.

After a test date, scores generally are available online in about 19 days and by mail in about 27 days. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but there is an additional fee attached.

3 hours, plus 50 minutes with optional essay.  Here’s the breakdown:  65 minutes for reading; 80 minutes for math; and 35 minutes for writing and language.

As many times as you want, although most take it once or twice.  First take it in the spring of your junior year and, if needed, again in the fall of your senior year. Consider retesting if you had any issues during your first test, such as an illness or misunderstanding of test directions, or if you feel your initial scores don’t reflect your abilities. If you take the test more than once, you decide which set of scores are sent to colleges.

The SAT has two major areas:  Evidence-based Reading & Writing and Math.  Each area is scored on a scale from 200 to 800. These two scores are combined to produce an overall SAT score of 400-1600.

Scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

Each college sets its own SAT admission requirements. Check with your prospective colleges to determine the score you need to achieve. You can decide which scores are sent to prospective colleges.

About The Subject Tests FAQs

SAT Subject Tests typically are offered on the same dates as the SAT.  You may take up to three Subject Tests in one day. You may not take the SAT and a Subject Test on the same day. The Language with Listening tests usually are given only once a year, typically in November. If you are taking more than one test on any date, the Language with Listening test is administered first. Only one Language with Listening test may be taken per test date.

After a test date, SAT Subject Test scores generally are available online in about 19 days and by mail in about 27 days. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but College Board charges an additional fee for this service.

Multiple times, but we recommend you take any one test no more than twice.

SAT Subject Tests reflect high school curricula, while the SAT is focused on the skills and knowledge learned in high school.

Right after completing the area of study, when the information is freshest.

Some schools now require the SAT Subject Tests as a way to evaluate top performing students for admission. Check with the schools your student is interested in attending to see if they require or recommend that your student take the SAT Subject Tests. These tests are a great way to show your student’s skill and proficiency of a particular subject and make your application stand out. Learn more by reading our SAT Subject Tests FAQs.

Subject Tutoring Questions

Begin by getting your child focused on the task in front of him or her, perhaps beginning with a short conversation or some easy problems.  Remove the barriers that get in the way of concentrating on math.  It’s difficult to concentrate if he or she doesn’t know the basics.  For example, he or she may not have mastered number facts, has weak computational skills, doesn’t know math vocabulary, or doesn’t grasp basic concepts.

If your child is focused and knows the basics, add explanations when you believe they are needed; otherwise, let your child work through the problems on his or her own.   Throughout, encourage questions.  Learn more about how you can help your child with math challenges.

A tutor can help students understand their subject and excel in school.  Here are some signs that your child may need a tutor:  Grades are slipping or you notice a decline (either gradual or sudden) in test scores in subjects that depend heavily on reading.  If your child puts off projects or postpones homework, this procrastination may be a sign of a larger issue, especially if a child ignores repeated reminders.  Your child is repeatedly puzzled by certain concepts, repeatedly expresses anxiety about a test, or is defensive when you try to help.  Read the full list of signs that tell you when it is time to look for a reading tutor.

Absolutely!  It’s a great aid in helping your child retain what he or she learned during the school year.  And, for those students who underperformed, it’s a wonderful way to help prepare for the upcoming grades.  Review these summer learning strategies to help your child continue learning during summer break.

SAT

  • Possible Score: 200-800

  • Consists of two tests, the Reading Test and the Writing and Language Test.

Section: Reading Test
Total Minutes: 65
Number of Questions: 52
Possible Score: 10-40

  • Consists of four full-length passages and one paired set of passages. Each passage is followed by 10-11 multiple-choice reading comprehension questions.

Section: Writing and Language Test
Total Minutes: 35
Number of Questions: 44
Possible Score: 10-40

  • Consists of four full-length passages. Each passage is followed by 11 multiple-choice questions.

  • Possible Score: 200-800

  • Consists of two sections, Calculator Section and No-Calculator Section.

Section: Calculator
Total Minutes: 55
Number of Questions: 38

  • Consists of 30 multiple-choice questions and 8 grid-in questions.

Section: No-Calculator
Total Minutes: 25
Number of Questions: 20

  • Consists of 15 multiple-choice questions and 5 grid-in questions.

  • Consists of 1 source text and 1 prompt

Total Minutes: 50
Number of Questions: 1 prompt
Possible Score: 2-8 in three separate categories (Reading, Analysis, Writing)

The SAT is 3 hours (plus 50 minutes with optional essay).

    • 65 Minutes for Reading

    • 80 Minutes for Math

    • 35 Minutes for Writing and Language

    • 50 Minutes for Optional Essay

In general, SAT scores are available online approximately 19 days after a test date. SAT score reports are mailed out approximately 27 days after a test date. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but there is an additional fee attached.

You may take the SAT as many times as you want. Most students who take the SAT more than once take it first in the spring of their junior year, then again in the fall of their senior year.

Each area of the SAT (Evidence-based Reading & Writing and Math) is scored on a scale from 200 to 800. The scores for the two areas are combined to produce an overall SAT scaled score of 400-1600.

The scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

Each college and university sets its own SAT score requirements for admission into that school. Check with the schools you are interested in applying to in order to determine the SAT score you need to achieve. You can decide which SAT scores are sent to prospective schools.

PSAT

The PSAT is composed of three parts: Reading and Writing, and Math, with a total possible score of 1520. It is 2 hours and 45 minutes long.

The PSAT is offered once a year, in the Fall. A student can take the PSAT in the 9th, 10th and/or 11th grade, and can only qualify for scholarships with the 11th grade score. The PSAT/NMSQT® is offered in the fall to students in 10th and 11th grade and may qualify for scholarships with their 11th grade score.

Although both tests are structured very similarly, they serve two different purposes. The PSAT is not used for college admissions, but it can produce recognition and scholarships for students with the highest scores. Taking the PSAT provides practice and helps students get a sense for taking the SAT, which is used for college admissions.

Each area of the PSAT (Evidence-based Reading & Writing and Math) is scored on a scale from 160 to 760. The scores for the two areas are combined to produce an overall PSAT scaled score of 320-1520.

SAT Subject Tests

Typically, SAT Subject Tests are offered on the same dates as the regular SAT, and you may take up to three SAT Subject Tests in one day. You may not take the SAT and an SAT Subject Test on the same date. The Language with Listening tests usually are given only once a year, typically in November. If you are taking more than one test on any date, the Language with Listening test is administered first. Only one Language with Listening test may be taken per test date.

You can register online for SAT subject tests by visiting https://sat.collegeboard.org/register.

In general, SAT Subject Test scores are available online approximately 19 days after a test date. SAT score reports are mailed out approximately 27 days after a test date. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but College Board charges an additional fee for this service.

SAT Subject Tests can be taken multiple times. It is generally recommended that you not take any one test more than twice.

Advanced Placement

There are 37 AP Exams that cover the 5 general academic areas of math, science, history, English, and languages.

 Arts

  • AP Art History
  • AP Music Theory
  • AP Studio Art: 2-D Design
  • AP Studio Art: 3-D Design
  • AP Studio Art: Drawing

English

  • AP English Language and Composition
  • AP English Literature and Composition

History & Social Science

  • AP Comparative Government and Politics
  • AP European History
  • AP Human Geography
  • AP Macroeconomics
  • AP Microeconomics
  • AP Psychology
  • AP United States Government and Politics
  • AP United States History
  • AP World History

Math & Computer Science

  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Calculus BC
  • AP Computer Science A
  • AP Computer Science Principles
  • AP Statistics

Sciences

  • AP Biology
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
  • AP Physics C: Mechanics
  • AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based
  • AP Physics 2: Algebra-Based

World Languages & Cultures

  • AP Chinese Language and Culture
  • AP French Language and Culture
  • AP German Language and Culture
  • AP Italian Language and Culture
  • AP Japanese Language and Culture
  • AP Latin
  • AP Spanish Language and Culture
  • AP Spanish Literature and Culture

Most AP Exams are two to three hours long. Each test covers the content of that subject area. For example, the AP Exam in World History covers the content from the AP course in World History. With the exception of Studio Art, all of the AP Exams combine multiple-choice questions with an open-response section. The open-response may be in essay format, problem-solving format, or spoken response. For AP Studio Art, a student must submit a portfolio for review and scoring. For more details on each exam, visit www.collegeboard.org.

AP Exams are administered each May. Usually, a student's high school will handle AP Exam registration. AP Exam dates, locations, and registration information can also be found by visiting www.collegeboard.org.

AP Exams are graded by the College Board on a scale of 1 to 5, with the following criteria for performing in that subject at the college level:

  • No recommendation
  • Possibly qualified
  • Qualified
  • Well qualified
  • Extremely well qualified

Most colleges require a score of at least a 3 to grant college credit. Some will accept a score of 2, while many of the more competitive colleges and universities require a 4 or 5 before granting credit.

In-School Test Prep Program

You can register your child online and receive an immediate confirmation email by going here.

Yes. Homework is assigned to reinforce the skills and strategies taught so that your child is able to independently apply these skills and strategies effectively while taking the exam.

We offer instruction at different times including after school, evenings, and weekends. Check with your school or local Huntington Learning Center to determine when instruction for your school is offered.

SSAT


*Applicable to Middle Level and Upper Level SSAT
Section Topics Number of Questions Section Time
Quantitative Math
  • Algebra
  • Computation
  • Geometry
  • Mathematical Concepts
  • 50
  • 60
Verbal
  • Synonyms
  • Analogies
  • 30
  • 20
Reading Comprehension
  • 7 passages, typically argument or narrative style
  • 28
  • 30
Writing
  • 1 prompt, which will differ from test to test
  • 1
  • 15
Experimental  
  • 16
  • 15

*Applicable to Elementary Level SSAT
Section Topics Number of Questions Section Time
Quantitative Math
  • Algebra
  • Computation
  • Geometry
  • Mathematical Concepts
  • 30
  • 30
Verbal
  • Synonyms
  • Analogies
  • 30
  • 20
Reading
  • 7 passages, typically argument or narrative style
  • 28
  • 30
Writing
  • 1 prompt, which will differ from test to test
  • 1
  • 15
Experimental
  • Varies
  • New questions tested for future SSAT forms
  • 15-17
  • 15
Testing Level Current Student Grade Grade Student Entering
Upper
  • 8-11
  • 9-12
Lower
  • 5-7
  • 6-8

The SSAT is 2 hours and 35 minutes in length.

For additional information on SSAT test dates, locations, and registration, please visit www.ssat.org.

You can take the SSAT on all eight test dates within a calendar year.

Each SSAT multiple-choice question has five answer choices. Students receive one point for each correct answer. Students are penalized for incorrect answers, with a deduction of ¼ point from the student’s score for each incorrect answer. Students are not penalized for omitted answers. Speed in completing each SSAT section is not considered in scoring. Correct, incorrect, and omitted answers are tallied for each test section to produce a raw score. Raw scores are then converted into scaled scores, using a formula used to compensate for any differences in difficulty from test to test. The scales come from specific tables produced by the test maker. Once scores are converted to scale scores, they can be compared with the median scores of students of the same grade level across the country.

SSAT Writing Samples are not factored into the student's score report. Instead, the Writing Samples are forwarded to the same schools that will receive the student's SSAT score report. Admissions committees from each school will individually assess the applicant’s writing capabilities.

SSAT Score Reports are released to the schools, educational consultants, and education organizations that you select on your registration form. Scores remain active for one academic year. The scores required for admissions vary by school. Contact the schools directly for admissions information.

ISEE

Upper Level Number of Questions Section Time
Verbal Reasoning
  • 40
  • 20
Quantitative Reasoning
  • 37
  • 35
Reading Comprehension
  • 36
  • 35
Mathematics Achievement
  • 47
  • 40
Essay
  • 1 prompt
  • 30
Middle Level Number of Questions Section Time
Verbal Reasoning
  • 40
  • 20
Quantitative Reasoning
  • 37
  • 35
Reading Comprehension
  • 36
  • 35
Mathematics Achievement
  • 47
  • 40
Essay
  • 1 prompt
  • 30
Lower Level Number of Questions Section Time
Verbal Reasoning
  • 34
  • 20
Quantitative Reasoning
  • 38
  • 35
Reading Comprehension
  • 25
  • 25
Mathematics Achievement
  • 30
  • 30
Essay
  • 1 prompt
  • 30
Testing Level Grade Student Entering
Upper
  • 9-12
Middle
  • 7-8
Lower
  • 5-6

Each of the Upper, Middle, and Lower exams takes 2 hours and 40 minutes.

Each school chooses their own test date. ISEE test dates, locations, and registration information can be found by visiting http://erblearn.org/parents/admission/isee/registration.

You may take the ISEE only once within any six-month period.

On all levels of the ISEE, the student receives one point for each multiple-choice question answered correctly. Students are not penalized for incorrect answers or for omitted answers. Speed in completing each ISEE section is not considered in scoring. Correct, incorrect, and omitted answers are tallied for each test section to produce a raw score. The total number of correct answers is the raw score.

Raw scores are then converted into scaled scores, using a formula used to compensate for any differences in difficulty from test to test. The ISEE is graded on a scale of 760 to 940. The scales are derived from specific tables produced by the test maker. Once scores are converted to scaled scores, they are compared with the scores of students of the same grade level across the country. This is done using a 3-year rolling pool of test-taker scores.

Program percentiles compare students with peer test-takers within the same age and grade group.

  • Scores between the 50th percentile and 74th percentile are considered to be "barely above average."
  • Scores at or above the 75th percentile are considered to be "very strong."

A student who always scored above the 50th percentile on other tests may place below the 50th percentile on the ISEE, and students who normally score above the 90th percentile on other tests may score barely above average on the ISEE. For example, parents are frequently surprised when they see a 75th percentile score for a child who scored at the 95th percentile last year on a test based on state or national norms. This difference is due to the high-achieving population of students taking the ISEE, which makes the ranking very competitive.

ISEE Essays are not scored and are therefore not factored into the score report. Instead, the Essays are forwarded to the same schools that will receive the ISEE score report. Admissions committees from each school will individually assess the applicant’s writing capabilities.

ISEE Score Reports are released to the schools, educational consultants, and education organizations that a student selects on the registration form. Scores remain active for one academic year. The scores required for admissions vary by school. Contact the schools directly for admissions information.

HSPT

Section Number of Questions Time Limit (minutes)
Verbal Skills
  • 60
  • 16
Quantitative Skills
  • 52
  • 30
Reading
  • 62
  • 25
Mathematics
  • 64
  • 45
Language
  • 60
  • 25

The HSPT is approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes in length.

The HSPT is administered twice each year, once in the spring and once in the fall. HSPT test dates, locations, and registration information are handled through individual schools. You can find more information by visiting http://www.ststesting.com/hp_1.html.

The HSPT may be taken twice. However, the test-maker, STS, records if a student takes the test twice. The lower of the two scores is accepted.

Each HSPT multiple-choice question presents four or five answer choices. For each HSPT multiple-choice question that the student answers correctly, the student receives one point. There is no penalty for incorrect answers or for omitted answers. Student speed in completing each HSPT section is not considered in scoring. Correct, incorrect, and omitted answers are tallied for each test section to produce a raw score. The total number of questions answered correctly is the raw score.

Raw scores are then converted into scaled scores using a formula used to compensate for any differences in difficulty from test to test. The HSPT scaled scores range from 200 to 800. The scales come from specific tables produced by the test maker. Once scores are converted to scaled scores, they can be compared with the scores of students of the same grade level across the country. Scaled score performance is then rated as partially proficient, proficient, and advanced proficient, measured by percentiles ranging from 1 to 99.

HSPT Score Reports are released to the schools, educational consultants, and education organizations that the student selects on the registration form. Scores remain active for one academic year. The scores required for admissions vary by school. Contact the schools directly for admissions information.

Regents

To receive a Regents High School Diploma, a student in New York must pass five exams:

  • Integrated Algebra
  • Global History
  • U.S. History
  • Comprehensive English
  • Any one science Regents, from a choice of the following: Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics

To receive an Advanced Regents High School Diploma, students must also pass an additional science exam of their choice, as well as two additional math exams in Geometry and Algebra 2/Trigonometry.

Most Regents Exams are structured in two parts. Part 1 is typically a multiple-choice section, usually between 30 and 50 questions. Part 2 is typically a long answer or essay section, where work must be shown.

Regents exams are administered at the student's high school. Test dates are typically in January, June, and August, although not all schools offer the August tests. Most students take Regents Exams in June of their sophomore and junior years. If a student does not pass a Regents Exam, he or she may retake that exam as many times as needed. For example, a student who fails the U.S. History exam in June of their junior year may take the exam again that August. However, if this exam is not offered in his area in August, he or she must wait until January of their senior year to retake the exam.

Regents Exams are given a scaled score based on the number of questions the student answered correctly, the level of difficulty of each question, and the skills each question measures. The minimum passing score is a scaled score of 65, and the minimum score for passing with distinction is a scaled score of 85.

ASVAB

The ASVAB is intended for both men and women who plan to enlist in any of the five branches of the Armed Services — Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The ASVAB is not the only requirement for enlistment. Those planning to enlist should also consider all other enlistment requirements, in addition to the ASVAB:

  • You must be between the ages of 17 and 35 years old. You need the consent of your parent or legal guardian if you are 17 years old.
  • You must have a high school diploma or GED equivalent, or plan on having a high school diploma or GED equivalent.
  • You must be a U.S. citizen; or you are an immigrant alien legally admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence and possessing immigration and naturalization documents.
  • You must meet other requirements, such as marital status, dependents, and moral character.

What content is tested on the ASVAB and what are the different test sections? Each branch of the U.S. Armed Services uses the ASVAB scores to determine the qualifications of people for enlistment and placement within military occupational programs. The ASVAB consists of eight subject areas, known as sub-tests.

Sub-Test Title Sub-Test Description Number of Questions Section Time
General Science
  • Measures knowledge of the physical and biological sciences
  • 11
  • 25
Arithmetic Reasoning
  • Measures ability to solve arithmetic word problems
  • 36
  • 30
Word Knowledge
  • Measures ability to select the correct meaning of words presented in context and to identify the best synonym for a given word
  • 11
  • 35
Paragraph Comprehension
  • Measures ability to obtain information from written passages
  • 13
  • 15
Mathematics Knowledge
  • Measures knowledge of general mathematics principles, including algebra and geometry
  • 24
  • 25
Electronics Information
  • Measures knowledge of electricity, radio principles, and electronics
  • 9
  • 20
Auto and Shop Information
  • Measures knowledge of automotive maintenance and wood and metal shop practices
  • 11
  • 25
Mechanical Comprehension
  • Measures knowledge of mechanical and physical principals and ability to visualize how illustrated objects work
  • 19
  • 25

The ASVAB is approximately 3 hours and 20 minutes in length.

To register, speak to a high school guidance counselor or contact the local military recruiter. There is no cost for this examination. You can find more information on test dates, locations, and registration by visiting www.military.com/ASVAB.

You may retake the ASVAB according to certain rules. ASVAB scores are valid for 2 years from the test date. If you have taken the ASVAB within the last 2 years, the following rules apply:

  • You must take all 8 sub-tests when you retake the test.
  • You must wait at least 30 days to retake the ASVAB. After you retake the test twice (for a total of 3 tries), you must then wait 6 months to take it a fourth time.
  • You must retake the test with a different version, unless more than 6 months has passed.

In addition, if you take the ASVAB for enlistment purposes and your most recent score is more than 20 points higher than your score on another ASVAB from within the last 6 months, you must complete a confirmation test.

Your ASVAB Score Report will include the following:

  • Scores for each of the 8 sub-tests
  • Three Career Exploration Scores: Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills
  • A percentile score for each area

The following table indicates what each Career Exploration Score measures:

Percentile scores indicate your standing in relation to a national sample of test-takers and demonstrate your strengths and weaknesses in each area. Percentile scores are used to understand your ability in one area over another. Your composite score will indicate your ability to perform specific functions within the Armed Services. Each branch of the Armed Services establishes its own minimum passing score requirements.

Career Exploration Score Section Section Description
Verbal Skills
  • Measures performance on the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension Tests combined. It is a general indicator of your ability to learn from written material.
Math Skills
  • Measures performance on the Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Knowledge Tests combined. It is a general indicator of your success in future math courses.
Science and Technical Skills
  • Measures general and technical skills, which are tested in the General Science, Electronics Information, and Mechanical Comprehension sections. It is a general indicator of your ability to do well on tasks that require scientific thinking or technical ability.

The Armed Forces Qualification Test, or AFQT, consists of the following four sections from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB): Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge. The scores from these four sections make up the Military Entrance Score, which is also known as the AFQT. The AFQT score is used to determine your eligibility for entrance into the Armed Services, as well as your training potential with the Armed Services.

The AFQT score is computed as follows:

  1. Combine the scores on Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension into a composite known as Verbal Ability (VE).
  2. Add twice the Verbal Ability score to your scores for Math Knowledge (MK) and Arithmetic Reasoning (AR).

Mathematically, this is computed as: AFQT = 2VE + MK + AR.

The AFQT Raw Score is then converted into a Percentile Score to determine your eligibility. This Percentile Score is compared to the scores of a national sample of other test takers, ages 18 to 23. Your percentile score lets you know how well you scored compared to these other test takers.

AFQT scores are ranked in categories. AFQT Category I tend to represent those who are above average in trainability; and Category V tends to represent those who are extremely low in trainability. Individuals scoring in Category V are generally not permitted entrance into the military.

AFQT Category Percentile Score Range
  • I
  • 93-99
  • II
  • 65-92
  • IIIA
  • 50-64
  • IIIB
  • 31-49
  • IV
  • 10-30
  • V
  • 1-9

GED

The GED test questions require the understanding of broad concepts and generalizations, rather than the ability to recall facts, details, or precise definitions. The GED uses practical and realistic settings in test questions, which adults will recognize and are relevant to adults' lives.

Individuals typically take the four test sections over two or three consecutive days or over two consecutive weekends. The total GED testing time is approximately 7 hours and 25 minutes.

Students must create an account and register online at www.GED.com or call 1-877-EXAM-GED.

Because the GED is taken on the computer, it is scored electronically.

  • Each content area test on the GED is reported on a scale of 100 to 200, with the passing score for each set at 150.
  • Students are required to achieve a passing score of at least 150 on each of the tests in the four content areas in order to receive high school equivalency.
  • Because the tests are scored electronically, complete score reports are available within 3 hours of completing each test.
  • Students who score 170 or higher in a subject area qualify for the GED Score with Honors, which is deemed reflective of college and career readiness.
  • If a student fails any one of the four content area tests, he or she may retake that test up to three times within a calendar year. If a passing score is still not achieved by the third attempt, the student must wait 60 days before attempting to take the test again.
  • GED Testing Services does not place restrictions on the timeframe for students to complete all four content area tests. However, some states or districts do have specific requirements. Check with the appropriate state for specifics on GED administration and requirements in your area. Information and websites can easily be found by conducting an Internet search for “GED and [state name].”

TASC

TASC test questions require the understanding of broad concepts and generalizations rather than the ability to recall facts, details, or precise definitions. The TASC uses practical and realistic settings in test questions, which adults will recognize and are relevant to adults' lives.

The total TASC testing time is approximately 7 hours and 25 minutes. Individuals typically take the four test sections over two or three consecutive days.

TASC is currently an approved high school equivalency option in the following states:

  • California
  • Indiana
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • West Virginia

Test takers should check with their state's Department of Education regarding test center locations and registration options, including CTB's online registration system.

  • The overall passing score for the TASC is 2500. Each of the five content area tests requires a passing score of 500.
  • The passing score for the writing prompt is a minimum of 2 out of 8 points.
  • If a student fails any of the five content area tests, he or she may retake that test up to two more times at no cost. If a passing score is still not achieved by the third attempt, the student may retake the test for an additional fee.

Middle School Reading Tutoring

Helping middle schoolers continue to strengthen and expand their reading skills is essential for continued school success and preparation for college. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Reading comprehension
    • Identifying the main idea
    • Following directions
    • Making inferences
    • Retaining details and drawing conclusions
    • Asking meaningful questions for better understanding
    • Reading rate
    • Critical thinking skills

Strong spelling skills help students become more confident when they're writing, helping them communicate better and more intelligently on written tests, school essays, and reports. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Structural word analysis
  • Prefixes/suffixes
  • Linguistic sentence analysis

Students who build a strong vocabulary are better readers and writers. As readers, they won’t stumble over unfamiliar words. As writers, they can choose words to express themselves more clearly. In middle school, they’re also learning to analyze roots of words and usage for meaning. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Word recognition
  • Word meaning
  • Words in context
  • Multiple meanings
  • Synonyms and antonyms

Middle School Reading Tutoring - Common Questions

We begin with an in-person or phone consultation to understand your goals. Then we conduct a comprehensive academic evaluation to pinpoint your child's strengths and weaknesses. Based on the results, we develop a personalized learning plan targeted to meet your student's needs. Your child will receive individualized tutoring from one of our certified teachers to build and enhance the skills needed for school success and help your child get the best grades possible on quizzes, tests, and report cards. And, with your permission, we keep you and your child's teachers informed with regular conferences to discuss progress.

Call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to get your child started on the path to success!

Most of the time it will be obvious when your child needs help. Often, you can see when they are struggling. You'll see warning signs, such as low grades, poor test and quiz grades, struggles with homework, avoiding homework, changes in attitude or behavior, or becoming disorganized or quiet and withdrawn.

Your child's teacher may also notice issues and tell you that your child is a day dreamer, a class clown, or is acting out. The teacher may be concerned about your child's ability to succeed, or that important school skills are missing.

Call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN and we can help you determine if your child needs help and how to take the first steps toward success!

Getting started is easy... call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak with a caring educational consultant. We'll spend the time you need to answer your questions and understand your goals. We can help start your child down a new path to academic success by tailoring a tutoring program that meets their needs and fits within your schedule and budget.

Middle School Math Tutoring

Pre-algebra is typically offered in middle school. For students on track to study Algebra and other higher-level math courses, Pre-Algebra skills are essential. When students master these skills, they are more prepared to start the next level with more confidence and success. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Types of numbers
    • Integers fractions
    • Decimals
    • Negative numbers
  • Operational properties
    • Commutative properties
    • Associative properties
    • Distributive properties
  • Constants and variables
  • Basic equations
  • Use of parentheses
  • Order of evaluation of formulas
  • Exponentiation
    • Ratios
    • Logarithms
    • Scientific notation
    • Significant figures
    • Simplifying radicals

Algebra students must learn a new vocabulary of symbols, equations, and mathematical rules. It is crucial to stay on top of classroom lessons since teachers build from one lesson to another throughout the year. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Equations and functions
  • Real numbers
  • Equations of lines
  • Graphs of equations and functions
  • Wiring linear equations
  • Graphing linear inequalities
  • Solving systems of equations
  • Exponential functions
  • Factoring polynomials
  • Quadratic and rational equations and functions

Middle School Science Tutoring

General Science is the introduction to a variety of science topics. Biology, chemistry, earth science and physics are introduced and applied to everyday life. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Earth's surface
  • Earth's atmosphere and weather
  • Solar system: earth, moon and sun
  • Cell structure and function
  • Cell division
  • Inheritance and variation of traits
  • Photosynthesis
  • Ecology
  • Growth and development of organisms
  • Sensory information processing
  • Chemistry in the lab
  • Periodic table of elements
  • Chemical processes and reactions
  • Liquids and solids
  • Structures and properties of matter
  • Force, momentum, energy
  • Heat
  • Gravity
  • Matter

Earth science is the study of Earth and its atmosphere. Knowledge of earth science helps us understand the land, water, and sky in our everyday world. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Earth's surface
  • Earth's energy
  • Tectonics
  • Earthquakes and volcanoes
  • Soil and rocks
  • Earth's fresh water and oceans
  • Earth's atmosphere, weather, and climate
  • Human actions and the earth
  • Observing and exploring space
  • Solar system: Earth, moon, and sun
  • Stars, galaxies, and the universe

High School Reading Tutoring

Taking reading comprehension to a higher level is important for both school success and for your teen's college studies and future career. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Reading comprehension
  • Determining the main idea
  • Following directions
  • Making inferences
  • Retaining details
  • Drawing conclusions
  • Reading rate
  • Critical thinking skills

Students who build a strong vocabulary are better readers and writers. Plus, knowledge of higher-level vocabulary words is important to a high score on college entrance exams such as the ACT and SAT. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Word recognition
  • Word meaning
  • Words in context
  • Multiple meanings
  • Synonyms and antonyms
  • Root words

High School Science Tutoring

Earth science is the study of Earth and its atmosphere. Knowledge of earth science helps us understand the land, water, and sky in our everyday world. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Earth's surface
  • Earth's energy
  • Earthquakes and volcanoes
  • Soil and rocks
  • Earth's fresh water and oceans
  • Earth's atmosphere, weather, and climate
  • Human actions and the earth
  • Observing and exploring space
  • Solar system: earth, moon, and sun
  • Stars, galaxies, and the universe

Biology is the study of living things, including plants and animals. Knowledge of biology helps us understand how the body works and how plants grow. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Cell structure and function
  • Cell division
  • Photosynthesis
  • Genetics
  • Biotechnology
  • Evolutionary theory
  • Classification
  • Ecology
  • Biomes and ecosystems
  • Systems of the human body

Chemistry is the study of matter and how it changes. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Chemistry in the laboratory
  • Atomic theory
  • Bohr model of the atom
  • Electron configuration
  • Periodic tables of elements
  • Ions and ionic formulas
  • Molecular architecture
  • Compounds
  • Chemical reactions and equations
  • The Kinetic-Molecular theory
  • Liquids and solids
  • The solution process
  • Chemical kinetics and chemical solutions
  • Acids
  • Water, pH, and titration
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electrochemistry
  • Nuclear and organic chemistry

Physics is the study of matter and the energy that puts it in motion. Students who study physics develop problem-solving and abstract-thinking skills. Tutoring builds skills in the following concepts:

  • Force, momentum, energy
  • Heat
  • Circular motion
  • Gravity
  • Electrostatics
  • DC electric circuits

Elementary Reading Tutoring

Building a strong reading foundation is important for school success throughout your child's school career. Tutoring will build skills in:

  • Letter formation
  • Sounds recognition
  • Sight words
  • Reading comprehension
    • Getting the main idea
    • Following directions
    • Retaining details
    • Drawing conclusions
    • Reading rate
  • Critical thinking skills

Strong spelling skills helps improve reading and writing fluency – plus, it improves vocabulary and reading comprehension. Learning to spell helps to cement the connection between the letters and their sounds, and learning high-frequency “sight words” improves both reading and writing. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Plurals
  • Compound words
  • Phonetic rules
  • Word endings
  • Syllabication

Students who build a strong vocabulary are better readers and writers. As readers, they won't stumble over unfamiliar words. As writers, they can choose words to express themselves more clearly. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Word recognition
  • Word meaning
  • Understanding words in context
  • Multiple meanings for words
  • Homonyms

Because phonics is the relationship between letters and sounds, it is an essential building block to learning how to read and spell. Knowing the sounds of letters and letter combinations will help your child decode words as they read. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Letter recognition
  • Consonants (e.g. B, C, D, F)
  • Vowels (e.g. A, E, I, O, U)
  • Digraphs (e.g. OA in boat)
  • Diphthongs (e.g. OY in toy)
  • Blends (e.g. SL in slip)

Elementary Tutoring - Common Questions

We begin with an in-person or phone consultation to understand your goals. Then we conduct a comprehensive academic evaluation to pinpoint your child's strengths and weaknesses. Based on the results, we develop a personalized learning plan targeted to meet your student's needs. Your child will receive individualized tutoring from one of our certified teachers to build and enhance the skills needed for school success and help your child get the best grades possible on quizzes, tests, and report cards. And, with your permission, we keep you and your child’s teachers informed with regular conferences to discuss progress.

Call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to get your child started on the path to success!

Most of the time it will be obvious when your child needs help. Often, you can see when they are struggling. You'll see warning signs, such as low grades, poor test and quiz grades, struggles with finishing homework, avoiding or refusing to do homework, changes in attitude or behavior, or becoming disorganized or quiet and withdrawn.

Your child’s teacher may also notice issues and tell you that your child is a day dreamer, a class clown, or is acting out. The teacher may be concerned about your child's ability to succeed, or that important school skills are missing. The teacher may even want your child retained.

Call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN and we can help you determine if your child needs help and how to take the first steps toward success!

Getting started is easy... call us today at 1-800-CAN-LEARN to speak with a caring educational consultant. We'll spend the time you need to answer your questions and understand your goals. We can help start your child down a new path to academic success by tailoring a tutoring program that meets their needs and fits within your schedule and budget.

High School Math Tutoring

Algebra students must learn a new vocabulary of symbols, equations, and mathematical rules. It is crucial to stay on top of classroom lessons since teachers build from one lesson to another throughout the year. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Equations of lines
  • Graphs of equations and functions
  • Wiring linear equations
  • Graphing linear inequalities
  • Solving systems of equations
  • Exponential functions
  • Factoring polynomials
  • Quadratic and rational equations and functions

Continuing to build on rules from Algebra 1, the lessons get more difficult. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Graphing linear functions
  • Solving linear equations and inequalities
  • Matrices, polynomials, radical expressions
  • Quadratic functions and inequalities
  • Conic sections
  • Polynomial and logarithmic functions
  • Rational expressions
  • Sequences and series

Geometry is the branch of mathematics that studies the relationship of points, lines, angles, and surfaces. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Angles, points, lines, surfaces, and solids
  • Axioms, theorems
  • Reasoning and proofs
  • Triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Similarity
  • Circles
  • Surface area and volume
  • Transformations

Trigonometry is the branch of mathematics dealing with the relations of the sides and angles of triangles and with the relevant functions of any angles. Because of its challenges, students need to stay on top of daily lessons. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Graphing
  • Trigonometric functions
  • Triangles, right angles, and vectors
  • Circular functions
  • Trigonometric identities and equations
  • Inverse functions
  • Polar equations and complex numbers

Pre-Calculus prepares a student for the study of calculus and builds on algebra, geometry, and trigonometry skills. If students are planning to take advanced-level math and science courses, they must master pre-calculus skills. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Real and complex numbers
  • Sequences and series
  • Parametric equations
  • Polar coordinates
  • Matrices
  • Conic sections
  • Elementary Functions
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  • Vectors

Calculus is a branch of mathematics that deals with the finding and properties of derivatives and integrals of functions, by methods originally based on the summation of infinitesimal differences. The two main types are differential calculus and integral calculus. It is also a prerequisite for many college math and science courses. Tutoring builds skills in:

  • Sequences, series, real and complex numbers
  • Parametric equations
  • Polar coordinates
  • Matrices, conic sections, vectors
  • Functions, limits, and continuity
  • Derivatives and integration
  • Transcendental functions
  • Integration techniques